Subject:  Butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  North Queensland
Date: 11/16/2019
Time: 01:14 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello we have a butterfly from north Queensland, the name we were given was Marfarlane’s Triangle, but we cannot find that name online so cannot find the species name, can you please help us
How you want your letter signed:  Hannah & Ellie

Green Triangle

Dear Hannah & Ellie,
We located images of a similar looking butterfly called a Blue Triangle,
Graphium sarpedon, on the Brisbane Insect site, and additional searching of that genus name brought us to the Green Triangle, Graphium macfarlanei, on Butterfly House, and we suspect the common name Marfarlane’s Triangle can also be used.

Green Triangle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbus, N.M.
Date: 11/08/2019
Time: 10:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We are on the border of New Mexico and saw this bug about the approx  size of a quarter.
How you want your letter signed:  Gaila

Blister Beetle: Megetra species

Dear Gaila,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus
Megetra and we identified it on BugGuide.  There are three species in the genus, and two are found in New Mexico, but they look so similar, we cannot discern a difference.

Subject:  Bug I can’t identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern NJ
Date: 11/11/2019
Time: 01:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw these on a pin oak this morning
How you want your letter signed:  Ryan Moore

Giant Bark Aphids

Dear Ryan,
We quickly identified what we suspected were Giant Bark Aphids,
Longistigma caryae, on BugGuide, but there were no images of what we suspected might be eggs.  The Bug of the Week site has a nice image with the caption:  “Eggs of the giant bark aphid are the overwintering stage. They line small branches by the thousands and change from amber to black as they age.”

Giant Bark Aphids

Giant Bark Aphids

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Djibouti
Date: 11/12/2019
Time: 03:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this kind of grasshopper today near my workplace, any idea of her name ?
How you want your letter signed:  jodrak

Grasshopper

Dear jodrak,
We have a similar looking Grasshopper in our archives, also from Djibouti, but we have never been able to ascertain a species name.  We also located this unidentified Grasshopper on FlickR.  We believe this is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae.

Subject:  Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Panama
Date: 11/14/2019
Time: 07:26 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this bug in El Valle..700m
Thanks for any comments
How you want your letter signed:  Jerry Harrison

Bee Assassin

Dear Jerry,
This is a predatory Assassin Bug and it sure looks to us like a member of the genus
Apiomeris, the Bee Assassins.  We found a FlickR posting that looks exactly like your individual and it is identified as possibly Apiomeris hirtipes.

Subject:  Large crawling bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Perth, Western Australia
Date: 11/09/2019
Time: 07:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I squashed this bug in a panic, but have never seen one like it. It was about 6cm in length and crawled. Found in the house on a very warm day. Is it a type of cockroach? Didn’t appear to have wings.
How you want your letter signed:  Angela

Mole Cricket Carnage

Dear Angela,
This was a Mole Cricket, a common subterranean dweller in many parts of the world.  Mole Crickets are considered harmless to people and it will not infest your home.  It accidentally wandered in or was brought in by a pet perhaps.  We are tagging this as Unnecessary Carnage and we hope in the future you will attempt to relocate future intruders.