Subject: Unknown Possible Moth
Location: Northern California Sierra Nevadas 6200ft
August 23, 2016 2:41 pm
This creature was spotted in the Sierra Nevada mountains in Northern California. What is it?
Signature: Tim Green

Newly Eclosed Pandora Moth

Newly Eclosed Pandora Moth

Dear Tim,
This is a newly eclosed Pandora Moth,
Coloradia pandora, as you can verify by comparing it to this BugGuide image.  The caterpillars pupate underground, and your image is of a freshly metamorphosed adult. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Elanora, QLD, Australia
August 23, 2016 10:24 pm
Found this little guy sitting on a mate’s garage door, I have seen anything like him.
Signature: Liam Jackson

Mantispid

Mantispid

Dear Liam,
This is a Mantispid or Mantis Lacewing in the family Mantispidae.  All of those names make reference to the resemblance of members of the family to the predatory Preying Mantids, but despite the resemblance, they are not closely related.  Predatory Mantispids are classified along with Antlions, Lacewings and Owlflies in the order Neuroptera.  Of all the Mantispids depicted on the Brisbane Insect site, your individual looks most like
Austromantispa imbecilla, or perhaps Ditaxis biseriata which is also pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.

Mantispid

Mantispid

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Florianopolis, SC, Brazil
August 21, 2016 8:39 pm
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I live on the Island of Florianopolis,SC, Brazil. I went out in the garden today and when I came back in I found this psychedelic caterpillar on me. I was fiddeling with a rose bush and a brugmansia. But honestly there are so many different plants in our garden, it could have fallen from anywhere😬. Do you know what bug this is? Today is Sunday August 21st, and the season is winter. But we have a very mild winter and it feels springy already with lots of rain in the last two days after some very dry winter weather.
Thank you!
Signature: Carolina

Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Scalloped Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Dear Carolina,
After some research, we are quite certain we have identified your caterpillar as an Owl Butterfly Caterpillar in the genus
Opsiphanes, but we do not feel confident providing a species identification.  Our search began with this similar looking caterpillar on FlickR that is identified as Opsiphanes invirae.  We continued to research and found more similar looking images of Opsiphanes tamarindi on Parasitoid-Caterpillar-Plant Interactions in the Americas.  According to Insects.org:  “Belonging to the same family of butterflies as the famous Owl Butterflies, this Opiphanes genus contains about ten different species which can be challenging to differentiate. This group is characteristically crepuscular, being most active during the dawn and dusk hours and patrolling the dark forest interior so their cryptic coloration optimally blends with the dark shadow. They can be attracted to fermenting fruit bait during daylight hours … .”  We will contact Keith Wolfe to see if he can provide a species identification.  

Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Scalloped Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Keith Wolfe provides a species identification:  Scalloped Owl Butterfly
Olá Carolina,
This is an immature Scalloped Owl-butterfly (Opsiphanes quiteria).  It needs to still grow further, so please put it on a nearby palm, which are the natural hostplants.  Here is a short report about your lagarta in Portuguese . . .
http://www.scielo.br/pdf/rbent/v49n3/26596.pdf
Let me know if you would like to see a more detailed paper in English.  Daniel, regrettably the larvae shown at the above “Parasitoid-Caterpillar-Plant Interactions in the Americas” link are all misidentified.
Abraços,
Keith

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Southwest Oregon
August 22, 2016 8:10 pm
I was hiking up Mt Mcloughlin Oregon and this attractive little bugger copped a ride. After he was kind enough to pose, he flew away, I can not find any information on this fella. Could you help?
Signature: Happy Hiker

Heart Beetle

Heart Beetle

Dear Happy Hiker,
It did not take us too long to identify your Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae as
Pachyta armata, but alas, BugGuide has no information on the species.  A comment by Gary Griswold on a BugGuide posting states:  ” in the Pacific Northwest we call them heart beetles. Assocated with high alpine enviroment….”  Other than finding some additional images online, we have not had any success in locating any species specific information.

Subject: fuzz ball with eyes
Location: new mexico
August 23, 2016 4:30 am
Hello, I have been plagued with the critters for several years and I would like to know what they are.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMR-AN_GneI&index=5&list=PLZyqnm4XHew6-SwAZlrTYda7Y3ZLp2tRq
Signature: janice bisset

Dust Bunny, we believe

Dust Bunny, we believe

Dear Janice,
There is not much detail in your image, which has a focus problem, so we cannot be certain, but we believe this is a Dust Bunny.  According to the Huffington Post:  “Deep cleaning your home can be emotional. There are feelings, and then there’s procrastination and somewhere, before you reach the finish line (or your wit’s end), there are questions. Like, what are those wads of dust that have made a home of their own underneath your sofa?”  The Huffington Post also provides this information:  “Dust bunnies are made of many things… …Including dead skin, hair, particles of fiber, paper and feathers, and lint from textiles.  Dust bunnies are held together with static electricity.  And in homes with many pets or lots of people with shedding hair, they can get large as they collect under furniture such as beds and sofas.  They can be harmful to those with allergy or respiratory issues.  According the Wilson, the danger lies in dust bunnies’ ability to harbor dust mites which can trigger an asthmatic or allergic reaction.  To ward off these potential allergy triggers, Wilson recommends moving your furniture once or twice a year as though you are moving out and cleaning underneath to ensure that the surfaces do not build up debris. As an extra measure of cleanliness, use a HEPA filtered vacuum so the dust does not blow back into the room, she says.”  The youtube link you provided is to a private video.

https://youtu.be/Slczo3Q-Gxk
thank you for your response—I made the video public and I will keep it that way for a few days. if you get a chance to watch it, notice the two antenna (?) and the way one of the ?appendages moves. see the two eyes?

Ed. Note:  The only movement we can perceive in the video is the entire “Fuzz Ball with Eyes” being moved by tweezers.  We do admit that some insects, including the Masked Hunter and certain Lacewing Larvae use debris as camouflage, but this does not appear to be either of those.

Subject: What is this insect?
Location: Perry Hall, Maryland
August 22, 2016 2:43 pm
Please tell me what insect this is. I have never seen it before and I am curious to know. Thank you.
Signature: I don’t understand this question

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

This large Robber Fly is commonly called a Red Footed Cannibalfly or a Bee Panther since it frequently preys upon bees and wasps that it catches on the wing.