Subject:  Porchlight
Geographic location of the bug:  Fredericksburg Va
Date: 07/19/2018
Time: 01:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this tiny bug late summer last year beneath the porch light at night.  It was smaller than my little finger nail. i wondered if it was an immature ….something.  It was high on the door and this was the only vantage point I could get without pulling out a ladder…
How you want your letter signed:  swarner

Longhorned Borer Beetle: Obrium maculatum

Hi again swarner,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and with the assistance of Arthur V. Evans book Beetles of Eastern North America, we identified it as
Obrium maculatum which we verified with this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Attracted to UV lights; common.”  According to Arthur V. Evans in his book, larval hosts include oak, pecan, hawthorn, river birch, black cherry and hackberry.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beauty and a beast
Geographic location of the bug:  Nova Scotia, Canada
Date: 07/19/2018
Time: 05:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman!
I was recently working on stream habitat assessments …  On another day, we were looking at rocks for freshwater benthic macroinvertaebrates and I found this worm-like creature that was not on our super-simplified ID guide. It was translucent and you could see everything shifting around when it moved. As I was trying to take photos and video of it moving/wriggling, it bit me (or stung/poked me), drawing blood and I dropped it. Luckily (or unluckily depending on how you look at it, I suppose), we came across another one later. As I watched it move this time, I believe what I might have gotten stuck with its back end grippers which it seems to use to grip onto the rock face. I was looking at some other aquatic larval stages for different insects and cam across an image of crane fly larvae that looks similar, but again, I’m not really sure and was hoping you might have a better idea.
Here’s hoping!
How you want your letter signed:  Many thanks, Van

Horse Fly Larva

Hi Van,
We believe your guess that this is a Crane Fly larva is incorrect, but we do believe you have the insect order correct.  We believe this is an aquatic Horse Fly larva and according to the Missouri Department of Conservation:  “The larvae of horse and deer flies are fairly straight, segmented, wormlike maggots that are tan, whitish, or brownish. Several fleshy rings circle the body. They are robust, circular in cross-section, and taper at both ends. There are no true legs, although fleshy, nobby pseudopods or prolegs are present. In relaxed specimens, a thin, pointed breathing tube extends from the hind end to protrude above the water surface.”  BugGuide has an account of a person being bitten by a Horse Fly larva.

Horse Fly Larva

Subject:  Beauty and a beast
Geographic location of the bug:  Nova Scotia, Canada
Date: 07/19/2018
Time: 05:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman!
I was recently working on stream habitat assessments and ran into a gorgeous spider. I believe it’s a fishing spider (six-spotted?), but I’m not certain and was hoping for some confirmation. Isn’t she (maybe a he…) a beauty??
…  Here’s hoping!
How you want your letter signed:  Many thanks, Van

Six Spotted Fishing Spider and Stonefly Nymphs

Hi Van,
We are going to split Beauty and The Beast apart for posting purposes.  The spider does appear to be a Six Spotted Fishing Spider, but we are not certain of the species.  The other insects on the rock appear to be Stonefly larvae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Basic Beautiful Birdbath Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Bountiful Utah
Date: 07/18/2018
Time: 11:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw these swimming in the the birdbath and was very curious as I had never seen anything like these before. I have watched them over several days, but this is the first time I could get a good picture as the camera focuses on the surface of the water. During the day they often hide under leaves in the birdbath, but seem to become active before sunset.  I can get more pictures if you like.  I will be eternally grateful if you identify these for me.
How you want your letter signed:  Dean Hirschi

Rattailed Maggot

Dear Dean,
This is a Rat-Tailed Maggot, the larval form of the Drone Fly or another Hover Fly species in the subfamily Eristalinae, and here is a BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide: “Larvae in moist, sometimes shallow aquatic environments” and “Larvae of most feed on decaying organic debris. They are filter feeders in different kinds of aquatic media. They purify water by filtering microorganisms and other products.”

Subject:  Rusty red-furred bee. Ridged flat back.
Geographic location of the bug:  Fredericksburg, Virginia
Date: 07/19/2018
Time: 01:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this bee on an agastache flower in my backyard. I looked at your guide and  it seems to be a resin bee?  It’s gorgeous.
We used to have carpenter bees out back (deck) but now they’ve sawed our front porch.  You say that the resin bees move into already established holes…………………….……………
How you want your letter signed:  swarner

Sculptured Resin Bee

Dear swarner,
You are correct that this is an introduced Sculptured Resin Bee and according to BugGuide:  “They are opportunistic and nest in existing wooden cavities, rather than excavating their own. Effectively pollinate kudzu, another invasive species.”

Subject:  Fly Wasp thing
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Coast California
Date: 07/19/2018
Time: 09:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Help ID please
How you want your letter signed:  Rebecca

Sand Wasp

Dear Rebecca,
Our editorial staff is very fond of these Sand Wasps in the genus
Bembix because in addition to being very pretty, according to BugGuide:  “Females provision their nest with flies which the larvae feed on (a single developing larva may eat more than twenty flies)” and “Provisioning is progressive. The females provide a greater number of prey over subsequent days during larval growth. Adults are excellent diggers and can disappear below the surface of loose sand within seconds.”  They are important predators that help reduce the numbers of troublesome flies that are attracted to sandy locations including beaches and campsites.

Sand Wasp