Subject: Panogena lingens found by Ilija Klejmjonov in Madagascar
Location: Madagascar, by Ilija Klejmjonov
July 8, 2014 4:01 pm
Dear Bugman,
As to our Coelonia fulvinotata… A confusion led to a spectacular new finding! When looking for some pictures of Coelonia fulvinotata, which were often found and commented within this nice site, as a model for a drawing, on the web, I accidentally found a slightly different caterpillar, guiding me to the blogsite of Ilija Klejmjonov, http://adderley.livejournal.com/150820.html?mode=reply#add_comment; as he breeded it at home and documented its metamorphosis with the pictures of the pupa and the moth, the emerged moth is obviously a Panogena lingens, and not the supposed Coelonia fulvinotata (to which one can be led by some confusing drawing of the moth, resembling to both species – but without this confusion I would never have found this caterpillar). Thus we have the first insight of the larval stages of a Panogena species, which were not yet known. Ilija Klejmjonov has found this caterpillar on a potted plant of Duranta erecta (Verbenaceae), a non native plant in Madagascar, it was difficult to assign, as imported ornamental plant originating from the southern new world. The documented pupa shows some similarity with those from the genus Lintneria. The revealment of an African (and Madagascan) secret… (Nothing own to attach except a picture of a tentative design by coloured pencils)
Nicest wishes,
Bostjan Dvorak
Signature: Bostjan Dvorak

Panogena lingens

Panogena lingens

Dear Bostjan,
We are sorry for the lengthy delay in responding.  Thanks so much for providing us with your wonderful drawing documenting the stages of life for
Panogena lingens of Madagascar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in becket ma
Location: Becket Ma
July 22, 2014 8:54 pm
This bug landed on my door screen in late June . It stayed for two days. It was about four inches tall. I have summered in the Berkshires for thirty years and never seen a bug so big. I did not kill it . I must have flown off on the second night.
Signature: Barbara French

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

Dear Barbara,
The mandibles and large size of a male Dobsonfly are the stuff of nightmares for folks who are afraid of bugs, but despite the fierce appearance, male Dobsonflies are perfectly harmless.  Female Dobsonflies, though their mandibles are considerably smaller, pose a greater threat of biting, and though the bite might be painful and possibly even draw blood, they are not venomous.

Subject: Huge Beetle Found! Invasive or Not?
Location: Eastern United States, DE
July 22, 2014 11:06 pm
Hello! I’ve got a bug on my hands – well, in a jar – and I don’t know what to do with it.
I have lived in this area for 20+ years and am an avid outdoorswoman. This critter was trying to get into my house through the window screen, and I’d like some expert help figuring out just what it is. Because I’ve never, ever seen it before.
This beetle is large, nearly two inches long, with a slender body about half an inch wide. It’s a rusty reddish brown color, with black mandibles and antennae about an inch long. There are no discernible markings.
I’ve confirmed that it is not a cockroach of any variety, and if it didn’t have terrifying looking mandibles I’d be picking it up to take better photos.
I’d like to know if it’s a type of boring beetle or not, so I can know if it’s invasive or not. I’ve never seen it before and it’s rather concerning to see something this…enormous on my window trying to nibble the screen.
Any info pointing me in the right direction would be awesome. :)
Signature: ~ Kat of the Coast

Brown Prionid

Brown Prionid

Dear Kat of the Coast,
Root Borers in the family Prioninae are quite impressive beetles and there are several native species found in Delaware, even if they have managed to avoid detection by you in the past.  This is a Brown Prionid,
Orthosoma brunneum, and you are wise to avoid its mandibles.  The grubs of Root Borers live feeding on wood for several years and the mandibles of the adults need to be strong enough to chew their way to the surface once metamorphosis is complete.  We suspect this individual was attracted to light, and that is why you discovered it on your screen.  See BugGuide for additional information on the Brown Prionid.  We would urge you to release your captive Brown Prionid.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this thing?
Location: Little Rock, AR
July 22, 2014 7:19 am
I found this in my back yard on a hollyhock while taking macro shots of bugs, and no one I know seems to know what it is. Legs of a cricket, body of a fly, wings of a wasp, head (and even mouth part) of any number of true bugs…we’re stumped.
Thanks so much! :)
Sincerely,
L.J.
Signature: L.J.

Scentless Plant Bug:  Niesthrea louisianica

Scentless Plant Bug: Niesthrea louisianica

Dear L.J.,
This is probably the finest image we have ever received of the Scentless Plant Bug,
Niesthrea louisianica, which does not have a common name.  According to BugGuide, it:  “Feeds on flower buds and seeds of plants in the Mallow family (Malvaceae), such as Hibiscus and Rose of Sharon.”

Subject: WTB
Location: Seattle wa
July 20, 2014 7:13 pm
found this in my backyard. there as only one that i have ever seen
Signature: Rae Ann

Horntail:  Urocerus albicornis

Horntail: Urocerus albicornis

Hi Rae Ann,
We are positively thrilled to be able to post your magnificent image of a very impressive Horntail,
Urocerus albicornis, a species with a range limited to the Pacific Northwest.  Horntails are classified in the order Hymenoptera which includes Ants, Bees and Wasps, but Horntails, which are frequently called Woodwasps, cannot sting.  The female uses her impressive ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the surface of trees or stumps, and the wood boring larvae feed on the wood.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include fir, larch, spruce, pine, Douglas-fir, hemlock, and western red cedar.”  Of the family, BugGuide notes:  “Some are serious pests of trees and spread as larvae with lumber trade.”

Subject: Strange wasp? Cape Cod
Location: Cape Cod, MA
July 21, 2014 5:56 am
My niece was in Cape Cod last year and couldn’t identify what this (wasp?) is. I’ve never seen anything like it. She asked several scientists that were there too and they couldn’t either. I don’t know if any were entomologists. It was just hanging out on a picnic table I believe.
Signature: Joe

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Hi Joe,
We sincerely doubt that any of the scientists were entomologists, because even those that specialize in other insect orders should recognize a Giant Ichneumon or Stump Stabber in the genus
Megarhyssa.  Despite the formidable looking ovipositor, Giant Ichneumons are not aggressive and they are not capable of stinging humans.  With that stated, the ovipositor is used by the female to lay eggs beneath the surface of dead and dying trees and stumps that contain the wood boring larvae of Horntails and Woodwasps, so it might be possible for the ovipositor to pierce human skin, though we think it is highly unlikely for a Stump Stabber to mistake a human limb for an infested tree.  Several members of the genus look very similar, so we are reluctant to attempt a species identification.  Another distinctive member of the genus, Megarhyssa atrata, is our featured Bug of the Month for July 2014.