Subject: Hornet or Wasp
Location: Kannapolis NC
May 20, 2015 11:40 pm
This giant thing was trying to make a nest in my paper lamp! It was huge and looked pretty dangerous…we let it go outside…maybe not the best decision?!
May 2015 location NC.
Signature: MForrest

European Hornet

European Hornet

Dear MForrest,
This is a European Hornet,
Vespa crabro, and introduced species.  You may read more about the European Hornet on the Penn State Entomology page where it states:  “”The European or giant hornet is an introduced species first reported in the United States in 1840 in New York. Currently, its geographical range extends from the Northeastern states west to the Dakotas, and south to Louisiana and Florida. It belongs to a family of wasps called the vespids, which encompass all of the yellowjackets including the bald-faced hornets. Technically, the European hornet is the only true hornet in North America and is large and will aggressively defend their nests. Homeowners should be cautious when attempting to manage this hornet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Webspinner?
Location: Austin
May 20, 2015 12:05 pm
They’re everywhere
Signature: Danyel

Long Necked Seed Bug

Long Necked Seed Bug

Dear Danyel,
This is a Long Necked Seed Bug,
Myodocha serripes, and according to BugGuide, they feed on:  “Seeds of strawberry and St. John’s wort. Sometimes a pest of strawberries.”  There is contradictory information in the El Dorado Springs Sun Online in an article LONG-NECK SEED BUGS BENEFICIAL IN STRAWBERRIES where it states:  “Jill Scheidt, agronomy specialist with University of Missouri Extension, has seen several long-neck seed bugs in many strawberry patches during the late spring.  ‘Long-necked seed bugs are a beneficial insect in strawberries,’ said Scheidt.”  The article contains information from another expert:  “They can be found under leaf litter in early spring and in fields and under artificial lights in the summer. Long-necked seed bugs overwinter in woodland and migrate to fields in the spring and summer; they are attracted to lights.  According to Richard Houseman, University of Missouri plant sciences professor, long-neck seed bugs will sometimes feed on strawberry seeds but are rarely a threat needing treatment. They do feed on pests like St. John’s wort and other small insects.”  Do you live near where strawberries are cultivated?

Subject: orange and black
Location: Mandeville, Louisiana
May 20, 2015 3:21 pm
My daughter and I brought a bug home from Mandeville, LA to live in our terrarium. It has molted and grown larger.
Signature: Laura

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Dear Laura,
This is an adult Florida Predatory Stink Bug,
Euthyrhunchus floridanus, a beneficial species that is sometimes called a Halloween Bug because of the colors and markings.  We just posted an image of immature Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs.

Oh wow that’s so cool! I really appreciate the swift reply. Now I can research how to take care of our little Halloween friend. I hope I can find some more. I wouldn’t mind a little colony in my terrarium. Thank you so much!!

Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stick insect?
Location: Berkeley, California
May 20, 2015 9:53 am
I found this on the kitchen floor. It must have come in on a bouquet of alstromeria which were grown in an organic garden in another county because I see fras on the table under the vase. I’d like to know what it is, what it eats and if I could release it outside. I have it in a jar with some greens but it’s not happy. Thanks!
Signature: Carla

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Dear Carla,
You are correct that this is a Walkingstick or Stick Insect in the order Phasmida, but we are unable to provide you with any information on its specific identification.  We cannot say for certain if it is native or introduced as many exotic Phasmids are kept as pets and sold in pet stores.  We cannot say for certain if it is the same as any individuals pictured on CalPhotos many of which are not identified. We would urge you to take it to your local natural history museum to get a quicker identification, but our readership may weigh in with information.

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Subject: Tale of two beetles
Location: Southern California, USA
May 20, 2015 2:45 pm
Hello Bugman!
I recently pulled the included two beetles from my Lindgren beetle trap. In our area here in southern California we’ve had large numbers of Pine trees in the area killed off by some type of pest. My trap is about 40 feet from several pines of various types. The trap has a generic methanol lure and one specific to western pine beetle.
I’d like to find out if the two beetles (image attached) are pests or just native harmless beetles. The one brown beetle is about 2/3 the size of a June bug (may be a small one) though their season is still about 4 weeks away normally.
The black beetle I’ve never seen before and it’s about 0.5 inches in length.
About 20 miles from my location the polyphagous shot hole borer has also been located.
Any help in Identifying these beetles would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Signature: Eric

Engraver Beetle, we believe

Engraver Beetle, we believe

Dear Eric,
We believe, but we are not certain, that this is an Engraver Beetle in the genus
Ips, based on an image of a False Five Spined Ips in “Insects of the Los Angeles Basin” by Charles Hogue, where it states:  “The adults of this species are very small (1/4 in., or 3 mm, long) and dark brown.  The prothorax is large and partly conceals the back of the head; the wing covers are finely haired and have linear series of punctures’ the antennae are clubbed.  The species develops under the bark of pines — in our area, primarily Monterey Pine.  Usually only unhealthy or cut trees are attacked, but healthy trees are sometimes infested.  The larvae make fine tunnels through the growth layer beneath the bark, and these tunnels may connect, girdling and killing the tree.”  BugGuide has a single dorsal shot of this species, but other members of the genus pictured on BugGuide have a similar profile.  The University of California Integrated Pest Management page includes the genus Ips in the table of Bark Beetles common in Southern California landscapes.  We will try to seek opinions from Eric Eaton and Arthur Evans.  Your other beetle looks like a May Beetle, commonly called a June Bug.

Arthur Evans provides a correction
This is a bostrichid beetle, not a bark beetle. Where is it from? Size? Any other details might help to narrow down its identity.

It is from Southern California and it is about .5 inch long.

Alfonso Moreno, John Giangrosso, Alisha Bragg liked this post

Subject: looks like devils coach horse
Location: ta248pq
May 19, 2015 6:42 am
a friend found this bug in west somerset England. we think it looks like a devils coach horse but bigger about 30mm long. can you help
Signature: Barry

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Dear Barry,
At first we thought this was going to be a routine identification of an Oil Beetle in the genus
Meloe, and the only item of significance is that all of our many reports are from North America and we did not realize that the genus was represented in Europe.  As we commenced research, we were led to BugLife where we learned:  “Oil beetles are incredible insects, but they are also under threat. Three of UK’s native oil beetles are now extinct, and the remaining five species have suffered drastic declines in their distributions due to changes in the way our countryside is managed. …  Oil beetles have been identified as priorities for conservation action through the UK Biodiversity Action Plan (UKBAP) – meaning work needs to be done to conserve them and their habitats. To help landowners and managers our oil beetle management sheet is now available. ”   Another page on BugLife provides this information:  “Oil beetles are conspicuous, charismatic insects which are often encountered when out walking and enjoying the countryside. Their habit of seeking out bare compacted earth in which to dig nest burrows means that they are frequently seen on footpaths. The best time of year to look for oil beetles is March to June.
Please keep a look out for these beetles when walking in meadows, grasslands and open woodlands and let us know if you find them by submitting your sighting records and uploading your photos. Your records can make a real difference to our oil beetle conservation work.”
  We would urge you to be a citizen scientist and submit your sighting.  Since neither BugLife page included images of Oil Beetles, we are also linking to this BBC Earth News page where it states:  “Conservationists are asking the public to take part in the first survey of the UK’s threatened oil beetles.  These large, lustrous insects thrive in wildflower-rich grasslands and heaths – areas of habitat that are being lost.  In the last hundred years, half of the country’s eight native species of oil beetle have disappeared.”  We are featuring your submission.