Subject: Some kind of Stink Bug(I think)
Location: Mims, Florida
March 31, 2015 9:08 pm
I took these pictures yesterday of what I originally thought was a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, but after viewing pictures of them online I was unable to find any comparable color patterns.
Signature: Zach

Black Stink Bug

Black Stink Bug

Dear Zach,
You are correct that this is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, but we needed to research its identity.  Relatively quickly we located the Featured Creatures site indicating that this is a Black Stink Bug,
Proxys punctulatus, and this information is provided:  “The biology of the black stink bug, Proxys punctulatus (Palisot), is not well known. It has a broad geographical range in the Americas but does not appear to damage agricultural crops as do other more important pentatomids. Black stink bugs appear to be facultative feeders on plants and other insects.”  The host plants are listed as:  “Black stink bugs have been collected in cotton, soybean and citrus. They feed on plant juices, with some documented association with Commelina (dayflowers) species. Although the black stink bug is a phytophagous species, it can also be predaceous, and has been found attacking insect larvae in cotton.”  Additional information can be found on BugGuide.  It seems the only other image of a Black Stink Bug in our archives is nine years old.

Black Stink Bug

Black Stink Bug

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Subject: Insect I.D.
Location: Southern Utah
March 31, 2015 12:38 pm
Cocoon found under lid of unused garbage can…..I carefully protected and waited to see what came out. Cocoon was gray/black and I expected a moth with little color. What a surprise! Appears to be big Swallowtail Moth, 4-5 inches tip to tip. I can’t find anything exactly like it searching the Web.
I don’t know if this critter is kind of rare down here – Ivins, Utah.
Signature: Kent P.

Two Tailed Swallowtail

Two Tailed Swallowtail

Hi Kent,
This Two Tailed Swallowtail,
Papilio multicaudatus, is a butterfly, not a moth.  According to the Utah Bug Club:  “Two Tailed Swallowtail butterflies are large and gorgeous and can occasioanlly be found patrolling neighborhoods that have ash trees (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) growing along the street. These same ash trees serve as the larval host plant for this butterfly. Adults appear on the wing from mid-May through July with a few fresh adults appearing for a small second flight in September. Although finding adults of the Two-Tailed Swallowtail is somewhat inconsistent in our cities, males can usually be found with much more regularity cruising our canyons and ravines in May and June. Caterpillars can be found on choke cherry (Prunus virginiana) from June through August in the mountains.”  BugGuide provides this information:  “Trivia: This is probably the largest species of Butterfly in North America, with spread specimens sometimes pushing 6 inches in wingspan. However, the Giant Swallowtail – Papilio cresphontes (which definitely averages smaller) is consistently listed as the largest species, and indeed some females of that species can reach very large proportions as well. Occasionally nearly as large is also the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail – Papilio glaucus. So, on an average, everyday basis, P. multicaudatus is largest, but as for the largest specimen recorded, it is probably an open contest.”  By all accounts, this is a early sighting.

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Subject: Cocooned????
Location: Columbus, GA
March 27, 2015 7:11 pm
Saw this on my porch railing. Pretty sure that it’s a moth or a butterfly. Don’t even know if that’s right. Will continue to watch to see if I can capture it’s release. I took video but couldn’t load that so I’m doing pics.
Signature: Jami S

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Dear Jami,
This is a very exciting posting for us.  We recognized your Chrysalis (proper term for the pupa of a butterfly) as a member of the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae, but we did not recognize the species.  We quickly located what appeared to be a match to a Red Spotted Purple chrysalis on BugGuide, but since the angle of view is different, we could not be certain.  We found a similar camera angle on Nature Search, so we are now quite confident that we have properly identified the species as
Limenitis arthemis astyanax.  Adult Red Spotted Purples are well represented on our site, but we do not have any images of chrysalides.  We especially love that your two images document the mobility of the chrysalis, which is generally thought of as an immobile stage of metamorphosis.  We hope you are able to document the eclosion of this beautiful butterfly and can send us additional images in the near future.

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

This is so cool. Thanks so much.

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Subject: Flying beetle
Location: Indio, CA. March 28, 2015
March 28, 2015 3:02 pm
Looks like swarms of this guy’s companions perished on our pool. Body about 1/4″ long. I fished this one out and photographed it as he dried off. Then he flew off shortly after the BUG 1 pic was taken. We have a lot of grass, trees and hedges around our lot.
Signature: Tony

Possibly Monkey Beetle

Possibly Monkey Beetle

Dear Tony,
We believe your Scarab Beetle is a Monkey Beetle in the genus
Hoplia, possibly Hoplia callipyge based on images and the range information on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on flowers and foliage, often in groups … Larvae feed on roots of various plants during the summer, hibernate in a late instar, pupate in soil in spring; adults emerge in spring … Some are considered pests of ornamental plants and grapevines, especially H. callipyge.”

Monkey Beetle, we believe

Monkey Beetle, we believe

 

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Subject: Caterpillers – foe or friend
Location: Highland Park, ca (county of LA)
March 30, 2015 8:50 am
Hi. I have been finding lots of black furry caterpillers on the ground in Highland Park, CA. The largest that I have seen is about one and a quarter inches long. I think that they are falling from the eves from businesses on Figueroa (around the 7000 black). There is no real vegetation for them so hide out in so they just cling to the innermost edge of the street. I would like to ID them. And if they should be saved where do they need to be placed (food supply)
Signature: Patricia

Woolly Bear

Woolly Bear

Dear Patricia,
Your images are quite blurry, but there is little doubt in our mind that this is a Woolly Bear, most likely the caterpillars of the Painted Tiger Moth,
Arachnis picta, because we have seen large numbers this year in nearby Mount Washington.  They are general feeders that will eat a wide variety of plants commonly considered weeds.

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Subject: Query-Locust
Location: about 15 km west of Port Elizabeth
March 30, 2015 9:59 am
On a January (2015) trip to the Eastern Cape of South Africa, we stopped the car to enable the pictured creature to cross the road. It was walking quite slowly, but determined. Body length was around 5cm (=2 inches). Not having any detailed field guide for S.African insects, I just couldn’t put a name to it, although I suspect it’s some kind of locust. We don’t see its like in the UK!
Signature: Neil Henry

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Dear Neil,
This magnificent grasshopper is a member of the family Pyrgomorphidae and many individuals in the family are known as Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers, Gaudy Grasshoppers or Koppie Foam Grasshoppers.  We believe we have correctly identified your individual as
Phymateus leprosus subsp. leprosus based on an image on iSpot.  This seems to be a variably colored species.

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