Subject: Big winged black bug with long tail?
Location: Alfalfa, Oregon
September 26, 2016 8:51 am
Location: central Oregon
Seen: September 25, 2016
Signature: Sandy

Black Horntail

Black Horntail

Dear Sandy,
This is a female Horntail, a non-stinging relative of wasps that uses her long ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the bark of trees.  We believe your black Horntail is in the genus Sirex based on BugGuide images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Green Caterpillar
Location: Southern Oregon
September 22, 2016 8:55 pm
Hello Bugman!
I found two beautiful, large, green caterpillars in my yard (mid July). I was thinking maybe they’re Luna Moth Caterpillars but they don’t have any red on them as some of the pictures I found do.
Can you tell me what they are? I took both of them out of the way and placed them on Oak Trees hoping that wasn’t a mistake but worried that they may otherwise be harmed.
Also, I want to write an article for our local paper about helping beneficial insects during the fall. I welcome any advice you have (especially about preserving some leaf litter for insects), and I will gladly quote you and ideally drive more traffic to your site.
Thank you!
Signature: Kenda

Silkmoth Caterpillar

Silkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Kenda,
These are Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars from the family Saturniidae and the genus Hyalophora.  There are two species from the genus in Oregon.  We are requesting assistance from Bill Oehlke to verify their species identity.

Silkmoth Caterpillar

Silkmoth Caterpillar

Bill Oehlke Responds
In southeastern Oregon they should be Hyalophora columbia gloveri. In southwestern Oregon, they should be Hyalophora euryalus.
There are hybrid blend zones in some areas and it is very difficult in some cases to differentiate even between adult moths whether they are [H.] euryalus, [H.] columbia gloveri or a naturally occurring hybrid strain.

Subject: Caterpillar?
Location: Clermont Florida
September 26, 2016 5:49 am
I found this on my window this morning when I opened the blinds. It was on the outside. I went out to look at it and it looks like it is making a cocoon? It looks like tree bark. The pictures were taken in Clermont Florida in September my me. I cannot find it anywhere on line.
Signature: Lynn Albanese

Bagworm Cocoon

Bagworm Cocoon

Dear Lynn,
This is a Bagworm Cocoon.  Bagworms are a family of moths, Psychidae, whose larvae construct “bags” out of plant material, generally the plants upon which they are feeding.  They carry around the bag for protection, and eventually pupate within the bag.  Your individual appears to have pupated.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black bug with horns on its butt
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
September 25, 2016 7:42 pm
Dear Bugman,
I was changing the sheets on my bed and found this little bug (I took it outside). It looks harmless other than the little horns on its back, but my wife and I often wake up with inexplicable bug-bite looking things on us. What is this bug? Thanks for your help!
Signature: Julian

Smoky Brown Cockroach Nymph

Smoky Brown Cockroach Nymph

Dear Julian,
This is an early instar Smoky Brown Cockroach nymph,
Periplaneta fuliginosa, which you may verify by comparing your images to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Early instars are black insects with characteristic white markings on the distal antenae, proximal antennae, thorax and abdomen.” 

Subject: Centipede baby?
Location: Nevada
September 25, 2016 4:29 am
I found this little guy crawling up my leg I live in Reno NV
Signature: Miss mack

Snakefly Larva

Snakefly Larva

Dear Miss Mack,
This is the predatory larva of a harmless Snakefly, and this image from BugGuide is a nice comparison.  According to BugGuide:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans). Adults typically prefer aphids but may eat a wide variety of arthropods. Adults take efforts to clean themselves after feeding.”

Subject: Green with Red Abdomen grasshopper?
Location: Eastern Sierra Nevada mountains (Alpine County)
September 25, 2016 3:18 pm
Hi Mr. Bugman,
I found this grasshopper-like insect in my house in the Eastern Sierra Nevada mountains this weekend and can’t identify it. The night before I found it, it was making such a loud noise (like a high-pitched humming) that I unplugged the refrigerator to see if it was the refrigerator on the blink that was making the noise!
Can you help me track down what this little critter is? I caught him in a glass (I was kind of skittish to catch him by hand, that looks like a stinger on his hind end!) and released him outside.
Thanks!
Signature: Nona Y.

Shield-Backed Katydid

Shield-Backed Katydid

Dear Nona,
This is not a Grasshopper.  Grasshoppers have much shorter antennae.  This is a Katydid, and we believe we have correctly identified it as a Shield-Backed Katydid from the genus
Idiostatus based on this BugGuide image.  There is another image on the University of Florida Entomology page that is identified as the Unarmed Shieldback, Idiostatus inermis, that looks very similar.  What you have mistaken for a stinger is actually the ovipositor of the female and it poses no threat to humans, but large Shield-Backed Katydids might bite.

Hello, Daniel,
Thank you so much for your quick reply to my query! So it is a Katydid! I’ve never seen one there before. But I appreciate your help!
Bests,
Nona