Subject: Spider Egg Sac
Location: Adelaide, Australia
February 4, 2016 8:45 pm
Dear Bugman,
We found a spider’s egg sac hanging on our painting easel. It was round and white and grey, and it was hanging on a thread. We looked it up and decided it looked like the egg sac of a two-tailed spider, but we aren’t sure if these spiders live where we are.
Yesterday we noticed it had started to open. We looked inside with our microscope and saw baby spiders! Do you know what type they are? What sort of home or food do they need?
We really like spiders, especially peacock spiders!
Signature: From the Kangaroo’s Room (3 to 6 year olds)

Spider Egg Sac

Spider Egg Sac

Dear Kangaroo’ Room kids,
We will attempt to identify your Spider Egg Sac, but our gut feeling is that this is an Orbweaver Egg Sac.  What we find most surprising is the few individual spiderlings inside.  They also seem quite large to be hatchlings.  Normally we expect to see hundreds of spiderlings emerge from an Egg Sac.  Perhaps a survival strategy for this species is to have the hatchlings cannibalize one another while still in the egg sac, ensuring that the strongest survive, and freeing them from having to hunt for food while very young.  Spiders are predators.  Try feeding them small insects like Aphids.

Spider Egg Sac

Spider Egg Sac

Spiderlings in Egg Sac

Spiderlings in Egg Sac

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug outside my house
Location: Hialeah, Fl
February 4, 2016 2:54 pm
This is the second bug like this that I see it likes to just camp out on walls outside the house.
Signature: I don’t know

Southern Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Southern Tussock Moth Caterpillar

This is a Southern Tussock Moth Caterpillar, Dasychira meridionalis.  According to BugGuide, the caterpillar:  “Prefers Oak, but is found on a variety of deciduous trees.”  Florida Nature Photography has excellent images depicting the life cycle, including the cocoon and adult moth.

Subject: Blue caterpillar
Location: Chiloe, Chile.
February 4, 2016 5:12 pm
Hello! I was trekking in Chiloe national park, in the great island of Chiloe, Chile, and I find this beautiful caterpillar, but no one could tell me it’s species. I hope you could tell me more about it. Cheers!
Signature: Marcos Nijborg

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Marcos,
We believe your Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar is in the subfamily Hemileucinae, the Buck and Io Moths.  Furthermore, we believe it is in the genus Automeris because of it strong resemblance to the North American Io Moth Caterpillar.  The closest match we could find is the Caterpillar of
Automeris hamata, a species pictured on DeviantArt and found in Argentina.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide any information.

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Bill Oehlke Responds
Daniel,
Larvae of Chilean Saturniidae are not well known. It is one of the Hemileucinae species, and I suspect of Ormiscodes genus based on spinage. There are probably six different Ormiscodes species from that area.
Bill Oehlke

Here is a link to Healthy Home Garden that contains images of a caterpillar in the genus Ormiscodes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A Ctenucha moth?
Location: Panajachel, Guatemala
February 3, 2016 1:15 pm
I’m a Canadian living in Panajachel, Guatemala, in the Western Highlands near Lake Atitlan. We found this beautiful moth on our porch today mid-afternoon on a very sunny day. He was very lively! Did not want to sit still for a picture.
Black and red wing, very bright iridescent blue body.
Am I correct in thinking this is a type of Ctenucha moth?
Signature: Cristel

Ctenuchid

Ctenuchid

Dear Cristel,
You are correct that this Tiger Moth is in the subtribe Ctenuchina, and we believe that it is in the genus
Cyanopepla based on the image posted to Emtomofausac Insectos de Guatemala and the image on Neotropical Lepidoptera that is identified as  Cyanopepla bella, though we are not fully convinced that is the correct species.  We located several members of the genus online that look very similar, but none have the bold, unbroken red marking on the forewing.  We will contact Arctiinae expert Julian Donahue to see if he can provide a species.

Ctenuchid

Ctenuchid

Julian Donahue Responds
Locality?? Also, hindwing markings important in this genus.
I may be able to come up with a name if I know the locality.
Julian

Thanks Julian.  The location is “Panajachel, Guatemala, in the Western Highlands near Lake Atitlan.”

Sorry, Daniel. It looks very familiar, and I’m pretty sure there’s an identified specimen of this in the LACM collection that you can check out.
Otherwise, without the hindwing I can’t be positive about anything else, although I think you have the right genus.
Good luck,
Julian

Gangamela ira (Druce, 1896).jpg

Gangamela ira (Druce, 1896).jpg

As luck would have it, I think I’ve come close.
This is the original figure of Gangamela ira (Druce, 1896), described from Panama, which, it has been noted, is virtually identical to the figure of Cyanopepla beata Rothschild, 1912, also described from Panama.
At present, the two taxa remain as separate species in separate genera! If they are the same species, then the Druce name would have priority, but that still leaves the proper generic placement in question.
Note that your Guatemalan specimen has much more blue on the inner margin of the forewing, and may, in fact, be something completely different. But this is the closest I can come for now.
Hurray for the bobcat; we’re still waiting to see one here on our property, although we’ve seen them on some local birding walks!
Julian

Wow, thank you so much!
I looked through all the pictures I had taken, even the blurry ones, to see if I got a shot of the hindwing but no luck. :(
I’ve been blogging about my time in Guate and I think I will post this conversation up as a topic of interest to anyone looking for bug identification.
Thanks again!
Cristel

Subject: What’s that bug
Location: New Brunswick
February 3, 2016 12:06 pm
Hi I have these little bugs infesting my apartment. They are in my pantry, my floor, my closet, and around my cats food. I’m so annoyed by them and want to get rid of them.
Signature: Helppp please

Possibly Sawtooth Grain Beetles

Possibly Sawtooth Grain Beetles

These sure look like Sawtooth Grain Beetles, Oryzaephilus surinamensis, to us, though there is not enough detail to be certain.  They might also be the closely related Merchant Grain Beetle, Oryzaephilus mercator, and according to BugGuide:  “Adults and larvae feed primarily on cereal products, particularly oatmeal, bran, shelled sunflower seeds, rolled oats, and brown rice; usually associated with oilseeds and less with cereal grains and in most regions damages processed cereals, especially those with high oil content; also feeds on seed-borne fungi”  You may compare your image to the images posted to BugGuide.

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa
January 29, 2016 1:29 pm
Hi bugman,
I am a service manager for a pest management company in Pittsburgh. We have a current issue with an insect in a restaurant. It is tiny with wings and is attracted to light. They are finding them along the windows along storefront and in light fixtures on first floor. No activity in basement. No second floor. Some old barn wood is inside but it has been there for several years. It appears to have an ovipositor.
Signature: thank you, Joe Ryan

Unknown Parasitic Hymenopteran

Unknown Parasitic Hymenopteran

Dear Joe,
We are not certain we will be able to provide more than a very general identification.  This is some species of Parasitic Hymenopteran, and the prominent ovipositor is used by the female to lay eggs.  Finding them indoors leads us to believe that they are preying upon some other insect or arthropod that is living in the restaurant.  Though this insect does not present a problem, it is a sign that there is something else living in the restaurant that is providing food.  Cockroaches would be a likely food source, but this is most definitely NOT an Ensign Wasp, a species that parasitizes the oothecae or egg sacs of Cockroaches.  You can try browsing the pages of BugGuide for Parasitic Hymenopterans. 

Thanks for the reply Daniel.
Although this restaurant has had problems in the past with Oriental roaches in the basement there has not been any activity reported for a year. None of these insects were found in basement along windows. I have some samples on a monitoring trap that I have to get to our Univar rep.
thanks again.
Joe