Subject: Identification help please!
Location: Raymond NH
July 23, 2016 6:58 am
Hi, I was in my yard last night and this interesting beetle landed beside me.
I was wondering if you might have an idea as to who my visitor was!
Signature: Courtney

Maple Sugar Borer

Sugar Maple Borer

Dear Courtney,
Along with its relative the Banded Alder Borer, we find the Sugar Maple Borer,
Glycobius speciosus, to be one of North America’s most beautiful native beetles.  BugGuide notes:  “Larvae mine under bark of living Sugar Maple, Acer saccharum” and that the species is “rare” which probably explains the scarcity of submissions of this gorgeous beetle to our site.  According to the USDA Forest Service Northeastern Area site:  “The sugar maple borer, Glycobius speciosus (Say), a long-horned wood boring beetle, is a common pest of sugar maple (the only known host) throughout the range of the tree. Although borer-caused mortality is rare, infestations lead to value loss through lumber defect caused by larval galleries, discoloration, decay, and twisted grain.”  According to the Cornell Sugar Maple Research& Extension Program:  “Damage by the sugar maple borer (Glycobius speciosus) varies among forest types and stands within a type. Infestation rates, the proportion of damages stems per acre or hectare, range from less than 5 to nearly 50 percent. Sugar maples in all stands are susceptible, but the incidence of damage is highest in stands with high proportion of sugar maple. Rarely does sugar maple borer kill a tree, but it directly affects the main part of the stem, sometimes reducing the available space for tapping. Borer attack is most prevalent on trees of low vigor.”  While this is just our opinion, in reading that information and the information contained in the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation pdf, we conclude that because the Sugar Maple Borer is rare, it is not a threat to the general population of Sugar Maple trees, but that the beetle does take advantage of already stressed trees, and in doing so, the general health of the Sugar Maple population is ensured.

Thank you so much for your reply! I love your site and use it all the time when I have a new bug friend in my life.
Again, thank you for your continued services!
– Courtney

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown beetle
Location: Pierrefonds, Quebec, Canada
July 22, 2016 2:15 pm
This beetle (and many others like it) have shown up in my uncle’s pool in Pierrefonds, Quebec, Canada. Any help identifying it would be appreciated. :)
Signature: Jeff Robinson

Japanese Beetle

Japanese Beetle

Dear Jeff,
This is an invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle and we have already made a posting this year commemorating the 100 Year Anniversary of its accidental introduction. Most home gardeners in eastern North American are very familiar with Japanese Beetles, dreading their yearly appearance when they feed upon the leaves and blossoms of roses, fruit trees and many other cultivated trees, shrubs and flowers. 

Subject: freak bug
Location: Berkeley Springs, WV
July 22, 2016 4:43 pm
Spotted this guy on a hike in West Virginia… can’t tell if it’s a beetle or maybe something emerging from casing…. help?
Signature: DJ

Two Lined Spittlebug

Two Lined Spittlebug

Dear DJ,
This Two Lined Spittlebug,
Prosapia bicincta, is a free living Hemipteran, not a Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bullet Ant
Location: La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica
July 23, 2016 12:14 am
Hi Bugman,
Thank you so much for your speedy identification of my robber fly. I had a feeling I wouldn’t be able to get a species ID (especially without the specimen itself and with only one photo) but it’s great knowing the order. Here is the bullet ant (Paraponera clavata) photo I mentioned before, also taken with my Canon macro lens. It was a difficult shot to get as these ants are constantly on the move. I am also submitting (separately) photos of a Weevil found in Monteverde and what I suspect to be a caterpillar in the genus Eumorpha.
Signature: Casey

Bullet Ant

Bullet Ant

Dear Casey,
We have one image of a Bullet Ant from Ecuador in our archive, and at that time we did some research to learn more about
Paraponera clavata.  Your backlit image is really beautiful. 

Subject: Cedar beetle ?
Location: New Hampshire
July 22, 2016 7:54 pm
Hello the misses and I have found a few of these around our porch and light lately and was wondering if you know what kind it is.
Signature: Rob

Variegated June Beetle

Variegated June Beetle

Dear Rob,
Though the antennae are very similar to a Cedar Beetle, we believe this is actually a Variegated June Beetle,
Polyphylla variolosa, and you are correct that they are attracted to lights.

Subject: Household insect with strange thick parts of legs
Location: New Jersey
July 22, 2016 11:21 pm
Hello,
I have seen these insects twice in my apartment in suburbia lately. One much smaller than this, about a centimeter long, and then this one, which was about 3 centimeters in length.
Sorry the photo is slightly blurry, but I hope you can see the shape. I know it’s not a roach, the back isn’t the right shape. I don’t think it’s a beetle. I am perplexed outside of that though: it has these thickenings near its joints in its legs that remind me of bees, and a head that reminds me of that, too, but it doesn’t have the hemiptera waist. My best guess is a true bug, but that’s pretty vague!
I tried to grab it so I could look at its mouth parts, but it intelligently moved away.
Signature: Sylvia

Long Necked Seed Bug

Long Necked Seed Bug

Dear Sylvia,
This is a Long Necked Seed Bug,
Myodocha serripes, a species that according to BugGuide:  “overwinters in woodlands, migrating to fields in spring/summer; adults attracted to lights” and “Sometimes a pest of strawberries.”  We love your dedication to learning its identity, including trying to see its mouth parts.