Subject:  clear and brown bug
Geographic location of the bug:  bed, hair
Date: 02/23/2018
Time: 10:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  it bit me a lot and they keep coming out of my hair
How you want your letter signed:  jenna thibault

Human Louse

Dear Jenna,
This is a Human Louse.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Ohio
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this bug crawling on my leg.Im hoping this is not a bed bug.If u could please tell me I would greatly appreciate it.I have kids so I would like to know before they start to multiply.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Human Louse

This is a very detailed image of a Human Louse.

Subject:  Balloon spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sao Paulo, Brazil (-22.79381, -44.37906)
Date: 02/20/2018
Time: 10:14 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I found this beautiful spider in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on 2012, 02/19. I would appreciate an identification.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Luis

Orbweaver

Dear Luis,
This is a pretty Orbweaver in the family Araneidae.  Our initial internet search did not turn up any visual matches, and we went through the Insetologia archives in an attempt to identify this species, but unsuccessfully.

Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flies
Geographic location of the bug:  Cootamundra, NSW. Australia
Date: 02/20/2018
Time: 12:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Wanting to know what sort of fly this is? Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Graham

Horse Fly or Bee Fly???

Dear Graham,
Our initial thought is this must be a Horse Fly (called March Flies in Australia) from the family Tabanidae, but there are no similar looking images on the Brisbane Insects site.  The white edge on the compound eye is a trait found in several Bee Flies on the Brisbane Insect site that share that trait.  We are going to request assistance from our readership with this identification.

Subject:  Large Moth in Hanoi
Geographic location of the bug:  Hanoi, Vietnam
Date: 02/21/2018
Time: 08:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear bugman,
The moth in the uploaded image appeared
on the wall in our stairway this morning, 21 Feb 2018, in
Hanoi, Vietnam. I would like to know what it is. It is about
15cm from wingtip to wingtip as shown in the image. The
stairway is quite open and often lit through the night, so
it is easy for it to enter. It is winter here, just starting
to warm up to 20C after a colder period and quite humid with
occasional light rain.  Only last week I started
noticing butterflies again as the weather warmed.

Dear bugman,
A couple more photos of the same moth attached. I found it again on the floor by the wall when I returned in the evening. I thought it had died at first. I nudged it and saw it move so carefully eased it onto some card, with the intention of taking onto our balcony to give it an easier escape route and protect it from rats and people. I put some honey mixed with water onto the card in case that might help give it some energy. Then as I was trying to nudge it into something more sturdy to shelter it from the breeze, it took off.
Even if you can’t respond I hope you enjoy this beautiful moth.
Cheers
Paul

Mango Hawkmoth

Dear Paul,
Thanks for resending additional images.  We did not receive your first identification request which is very puzzling.  This is a Mango Hawkmoth,
Amplypterus panopus, and we identified it on the Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic site where it states:  “The moth is sluggish during the daytime and allows itself to be handled, but at night it flies strongly. It has never been seen feeding at flowers, nor does it seem to come readily to light, though Mell states that it has frequently been caught at light in Java. It emerges from the pupa after dark, and pairs after midnight when in captivity.”  There are also images on iNaturalist.

Dear Daniel and the folks at whatsthatbug.com,
Many thanks for your informative response. Keep up the good work.
Paul

Subject:  ID help please!
Geographic location of the bug:  North Eastern CT, USA
Date: 02/21/2018
Time: 08:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello!
Sorry that they are dead, I just found these guys in a cup of water in my backyard. Can you help me figure out what they are?
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in CT

Globular Springtails

Dear Curious in CT,
When we were renaming the digital image you sent, we realized that several years ago we posted another identification for Globular Springtails from Connecticut.  Though they can become very numerous when conditions are favorable, Globular Springtails are benign creatures and they are no cause for concern.