Subject: Red admiral proboscis
Location: Troy, VA
June 24, 2016 10:25 am
I know that the red admiral is not a rare butterfly, but I thought I would submit this picture because you can see his proboscis fairly clearly and really, his antennae are lovely.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Red Admiral Puddling

Red Admiral Puddling

Dear Grace,
Rarity is not a criterion for posting to our site.  Actually, if the truth be made known, the Red Admiral is one of our favorite butterflies.  Perhaps it is because they and Mourning Cloaks are so long lived that they seem to have so much more personality than other butterflies.  Famed author and amateur lepidopterist Vladimir Nabokov playfully referred to the Red Admiral as the Red Admirable.  Your individual appears to be puddling, taking moisture and also important minerals, from the mud.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red-Orange Bug Needs a Name
Location: Boca Raton, Florida
June 23, 2016 1:13 pm
Hello What’s That Bug!
Found a bunch of these little guys covering a tree at Yamato Scrub Natural Area in Boca Raton, Florida. The picture doesn’t do the bug justice – they are bright reddish-orange – really stand out in the woods! I’m not sure if this is a juvenile form or an adult form. I’m hoping you can give me a proper identification. As always, I enjoy your web site and appreciate the service you provide to us amateur naturalists!
Signature: Ann Mathews

Giant Milkweed Bug Nymph

Giant Milkweed Bug Nymph

Dear Ann,
This is an immature True Bug, and nymphs can often be very difficult to properly identify.  Most guide books only contain images of adult insects.  This Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae is
Sephina gundlachii, also known as the Giant Milkweed Bug (not to be confused with the Large Milkweed Bug or the Small Milkweed Bug) and we identified it thanks to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it feeds on climbing milkweed.  Only reported from Florida on BugGuide, this is only the second report we have received.  Perhaps you will be able to send us a nice image of a winged adult in the future.

Subject: Possible Silkworm or Hornworm?
Location: Marquette, MI
June 23, 2016 5:03 pm
I had come across a very plump caterpillar when letting my dogs outside. It was on a beach tree, and looked to be in the process of forming a chrysalis, as it was hanging upside-down. It was/ is approximately between 1- 2 long, and is green. It’s face is also green, and has: a continuous white stripe on each side of its body; yellow dashes on it’s back; and three prominent yellow dashed lines going down it’s back. It does have a tail, and has an end that looks similar to a tail-less Silkworm and/ or Hornworm. Overall, this Caterpillar seems to have a build similar to a Silkworm and Hornworm.
I live in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, which mostly consists of rain forests, and is surrounded by Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, and Lake Huron. Because of these factors, we get a lot of bugs
Signature: – Sam

Humped Green Fruitworm

Humped Green Fruitworm

Dear Sam,
This is neither a Silkworm nor a Hornworm.  This is a Humped Green Fruitworm, the larva of the Copper Underwing,
Amphipyra pyramidoides.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Maine Moth?
Location: Houlton, ME
June 24, 2016 8:57 am
These little creatures never sit still. I was lucky yesterday with a zoom lens.
Signature: Mike from Maine

White Spotted Sable

White Spotted Sable

Dear Mike from Maine,
At first glance we thought this was an Eight Spotted Forrester, but we quickly realized there were subtle differences.  Your moth is a White Spotted Sable,
Anania funebris, and according to BugGuide it is:  “Often mistaken for an Eight-spotted Forester (Alypia octomaculata), which is considerably larger [no overlap in wingspan], has a total of only 8 spots on the wings, and has a prominent tuft of orange hair-like scales on its legs – the ‘leg warmers’ that Hannah refers to in her image of an Eight-spotted Forester.”  Of the White Spotted Sable, BugGuide notes:  “Habitat fields, open areas; adults often visit flowers during the day Season adults fly from May to July Food larvae feed on goldenrod (Solidago spp.) and Dyer’s Greenweed (Genista tinctoria).” 

Subject: What is this bug
Location: LA-lower AL
June 24, 2016 7:07 am
What is this bug on my plants.
Signature: Helen

Milkweed Assassin Bug

Milkweed Assassin Bug

Dear Helen,
This is a beneficial, predatory Milkweed Assassin Bug, and it will help keep your plants free of phytophagous species.  We would urge you not to try to handle Milkweed Assassin Bugs as they are prone to biting if they feel threatened, though the bite is not dangerous and will produce little more than local swelling and irritation.

Subject: Phileurus truncatus?
Location: Near Orlando, FL
June 24, 2016 8:00 am
I found this beetle outside a hotel room in central Florida. I looked it up (here, actually) and came to the Phileurus truncatus page after a bit of digging. But I just wanted to confirm whether this was in fact a specimen of Phileurus.
Signature: Jacob S.

Triceratops Beetle

Triceratops Beetle

Dear Jacob,
Congratulations on correctly identifying your Triceratops Beetle,
Phileurus truncatus, which we feel is an exact match to this BugGuide image.  It is described on BugGuide as being:  “Black, distinctly flattened, both sexes with three prominent horns on head. Elytra deeply striated. …  Both genders have horns. This is unusual among horned scarabs.”