Subject:  Found this in my yard last summer
Geographic location of the bug:  Sherwood Park, Alberta
Date: 02/18/2018
Time: 11:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This was really big. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Hi

Poplar Borer

Based on this BugGuide image, we are pretty confident that your Longicorn is a Poplar Borer, Saperda calcarata, and it is described on BugGuide as being:  “Largest of its genus. Prominent spines at tips of elytra. Coloration variable, pastel hues.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Very large cicada-like, wingless insect found (dead)
Geographic location of the bug:  New Bern, North Carolina
Date: 02/18/2018
Time: 11:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this nearly 3 inch (dead) insect on our golf course in New Bern, NC. It seems to be cicada-type, but much larger, with a bright blue “saddle” dorsal pattern in thorax area. Several legs were gone, but the remaining ones seemed to belong to an original six, and have beetle characteristics.
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy Pellegrini

Crayfish

Dear Cindy,
Commonly called a Crayfish, Crawfish, Crawdad or Clawfish, this is actually a freshwater Crustacean, not an insect.  When not missing its legs, a Crayfish looks like a small lobster.

Subject:  Red and Black beetles
Geographic location of the bug:  Corona, CA
Date: 02/18/2018
Time: 03:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen these beetles en masse during late winter through mid spring for years and haven’t seen a clear answer in my searches.  There was hundreds of these near the bushes and a downed and mulched tree (although the tree had been taken down quite some time ago).
How you want your letter signed:  KJS

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Dear KJS,
These are not beetles.  They are Red Shouldered Bugs,
Jadera haematoloma, and your image depicts both a mating pair and an immature nymph.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Yards, gardens, riparian areas, and other areas in association with hostplants. Often found in large aggregations feeding on leaking tree sap, dead insects, or seeds that have fallen from trees overhead. Also forms aggregations in winter to hibernate, often in association with human residences.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  ID for large net-veined winged insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Gardenton, MB (southeastern MB)
Date: 02/16/2018
Time: 04:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This insect showed up on my deck on June 12, 2012, in the tall grass-aspen parkland eco-region. I wish I had more info. None of my searches have come up with anything close.
I sure hope you can help solve this mystery!
How you want your letter signed:  Laura

Salmonfly

Dear Laura,
Giant Stoneflies in the genus 
Pteronarcys are frequently called Salmonflies.  Despite there being no reports from Manitoba listed on BugGuide, since the surrounding provinces have reports, we would deduce that the range of the Giant Stoneflies also includes Manitoba.

Thank-you so much, Daniel! I’ll be looking up more info on the salmonfly now
Laura

Subject:  Spiders
Geographic location of the bug:  Sunnyside, Utah
Date: 02/15/2018
Time: 11:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have been a fan of your page for many years. Whenever I seen and interesting bug I come here to investigate it. I have collected some bug photos that I just wanted to share.
How you want your letter signed:  Janice Leavitt

Orbweaver Spiderlings

Dear Janice,
Thank you for your kind words.  We really love your image of hatchling Orbweavers that have not yet dispersed.  We will do a separate posting of the Centipede you submitted.

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Caribbean side of Costa Rica
Date: 02/15/2018
Time: 09:18 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug is about an inch and a half long. The body is orange-ish.  It came out at night but was still here in the morning.
How you want your letter signed:  Sherry Lidstone

Male Timber Fly

Dear Sherry,
This is one beautiful fly, and the large eyes indicate it is a male Fly.  Our best guess is that it might be a male Horse Fly, but we have never seen any images of Horse Flies with such unusual markings.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist us with a proper identification.

Thanks to Cesar Crash, we now know that this is a male Timber Fly in the family Pantophthalmidae.  We have images of a female Timber Fly in our archives.