Subject: Tussock Moth Caterpillar
Location: Singapore
March 2, 2015 7:41 pm
I found this caterpillar crawling on my mother’s eggplant about a week ago, and as I’ve a weird interest in all kinds of creepy crawlies, I’ve made it my mission to see this guy to adulthood. He’s molted twice now and I’ve been feeding him leaves off the plant I found him on.
Through google I’ve determined that this guy is a Tussock Moth caterpillar, but I couldn’t find any images or information as to exactly what species he is and/or how the adult moth looks like. I’m attaching a few pictures of it as of 3 March 15, in hopes that you can help!
Thanks in advance!
Signature: Saphiea

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Saphiea,
We agree that this looks like a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the genus
Orgyia,  but we have not had any luck determining a definite species.  Females in this genus are flightless, and it will be interesting to see what happens when your adult ecloses.

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pumpkin Beetle
Location: Thailand, Chiang Mai
March 2, 2015 8:01 pm
Hello Daniel,
thank you and you are right after searching for the name.
Here is something that might interest you:
This is an “orchid lover” … a real pest at orchid nurseries here in Thailand.
People call it “Pumpkin beetle” (Aulacophora abdominalis) but it isn’t one. Look at black legs and antennae.
And it’s neither Stethopachys formosa or Lema pectoralis, but close to them.
The bug and its larvae love orchid flowers, especially these of the Aeridinae group (Vanda, Rhynchostylis, Seidenfadenia and all of their hybrids), Dendrobium and Spathoglottis.
Regards … Ricci

Mating Leaf Beetles

Mating Leaf Beetles

Hi Ricci,
In the future, please submit new requests by using our standard submission form.  We realize it is easier for you to just attach additional images to a previous response, but it makes our postings so much easier if we are able to use the format of our submission form.  Thanks so much for sending us images of two phases of this Leaf Beetle.  We haven’t the time to research its identity this morning, but we are posting the images and we will provide additional feedback at a later time.
  We hope the eggs are not exported with the orchids because the introduction of a major orchid pest can wreak havoc on orchid nurseries around the globe as orchids are such a popular gift item.

Leaf Beetle Larva

Leaf Beetle Larva

Update:  March 4, 2015
We did locate this similar search for an identification on the Dokmai Dogma Drama In The Orchid Nursery posting.

Hi Daniel,
the orchid nurseries that export their plants use so much poison (most of it is forbidden in Europe) … no egg or Beetle will survive this.
When I asked a friend who own a nursery about this beetle, she answered:
“For bug (Pumpkin beetle) use Dicrotophos and Sticking Agent spray 5 days per time. And larva use Abamectin and Sticking Agent.”
Abamectin and Dicrotophos are highly toxic and dangerous for the environment.
Btw.:
– In Australia the black and yellow Dendrobium beetle (Stethopachys formosa) is a pest in orchid nurseries.
– Lema pectoralis has been reported from orchid nurseries in Thailand.

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Subject: mystery pink and white bug
Location: North Shore of Maui, Hawaii
February 28, 2015 11:38 pm
Aloha, I found this little guy on some herb/greens cuttings from the garden. I’m not sure of the exact species he was on… either parsley, kale, or young leaf lettuce. He was in the bottom of my tray when I removed the greens. I took this photo with a 200x usb microscope, but I can’t swear to the magnification as it was kind of cheap. Temps have been in the mid 70’s and on the humid side (70-80%) if that helps.
Signature: Aloha, Greg Hansen

Immature Torpedo Bug

Immature Torpedo Bug

Dear Greg,
This looks like an immature Torpedo Bug,
Siphanta acuta, one of the Flatid Leafhoppers.  You can read more about it on BugGuide where it states:  “native to Australia, adventive elsewhere (New Zealand, Hawaii, S. Africa); established in CA.”

Wow!  That was so fast!  Thank you so much for your help!  I love your website!
Greg Hansen

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spiny larva
Location: Thailand, Chiang Mai
March 2, 2015 5:36 am
Found that larva eating a leave in my garden.
No good idea to touch it – seems to have a light poison (acetic acid or so) in his spines.
Any idea what the adult bug would be?
Signature: Regards from the sunny Thailand

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

We believe this is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.

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Subject: Migrating Painted Ladies
Location: Elyria Canyon Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
February 14, 2015 10:00 AM
Though we have received many images recently from our readers, we made a decision to select our Bug of the Month for March 2015 from our own images because of the significant seasonal migration of Painted Ladies this year.  According to Julian Donahue, the Painted Ladies are: “particularly active on the wing now, and most appear to be migrating, pausing to nectar on their way farther north.” The Painted Lady,
Vanessa cardui, is a medium sized orange butterfly with a mottled wing pattern and distinctive “eye spots” on the underwings. Painted Ladies were seen taking nectar from the pictured Mule Fat or Baccharis salicifolia, Coastal Bush Sunflower and Manroot. Caterpillars feed on both native and non-native leaves, and the Arroyo Lupine, that is currently blooming, is one native host plant.

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

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Subject: can you identyfy this large beetle
Location: hythe, kent
February 28, 2015 2:08 pm
Dear all
We found this bug in our bathroom , running down the door.
Can you help with his identity
Thanks Grant
Signature: G West

Australian Cockroach

Australian Cockroach

Dear Grant,
At first we were going to send a brief response that this is a Cockroach, but we decided the thoracic markings are so striking that we would attempt to identify the species of Cockroach you encountered.  After finding several similar looking images that only identified it as a Cockroach, we found the Suffolk Pest Control Company that identified it as an Australian Cockroach,
Periplaneta australasia., and that provided this information:  “Inspite of their exotic origins Australian cockroaches are making a home for themselves in the UK, where they can found in most major cities.”  Not confident that the Australian Cockroach is actually native to Australia, we found this information on BugGuide:  “Adult has thorax outlined in yellow with black/brown center marking somewhat like a sideways number eight. Differentiating Australian cockroaches from other species of Periplaneta requires identification of the narrow yellow mark along front outside edge of wings”, but nothing was written about the country of origin.  The garden is calling us from additional research at this time.

Hi Daniel
Thanks for your help. Am guessing we need to contact some form of pest control company as they seem quite dangerous.
Because we d found one , I suppose there are more so will get onto it straight away.
Thanks again
Grant

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