Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Honaunau Hawaii
Date: 01/17/2018
Time: 07:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Do you know what this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Sharon

Pink Spotted Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Sharon,
This Hornworm is a Pink Spotted Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Agrius cingulata, and you can find similar images on the Sphingidae of Hawaii page.

Pink Spotted Hawkmoth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cricket or Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Azerbaijan
Date: 01/17/2018
Time: 12:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I’m not sure if this is a grasshopper or a cricket let alone its species.  Also is it a female as it has an enlarged ovipositor? If anyone can help me with the species and sex (if possible) I would be ever so grateful
How you want your letter signed:  AM

Shieldback Katydid

Dear AM,
This is some species of Shieldback Katydid in the subfamily Tettigoniinae and it appears to have several red Mites on it.  You are correct that it is a female.

Oh wow thank you very much for such a fast reply and pointing out the mites, we weren’t sure what they were! I didn’t realise Katydids had wings? Out of interest how can you tell the difference between a cricket and katydid? Do you think it would be eating one of it’s own species, do you know in what situation they turn to cannibalism?

Many thanks,
Alice Marlow

Subject:  Worm
Geographic location of the bug:  USA, Wisconsin
Date: 01/18/2018
Time: 11:31 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  During a bowel movement  two Identical (things) were passed. They look to have come open as you can see the insides.  I searched here last month after I found similar photos of the sesame seeds around my bed and house.  Thank you for your time. Sincerely,  Drophammer77
How you want your letter signed:  Drophammer77

Thing passed in bowel movement

Dear Drophammer77,
We do not recognize what you passed during your bowel movement.  We are not qualified to give medical diagnoses.  If you suspect you have internal parasites, you should seek the advice of a medical professional.

Things passed in bowel movement

Thing passed in bowel movement

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cavite, Philippines
Date: 01/18/2018
Time: 10:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this spider dangerous?
How you want your letter signed:  Perry

Huntsman Spider

Dear Perry,
This is a male Huntsman Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has expanded its range greatly due to the cultivation and shipment of bananas, hence the common name Banana Spider.  Your individual is missing two of its legs.  This species of Huntsman Spider is considered harmless to humans.  The are nocturnal hunters that are tolerated indoors in many tropical countries because they feed on Cockroaches.

Subject:  South Africa Preying Mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  South Africa, Kruger National Park
Date: 01/17/2018
Time: 05:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I saw this preying mantis a week ago (therefore in early January) near the Satara Camp in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. I have been trying to identify the majestic bug, but wasn’t able to. I would really appreciate your help.
How you want your letter signed:  Thomas

Mantid

Dear Thomas,
While we cannot provide you with an exact species at this time, we can tell you that the small wing pads indicate this is either an immature individual or a flightless species of Mantid.

Subject:  Cruise ship moth
Geographic location of the bug:  At sea near Cozumel, Mexico
Date: 01/13/2018
Time: 10:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was on a week long cruise that left Cape Canaveral, Florida traveling to Haiti, Jamaica, and Cozumel. It was our last day at sea and we were heading back towards Florida. We found this moth clinging to the top deck of the ship because it was a very windy day. We coaxed it into a cup and transported it to a lower level open atrium that had many live plants. We figured it could fly away when we got to port or stay and go on another vacation. What type of moth is this?  Was it originally from Florida taking a holiday or a new passenger from one of our destinations?
How you want your letter signed:  Brian Norton

Fig Sphinx

Dear Brian,
This is a Fig Sphinx, and it might have stowed away in Florida, or come aboard in Mexico or the Caribbean, or even because Sphinx Moths are such strong fliers, been picked up at sea.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas, the Fig Sphinx is found in South America to Argentina as well as ” through Central America: Panama to Mexico: Quintana Roo (BT) probalby [sic] throughout Mexico, and the West Indies to Florida, southern Texas, and southern Arizona.  It occasionally strays as far north as Indiana and Pennsylvania.”

 

Fig Sphinx