Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
February 27, 2015 3:44 am
We found this caterpillar in our garden today -late summer in Johannesburg, South Africa. I have never seen anything like it. Would love to know what it is. Many thanks!
Signature: Elizabeth

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Elizabeth,
Though you may have never seen one before, the Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Acherontia atropos, is a relatively common species in South Africa.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug in the algarve, portugal
Location: lagos, portugal
February 26, 2015 12:02 pm
Hi, i found this in the mouth of my four month old puppy this morning, just wondering if it dangerous?
Signature: clare curry

Hi, have managed to find out, it is a violet flower bee

Violet Carpenter Bee

Violet Carpenter Bee

Dear Clare,
Though you have identified your Carpenter Bee,
Xylocopa violacea, we are happy to post the image to our site.  According to TrekNatureReadily identified by its color, this handsome solitary bee flies in summer and autumn and again in spring, after hibernation.”  We don’t know what your weather is like right now, but we are speculating this sighting occurred on a warm day which brought the Violet Carpenter Bee out of hibernation.

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Subject: Help!
Location: California
February 25, 2015 10:37 am
Bugman, what in the heavens is this world coming to? I was starving and wishing that someone would make me a hot meal when I went outside and noticed this monstrosity out on the cement! Now I don’t know about you, but I think it’s safe to say that this creature is a sure fire fact that evolution exists as it is most certainly something entirely new!
PS. I hope you appreciate my photography skills as I almost lost my head taking them!
Signature: Tight Red Jeans

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear Tight Red Jeans,
This Whitelined Sphinx or Striped Morning Sphinx,
Hyles lineata, is one of the most common, larger moths found in California.  When conditions are right, great quantities of the edible caterpillars are found on desert plants, and they will metamorphose into moths that are generally seen at dawn or dusk, are attracted to lights, and that are easily mistaken for hummingbirds.  You could have eaten the moth to prevent starvation.  We are curious to find out how you almost lost your head.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the heck is this?
Location: Bay Area, California
February 25, 2015 4:11 pm
Hello!
Can you please help me identify the creature I found today fervently attached to my ceanothus? It’s the ivory-colored stick-like thing roughly in the middle of the picture.
Thank you!
Signature: CdeP2007

Spanworm

Spanworm

Dear CdeP2007,
This is a Spanworm or Inchworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Geometridae.  Caterpillars in this family are often hard to distinguish from sticks, especially when they grasp a branch with their terminal prolegs, extending the body out away from the branch at an angle, much as your image illustrates.  It may be the caterpillar of a Sulfur Moth,
Hesperumia sulphuraria, which is pictured on the Moths of Orange County website.

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Subject: Cool Costa Rican Beetle
Location: Santa Elena, Costa Rica
February 25, 2015 7:59 am
We found this beetle at high elevations in Costa Rica (Santa Elena/Monteverde in February) I’ve looked around and can’t seem to find a picture to identify it. Can you help? It was found on a fence between cleared farmland and forest near an ant trail.
Signature: C Avilez

Spotted Shield Bug

Spotted Shield Bug

Dear C Avilez,
This is not a Beetle.  We quickly identified this Shield Bug in the family Scutelleridae as a Spotted Shield Bug,
Pachycoris torridus, thanks an image on FlickR.  Some of the variations in markings and coloration are pictured on Neotropical Entomology.

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Subject: Tiny Bee With A Big Head
Location: Silver Lake (Los Angeles)
February 23, 2015 9:54 pm
Hi Daniel,
This morning, I was shooting a photo of wild radish on the Red Car Property in Silver Lake, above the historic viaduct footings. While editing, I noticed I captured one frame of this tiny bee with a very strangely shaped, almost mod head. Sorry I couldn’t get a better shot – it was with my phone. I’ve often caught the incidental bug in close-ups, but this is a new one for me.
http://redcarproperty.blogspot.com/
Signature: Diane E

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Hi Diane,
This is a Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae.  Many members of the family mimic bees or wasps as it is beneficial for harmless insects to be mistaken for stinging insects.  Is there any progress on the preservation attempts of the Red Car Property?

Cool.  Thought it was weird.
TPL still has exclusive option on the property.  It’s wonderful to walk right now.

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