Subject: Tiny green bristly larva
Location: NJ
May 29, 2016 3:03 pm
I live in NJ. This tiny green bristly larva of some kind was on a severely stressed tomato plant that had suffered tomato russet mite then aphid infestation when I decided to just plant it and let it survive or die.
I thought I should be able to recognize it, but am striking out with all my guesses. I would appreciate it very much if you could help.
I prefer to let the Garden Patrol take care of the pest issues, so I err on the side of the living — Not knowing what it was, I left it on the plant. (I found a ladybug larva on another plant)
Signature: Garden Patrol Squad Leader

Buffalo Treehopper Nymph

Buffalo Treehopper Nymph

Dear Garden Patrol Squad Leader,
This is the nymph of a Buffalo Treehopper in the genus
Ceresa which you can verify by comparing to this BugGuide image.  While they might not do too much damage to your plant, they do have mouths designed to pierce and suck fluids from the plant, which in the case of an already stressed tomato plant, does not seem like it will be doing the plant much good.

Yikes!  that being the case, I will have to deploy a proper member of the Garden Patrol to protect that plant.  Perhaps a treehopper nymph will be appreciated as a tasty assignment bonus.  ^_^
Thank you for a speedy response! Much appreciated.  :o)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornet?
Location: Holt, Michigan
May 28, 2016 5:35 pm
Found in mid-Michigan in a wood pile. He was disoriented and walking in the grass, and let us move him without any issue. Looks like it has a very large stinger.
Signature: Melissa

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Dear Melissa,
We believe we have correctly identified this female Crane Fly as
Tanyptera dorsalis, formerly Ctenophora dorsalis, thanks to images posted to BugGuide where it states:  “larvae live in decaying wood of recently dead deciduous hardwood trees, often in prostrate trunks that are fairly sound.”  This BugGuide image illustrates the female ovipositing using her egg-laying organ that you have mistaken for a stinger.  The coloring and shape of this Crane Fly likely provides the species with some protection as it seems to mimic the markings on many stinging wasps.

Subject: What bug is this
Location: South west florida
May 30, 2016 8:29 am
We just moved into a vacation home for the summer while our house is being fixed and in the master bedroom up stairs we found these on the window ledge and on the bed
Can you tell me what these are
Signature: Seth

Termite Wings

Termite Wings

Dear Seth,
You have submitted excellent documentation of a Termite Swarm.  When conditions are right, virgin Alates, the reproductive caste in a Termite colony, take to the air and swarm.  They mate, shed their wings and start new colonies.  The shed wings are definitely Termite Wings and the two insects are Termite Alates that have shed their wings.  We feel confident that your summer home is infested with Termites.

Termite Alates after shedding wings

Termite Alates after shedding wings

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Satan’s spawn
Location: Northern Maine
May 29, 2016 6:34 pm
Any idea what this could be? Was in northern Maine near The Forks and river. Quite a few around. Bleeeeeech!
Signature: Nanci “I’m not touching that” Sullivan

Hellgrammite

Hellgrammite

Dear Nanci,
This is the larva of a Dobsonfly, and we are very amused at your subject line because Dobsonfly Larvae are known as Hellgrammites, and we have never to our satisfaction been able to determine the etymology of that name, which might actually mean “Satan’s Spawn.”  Though they are not considered dangerous, Hellgrammites can deliver a painful pinch that might even draw blood in some instances.  Hellgrammites are a prized bait for freshwater fishermen.

Subject: What kind of roach is this?
Location: Southern Louisiana
May 30, 2016 2:26 am
Usually I see flying cockroaches or the wingless females, this one I’ve never come across. It’s darker in color with shorter legs and antennae. I never kill anything I find indoors, but I like to observe them before setting them free outside.
I was just curious since this one isn’t the usual kind I find.
Thanks!
Signature: #buglivesmatter

Female Sand Cockroach

Probably Immature Surinam Cockroach

Dear #buglivesmatter,
At first we thought that this was a flightless female Sand Cockroach in the genus
Arenivaga, and though BugGuide does not list any species in Louisiana, that just means no one in Louisiana has submitted any images to the site.  There are several species listed in nearby Texas, including the Boll’s Sandroach, which is pictured here on BugGuide.  The more we looked at your individual, the more we began to doubt that it was a Sand Cockroach.  We now believe, based on this BugGuide image, that it is an immature Surinam Cockroach, Pycnoscelus surinamensis, a species that according to BugGuide has “Nymphs look similar to the Oriental cockroach but can be easily distinguished by the rough appearence of the posterior abdomen.”  It is difficult to make out that detail in your image, so we would not rule out that it might be an immature Oriental Cockroach.  Of the Surinam Cockroach, BugGuide notes:  “Reproduces through parthenogenesis in the US, where no males are found. It has two sexes in some parts of the world (Europe and Indo-Malaysia), though. Unlike many roaches, the egg capsule is retained inside the female’s abdomen until young are ready to emerge.”

Subject: It has 2 centimeter black things on its head and wings
Location: Clinton, CT
May 29, 2016 5:29 pm
Dear bugman please let me know what this bug is
Signature: Ross

Male Spring Fishfly

Male Spring Fishfly

Dear Ross,
This is a male Spring Fishfly, Chauliodes rastricornis, and according to BugGuide:  “The comb-like, (pectinate) antennae of the males are quite obvious” while “The antennae of females are serrate (saw-like).”  BugGuide also notes:  “Adults typically fly late spring: March?-May (North Carolina), April-May (West Virginia). Seen into early June in New England (Massachusetts–guide photo). Further south, much of year (Florida).”  This individual seems right on time for your part of New England.