Subject:  Bright and Lonely in FL
Geographic location of the bug:  St. Petersburg, FL
Date: 05/21/2019
Time: 06:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello from sunny Florida! It’s springtime here and I found this bright and lonely guy  (or gal) hanging out by itself for literally hours on the aluminum railing of my porch. It didn’t seem to mind me walking by and taking a picture of it. I wonder if it’s sick/dying because it is in an odd place not reacting to much at all. It walks up and down but I haven’t seen it fly yet. I’m not sure exactly what species this is, although it appears to be some sort of beetle. Of note, there is a small spider that created a web in the corner of my porch ceiling. I’m not sure if maybe the spider is after this unusual looking beetle or if the beetle is after it and that’s maybe why it’s creeping so slowly! Help with identification and info on if I should be worried about anything like harm to my house, plants or the poor lonely beetle itself, would be greatly appreciated! 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks so much! ~Alicia

Longjawed Longhorn Beetle

Dear Alicia,
This magnificent beetle is a Longjawed Longhorn Beetle,
Dendrobias mandibularis, and the smaller mandibles indicate this is a female.  The males have very impressive mandibles.  According to BugGuide:  “Hosts: Citrus, Parkinsonia, Salix, Celtis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this huge bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Dorohoi, Romania
Date: 05/20/2019
Time: 07:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Very large black beetle like with claws…. scary looking. Interested to know what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Leah

Stag Beetle

Dear Leah,
The gorgeous male Stag Beetle,
Lucanus cervus, was immortalized by German artist Albrecht Dürer in 1505 and is pictured on the Getty site.  This is a perfectly harmless species

Subject:  Very Cool Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Virginia
Date: 05/20/2019
Time: 10:35 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I came across this moth while mowing. Made sure to move it before going through. Thoughts?
How you want your letter signed:  Mr. Motter

Newly Eclosed Tiger Moth

Dear Mr. Motter,
This Tiger Moth appears to be newly eclosed and its wings haven’t yet fully expanded.  We believe it is in the genus
Apantesis which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of cricket (?) is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney, Australia
Date: 05/19/2019
Time: 08:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi this cricket (?) leapt at me and then tried to bite me! When I tried to initiate contact it reared back like a spider and it’s mandibles we’re clacking away.
How you want your letter signed:  Simon Carter

Raspy Cricket

Dear Simon,
This is a King Cricket in the genus
Australostoma.  There are images posted to FlickR and The Bug Chicks.  According to the Queensland Museum:  “Giant King Crickets are found only in rainforest in south-eastern Queensland and north-eastern New South Wales. They live in burrows in the soil and emerge on wet nights to forage on the rainforest floor for live insects and rotten fruit. They are closely related to the giant wetas of New Zealand.”

Raspy Cricket

Correction:  We received a comment from Matthew that this is actually a Raspy Cricket which is profiled on Brisbane Insects.

Subject:  moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Idaho
Date: 05/15/2019
Time: 10:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hey buggy man…I found this on my wall east side late afternoon in Idaho…we have maple trees and some blue spruce trees. may have some poplar trees around too.
How you want your letter signed:  Gary

Possibly Twin Spotted Sphinx

Dear Gary,
This is a Sphinx Moth in the genus Smerinthus, but we are uncertain of the species as there are to possible species that are known to fly in Idaho, and they are very difficult to distinguish from one another.  One possibility pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas is the Twin Spotted Sphinx,
Smirinthus jamaicensis, and the other species with no common name, Smirinthus ophthalmica, is also pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas

Subject:  some kind of horn worm?
Geographic location of the bug:  Boulder City  Nevada 89005
Date: 05/17/2019
Time: 11:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is not our standard tomato hornworm/sphinx moth but is a different horn worm?
Please help me ID this caterpillar!
How you want your letter signed:  Dr. Merkler

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Dr. Merkler,
This is a highly variably colored Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar, a species that is known for extreme population explosions in desert areas following winters of significantly heavy rainfall.  In April, Daniel  saw thousands of dark colored Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars feeding on wildflowers in Joshua Tree National Park.