Subject: what is this other than a giant scary horned caterpillar
Location: Perth Western Australia
April 24, 2014 3:31 am
Hi! Hoping you can help me out. Saw this creature/monster crawling across my lawn late this afternoon. Its the second one we’ve seen and we’re really curious as to what it will be! It was about 3 inches long (maybe slightly more) and slightly furry looking. Almost like felt. The pics make it look purple but it was more of a beige colour with a bit of red/tan. And those horns!!! Any ideas?
Signature: Nicole

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Hi Nicole,
We struggled a bit on this identification, but we eventually found some images of your Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar,
Entometa fervens, on the Butterfly House website where it states:  “This is a large fleshy Caterpillar with soft downy hairs. It is sometimes smooth, sometimes rough, sometimes brown, and sometimes mottled with cream and grey. The variable nature of the caterpillars suggests that the name Entometa fervens is being applied to a complex of several species. More investigation is needed to clarify this.  The caterpillar has a prominent projection on the back near the posterior end, and a pair of fleshy filaments behind the head. It is solitary, and feeds at night on a variety of Gum Trees.”  The image on the Queensland Museum site through us off as it looks so different from your images.  It is also pictured on the Brisbane Insect website.

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hitchhiking Bee?
Location: Andover, NJ
April 22, 2014 5:38 am
I am hoping that you might be able to shed some light on this very peculiar behavior. I was photographing bees in our yard yesterday (our cherry trees just started blooming) and was excited to see my first carpenter bee of the season – then I realized that he had a passenger. The second bee was hanging tight to the carpenter’s back. The carpenter traveled around to some daffodils, seemingly not bothered by the passenger. Then, a third bee (and third species from what I could tell) flew in and appeared to attack the first bee. All three bees separated and flew off. The carpenter didn’t appear to be injured.
I’ve never seen anything like this and really hope that you might be able to tell me what it all meant.
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Eastern Carpenter Bee carrying passenger Bee

Eastern Carpenter Bee carrying passenger Bee

Hi Deborah,
We must confess that we are uncertain what is going on in your images, which are quite detailed.  The Eastern Carpenter Bee is a male as evidenced by his light face.  We will send your images to Eric Eaton to see if he can identify the hitchhiking bee and to see if he has any idea what this behavior indicates.

Male Eastern Carpenter Bee carries passenger Bee

Male Eastern Carpenter Bee carries passenger Bee

Unknown Bee riding on male Eastern Carpenter Bee

Unknown Bee riding on male Eastern Carpenter Bee

Subject: Red and black bug on parsley
Location: Southeast US near Birmingham, AL
April 22, 2014 3:49 pm
Thank you for this opportunity! This is a photo of a bug found on our parsley garden in late June of 2006. We live near Birmingham, AL in a river valley on several acres between two rivers, the big and Little Cahaba. An entomologist friend of mine identified it for me years ago but I have forgotten its name and do not want to ask again. Hope you can help. Thank you!
Signature: Debbie K Pezzillo

Wheel Bug Nymph

Wheel Bug Nymph

Hi Debbie,
This is a beneficial, predatory Wheel Bug nymph.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown Commodore Butterfly
Location: Marloth Park, South Africa
April 22, 2014 10:58 am
Thank you, Bugman for all you help!
I’m happy to share some photos of recent butterfly findings. This one is the Brown Commodore Butterfly found in Marloth Park, South Africa on April 20, 2014. This and other fabulous insects can be found on my blog at http://www.travelsandtripulations.com/2014/04/21/the-wildlife-of-marloth-park-south-africa/
Cheers,
Signature: Kenda

Brown Pansy

Brown Pansy

Hi Kenda,
We tried finding a link online to your Brown Commodore, and we found it listed as a Brown Pansy,
Junonia natalica natalica, on Butterfly Valley.  It is also called a Brown Pansy on BioDiversity Explorer as well as on ISpot and iGoTerra.  The Butterflies of Kruger National Park also calls it a Brown Pansy and we learned it:  “prefers the shadows of riparian forest and woodland found along waterways in the KNP.”  Common names can be confusing, so we are curious where you found this lovely Nymphalid called a Brown Commodore.

April 22, 2014
Hello Daniel,
Very interesting!  Attached is a PDF I found online, and I’ve been using it to name the butterflies I’ve been photographing. That’s where II found the name “Brown Commodore” on page 80. I was unaware of the other resources, but they seem more in-depth. Thanks for passing that along
Given your passion for bugs, I wonder if you’ve ever been to the Monarch Sanctuaries in Mexico (Michoacan). I’m very passionate about the Monarchs and used to volunteer at Natural Bridges in Santa Cruz (an overwintering site for Monarchs). We visited Michoacan last year while living in Mexico (there’s a post called Mariposas Monarcas), and it is heavenly. While we were there, we met Lincoln Brower, a leading authority on the Monarchs. He just happened to be doing research while we were there – amazing! He talked to us about the decline of the Monarchs – the usual suspects: deforestation (habitat destruction) due to logging (legal and illegal) and of course, human activity like people spraying their gardens (Roundup and other products by agrochemical companies with Monsanto being the most evil IMO) or pulling milkweed. Monarchs only lay eggs on milkweed (she will die looking for it), so the world needs to know that we need more milkweed. Healthy milkweed. And no more toxic spraying in the gardens. It’s not only killing Monarchs who nectar on other flowers but other insects. They’re all vital!
Cheers,
Kenda

Subject: Identification Required
Location: St Louis, Missouri
April 22, 2014 2:35 am
Hi
This was taken in Sept 2013 – there was alot of them about and they were very noisey
Signature: Helen

Black Legged Meadow Katydid

Black Legged Meadow Katydid

Dear Helen,
We are nearly certain your Katydid is a Black Legged Meadow Katydid,
Orchelimum nigripes, based on this image posted to BugGuide.  Your individual is a male and it is the males of the species that produce the sounds.  There is additional information on BugGuide

Subject: Tree infestation
Location: Los Angeles, California
April 21, 2014 9:12 am
I have an infestation in a mature (about 50ft high) Camphor tree. The infestation seems to be around the root and the insects (in the picture) are revealed if I pull some bark out. Any help identifying the insects would be appreciated, thanks.
Signature: Anshuman Prasad

Woodlice

Woodlice

Dear Anshuman,
These are Woodlice, a type of terrestrial isopod.  They are commonly found in cool, dark, damp places within the garden where they feed on dead plant material.  If the base of the tree is rotting, they may be feeding on the rotting wood, but they will not harm living portions of your camphor tree.  Woodlice will also enter homes, and they are most frequently found in basements where the conditions are favorable.