Subject: Huge Orange Caterpillar
Location: Corning, New York
September 29, 2014 3:04 pm
My cat, Mr. Waffles, found this guy crawling around the gravel driveway. It looked like it was trying to burrow into the ground but it was all rocky there and couldn’t. I rubbed a leaf against it and it jumped and curled up and started to pulsate a little bit, like a defense mechanism. After a few seconds it uncurled and started to crawl away.
Signature: Stedge

Hornworm ready to pupate

Hornworm ready to pupate

Hi Stedge,
This Hornworm looks positively ripe, like a juicy piece of fruit, was the first thought in our mind when we saw your images.  This Hornworm in the family Sphingidae is getting ready to pupate, so it has turned from green to those warm, glowing colors.  We believe we have correctly identified your Hornworm as an Elm Sphinx,
Sphinx chersis, thanks to the Sphingidae of the Americas site.  We are going to write to Bill Oehlke to see if he can verify our identification.

Hornworm

Hornworm

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s is this thing
Location: Southern Minnesota
September 29, 2014 7:34 pm
I have found 3 or 4 of these rather large things in my house the past few days . Any idea what they are and how to get rid of them ?
Signature: Laurynneah debois

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Laurynneah,
In our opinion, House Centipedes are beneficial predators that will eat anything that won’t eat them.  They will help keep Cockroaches and other undesirable Household Intruders from infesting your home.  We do not provide extermination advice.

Emily Hawkins, Kitty Heidih liked this post

Subject: What’s that ?
Location: Seen in Tampa, FL 9/28/2014 in town
September 28, 2014 4:02 pm
Hi bugman
What’s the bug on this picture ?
Thanks
Signature: Fred

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Dear Fred,
The Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth,
Empyreuma pugione, is one of the Tiger Moths that benefit from mimicry because they look like stinging Wasps.  This black bodied, orange winged beauty most closely resembles Spider Wasps, especially the Tarantula Hawks.  According to BugGuide:  “The spotted oleander caterpillar is a recent immigrant to the US from the Caribbean, first recorded in Florida in Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, in February 1978.”

Tarantula Hawk with Prey

Tarantula Hawk with Prey

 

Rachel Carpenter liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 6 inch long bug with wings
Location: Switzerland – montreux
September 28, 2014 1:05 pm
Found this guy walking around garden. Huge with what looks like moth wings. Scales have a velvet like look. 6 legs with black and yellow abdomen.
Looked everywhere on net and can’t find it.
Signature: Chris

Death's Head Hawkmoth

Death’s Head Hawkmoth

Dear Chris,
This Death’s Head Hawkmoth has just eclosed, meaning it has emerged from its pupal stage, and its wings have still not expanded and hardened, a process that will enable it to fly.

Subject: New Caterpillar
Location: Alexandria VA
September 29, 2014 8:37 am
Please help us identify this species, photographed in Alexandria VA. in a suburban backyard.
Signature: Paul Dunay

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Dear Paul,
Though typically green, this Luna Moth caterpillar has turned orange because it is getting ready to pupate.  The Luna Moth Caterpillar is described on BugGuide as being:  “Larva lime-green with pink spots and weak subspiracular stripe on abdomen. Yellow lines cross the larva’s back near the back end of each segment (compare Polyphemus moth caterpillars, which have yellow lines crossing at spiracles). Anal proleg edged in yellow. Sparse hairs.”

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Subject: Striped Morning Sphinx Moth
Location: Collinsville, IL
September 28, 2014 6:22 pm
Hanging out by our outside light…
Signature: Kat D.

Striped Morning Sphinx

Striped Morning Sphinx

Dear Kat,
Though the common name Striped Morning Sphinx is not used as frequently as the name Whitelined Sphinx for
Hyles lineata, we actually prefer the more obscure common name because it was used by author Charles Hogue in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin.  The Striped Morning Sphinx has been reported in all 48 continental states.

Ron Grondin, Matthew Elliott liked this post