Subject: Daniel – What’s This Fly?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
August 19, 2014 6:19 pm
Hello,
I thought I’d discovered all of the flies that could possibly come to our little patch, but here’s another. Can you please help? It spent a lot of time on catnip blooms and the adjacent native geranium (I think I have it properly distinguished from geranium.) It is very shy and moves fast, but came back over and over again.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Hi Anna,
We believe we have correctly identified your Bee Fly as 
Dipalta serpentina based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are parasitoids of pupae, and perhaps also larvae, of antlions (Myrmeleontidae)” and “In Calif. species is most abundant in August and September” which makes your sighting right on schedule.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Kelowna, BC
August 19, 2014 8:44 am
A friend posted a picture of this and nobody knows what it is. She lives in Kelowna BC.
Signature: Courtney

Male California Prionus

Male California Prionus

Dear Courtney,
Though is it named for the Golden State,  the range of the California Root Borer,
Prionus californicus, extends well beyond California as you can see from the sighting data on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larva feed primarily on living deciduous trees (oaks, madrone, cottonwood) and are also recorded from roots of vines, grasses, and decomposing hardwoods and conifers. Will also attack fruit trees growing on light, well-drained soils (e.g. apple, cherry, peach).”  This individual is a male which can be distinguished from the female by his developed, distinctly sawlike antennae.

 

Subject: scary hybrid looking bug
Location: Western Oklahoma USA
August 18, 2014 5:57 pm
My assistant found this bug in her dog’s water dish.
Signature: Beth Tones

Grasshopper Lure???

Grasshopper Lure???

Hi Beth,
This “thing” looks Orthopteran, like a Grasshopper, however it is missing its jumping legs.  Though it is somewhat realistic, it does not look like any species of Grasshopper we are familiar with, and we are entertaining the possibility that it is a lifelike fishing lure not unlike the many examples pictured on the Realistic Fishing Lures and Fly Tying page of Graham Owen’s Gallery.

Grasshopper or Fishing Lure???

Grasshopper or Fishing Lure???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider with pincers and strange legs
Location: Somerset, south-west UK, bathroom ceiling
August 18, 2014 9:36 am
Hi I found this on the ceiling of our bathroom, in UK in the summer. Strange flat legs out to the sides and what look like pincers at the front. Is it a harvestman too?! Someone suggested a kind of tick!
Thanks!
Signature: Freya Morgan

Harvestman

Harvestman

Dear Freya,
You are correct that this is a Harvestman.  More specifically, it is
Dicranopalpus ramosus, an invasive species that NatureSpot has identified as being:  “Now quite frequent in Britain” and “The species has spread across Europe from Morocco. As early as 1957, it was reported in Bournemouth in southern England, from where it spread. It reached Scotland in 2000.”  We have always been amused by the uneven legs, and the shape of this Harvestman reminds us of architectural dingbats from mid-century modern Los Angeles apartment buildings and starburst home furnishings from the same time period.

Subject: Large Orange Bee like bug
Location: Maine
August 19, 2014 7:30 am
This bug was seen flitting about a group of flowers. It was the size of a large bumble bee, and moved as such. It was Orange colored on the back half, and greyish on the front half. The wings in the photos looked more butterfly like. It had fairly long antenna and tongue. It looked like a cross between a bee and a hummingbird.
Found flitting about medium sized white clustered flowers within a few yards of the shore of a Maine fresh water lake.
The photos were taken by my sister, and she will be sending me larger copies soon, but I attached what I have so far.
Signature: J from Maine

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Dear J from Maine,
This is a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth,
Hemaris thysbe, a diurnal Sphinx Moth.  We don’t need larger copies, but since one image looks like it was taken from a television screen and the other is just plain blurry, it you have sharper images with more clarity, we would love to post those instead.

Subject: bug
Location: Portland Tn.
August 18, 2014 6:50 pm
Would like to know what this bug is and any other info. on it.
Signature: Carol

Jagged Ambush Bug Nymph

Jagged Ambush Bug Nymph

Dear Carol,
This is an immature Jagged Ambush Bug, and like the winged adult Jagged Ambush Bugs, they are adept hunters that ambush prey, generally by waiting on flowers for pollinating insects.  Ambush Bugs ambush prey, grasping them with their raptorial front legs and then using their piercing mouthparts to suck fluids from the bodies of the insects they capture.   See BugGuide for a comparison image.