Ed. Note:  We get annoyed when people submit images pilfered from the internet, claiming to be the authors of those images.  Eric Eaton provided the following explanation:
Daniel:
This is a still from a video I have seen circulating recently on Facebook (but of course cannot find right now).  Yes, it is definitely a tailless whip scorpion (amblypygid), probably a species that lives in caves given the ultra-long appendages.
Also definitely NOT from Maryland.
Eric

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Maryland
February 7, 2016 11:54 am
I recently saw this bug and I was wondering what it was!
Signature: Creepybuggirl

What's That Arachnid???

What’s That Arachnid???

Dear Creepybuggirl,
Please provide us additional information on exactly where and when this Arachnid was sighted.  The image was obviously taken indoors, but we are having a difficult time believing it is native to Maryland.  There is not much detail in your image, and we cannot even say for certain to which order it belongs as it seems to have traits of both Harvestmen in the order Opiliones and Tailless Whipscorpions in the order Amblypygi.  Tailless Whipscorpions are only reported from Arizona, Texas and Florida, and this individual does not look like any native species depicted on BugGuide.
  While Harvestmen are found throughout North America, we have never seen any images on BugGuide that look like this individual.  It is difficult to tell from your image if the appendages that appear to end in claws are the first pair, known as pedipalps, but that is what we surmise.  So, we know it is an Arachnid, and we do not believe it is native.  Are you able to provide any additional images from different angles?  We have contacted Eric Eaton to get his opinion. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: brown spider!
Location: malibu, california
February 6, 2016 12:30 am
hi! we found this cool spider on the street between dunes/beach in malibu, california. tried googling and couldn’t figure out what it was
Signature: Thanks so much! Erica

Trapdoor Spider

Southern Coastal Dune Trapdoor Spider

Dear Erica,
We immediately recognized your spider as a Trapdoor Spider, but we are very excited as we believe we have correctly identified it as a Southern Coastal Dune Trapdoor Spider,
Aptostichus simus, based on this BugGuide image.  All indications are that this species is endemic to coastal dunes in Southern California.  According to an online article we located:  “The tradpoor spider Aptostichus simus inhabits coastal dunes of southern California and the California Channel Islands (Ramirez 1995).  It lives in burrows concentrated in and about stands of native dune vegetation and extending into the dunes amid litter and the root systems of the plants.”

 

Subject: What’s That Bug! — Super Small Edition
Location: Bay Area, California
February 5, 2016 4:49 pm
Dear Bugman,
Hello! Thanks for all your passion of the field you share online. Thought I’d add one to the mix for fun.
We’ve been seeing two or three of these very small insects on our bathroom counter every day (second floor). Our apartment is surrounded by gardens, and within reasonable proximity to water.
I’ve seen the bugs jump quick magnificently, but I don’t think they can fly. For reference, my pointer finger is in the shot (30 year-old male). So yes, they’re small. Any guesses?
Thanks for your time!
Signature: R

Springtail

Springtail

Dear R,
This is an Elongate Bodied Springtail in the order Entomobryomorpha and probably the family Entomobryidae, the Slender Springtails.  You can see some similar images on BugGuide.  Springtails are considered benign creatures, though when they are plentiful, they may pose a nuisance, especially indoors.

Springtail

Springtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar found in Penang Butterfly Farm
Location: Penang, Malaysia
February 6, 2016 4:20 am
Hello, I took this picture in 2011 at Penang Butterfly Farm, Malaysia, early February. I would be ever so grateful if you could identify it. I’ve been searching online and can’t find one that looks like it.
Kind regards,
Signature: Aeve Pomeroy

Caterpillars

Leopard Lacewing Caterpillars

Dear Aeve,
We found your species of caterpillar, also taken at the Penang Butterfly Farm, pictured on the Tennyson Lee blog, but alas, it is not identified.  Onewayticketmsia also has an unidentified image from the Penang Butterfly Farm.  We eventually found the entire life cycle of the Leopard Lacewing,
Cethosia cyane, pictured on the Butterflies of Singapore site, and we are satisfied that is a correct identification.  According to the site:  “The local host plant adopted by Leopard Lacewing as it spread quickly across the island is Passiflora foetida, a member of the Passifloraceae family commonly found in wastelands. In captive setting, the Leopard Lacewing has also been breed succesfully on another plant in the same family, Adenia macrophylla var. singaporeana, a plant which only occurs naturally within the catchment reserves. This might account for the sightings of Leopard Lacewing in some areas of the nature reserves.  The caterpillars of the Leopard Lacwing feed on the leaves, young shoots and outer surface of older stems of the host plant. The Leopard Lacewing caterpillars are gregarious throughout all five instars, often eating (leaves and stems), resting and moulting together in groups.”  According to Butterfly Circle:  “the larvae and adult butterflies display a distinct warning coloration that advertises their unpalatable nature to potential predators. When handled, they often exude a noxious odor generated from the ingested passion vine organic compounds.”

Dear Daniel,
That’s wonderful you have found it! Thank you so much for taking time to do this, and for the information given.
You are welcome to keep the photo and use freely if it is useful for your website, or anything else. I also have a photo of the adult Leopard Lacewing if that might be useful too.
Have a great weekend,
Aeve

 

Subject: What is the common name for this Katydid?
Location: Monteverde, Costa Rica
February 6, 2016 12:36 am
Hello! I took a picture of this katydid at our lodge in Monteverde Costa Rica. I can’t seem to figure out what the common name of it would be. Could you help please?
Thank you!
Signature: Lise

Katydid

Katydid: Scopiorinus sp.

Katydid

Katydid: Scopiorinus sp.

Subject: Another katydid from Costa Rica
Location: Monteverde, Costa Rica
February 6, 2016 12:43 am
Hello again, I have another katydid that I can’t identify. I took a picture of this one at Cala Lodge in Costa Rica. I think it may be a bush katydid but, not sure. Can you help please?
Thank you!
Signature: Lise

Katydid

Katydid: Lamprophyllum sp. (most likely L. bugabae)

Hi again Lise,
We have combined your other requests into a single Katydid posting and we will contact Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can identify all your Katydids.

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
Yes, the big, mossy katydid is Haemodiasma tessellata. The smaller one with a sickle-shaped ovipositor is Scopiorinus sp. (impossible to ID to species based on the photos), whereas the bigger green one is a female of Lamprophyllum sp. (most likely L. bugabae).
Cheers,
Piotr

Subject: Big grasshopper!!
Location: Monteverde, Costa Rica
February 5, 2016 11:24 pm
Hello Mr. Bugman!
I am so happy to have found your website. I am often curious as to what kind of bug I’ve found and now there is a resource! I have here a picture I took at Cala Lodge in Monteverde, Costa Rica last month. This huge grasshopper looked like he would camouflage very well in a tree. Helooked like he had a piece of leaf sticking out of his neck. Can you tell me what kind of grasshopper this is?
Thanking you in advance for your time,
Signature: Lise

Moss Mimic Katydid

Moss Mimic Katydid

Dear Lise,
This is NOT a Grasshopper.  It is a Katydid.  We believe it is a Moss Mimic Katydid,
Haemodiasma tessellata, a highland species that is already pictured on our site, or a closely related species in the same genus.  We noticed you have three additional identification requests, all titled as Katydids.  We did not look at the images yet.  If they are in fact all Katydids, we will attempt to get Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to verify our identifications when they are all posted.

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
Yes, the big, mossy katydid is Haemodiasma tessellata.
Cheers,
Piotr

That’s excellent!  Thank you for taking the time to look into this photo.  A moss mimic katydid.  How cool is that!?  :)  I can’t wait to go back to Costa Rica.  I plan to pay way more attention to the insects there next time.  So different from what we have here in northern Canada.
Thanks again,
Lise