Subject: Long Horn Beetle?
Location: Massachusetts
July 28, 2014 4:35 pm
Found this outside my house and would like to know a little more about it. Bit of a Asian Longhorn beetle scare round here and I know this is not one but now my kids and I have caught the bug (pun intended) and want to know what it is.
Thanks for time!
Signature: Sean

Red Banded Pine Borer

Red Banded Pine Borer

Hi Sean,
This pretty beetle is a Red Banded Pine Borer,
Stictoleptura canadensis, and according to bugGuide:  “The normal colouration of Stictoleptura c. canadensis (Olivier) is with banded antennae (male and female). Rarely the antennae are all black.… Christopher Majka, 31 January, 2013.” 

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Subject: Unknown Alypia Forester Moth
Location: western Montana
July 28, 2014 2:04 pm
Can anyone ID this Alypia? I’ve gone through 4 different species, but the pattern of white patches does not match well to any of them. This photo was taken on July 28th, 2014 in western Montana. It was nectaring on Brassica weed flowers in open coniferous forest at approximately 3,400′.
Signature: Jeremy Roberts

Police Car Moth

Police Car Moth

Hi Jeremy,
While your moth bears a superficial resemblance to the Forester Moths in the genus
Alypia, the reason you had so much difficulty with a species identification is that your moth is in a different family.  This is a Police Car Moth, Gnophaela vermiculata,  According to BugGuide, the range is “southern British Columbia south to Oregon, northeastern Nevada, Utah, Colorado, and northern New Mexico” and it is found in “Typically foothills, mountain ranges, mid-elevations.”  As there are other similar looking members of the genus, we cannot say with 100% certainty that this is not a close relative of the Police Car Moth.

Subject: Bee fly
Location: Williams, AZ
July 28, 2014 12:41 pm
Could this be some type of bee fly? It was pretty large–maybe about an inch long.
Signature: Chris

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Chris,
Yes, this is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, however we are not certain of the genus or species.  Our best guess at this time is the Sinuous Bee Fly,
Hemipenthes sinuosa, and this image on BugGuide looks very close.  The pattern on the wing seems correct, but the body is lighter than the individuals pictured on BugGuide where it states:  “black area of wing has irregular sinuous (wavy) border with a small rounded blob near the apex – a distinguishing feature abdomen, thorax, and head black or very dark with no banding or other obvious markings”.

 

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Subject: Just bit me!!
Location: Medford, NJ
July 28, 2014 10:33 am
This bug bit me get I see no pincers or stingers. It has long antenna, long skinny wings, a short body and is greyish in color.
Signature: Anne Marie

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear Anne Marie,
This looks to us like a Caddisfly in the order Trichoptera, and we would challenge your belief that it stung or bit you.  Most Caddisflies do not have functional mouthparts, and they do not feed as adults.  According to BugGuide:  “Some adults take liquid food, such as nectar, others do not feed.”  They do not possess stingers either.  Is it possible that you have mistaken this Caddisfly for the creature that bit you?

Subject: Bug id
Location: Northern Maine
July 27, 2014 9:27 pm
Saw these getting busy on my boat trailer tire as I attempted to put air in it.
Signature: Nathan

Mating Pale Green Weevils

Mating Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils

Dear Nathan,
We believe these are mating Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils,
Polydrusus sericeus, and according to BugGuide: “introduced from Europe, where it is widespread” and it feeds on “primarily Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis).”  Since you image is not in critical focus, they might also be Pale Green Weevils, Polydrusus impressifrons, and they are also an invasive, introduced species.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Europe, adventive in NA (introduced ca. 1913)” though this date discrepancy information is also provided:  “earliest record in our area: NY 1906.”  Finally, BugGuide offers this comparison information with the Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil:  “P. impressifrons is similarly colored but has less conspicuous black lines in elytra, relatively small eyes positioned laterally and parallel to midline, least interocular distance 1.5 to 2 times width of eye, and elytral margins slightly sinuate and widest near apex (compare images of both species).”

Subject: Black Flying Insect
Location: West Texas, Lubbock County
July 28, 2014 9:16 am
Hello,
We have seen these very pretty black insects just this summer in our yard and have tried to use on-line searches to identify them, but to no avail. I would like to know whether or not they are harmless, as I have had one land on me several times. They seem to flutter around and also do not seem to be very stable in the wind. Thank you for your help!
Signature: A. Melugin

Grapeleaf Skeletonizer

Grapeleaf Skeletonizer

Dear A. Melugin,
We suspect you may have grapes growing nearby.  This is one of the Grapeleaf Skeletonizers, a moth in the genus
Harrisina.  According to bugGuide, there are three species in Texas, and we can eliminate the Eastern Grapeleaf Skeletonizer as it has an orange collar behind the head.  The other two species, Harrisina coracina and Harrisina metallica which is commonly called the Western Grapeleaf Skeletonizer, look quite similar.  Caterpillars feed on the leaves of grapes, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae are a major defoliating pest of grapes – Vitis spp., and also feed on creeper – Parthenocissus spp. (Vitaceae).”

Thank you so much!  We do not have grape vines, butI looked it up, and found they also feast on Virginia Creeper, which you mentioned and we have.  When I went to inspect the plant, sure enough they have been eating the leaves! I really appreciate your help.  Thanks again!
April