Subject: Red and black bug on parsley
Location: Southeast US near Birmingham, AL
April 22, 2014 3:49 pm
Thank you for this opportunity! This is a photo of a bug found on our parsley garden in late June of 2006. We live near Birmingham, AL in a river valley on several acres between two rivers, the big and Little Cahaba. An entomologist friend of mine identified it for me years ago but I have forgotten its name and do not want to ask again. Hope you can help. Thank you!
Signature: Debbie K Pezzillo

Wheel Bug Nymph

Wheel Bug Nymph

Hi Debbie,
This is a beneficial, predatory Wheel Bug nymph.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown Commodore Butterfly
Location: Marloth Park, South Africa
April 22, 2014 10:58 am
Thank you, Bugman for all you help!
I’m happy to share some photos of recent butterfly findings. This one is the Brown Commodore Butterfly found in Marloth Park, South Africa on April 20, 2014. This and other fabulous insects can be found on my blog at http://www.travelsandtripulations.com/2014/04/21/the-wildlife-of-marloth-park-south-africa/
Cheers,
Signature: Kenda

Brown Pansy

Brown Pansy

Hi Kenda,
We tried finding a link online to your Brown Commodore, and we found it listed as a Brown Pansy,
Junonia natalica natalica, on Butterfly Valley.  It is also called a Brown Pansy on BioDiversity Explorer as well as on ISpot and iGoTerra.  The Butterflies of Kruger National Park also calls it a Brown Pansy and we learned it:  “prefers the shadows of riparian forest and woodland found along waterways in the KNP.”  Common names can be confusing, so we are curious where you found this lovely Nymphalid called a Brown Commodore.

April 22, 2014
Hello Daniel,
Very interesting!  Attached is a PDF I found online, and I’ve been using it to name the butterflies I’ve been photographing. That’s where II found the name “Brown Commodore” on page 80. I was unaware of the other resources, but they seem more in-depth. Thanks for passing that along
Given your passion for bugs, I wonder if you’ve ever been to the Monarch Sanctuaries in Mexico (Michoacan). I’m very passionate about the Monarchs and used to volunteer at Natural Bridges in Santa Cruz (an overwintering site for Monarchs). We visited Michoacan last year while living in Mexico (there’s a post called Mariposas Monarcas), and it is heavenly. While we were there, we met Lincoln Brower, a leading authority on the Monarchs. He just happened to be doing research while we were there – amazing! He talked to us about the decline of the Monarchs – the usual suspects: deforestation (habitat destruction) due to logging (legal and illegal) and of course, human activity like people spraying their gardens (Roundup and other products by agrochemical companies with Monsanto being the most evil IMO) or pulling milkweed. Monarchs only lay eggs on milkweed (she will die looking for it), so the world needs to know that we need more milkweed. Healthy milkweed. And no more toxic spraying in the gardens. It’s not only killing Monarchs who nectar on other flowers but other insects. They’re all vital!
Cheers,
Kenda

Subject: Identification Required
Location: St Louis, Missouri
April 22, 2014 2:35 am
Hi
This was taken in Sept 2013 – there was alot of them about and they were very noisey
Signature: Helen

Black Legged Meadow Katydid

Black Legged Meadow Katydid

Dear Helen,
We are nearly certain your Katydid is a Black Legged Meadow Katydid,
Orchelimum nigripes, based on this image posted to BugGuide.  Your individual is a male and it is the males of the species that produce the sounds.  There is additional information on BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tree infestation
Location: Los Angeles, California
April 21, 2014 9:12 am
I have an infestation in a mature (about 50ft high) Camphor tree. The infestation seems to be around the root and the insects (in the picture) are revealed if I pull some bark out. Any help identifying the insects would be appreciated, thanks.
Signature: Anshuman Prasad

Woodlice

Woodlice

Dear Anshuman,
These are Woodlice, a type of terrestrial isopod.  They are commonly found in cool, dark, damp places within the garden where they feed on dead plant material.  If the base of the tree is rotting, they may be feeding on the rotting wood, but they will not harm living portions of your camphor tree.  Woodlice will also enter homes, and they are most frequently found in basements where the conditions are favorable.

Subject: Green Longhorn Beetle from Barbados
Location: Barbados, Caribbean
April 21, 2014 9:50 pm
Hi, This green longhorn beetle (looks like Chlorida festiva) flew into my room to get its picture taken last night. First time I’m seeing one of these and it was about 4cm (body) long. I also noticed what looks to be mites on its ‘neck’ area, can you confirm this? Thought it would be a nice addition to your collection.
Signature: Niaz

Longicorn, Chlorida Festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn, Chlorida festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Hi Niaz,
We agree that you have correctly identified your Longicorn as
Chlorida festiva, but in searching for an image online for a link, we stumbled upon this Superstock image of Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites identified as Histiogaster arborsignis.  Phoretic Mites do not prey upon the Longicorns, but rather use them to move from location to location.  Back to the Longicorn, according to American Insects:  “Linnaeus described this large and striking species in 1758. It can be found in the West Indies, and from Mexico south to Argentina.”  Your images are gorgeous.

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

 

Subject: what is this bug? a kind of Fly?
Location: Saudi Arabia_Madinah
April 21, 2014 8:45 am
Can you please identify this bug?
I’ve found it sitting on a leaf, in the morning in 21/4/2014.
I couldn’t take any pictures, except for this one.
and thank you.
Signature: M.A

Possibly a Sawfly

Unknown Wasp

Dear M.A.,
We wish your image had more detail.  At first we thought this might be a Fly in the order Diptera, but the antennae look decidedly unflylike.  We now believe this is a Hymenopteran, the order that includes bees and wasps, and we believe it might be a Sawfly.  We wish we were able to tell if there is one pair of wings or two pairs.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this identification.