Subject: Soldier Beetle?
Location: Massachusetts
July 27, 2016 4:51 am
We just had a large hatch of these, and hope that they are not enemies of my garden.
Signature: Farmer Bob

Banded Net-Wing

Banded Net-Wing

Dear Farmer Bob,
We just finished posting an especially lurid image of a group of Banded Net-Wing beetles, also from Massachusetts.  According to the genus page on BugGuide:  “adults take nectar; larvae prey on small arthropods under bark”
which would make them a beneficial species in your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What beetle
Location: Central MA
July 27, 2016 4:11 am
A friend thinks a costa Rican beetle I think they were showing off
Signature: Inazuma Hiro

Banded Net-Winged Beetle

Banded Net-Winged Beetle

Dear Inazuma,
In a sense, you and your friend are both correct.  These are Banded Net-Wing beetles,
Calopteron reticulatum, and based on this Alamy image, the species ranges as far south as at least Costa Rica.  You image depicts quite a mating frenzy.

Subject: Is this a Sawfly larva?
Location: South Surrey, BC, Canada
July 24, 2016 12:18 pm
Hi Bugman,
I came upon several of these in my garden in South Surrey, BC, Canada in June, 2016. South Surrey is south of Vancouver, BC, near White Rock, just north of the USA border (WA State) — just in case your readers aren’t familiar with the local geography.
I had no idea what they are, but I think they look like your photo of a Sawfly larva. Are they harmful to plants or beneficial insects?
Thanks for your help.
Signature: Jerry Steinberg

Millipedes

Flatbacked Millipedes

Dear Jerry,
These are NOT Sawfly larvae.  They are Flatbacked Millipedes,
Harpaphe haydeniana, and according to BugGuide:  “This particular millipede secretes a dark fluid that has an odor similar to the almond extract used in cooking. Apparently this is a defensive manuveur. Millipedes also curl up in tight coils when threatened.  Caution: Many millipedes with bright color patterns secrete a compound containing cyanide. Wash your hands after handling them and do not allow children to pick them up.”  According to Island Nature:  “the millipede can perform its duty as a ‘macroshredder,’ breaking up plant material and initiating the process of nutrient recyclying [sic] in the soil ecosystem … . In fact, it plays such an important role in the process that it can be considered to be a “keystone” species.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly
Location: Seaside
July 26, 2016 8:42 am
Can you identify which kind of dragonfly this is and also if it is male or female? Just curious really. Found this beauty on the deck in Seaside.
Signature: Cat

Emerald Darner, we believe

Emerald Darner, we believe

Dear Cat,
Where is the seaside?  The Jersey Shore?  Miami Beach?  Australia?  The south of France???  The claspers on the tip of the abdomen indicates this is a male Dragonfly.  You can find information on sexing Dragonflies on Odes for Beginners.  If this is a North American sighting, this might be an Mosaic Darner in the genus
Aeshna based on BugGuide images.

Subject: Space Bug
Location: Sherman, Texas
July 26, 2016 11:27 am
What is this lovely little guy? He looks like he has dropped in from outer space or a 70s disco party. Will he be staying for dinner? If so, which of my pants will be served up?
Signature: Grammy Gardener.

Mottled Tortoise Beetle

Mottled Tortoise Beetle

Dear Grammy Gardener,
This is a Mottled Tortoise Beetle,
Deloyala guttata, and you can verify our ID on BugGuide.  Adults and larvae both feed on leaves of morning glories.

Subject: Moth?
Location: Irmo, SC
July 24, 2016 7:12 am
My neighbor found this in her house last night and promptly threw it back outside! What is it??? Any idea?
Signature: Frances O’Toole

Regal Moth

Regal Moth

Dear Frances,
This beauty is a Royal Walnut Moth or Regal Moth, the adult form of the Hickory Horned Devil caterpillar, arguably an even more impressive creature.  We are sad that our first report this year is a dead individual as they are so much more impressive while living.  Regal Moths only live a few days, so this individual may have actually died of old age.

It wasn’t dead yet…. they captured it in there house and put it back outside…