Subject: Mystery eggs
Location: Alton, Illinois, USA
May 28, 2017 1:12 pm
I was wandering around my yard with my tortoise when I discovered a tiny dying leaf with tiny eggs on it. I am totally clueless and need help identifying!
Signature: Sarah D

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Eggs

Dear Sarah,
We are quite certain these are Stink Bug eggs, and after comparing them to this BugGuide image, we are fairly certain they are Brown Marmorated Stink Bug,
Halymorpha halys, eggs.  The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an Invasive Exotic Species and according to BugGuide:  “Native to E. Asia, adventive elsewhere(2); in our area, mostly e US and West Coast states.”  First collected in Pennsylvania in 1998, in just a few years, this noxious species has spread from coast to coast according to BugGuide data.  In addition to doing major agricultural damage, according to BugGuide:  “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to fruiting structures,” the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is a source of consternation to homemakers because they frequently enter homes in large numbers to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug??
Location: Coeur d alene idaho
May 28, 2017 10:33 am
My tree out front has these bug eggs all around the outside of it. The leaves are turning black and seems to be leaving the sidewalk underneath it sticky. I think they might be ladybugs? What are they and how do I save my tree?
Signature: Concerned citizen

Hemipterans

Dear Concerned Citizen,
We are unable to provide you with a species identification, but we can tell you that these are not eggs.  They are plant feeding insects in the order Hemiptera, and all Hemipterans, a group that includes Scale Insects and Aphids, have mouths designed to pierce and suck fluids, which is why your tree is ailing.  Also, many Hemipterans secrete honeydew, which is why the sidewalk is sticky.  Are you able to identify the tree?  Knowing the plant host is often a tremendous asset when trying to identify insects.

Hemipterans

Subject: WTB ?
Location: N.E. Alabama
May 28, 2017 10:03 am
My daughter n law was bit by what she described as a flying ant outside. Later the next day I found this in the floor of my laundry room thinking it mite have been what bit her.
Signature: Dmeado

Carpenter Ant Alate

Dear Dmeado,
Earlier today we posted an image from North Carolina of what we believe to be a male Carpenter Ant alate, the winged reproductive form that swarms when weather conditions are right.  We believe your image is that of a female Carpenter Ant alate, possibly
Camponotus castaneus, based on this BugGuide image.  We believe the best way to distinguish the males from the females is the shape of the head and the longer antennae on the males as he uses his antennae to help locate a female.  BugGuide notes:  “Alates noted May-June (Mississippi) and September (Mississippi, North Carolina)” so your swarm seems quite on schedule.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Cornwall
May 28, 2017 7:02 am
Hi I found this bug on my trampoline never seen one before was wondering what it is
Signature: joanne woolley

Billy Witch

Dear Joanne,
This is a Billy Witch or Cockchafer, a native Scarab Beetle in England.

Subject: Wolf spider?
Location: Vermont
May 27, 2017 7:46 pm
We see spiders here all the time in the woods of Northern New England. I am guessing this is a wolf spider that looks like it was successful in getting supper. He was on our screen door outside. Curious if I am correct and thought it would make a cool picture. He is not camera shy or timid.
Signature: Jim

Nursery Web Spider

Dear Jim,
This is the second image of a Nursery Web Spider,
Pisaurina mira, we are posting today.  Nursery Web Spiders do not build a web to snare prey.  They hunt without webs.  The female constructs a web to act as a nursery for her spiderlings once she locates an appropriate location to house the egg case she carries with her.

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: North Carolina
May 28, 2017 10:46 am
They seem to have showed up out of no where and there are a lot of them sitting somewhat peacefully all around and all over the outside of our home.
Signature: Thanks Joe.

Carpenter Ant Alate

Dear Joe,
This looks to us like a male Carpenter Ant alate, the winged reproductive form that swarms when conditions are right, often a warm sunny day after a good rain.  It might be a
Camponotus castaneus based on this BugGuide image, a species BugGuide calls the Reddish Carpenter Ant and states:  “Nests in rotting logs, soil under rocks, etc., or even in exposed soil.”

Carpenter Ant Alate

Thank you so much. The photo and identified conditions are consistent with what I see.