Subject:  Hello Spikey Crab Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia Beach VA
Date: 06/16/2018
Time: 06:10 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I have never seen this spider before. There are lumps of spider web all around it’s web. It looks like it has spikes and a shell.
How you want your letter signed:  Me!

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

This is a Crablike Spiny Orbweaver, a common species, especially in the South.  Like other members of the Orbweaver family, the Crablike Spiny Orbweaver is perfectly harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mid west USA specifically southern minnesota
Date: 06/16/2018
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this moth on a basket outside my house. I can’t seem to find any info on it or another moth that resembles it. It’s green was very fuzzy.
How you want your letter signed:  M

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Dear M,
This beautiful moth is a Virginia Creeper Sphinx or Hog Sphinx,
Darapsa myron, and we identified it thanks to images on BugGuide.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  ” Darapsa myron larvae feed on Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), Grape (Vitis), Ampelopsis, and Viburnum.”

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Subject:  What’s this insect?
Geographic location of the bug:  Houston Texas
Date: 06/16/2018
Time: 12:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We  have been searching all night to identify this bug. Please help us!
How you want your letter signed:  Drema from Houston

Giant Robber Fly:  Promachus bastardii

Dear Drema,
We believe we have correctly identified this Giant Robber Fly with its distinctive white-tipped abdomen as a male
Promachus bastardii thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Males have distinctive white tip on abdomen and white bands on thorax.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Interesting Moth Find
Geographic location of the bug:  Suburban town in Connecticut, USA
Date: 06/16/2018
Time: 09:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This moth (?) was found in early June on a warm, sunny day on the playground of a elementary school in Connecticut. I could not capture a better photo before it flew away, however it was VERY large. Out of curiosity, I did some research to identify the moth but had no luck. The only related species that I found were Atlas moths, but none were inhabitants of the area or displayed such interesting markings. Any ideas what this bug could be?
How you want your letter signed:  Moth Mystified

Cecropia Moth

Dear Moth Mystified,
This magnificent moth is a male Cecropia Moth.

Subject:  Little Ferry of a bug super long Wings super long antennas awesome giant eyeballs
Geographic location of the bug:  Ohio on my window curtain
Date: 06/16/2018
Time: 08:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  me and my ex-boyfriend are autistic we wanted to be entomologist as children this insect gets all of my honor what is he or she please I love this little baby look at how cute his eyeball is I got a super big close up picture coming for you
How you want your letter signed :  Mister cute big bug man eyeball

Green Lacewing

This is a predatory Green Lacewing in the family Chrysopidae and they are sometimes called Golden-Eyes.

Subject:  What is that wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mountains by provo Utah
Date: 06/16/2018
Time: 02:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw several very big wasps while camping in the mountains next to provo Utah. At first we were a little afraid of them do to their size, but eventually we realized they were not interested in us. We saw them mostly on the trunks and branches of the trees in small groups. Their body’s were long and slender, at least 2 inches long, with long legs. They had a “stinger” that was twice as long as its body, but really mobile and bendable. Just curious what it might be. We have lived in the city at the base of the mountain for decades and have never seen them before.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious Canpers

Stump Stabbers

Dear Curious Campers,
These are female Ichneumon Wasps in the genus
Megarhyssa, commonly called Stump Stabbers because they use their long (up to five inches long) ovipositors to lay eggs in trees and stumps that are infested with wood burrowing Horntail larvae.

Stump Stabbers