Subject: insect ID
Location: Willits, Mendocino County, CA
May 21, 2015 2:33 pm
I found this in the vegetable garden. I use no pesticides and wonder if this is a good guy or bad guy?
Signature: Donna

Timema

Timema

Dear Donna,
This Timema is related to Walkingsticks, and though they feed on leaves, they are not considered agricultural pests, so you should not be concerned.  Timema are rarely seen.
  You can read more about the Timema on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found in SW Ohio
Location: Ohio, USA
May 21, 2015 5:21 pm
this bug was found on a friends’s farm in SW Ohio on May 21, near Dayton. We have No idea what it is.
Thank you.
Signature: Puzzled

Carolina Sphinx Metamorphosis

Carolina Sphinx Metamorphosis

Dear Puzzled,
This is a newly metamorphosed Carolina Sphinx,
Manduca sexta, and soon its wing will expand and it will be able to fly.  Though the adult Carolina Sphinx might not be familiar to your friends, if they grow tomatoes, they are probably familiar with the large caterpillars of the Carolina Sphinx, the Tobacco Hornworm, that feeds on the leaves of tomatoes and related plants.

 

Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Sue Dougherty liked this post

Subject: Wasp or Beatle?
Location: Covina California
May 21, 2015 6:35 pm
Found this in the backyard crawling into a hole, never seen one before. It’s quite interesting. It really looks like a beetle mixed with a wasp. 05-21-2015
Signature: Joshua

Tarantula Hawk Carnage

Tarantula Hawk Carnage

Dear Joshua,
We are afraid to ask why this Tarantula Hawk is no longer crawling into a hole.  Tarantula Hawks are Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae.  We will be tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

Tarantula Hawk Carnage

Tarantula Hawk Carnage

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar or moth?
Location: North Charleston, SC
May 21, 2015 8:14 pm
This strange fellow about fell on my head tonight. I’ve never seen a bug quite like it. It looked like a caterpillar but had wings and was quite large (about 5 inches long). Any idea who this guy was?
Signature: Christy

Newly Metamorphosed Imperial Moth

Newly Metamorphosed Imperial Moth

Dear Christy,
This is a newly eclosed Imperial Moth, and because its wings have not yet fully expanded, it still resembles a caterpillar in form though its metamorphosis is complete.  Once its wings have expanded, it can fly and it will seek out a mate, living only long enough to reproduce.  Adult Imperial Moths do not take food.

Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Lori Ledeboer, Kristi E. Lambert, Sue Dougherty liked this post

Subject: Hornet or Wasp
Location: Kannapolis NC
May 20, 2015 11:40 pm
This giant thing was trying to make a nest in my paper lamp! It was huge and looked pretty dangerous…we let it go outside…maybe not the best decision?!
May 2015 location NC.
Signature: MForrest

European Hornet

European Hornet

Dear MForrest,
This is a European Hornet,
Vespa crabro, and introduced species.  You may read more about the European Hornet on the Penn State Entomology page where it states:  “”The European or giant hornet is an introduced species first reported in the United States in 1840 in New York. Currently, its geographical range extends from the Northeastern states west to the Dakotas, and south to Louisiana and Florida. It belongs to a family of wasps called the vespids, which encompass all of the yellowjackets including the bald-faced hornets. Technically, the European hornet is the only true hornet in North America and is large and will aggressively defend their nests. Homeowners should be cautious when attempting to manage this hornet.

Thank you!
I have a young child.  This makes me very concerned…we will be cautious and keep an eye out for anymore.

Subject: Webspinner?
Location: Austin
May 20, 2015 12:05 pm
They’re everywhere
Signature: Danyel

Long Necked Seed Bug

Long Necked Seed Bug

Dear Danyel,
This is a Long Necked Seed Bug,
Myodocha serripes, and according to BugGuide, they feed on:  “Seeds of strawberry and St. John’s wort. Sometimes a pest of strawberries.”  There is contradictory information in the El Dorado Springs Sun Online in an article LONG-NECK SEED BUGS BENEFICIAL IN STRAWBERRIES where it states:  “Jill Scheidt, agronomy specialist with University of Missouri Extension, has seen several long-neck seed bugs in many strawberry patches during the late spring.  ‘Long-necked seed bugs are a beneficial insect in strawberries,’ said Scheidt.”  The article contains information from another expert:  “They can be found under leaf litter in early spring and in fields and under artificial lights in the summer. Long-necked seed bugs overwinter in woodland and migrate to fields in the spring and summer; they are attracted to lights.  According to Richard Houseman, University of Missouri plant sciences professor, long-neck seed bugs will sometimes feed on strawberry seeds but are rarely a threat needing treatment. They do feed on pests like St. John’s wort and other small insects.”  Do you live near where strawberries are cultivated?