Currently viewing the category: "Orthoptera"
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Subject: What insect is this?
Location: Mpumalanga
March 8, 2013 12:51 am
Hi there
I came across this insect while holidaying in Marloth Park – Mpumalanga Dec 2012.
Signature: unsure

Orthopteran

Orthopteran

Dear unsure,
This is some species in the order Orthoptera that contains Katydids, Crickets and Grasshoppers.  We are unsure of its identity.  A head on view is not the ideal vantage for trying to identify an unknown creature.  A lateral view would be highly preferred.  It also appears that this is a Longhorned Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera.  We were unsure of your location, but we now know that Marloth Park and Mpumalanga are in South Africa.

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Subject: Domincan Bug
Location: Samana, Dominican Republic
February 7, 2013 5:05 am
Hi there. I ran into this bug hanging out at the Bahia Principe Caylo Levantado Resort in Samana, Dominican Republic. It was the only one I saw. Its antennae hung down about 12 inches from the body. It looked like it had wings, but I’m not sure.
Signature: Lynette in Canada

Longhorned Orthopteran

Hi Lynette,
This is a member of the order Orthoptera that contains Grasshoppers, Crickets and Katydids.  Much of the insect’s body is concealed by the foliage, and we wish more was showing.  The long antennae indicates it is in the suborder Ensifera, the Longhorned Orthopterans, so that would exclude the Grasshoppers.  We will send the image to Piotr Naskrecki, a Katydid specialist, to see if he recognizes it.

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Unknown Tiny Grasshopper
Great Smoky Mountains, TN
First Full Day of Spring
Hi Daniel,
I went for a walk in the woods earlier today, and found this tiny grasshopper sunning itself on an Oak leaf, and then it was gone.  I have been unable to identify it, so far.  Can you help?
Of course, I’ve been wrong so many times before…Cricket?  ;-D
I didn’t crop the photo so that you could see just how tiny it is.
Thanx for being there,
R.G. Marion

Orthopteran Nymph

Hi R.G.,
We are too late to try to research this at the moment.  The antennae seem too long for a grasshopper nymph, so we suspect it is in the suborder Ensifera, the Long-Horned Orthoptera.

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Huge green Ortopthera (?)
July 5, 2009
Helo! Todays walk near Danube cliff revealed me this huge cricket, which im trying to identify whole day. But closest that i get is Phaneroptera nana… Still it doesnt seep to be one. Phaneroptera nana is relatively frekvent here… Anyway, this one on the picture have more coned head, somewhat thinner body and white stripes :) Can u help?
Aleksandar
Serbia

Predatory Bush Cricket

Predatory Bush Cricket

Greetings Aleksandar,
This is most definitely not a Mediterranean Katydid, Phaneroptera nana.  Your specimen is a female judging by her long swordlike ovipositor.  She is also in the suborder Ensifera, the Longhorned Orthopterans.  We also would concur that this is a species of Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae.
We believe we have identified it as a Predatory Bush Cricket in the genus Saga, perhaps Saga pedo based on a photo on BioLib.  There are many additional images on BioLib and when we did a websearch of the name, we found a page that indicates 6 specimens were found in Michigan and indicates it is called the Matriarchal Katydid because:  “No males; females large and wingless. Known only from Jackson County, Michigan. Length 60–65 mm.” and “A reasonable hypothesis as to how the matriarchal katydid was brought to Michigan is that one or more of its eggs were in soil adhering to farm equipment returning from plowing contests in Italy. The first Michigan specimen was collected in 1970 and only six have been taken since. Unlike our native katydids and other species of Saga in Europe, the matriarchal katydid is obligatorily parthenogenetic. No males are known from here or from Europe. Even though there is no male calling song, females have prominent tympanal organs on the fore tibiae.”  We located a pdf ( cantrall72) of a Great Lakes Entomologist article written by Irving J Cantrall that contains accounts of the discovery in the early 1970s of this species in Michigan.

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Giant beetle in Anti Atlas mountains Morocco
When looking for information about a giant beetle we saw in the Anti Atlas mountains in Morocco i came across your website. You have any information about this giant bug? Regards,
Joost de Wall

Hi Joost,
This looks to us like some type of Orthopteran, the crickets and katydids. We will see if Eric Eaton can assist us. Here is Eric’s speedy response: “The mystery Moroccan orthopteran is an Armored Ground Cricket, which is actually a flightless katydid in the subfamily Hetrodinae. Apparently they are not uncommon in desert habitats.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination