Subject:  What’s That Bug?
Location:  Ventura, California
April 28, 2017
Dearest Bugman,
I live in Ventura, Ca a small coastal city about an hour north of LA. My home is on the hillside and I enjoy the small ecosystem in my neighborhood with a variety of birds (some of which sing morning and night), lizards, other critters I often do not encounter inside my home and a large variety of “bugs” of all types. I often have silverfish in my home and my practice is to acknowledge them and let them be, but I spotted this guy the other night on my kitchen floor and he looked a little different. I got down on the floor for an intimate photoshoot with this little fella, and also noticed that when I got close he would flutter small wings, but never really took flight. I snapped these shots with my iPhone and hopefully got enough details for you to determine just who my new friend is…  30 seconds after I switched off the kitchen light and sat down in the other room (with a view of the kitchen) I saw a mouse run across the very kitchen floor I had just been down and dirty on! Of course I screamed as this was my very first ever experience of any type of four legged animal in my domicile. I considered leaving for the evening and returning in daylight hours, but decided that it is my home and I will be a decent hostess even to the most unsavory of uninvited guests for a night or two. It took 3 nights and about 15 have a heart traps set in my kitchen by a professional, but the good news is it appears that there are no longer unwanted mammals in my home… which brings us back to the question at hand: have you seen this before?
Signature:  Melanie On the Irish Chain

Bristletail

Dear Melanie on the Irish Chain,
The Bristletail in your images is a primitive insect that was once classified with Silverfish and several other groups that have since been taxonomically divided, with Bristletails now being classified in the Order Microcoryphia.  BugGuide has some wonderfully detailed images of Bristletails.  Based on this BugGuide information on habitat:  “outdoor grassy or wooded environments: under bark, in leaf litter, rock crevices, or under stones; not normally found in homes, does not breed indoors, and not considered a pest” we would not classify this posting as a Household Pest, but considering your encounter with the rodent, we feel the tag is appropriate.

Bristletail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A beetle?
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
April 29, 2017 10:08 am
I found this bug in my bedroom and let it outside. It’s early spring, and it seemed to be the only one and didn’t have friends. I hope.
Signature: SJ

Larder Beetle

Dear SJ,
The Larder Beetle is a common household pest that will infest stored foods and other organic items in the home.

Subject: Looks like an Ant???
Location: Deatsville, Alabama
April 28, 2017 1:24 pm
Found these crawling around on tile by our sliding glass door. I looked at them under a jewelers loupe. The antennae appear “beaded” and it looks like one of them may have had wings. They kind of look like ants but they kind of don’t. We tried googling what these were but came up empty. My husband picked them up with a piece of scotch tape. Both pictures are the “same” but one you can see a little more clearly. I hope you can help.
Signature: Sandy

Termites

Dear Sandy,
You did not indicate if this was an indoor or an outdoor sighting.  If they were found on the tile inside the house, you might want to consult with an expert since these are Termites.  Termites often make themselves known when they swarm, and an indoor swarm will cause attention.  Swarming Termites are reproductive alates, winged fertile males and females that mate and shed their wings when starting a new colony.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Longhorns Beetle?
Location: Panhandle, Florida
April 29, 2017 8:48 am
This little critter came near me today. Before I removed myself from its environment, I snapped this picture. What has me stumped is the very pointy piece located opposite of its head. Stinger? A pregnant female? Not a beetle?
Signature: Living in the humid country south

Longicorn: Graphisurus fasciatus

You are correct that this is a Longhorned Borer Beetle or Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  We believe we have correctly identified it as Graphisurus fasciatus thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, larval hosts are: “numerous hardwoods, also pine.”  What you have mistaken for a stinger is actually an ovipositor, an organ a female insect uses to lay eggs.

Subject: what is going on with these wasps
Location: near houston
April 28, 2017 9:56 am
very odd. 4 wasps on top of each other. At first ii thought it was a multiple mating, but It appears that the bugs on top are dead. What is going here? what sort of wasp is this? is this normal? i’ve never seen this before.
Signature: jay in texas

Mud Dauber Mystery

Dear Jay,
We wish you had been able to provide better quality images.  While there is enough detail to determine that these are Black and Yellow Mud Daubers,
Sceliphron caementarium, and it appears they are “attached” to one another at the head like each was biting another at the “neck”, we cannot fathom what is going on or what happened.  It is interesting that you observed the the ones on top are dead.  Does that mean the ones on the bottom were alive?  It also appears that they are on a collapsible hose, which makes sense since Mud Daubers are often found near puddles that occur when watering or near swimming pools.  You may verify our identification by comparing your individuals to this BugGuide image.  Mud Daubers are solitary Wasps, and each female makes and provisions her own nest, so this “group activity” is quite puzzling.  We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he can provide a hypothesis on what is happening.

Update:  Supposed Mating Behavior
Thanks to Cesar Crash who provided comments with links to Shutterstock and BugGuide.

Subject: Unidentifiable bee?
Location: Southeast Michigan
April 28, 2017 10:30 am
Dear bugman,
I found this bug in my bedroom this morning. Cool looking! What is it?!
Signature: Julie Jones

Rodent Bot Fly

Dear Julie,
Though it is frequently mistaken for a Bee, this is actually a Rodent Bot Fly in the genus
Cuterebra.