Subject: Long beetle shaped bug
Location: Ireland
May 23, 2015 2:01 am
Hi I found this bug in my bathroom and I can’t figure out what he is, you might even say it’s bugging me, if you’ll excuse the pun. Anyway I’d appreciate if you could identify, thanks xx
Signature: bugged out

Two Banded Longhorn

Two Banded Longhorn

Dear bugged out,
We quickly identified your Longicorn from the family Cerambycidae on Nature Spot as the Two Banded Longhorn,
Rhagium bifasciatum.  It is described as “A large species of longhorn beetle that may reach 22 millimetres long and can be distinguished by the two prominent pale yellow bands on each elytron” and the life history is described as “Like other longhorn beetles, R. bifasciatum lays its eggs in dead wood, often using coniferous trees, where they bore deep, broad tunnels until they are ready to pupate after about two years.”  According to Eakring Birds:  “Another fairly distinctive Longhorn beetle is Rhagium bifasciatum. The larvae develop under bark and we have found newly hatched adults in the early Spring, under Pine logs at Clipstone Old Quarter. The adults are commonly found on tree trunks and occasionally low vegetation. R. bifasciatum is a common beetle throughout the Sherwood Forest NNR.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird Bug
Location: Harrisburg PA
May 23, 2015 5:46 am
Dear WTB:
I was hoping you could tell me what kind of insect this is. I found it hanging out on my screen door this morning and it scared the crap outta me! It’s all different colors and has this long tail? It’s not a stinger because it could move it. All together it’s probably about 8-12 inches long. I hope you can ID it for me! Thanks so much!
Signature: Audrey

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Dear Audrey,
This is a Giant Ichneumon in the genus
Megarhyssa, a group that is commonly called Stump Stabbers because the female uses her lengthy ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the surface of trees infested with the wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps like the Pigeon Horntail.  We have never heard of a person being stung by a Giant Icheumon in the genus Megarhyssa, so we consider them to be harmless, though there is one group of Ichneumons in the genus Ophion with shorter ovipositors that are reported to sting people.

Ann Levitsky, Sue Dougherty, Kitty Heidih, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post

Subject: Found in house, uk
Location: Uk
May 23, 2015 8:01 am
Just found this beetle in my house, it’s may, West Yorkshire, uk, googled and looks like a cedar, but there not common to uk?
Signature: Juzza2

Cockchafer

Cockchafer

Dear Juzza2,
Several years ago we read that populations of this distinctive Scarab Beetle known as a Cockchafer were on the decline, though in recent years the number of identification requests for Cockchafers from the UK is on the rise.  It is possible that it was attracted to lights, which would explain its presence in the home.

Timothy Steele liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange larvae of something or other
Location: Missouri, United States
May 22, 2015 10:21 pm
my friend found one of these awhile back and I submitted it but I understand you’re all busy. turns out I’ve found one now too and I’m very curious so I’m submitting this one too in hopes of finding out what it is!
also it DID seem to emit a foul smelling odor when I touched it if that helps to identify it any.
Signature: Michael

Carrion Beetle Larva

Carrion Beetle Larva

Dear Michael,
This is the larva of a Carrion Beetle in the family Silphidae and you may verify our identification on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults consume fly larvae (maggots) at carrion, as well as some carrion; larvae eat carrion, maggots, and beetle larvae, may prefer dried skin, bits of flesh after maggots have departed”
which may explain the odor you detected.

Carrion Beetle Larva

Carrion Beetle Larva

Ann Levitsky, Jacob Helton, Sue Dougherty liked this post

Subject: Ldybird Spider
Location: Vamos, Crete
May 23, 2015 8:05 am
This was taken in my garden on the island of Crete. Can you tell me if it is poisonous? Fascinating to find many different spiders here. Last one we found was a wolf spider.
Signature: LindaJ

Male Ladybird Spider

Male Ladybird Spider

Dear LindaJ,
Your endangered male Ladybird Spider in the genus
Eresus, most likely Eresus sandaliatus based on information included on the Spiders of NorthWest Europe site which has images from Crete indicating that the species can be identified by the black and white hind legs.  Most spiders have venom, but very few species of spiders are considered dangerous to humans.  To the best of our knowledge, the Ladybird Spiders are considered harmless, and the fact that they are endangered through much of their range indicates that no methods should be used to threaten them if they are found in your garden.

Christina Sargent, Katie Pasulka Casas, Mandi Yates-Elwood, Amy Gosch, Astrid Bremstaller, Ann Levitsky, Carol Love, Jessica M. Schemm, Karin Weidman, Melissa Dilts, Lori Filipovich Kelly, Julie King, Jacob Helton, Michelle Ramsey Pedersen, Rebecca Wright-Hyde, Kathy Haines, Manda Cariglino, Leslie Gist, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Chris Chisholm, Rick Smith, Sandra Mason Comer, Chrissy Bodin Ibclc, Nicole Momaney, Norman Gems, Kitty Heidih liked this post

Subject: ID help
Location: Stamford, CT
May 22, 2015 7:47 am
Walking along a small river with a thin line of trees/shrubs on both sides in Stamford, CT on May 22, 2014, I saw this insect repeatedly on various tree and shrub leaves. There was no sign of leaf damage in the area of the insect. I was amazed by the length of the antennae – almost 2 times the body length.
Your help on ID would be appreciated!!
Signature: Patty

Black Winged Flying Insect

Black Dancer Caddisfly

Dear Patty,
We do not recognize your insect, but it looks to us like it might have an aquatic nymph.  We have contacted Eric Eaton for input and we will begun researching this after we finish cooking.

What's That Bug?  Caddisfly perhaps???

Black Dancer Caddisfly

Hi, Daniel:
This is a caddisfly called the “Black Dancer,” Mystacides sepulchralis.  The thick, leg-like things in front are actually the palps, part of its mouthparts.  They do not bite or anything, though.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

Thanks Eric,
We thought it was probably a Caddisfly, but didn’t have the time to research it before requesting assistance.  According to BugGuide:  “Only two species of
Mystacides occur in the east and the other one has brownish wings. … Males have red eyes.”

Sue Dougherty, Alisha Bragg, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post