Subject: green/pink horned caterpillar
Location: Eastern Iowa
September 30, 2014 9:06 am
This guy was found outside in the grass by a chold at the daycare I work at. He is pinkish with a green underbelly and a little horn on his abdomen. He is about two inches long. We were unable to find online what type he is and would like to know to care for him as we’d like to keep him in the classroom. Thanks!
Signature: Celie B

Waved Sphinx Caterpillar

Waved Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Celie,
This is a Waved Sphinx Caterpillar,
Ceratomia undulosa, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas site:  “Just prior to pupation, larvae frequently take on a rosy hue.”  That means your caterpillar is probably ready to burrow beneath the soil to metamorphose into a pupa.  Provide your caterpillar with a small aquarium with several inches of moist, but not wet, dirt.  Potting soil without additives should work nicely.  Keep the terrarium cool, at approximately the same temperature as the outdoors.  You should expect eclosion, or emergence of the adult in the spring.  Keeping the terrarium at room temperature will most likely result in early eclosion, during the winter, and the individual will not be able to survive outdoors, nor will it find a mate.

Kitty Heidih liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what bug is it
Location: alicante spain
September 30, 2014 2:46 pm
long 5cm. fast runner and it flies.
Signature: username

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear username,
This is a Mole Cricket, and in addition to running and flying, it also digs quite well as it is typically a subterranean dweller.  We have also received reports that Mole Crickets can swim.  We get reports of Mole Crickets from all over the world.

Subject: Squash Bug family?
Location: Bucerias, MX
September 30, 2014 2:11 pm
I’ve spent several hours online doing my due diligence before asking for help. Help!
Signature: Freda

Flag Footed Bug from Mexico

Flag Footed Bug from Mexico

Dear Freda,
This magnificent insect is a Flag Footed Bug,
Anisocelis flavolineata, and it is in the same family as the Squash Bugs, Coreidae.  Here is an image of a Flag Footed Bug on iNaturalist.  Your image is quite lovely, which is why we have decided to feature it as the Bug of the Month for October, 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nymph of Cadophila varia
Location: Crete/Greece/Iraklion
September 29, 2014 8:47 pm
I found this nymph on a fennel. I think it is a pentatomid possibly belongs to Cadophila varia
Signature: Nikos Roditakis

Stink Bug Nymph

Stink Bug Nymph

Dear Nikos,
Your nymph is a Pentatomid or Stink Bug, and upon researching images of
Cadophila varia on TrekNature, we did locate an image of an adult that looks very similar.  When we attempted to locate images of the nymph, your image popped up on both TrekNature and BugGuide.  We then located an image of a nymph on Biodiversidad Virtual, but it is black, not reddish orange, but that doesn’t mean there might be color variations within the species or that different instars might have different coloration.  We cannot say conclusively that your identification is correct, but it might be correct.

Rachel Carpenter liked this post

Subject: Huge Orange Caterpillar
Location: Corning, New York
September 29, 2014 3:04 pm
My cat, Mr. Waffles, found this guy crawling around the gravel driveway. It looked like it was trying to burrow into the ground but it was all rocky there and couldn’t. I rubbed a leaf against it and it jumped and curled up and started to pulsate a little bit, like a defense mechanism. After a few seconds it uncurled and started to crawl away.
Signature: Stedge

Hornworm ready to pupate

Hornworm ready to pupate

Hi Stedge,
This Hornworm looks positively ripe, like a juicy piece of fruit, was the first thought in our mind when we saw your images.  This Hornworm in the family Sphingidae is getting ready to pupate, so it has turned from green to those warm, glowing colors.  We believe we have correctly identified your Hornworm as an Elm Sphinx,
Sphinx chersis, thanks to the Sphingidae of the Americas site.  We are going to write to Bill Oehlke to see if he can verify our identification.

Hornworm

Hornworm

Bill Oehlke confirm Elm Sphinx identification.
Daniel,
It is Sphinx chersis. Can you put me in contact with photographer so I can
seek  permission to post and can also find county.
Thanks for thinking of me.
Bill

Emily Hawkins, Oliver Gross, Catherine Henderson, Emily Camille, Gwen Skinner, Kitty Heidih, Jessica M. Schemm, Karin Weidman, Vicki Stone liked this post

Subject: What’s is this thing
Location: Southern Minnesota
September 29, 2014 7:34 pm
I have found 3 or 4 of these rather large things in my house the past few days . Any idea what they are and how to get rid of them ?
Signature: Laurynneah debois

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Laurynneah,
In our opinion, House Centipedes are beneficial predators that will eat anything that won’t eat them.  They will help keep Cockroaches and other undesirable Household Intruders from infesting your home.  We do not provide extermination advice.

Emily Hawkins, Kitty Heidih liked this post