Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Welland ON Canada
September 21, 2014 9:04 am
The attached picture was taken in Welland Ontario on 18th September 2014.
The caterpillar was on New England Aster and was close to 50 mm long.
Signature: Rick Young

Goldenrod Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Goldenrod Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Rick,
This is the caterpillar of a Hooded Owlet Moth in the genus
Cucullia, and of the species represented on BugGuide, it most closely resembles the Goldenrod Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar, Cucullia asteroides.  Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars were selected as our Bug of the Month for September 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I have never encountered this at work before
Location: Seattle, WA
September 19, 2014 7:27 pm
I work in Seattle, WA on commercial boilers. The location I took these photos (which are actually screenshots from much more informative HQ videos that I took) is on the ground near an outdoor steam boiler in September at the end of summer. It was 75°F that day and was the last day of an unusually long and hot summer. The water (and sludge) these things were living in was very warm, I did not measure the temperature of the water but because it was continually being fed by 212°F boiler water. Please let me know if you need more information, pictures or video. Oh and these things were about half an inch long.
Signature: Aaron in Seattle

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Dear Aaron,
One of your images appears to depict a Rat-Tailed Maggot, the larva of a Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax.  According to BugGuide:  “The larva of the Drone-Fly feeds on decaying organic material in stagnant water in small ponds, ditches and drains. Such water usually contains little or no oxygen and the larva breathes through the long thin tube that extends from its rear end to the surface of the water and that gives it its common name of ‘rat-tailed maggot’.”

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Subject: What kind of beetle is this?
Location:  Marmaris, Turkey
September 20, 2014 3:59 pm
Hi, I am on holiday in Marmaris, Turkey and woke up to find quite a large beetle on my balcony. I took many photos and was just curious to learn what type it was. I have scoured the web and can’t seem to find it anywhere. Any help?
Signature: Joshua

There is no image attached.

Yeah because your website has no email or any way of attaching photos I shall send them to you now. I was just waiting for your reply so I could do so. Thanks!  I was particularly interested to find out what if those were eggs it was carrying?

Red Palm Weevil

Red Palm Weevil

Dear Joshua,
You can send identification request with images by using our Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.  This is a Red Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, a species that is doing significant damage to cultivated palm trees throughout the Mediterranean region.  According to BugGuide:  “native to so. Asia and Melanesia, since the 1980s spread into many warm coastal areas around the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean.”  The UK Food and Environment Research Agency has an excellent pdf on the Red Palm Weevil.

Red Palm Weevil with Passengers

Red Palm Weevil with Passengers

We suspect that the passengers on your Red Palm Weevil are Mites, but we don’t know if they are parasitic or if they are phoretic, meaning they use the Weevil for transportation purposes and pose no harm to the tranporter.  The Iberia-Natur site includes images of a Red Palm Weevil with mites and it includes the following statement:  “that mites are transported on the legs of the bug. This process is called phoresy, which means the temporary use of another animal (in this case a bug) for transportation to another fee lot.”  Krishna Mohan PHotography also has images of Mites on a Red Palm Weevil and the statement:  “that mites are transported on the legs of this weevil. This process is called phoresy, which means one animal attaching to another for transportation only.”

Mites on Red Palm Weevil

Close-up of Mites on Red Palm Weevil

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: West Viriginia
September 20, 2014 11:42 am
I was wondering if you could tell me what kind of bug this is. Found it crawling out of the ground. Can you help me. Please and thank you.
Signature: Bobbi

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Hi Bobbi,
This is a Hickory Horned Devil, the largest North American Caterpillar, and despite its fearsome appearance, it is perfectly harmless as it neither stings nor bites, and it is not venomous or poisonous.  We typically receive numerous reports of sightings in the late summer and early fall, but this year we have received very few reports.  Since this individual was on the ground, we assume it was searching for a likely spot to dig beneath the surface to begin pupation.  The adult Hickory Horned Devil is the spectacular Royal Walnut Moth.

 

Subject: Spider
Location: Barbados
September 20, 2014 1:21 pm
Has been in my bathroom in Barbados for the last few days. Shows no fear of me but tends to stay high on the wall.
Signature: Huh?

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Dear Huh?,
This is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.  These are hunting spiders that do not build webs, and their presence is frequently tolerated in warmer climates as they help to control the populations of Cockroaches and other undesirable insects inside the home.  We believe this is a female
Heteropoda venatoria.

Subject: Stick bug?
Location: Fairview ,PA
September 20, 2014 8:57 pm
Hi bugman!,
Here are a couple of photos from Erie county Pennsylvania. We assume it is a stickbug of some type, but we’ve never seen one around here before. We were hoping that you could give us more info on it.
Signature: Joe S.

Northern Walkingstick

Northern Walkingstick

Dear Joe S.,
This is a Northern Walkingstick,
Diapheromera femorata.  According to BugGuide:  “This species is native to the US and Canada. It is the most common species of Phasmid in North America.  When very numerous, they can severely defoliate trees.”

Northern Walkingstick

Northern Walkingstick