Subject: Giant wood-boring flying insect
Location: Rural Bangladesh
November 20, 2014 7:13 pm
My husband took this picture in rural Bangladesh. He says it was a wood-boring insect, about 3 inches long, and that it died right in front of him (he didn’t kill it). The eyes and wings are just amazing.
Signature: Lisa C.

Carpenter Bee

Carpenter Bee

Dear Lisa,
This amazing insect is a Carpenter Bee in the subfamily Xylocopinae.  The female tunnels in wood, creating several nursery chambers that she provisions with pollen.  She lays an egg in each chamber so that her developing larva will have a food source.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetles
Location: South Africa
November 21, 2014 4:23 am
Hello. I have been trying to identify this “heart beetle”- do you perhaps know what it is called? I found it on my chair at Kruger National Park in South Africa in October (Spring). The other beetle is just really pretty – amazing colours! Found by the car in a parking lot in Rustenburg, South Africa in November (Summer). Thanks :)
Signature: Kareen

Fruit Chafer

Fruit Chafer

Dear Kareen,
Our favorite place to identify South African insects is iSpot where we identified your Fruit Chafer as
Pedinorrhina trivittata.  We believe the green beetle is a Leaf Beetle, and we will do a unique posting of it eventually.

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Subject: Yellow & black beetle
Location: Zimbabwe
November 21, 2014 5:48 am
hiya!!! Here’s hoping you can identify this bug. Seen in the eastern area (mutare) of Zimbabwe in late November (summer/rainy season). Looking forward to hearing from you!!!!
Signature: Ange

Orange Spotted Fruit Chafer

Orange Spotted Fruit Chafer

Dear Ange,
This beautiful Scarab is an Orange Spotted Fruit Chafer,
Mecynorrhina passerinii, and it is pictured on Biodiversity Explorer as well as on Meloidae.com.  Finally, iSpot is a wonderful place to look up South African insects.  The horns indicate your individual is a male.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: australian beetle or bug
Location: Maryborough, Queensland, Australia
November 18, 2014 4:03 am
Dear Bugman
I don’t even know if this site is still running or tended regularly, so I will just send this and hope for the best.
I live in Australia, the land of Poisonous Things. I am wary of anything that looks like it might bite me, and this insect has me horrified.
It can fly. It reminds me of a weevil, but bigger – almost as long as an adults thumb. Hard, dark brown, shiny shell with thick legs and antenna. Long body.
And the most awful looking pincer type arrangement at the head.
It looked awful and I had my husband remove it from the house. I have never seen anything quite like it – can you help?
I have attached the clearest picture I could take without getting too close!
Signature: Warm regards, Carly Philp

Possibly Acacia Longicorn

Possibly Acacia Longicorn

Dear Carly,
This is a Longhorned Borer or Longicorn in the subfamily Prioninae, and we believe, based on images posted to BushCraftOz that it might be an Acacia Longicorn,
Eurynassa australis.  According to BushCraftOz :  “Found under eucalypt bark, with head protruding. Larvae live in dead wood of acacia species. Large beetle ~40 mm.”  Beetles in the family Cerambycidae have powerful mandibles, and large individuals, like the one you found, might deliver a painful bite if carelessly handled, and the bite might even draw blood.  Though a nip might be painful, it is not dangerous as the Longicorns are not venomous.

Hi Daniel
Thank you for the information. I just couldn’t find any details on a native species with such big pincers!
I really appreciate your email, and the time to look into it for me.
Cheers
Carly

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Subject: Looks like tree bark with 4 legs?
Location: Jacksonville, FL
November 19, 2014 3:24 pm
Hello,
This bug has been sitting in relatively the same position for two days on the bricks along our window ledge. It’s November in Florida and we just had two cold nights. It looks as if it has only 4 legs. It’s facing down in the photo shown. Curious!
Signature: Brandi

Florida Bark Mantid

Florida Bark Mantid

Dear Brandi,
This is a marvelous image of a Florida Bark Mantid or Grizzled Mantid,
Gonatista grisea, which you can read more about on BugGuide.  Like other insects, which are known as hexapods, it has six legs, and the raptorial forelegs, which are modified for capturing and holding onto prey, are being held close to the head in your image.  While this individual stands out against the light brick wall, it easily blends in unnoticed when lurking on a tree trunk, making it a very effective camouflage artist.

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Subject: Identifying a bug request
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
November 20, 2014 1:08 am
Hi there.
I found these bug eggs that hatched yesterday and would like to know what they are?
Signature: name

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Stink Bug Hatchlings

These appear to be hatchling Stink Bugs in the family Pentatomidae.

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