Subject:  Unknown Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Wilmington, Delaware
Date: 09/19/2018
Time: 11:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  When recharging my electric vehicle, I found a swarm of these insects on the handle of the charging station.  They appear some sort of ant and as it started to rain, they grouped together into a tight formation.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in Delaware

Probably Leaf Footed Bug Hatchlings

Dear Curious in Delaware,
These are hatchling True Bugs and we suspect they are in the Leaf Footed Bug family Coreidae.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Nova Scotia , Canada
Date: 09/19/2018
Time: 09:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My dad snapped a pic if a beetle. I’m trying to figure out the name of it.
How you want your letter signed:  Scott

Sugar Maple Borer

Dear Scott,
This beautiful beetle is a Sugar Maple Borer and they are not very common.

Subject:  Locust Borer
Geographic location of the bug:  Benton Harbor, MI
Date: 09/18/2018
Time: 05:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I know you already have a lot of locust borer pictures, but thought, since your description in one of the pictures starts with “Adult Locust Borers are often found on goldenrod in the autumn”, you would like to see this shot of one sitting in the goldenrod we spotted while we were out walking the dogs….
How you want your letter signed:  pat

Locust Borer

Dear Pat,
We love your image of a Locust Borer on goldenrod and we are thrilled to post it, especially as we just posted another image of a Locust Borer from Washington state, not part of its native range, an expansion made possible because of the cultivation of black locust trees for landscaping and other reasons.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  black/green striped beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Walla Walla, WA
Date: 09/18/2018
Time: 09:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, we found this inch-long beetle on a lemongrass plant in our yard.  It’s not in any of our guidebooks.  What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Beetle-befuddled

Locust Borer

Dear Beetle-befuddled,
This is a Locust Borer, and if your guidebooks are Pacific Northwest local, and not published very recently, they probably don’t include this distinctive beetle because it has recently expanded its range of eastern North America because of the cultivation of its host tree, the black locust.  According to BugGuide:  “Previously confined to the native range of Black Locust in the northeast, it has spread with the trees throughout the US and parts of Canada. Black Locust is used for reclamation and similar projects where trees are likely to be stressed and thus more vulnerable to damage.”

Subject:  Cute picture
Geographic location of the bug:  westchester county new york
Date: 09/17/2018
Time: 10:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve never seen this before and although I have extremely limited affection for slugs I had to take a picture
How you want your letter signed:  Don Erwin

Mating Slugs

Dear Don,
Your image of mating Slugs is quite stunning.  If you would like to read more about hermaphroditic mating Slugs, the Wildlife Kate blog has a nice posting that states:  “I returned a little later to see just one slug…. and no sign of the jelly, which I had presumed was some kind of slime in which the eggs were fertilised. I was wrong! On doing a little research, I discovered that this blob of jelly was in fact two slug penises, entwined! Slugs are hermaphrodite and they impregnate each other through this method and then retract their penises, laying eggs a couple of weeks later.”

Subject:  Red Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Denver Colorado
Date: 09/17/2018
Time: 05:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Any idea what kind of bug this is? I’m 99% sure it is a caterpillar, but can’t find a similar one online. It is definitely a creature of some sort, it moved when I tried to pick it up.
How you want your letter signed:  Robin

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Robin,
This is a third instar Pandorus Sphinx Caterpillar, and here is a matching image from BugGuide.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  “L3: At this stage, the larvae look quite different. The long straight horn now curves and looks strikingly similar to a
Parthenocissus quinquefolia tendril. The larvae can be yellowish, green, brownish or reddish with 5 white eyespots around the spiracles on the sides of the larvae.”  Your individual has not yet shed its caudal horn.

Correction:  Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar
Thanks to a correction from frequent WTB? contributor Bostjan Dvorak, we acknowledge our initial mistake.