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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  3 inch pink larva with scales
Geographic location of the bug:  Sweden
Date: 04/27/2018
Time: 10:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Most likely not native to Sweden, what is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious

Weird Pink Thing

Dear Curious,
Please provide us with additional information.  Did you take this image?  Are there any other angles?  Where (habitat) in Sweden was it found?  Did it move?

Ed Note: This is not the first time we have received an image of a rubber or plastic creature that the submitter insisted was alive, and most are spiders like this  rubber Tarantula, or this plastic Spider, and fishing lures like this blue worm often fool people into believing they have seen an unusual creature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  this bug stung/bit me
Geographic location of the bug:  Center Point Indiana
Date: 02/11/2018
Time: 12:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My husband and I went to the exotic feline rescue center to check out some big cats, while we were there I leaned on a tree and got stung bit by this bug. My hand swelled a little and I took a photo
How you want your letter signed:  Jshearer

Wheel Bug

Dear Jshearer,
This is a Wheel Bug, the largest Assassin Bug in North America.  Though we frequently warn folks not to handle Wheel Bugs, we rarely get reports of bites.  Thanks for confirming our suspicions that a careless encounter with a Wheel Bug might result in a painful, but not serious, bite.  We strongly suspect the bite did not occur in February in Indiana.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Name of bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Geilston Bay, Tasmania, Australia
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I wonder if you could tell me what kind of bug this is? They range in size from not much bigger than a pinhead to about 5 mms. I only see them for a short period in summer. Usually in small clusters on the road, though this year I have noticed them in the vegetation on the roadside. I have never seen them anywhere except this one small section (approximately 15 ft) of road. Thanks so much for your time
How you want your letter signed:  Ruth Gooding

Immature Jewel Bugs

Dear Ruth,
These are immature Shield Bugs in the family Scutellaridae, and because many members of the family have bright metallic colors, they are frequently called Jewel Bugs.  We located a nearly identical image on FlickR from Tasmania that identifies the species as
Choerocoris paganus creche.  The tripart name stands for genus, species and subspecies.  We found additional information on the genus and species from Australia, which leads us to believe the subspecies C. p. creche is a Tasmanian subspecies.  Geographically isolated populations often form subspecies, and with the passage of time, they might even become distinct species.  The Atlas of Living Australia calls the species the Ground Shield Bug, and the Brisbane Insect site calls it the Red Jewel Bug.  According to Jungle Dragon:  “Adults and nymphs feed primarily on the sappy contents of seeds of hop-bush (Dodonaea viscosa), including those which have fallen to the ground.”

Immature Jewel Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  South Africa Preying Mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  South Africa, Kruger National Park
Date: 01/17/2018
Time: 05:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I saw this preying mantis a week ago (therefore in early January) near the Satara Camp in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. I have been trying to identify the majestic bug, but wasn’t able to. I would really appreciate your help.
How you want your letter signed:  Thomas

Mantid

Dear Thomas,
While we cannot provide you with an exact species at this time, we can tell you that the small wing pads indicate this is either an immature individual or a flightless species of Mantid.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Kissing bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Williamsport Pennsylvania
Date: 01/11/2018
Time: 10:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! We have brown stink bugs but this one is different. I was wondering if you could identify this for me? I was worried about it being the kissing bug. Thank you very much!
How you want your letter signed:  Ashley

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Ashley,
This is a Western Conifer Seed Bug, one of the Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae.  It is classified in the insect suborder Heteroptera, the True Bugs, along with Stink Bugs that are in the family Pentatomidae and Kissing Bugs that are in the family Reduviidae.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs are native to the Pacific Northwest, but they began to noticeably increase their range beginning in the 1960s, possibly due to more and more people traveling for work or pleasure.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs often enter homes to hibernate as the weather cools.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mantid Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Africa
Date: 01/02/2018
Time: 04:46 PM EDT
Hi!
I’ve been looking for a few weeks trying to identify a mantid I got that lost her label where I got her from and the person I got her from also has no idea of her species without the label, please could you help to try to identify her?
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  A.H.

Mantis Nymph

Dear A.H.,
This is an immature Mantis, and they are more difficult to identify than adults of the species.  We are posting your images and perhaps one of our readers will write in with a proper identification.

Mantis Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination