Subject: Wtf?
Location: West Virginia
February 9, 2016 12:13 am
I found him on my work shirt (which i leave in my locker) hours after being at work. Im freaked out.
Signature: Brooke

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

Dear Brooke,
You are lucky you left it at work.  This is a Bed Bug.  You should carefully check your belongings in the future before heading home.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth ID
Location: Melbourne, Australia
February 9, 2016 4:09 am
Dear Bugman
Took a few pics of an unusually marked/colored moth at a local native parkland recently.
It might be a variety of Tiger Moth after looking at some pics on this site?
Would be pleased if you could verify.
Thanks
Signature: Alan Gardner

Mistletoe Moth

Mistletoe Moth

Dear Alan,
This one really gave us a challenge.  Though it really does resemble a Tiger Moth, it is actually an Owlet Moth in the family Noctuidae and the subfamily Agaristinae.  We found two very similar looking moths on Butterfly House, and we eliminated the Grapevine Moth,
Phalaenoides glycinae, and we believe this is a Mistletoe Moth, Comocrus behri , which is described on Butterfly House as:  “The adult moths have wings that are black with white straight and zigzag lines. The abdomen is black on top and has orange stripes underneath, and a scarlet tuft on the tail.  The adult is a day-flying moth, with a wingspan of up to 5 cm.”  According to Csiro:  “This species is widely distributed across southern mainland Australia and can often be seen during the day flying around mistletoe plants growing on Casuarina and Eucalyptus species. The adults have a wingspan or about 58 millimetres and are predominantly black with white bands or lines through the wings. Males display what is known as ‘hill topping’ behaviour, where they fly to the highest spot on the landscape so that females know to congregate there for mating.”  There are some very nice images on FlickR.

Mistletoe Moth

Mistletoe Moth

Mistletoe Moth

Mistletoe Moth

Subject: bug identification
Location: Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England
February 8, 2016 5:32 am
Please could you take a look at the attached picture of an insect which was in my friends house and identify it for her please? Apparent his is the second one she has had. It looks like some sort of bee to me but I’m not sure.
Signature: Nicola Bailey-Berry

Common Wasp

Common Wasp

Dear Nicola,
Today we learned that insects known as Yellow Jackets in North America are called Common Wasps in England.  We identified your Common Wasp,
Vespula vulgaris, thanks to the iSpot site where it states:  ” The common wasp usually forms large colonies below ground, but occasionally nests may be made in wall cavities, hollow trees and attics. Queens emerge from hibernation during the spring, and they search for a suitable location in which to start a new colony. She then begins to build the nest with chewed up wood pulp, which dries to make a papery substance. A few eggs are laid, which develop into non-reproductive workers. These workers eventually take over the care of the nest, and the queen’s life is then devoted solely to egg laying. At the end of autumn a number of eggs develop into new queens and males, which leave the nest and mate. The new queens seek out suitable places in which to hibernate, and the males and the old colony (including the old queen) die.”  We suspect the individual found by your friend is a hibernating queen that will soon begin to construct her own nest when the weather warms.  North American Yellow Jackets, and we suspect your Common Wasp as well, are not normally aggressive, though they will defend the nest by stinging any perceived or actual threats.  Getty Images has a nice image of a nest of Common Wasps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug??
Location: New Zealand
February 8, 2016 2:23 am
Sorry, my partner got a little freaked out and the bug got swatted 😕
Have never seen anything like this before in NZ!
Almost like a cross between a fly and a dragon fly!
Signature: Kim

Smashed Dobsonfly from New Zealand

Smashed Dobsonfly from New Zealand

Dear Kim,
We are feeling sad that the first Dobsonfly image we have received from New Zealand has to be tagged as Unnecessary Carnage.  We found an image on FlickR that is identified as
Archichauliodes diversus, and we found another image on Hidden New Zealand Photographaphy where it states:  “New Zealand only has one Dobson fly species, They are also known as toe-bitters, due to their larva having large jaws and their tendency to bite :).”  We suspect the common name of the larva is Toe-Biter, and that is a very commonly used name for the North American Giant Water Bug despite North America having its own species of Dobsonflies.  iNaturalist states:  “Archichauliodes diversus is an insect in the subfamily Corydalinae – the Dobsonflies. In its larval form It is commonly known by the name toe-biter, and its Maori name is puene. The species is native to New Zealand. Although there are other species of Dobsonfly in other parts of the world including Asia, Australia (Archichauliodes guttiferus) and South America, Archichauliodes diversus is the only species of Dobsonfly in New Zealand. The Dobsonfly larva is the largest species of freshwater insect found in fresh water and the only family representatives in New Zealand.”  The site also states:  “The biggest threat to dobsonflies is human intervention,[14] by removing over hanging bush and trees from the waterways. This has a significant negative impact as it is a critical part in the life cycle of the Dobsonfly.[10] The Dobsonfly is only found in good quality water. Any pollution could do serious damage to not only the Dobsonfly but also other species that could be potential food source.”  Csiro has some good information on Australian Dobsonflies.  Though its larva is called a Toe-Biter (or Toe-bitter), they are not considered dangerous to humans.  Adult Dobsonflies might also bite if carelessly handled, but they do not pose any threat to humans.  We hope that should you happen to encounter another individual in the future, you will allow it to survive and that you will provide us with an image of a living Dobsonfly.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for that information, I will definitely make sure next time my partner doesn’t get to it first.
We live on a golf course so hopefully I will encounter another one and I will definitely take a pic for you 😊
Kind regards,
Kim

Subject: Penang Butterfly Farm
Location: Penang, Malaysia
February 7, 2016
Here are the adult’s. The one with more colour I think is the male.
Best wishes,
Aeve

Leopard Lacewing

Leopard Lacewing

Dear Aeve,
Thanks for sending some butterfly images to accompany the Caterpillar image you sent previously.  One image appears to be a male Leopard Lacewing,
Cethosia cyane, but we believe the other image is another species of Brushfooted Butterfly.  We quickly identified it as a Jewelled Nawab Butterfly, Polyura delphis, thanks to Getty ImagesLearn About Butterflies uses the common name White Nawab and states:  “The butterflies are characterised by their distinctive wing shape with twin tails on the hindwings, a feature strongly reminiscent of the African Charaxes. Most have dark brown uppersides with bands of dazzling creamy white which vary in size and shape from one species to another. These bands are usually repeated on the underside in a beautiful shade of pale green, but in the case of delphis the underside is white, and marked with orange, yellow and grey spots and lunules, hence its alternative name the Jewelled Nawab.  Polyura delphis is one of the scarcer species, and is found in Assam, Sikkim, Myanmar, Thailand, peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, Sabah, Brunei, Kalimantan, Palawan and Java.”

Brushfooted Butterfly

Jeweled Nawab Butterfly

 

Ed. Note:  We get annoyed when people submit images pilfered from the internet, claiming to be the authors of those images.  Eric Eaton provided the following explanation:
Daniel:
This is a still from a video I have seen circulating recently on Facebook (but of course cannot find right now).  Yes, it is definitely a tailless whip scorpion (amblypygid), probably a species that lives in caves given the ultra-long appendages.
Also definitely NOT from Maryland.
Eric

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Maryland
February 7, 2016 11:54 am
I recently saw this bug and I was wondering what it was!
Signature: Creepybuggirl

What's That Arachnid???

What’s That Arachnid???

Dear Creepybuggirl,
Please provide us additional information on exactly where and when this Arachnid was sighted.  The image was obviously taken indoors, but we are having a difficult time believing it is native to Maryland.  There is not much detail in your image, and we cannot even say for certain to which order it belongs as it seems to have traits of both Harvestmen in the order Opiliones and Tailless Whipscorpions in the order Amblypygi.  Tailless Whipscorpions are only reported from Arizona, Texas and Florida, and this individual does not look like any native species depicted on BugGuide.
  While Harvestmen are found throughout North America, we have never seen any images on BugGuide that look like this individual.  It is difficult to tell from your image if the appendages that appear to end in claws are the first pair, known as pedipalps, but that is what we surmise.  So, we know it is an Arachnid, and we do not believe it is native.  Are you able to provide any additional images from different angles?  We have contacted Eric Eaton to get his opinion. 

A Reader Provides a Link to the Video
Subject: The pincered still shot – here’s the video
Location: Unknown
February 7, 2016 4:43 pm
https://www.facebook.com/itsmuchtoolate/videos/1004745686238090/
Signature: Cat

Thanks for sending the link Cat.  It is much easier to tell this is a Tailless Whipscorpion in the video clip.

My pleasure. And the self interest was that I was curious too.
I hope it wasn’t harmed. I hate to see creatures tormented for fun.
Best regards.
Cat