Subject: Parasitic fuzzy black bee?
Location: San Antonio, TX
August 27, 2015 1:01 pm
Hello,
I hope this letter finds you well. I was in my back yard yesterday afternoon, in san antonio, TX, when I stumbled across a large, fuzzy, black, winged insect. It looks almost like a bee and had a large wasp under it. I was thinking a parasite of some sort? Thanks for your help!
Signature: – T

Belzebul Bee Eater

Belzebul Bee Eater

Dear T,
We want to begin by correcting your terminology.  A parasite lives in or on the body of a host creature, feeding on blood or other forms of nutrition that the body can offer.  A parasitoid is all of the above, but it also kills the host while feeding.  A predator catches and eats prey, and your image is of a predatory Robber Fly, the Belzebul Bee Eater,
Mallophora leschenaulti, but we are uncertain of the identity of the prey as your image is lacking in critical detail.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big yellow butterfly
Location: Croatia
August 26, 2015 4:05 pm
Do you know what is the name of this beautiful butterfly?
Signature: Yellow butterfly

Japanese Silkmoth

Japanese Silkmoth

This is not a butterfly, but rather, a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae.  Our first matching image in researching its identity was found on Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa where it is identified as a Japanese Oak Silkmoth, Antheraea yamamai, and on SummitPost it states:  “Europe’s largest moth: Japanese Oak Silkmoth (Antheraea yamamai). Its wing span is 11-15 cm.  Originally it lived only in Japan, but it was imported into Europe I think in the middle of the 20th century. A few of them escaped from the farm where they were hosted, and since then it widespread in a few CEE countries, living on oak leaves.”  According to Stock Photo, it was:  “introduced in Europe for silk production.”

Juliett Moth, Jen Nay, Jeff Lanterman, Aundrea Murillo-Faynik, Eve Bennett, Melissa Covey, Jessica M. Schemm, Ann Levitsky liked this post

Subject: Bug project
Location: Wisconsin
August 25, 2015 1:29 pm
Hi there! My name is Jada and I am a highschool student in Wisconsin, for a summer project we had to collect and identify 25 insects and I am having trouble finding the name and classification for these three bugs, it would be great if you could help me out! If not that’s totally fine!
Signature: Thanks! Jada

Placid Stag Beetle image captured January 8, 2015

Placid Stag Beetle image captured January 8, 2015

Dear Jada,
We do have a policy that you should know about, but your communication is very polite and by our accounts, you should have already identified 22 insects for your project as you are only requesting assistance with three.  We will provide you with an identity for one and we will give you categories for the other two.
Were we your teacher, the first thing we would ask is “How could an image dated January 8, 2015 have been visually collected this summer?”  This is a female Stag Beetle in the genus
Lucanus, and after browsing BugGuide, we determined it to be a female Lucanus placidus based on the BugGuide description:  “Similar to L. capreolus, but much darker, elytra more punctate. Legs dark reddish brown, no light brown patches as in capreolus.”  Male Stag Beetles have much larger mandibles.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.  We are going to unofficially call this a Placid Stag Beetle based on the BugGuide definition:  “placidus – Latin for ‘smooth, pleasing.'”  Your other images are of a beetle and a true bug.  You can peruse our own archives or check BugGuide for the remaining two images.

stag_female_jada_cu

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Striped caterpillar
Location: Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada
August 26, 2015 6:11 am
Any clue as to what this is going to turn into?
Signature: Susan

Black Swallowtail Caterpillar

Black Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Susan,
This is a Black Swallowtail Caterpillar, and we suspect that parsley, carrots or some other related plant was found in the immediate vicinity of the sighting.

Aundrea Murillo-Faynik, Sue Dougherty, Ann Levitsky, Paula Mullen, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post

Subject: what is this
Location: Jamaica queens
August 26, 2015 6:33 am
Found this in my closet and have no clue as to what it is
Signature: yanira

Human Finger found in Closet

Human Finger found in Closet

Dear Yanira,
This is the second Human Finger sighting we have reported in the past week.  Nothing else in your image is recognizable.

Ed. Note:  Fingers, toes and other objects for scale can be very helpful, but only when the desired object to be identified is clearly focused, not smashed beyond recognition, or in any other way rendered unidentifiable.

Elizabeth Owens, Leslie Ticer Lusch, Sue Dougherty, Kingson Mendoza Maqui, Brian Borowski, Rick Medlin, Deborah Snyder, Megan Rivera-Franceschi, Nadine Oconnor, Lorraine Phelan Grier, Lauren Fay, Amy Swain, Jen Nay, Sara Ann liked this post

Subject: beetle?
Location: The Netherlands
August 26, 2015 8:56 am
Hi,
I am in The Netherlands (europe) and came across this bug. I have never seen it before and was a lot bigger then what I normally see crawling around.
It looks like a bug with a tough shell. Though when he found me a threat, he lifted his backside up as a scorpion and faced me. I have never seen a beetle do that, so it might just be something else entirely.
I am amazed and in awe since I never seen it, while I am always looking around for bugs haha. I find them very interesting. I hope you can help me out!
Thanks,
Signature: Niels

Devil's Coach Horse

Devil’s Coach Horse

Dear Niels,
We are very excited to be able to post an image of a Devil’s Coach Horse, a species of Rove Beetle, from its native habitat.  Most of our images are from North America because this species was introduced and it has naturalized.  We encourage Devil’s Coach Horses in our own garden as they are one of the few creatures that will feed on introduced Snails and Slugs, also from Europe.  Though the Devil’s Coach Horse rears up its abdomen in a threat position, and it will release a foul odor from scent glands, it is a harmless species that poses no threat to humans.

Ann Levitsky, Sue Dougherty, Kyla Gunter Gatlin, Mike Maxwell liked this post