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Subject:  Possibly Meadow Fritillary
Geographic location of the bug:  Campbell, Ohio
Date: 07/27/2021
Time: 3:29 PM EDT
Gentle Readers,
Daniel noticed this Lesser Fritillary, possibly a Meadow Fritillary,
Boloria bellona, pictured on Ohio Butterflies and BugGuide.  Fritillaries can be difficult to identify conclusively.

Probably Meadow Fritillary

 

Subject:  A long-shot request…
Geographic location of the bug:  Montreal, QC
Date: 07/16/2021
Time: 03:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I unfortunately didn’t have a camera with me when I came across this bug, so this is admittedly quite a terrible ID request – I know you probably can’t proceed without a photo and I fully understand if so! The best I can do is a *very* rough sketch from surely faulty memory (it feels like I’m playing a game of Monsdrawsity with myself, and badly). But it was a distinct/weird enough critter that perhaps even a vague impression will help to identify, or, at least I hope so! Sighting time: mid-July, late evening. It was walking on the sidewalk and then trying to fly/climb into a short plant at the edge of a lawn. Its little wings made quite a ruckus and it seemed to find this task a bit of a challenge. It was at least cicada-size. The way its back was segmented was quite unique. I’ve never seen anything like it, and would really like to know what kind of creature I encountered!
How you want your letter signed:  Curious but ill-prepared nature-lover

Possibly Newly Eclosed Moth

Dear Curious but ill-prepared nature-lover,
Obviously our response is pure speculation, but we suspect you encountered a newly metamorphosed moth that emerged from the pupa and whose wings have not yet expanded and hardened enabling flight.  It might be a Tiger Moth like this Isabella Tiger Moth.

Recently eclosed Isabella Tiger Moth

Or it might be a Giant Silkworm like this Imperial Moth.

Newly Eclosed Imperial Moth

Or it might be a Sphinx Moth like this recently metamorphosed Walnut Sphinx.  All three species we cited can be found in Quebec.

Newly Eclosed Walnut Sphinx

Subject:  LARGE WEIRD LOOKING FLY
Geographic location of the bug:  S.E. PA.
Date: 06/02/2021
Time: 02:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  IN ALL MY 72 YEARS AND QWORLD TRAVELS, I HAVE NEVER SEEN THIS ONE . . . . LOOKS LIKE A LARGE HORSEFLY
How you want your letter signed:  HAL SLACKWAY

Male Black Horse Fly

Dear Hal,
You are absolutely correct that this is a Horse Fly.  More specifically it is a Black Horse Fly,
Tabanus atratus, and the large close set eyes indicate it is a male.  Despite its size, only female Horse Flies bite and feed on blood.  This male is perfectly harmless.

Subject:  Leaflike grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Ventura, California
Date: 11/16/2019
Time: 07:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I’ve noticed this grasshopper in my yard in several places lately. First he was stuck in my house and I caught him and took him outside. Today I got a great shot of him on the plumeria tree. His body looks so much like a leaf! Do you know what his name is?
How you want your letter signed:  Tonja…we met at a party in Ventura!

Pinkish Bush Katydid

Dear Tonja,
We were talking on the phone this evening with Melanie on the Irish Chain and we commented that we hadn’t posted to WTB? recently because we are so busy.  This pinkish Katydid is awesome looking.  Most Katydids are green in color, and occasionally individuals from some normally green species are vividly pink, and some are more subtly pink. We believe your individual is a Broad-Winged Katydid,
Microcentrum rhombifolium, which we located on the Natural History of Orange County site, or perhaps the closely related California Angle-Winged Katydid, Microcentrum californicum, which we located on BugGuide.  We have not had any luck locating any unusual color variants of either species.  We will attempt to contact Piotr Naskrecki for species confirmation. We find it closer visually to the Plumeria buds rather than its leaves, and with the unusual coloration of your individual, we would go so far as to say it is almost camouflaged among the buds. 

Pinkish Bush Katydid

Hi Daniel!
Thanks so much for your e-mail.  You really made me laugh with your “talking with Melanie on the Irish Chain”.  haha That’s really great.  As you may know, Melanie gave me the idea to contact you to ask about this fascinating bug…now I know it’s an Katydid (I’ve always loved that word!).  I sure am glad I asked you, because I was wrongly identifying it as a grasshopper…even though I’ve seen grasshoppers in my yard and they look different than this guy.  So, THANK YOU for your reply and all the wonderful information!
I hope life is treating you well and hope to meet you again one day.
Blessings,
Tonja
Correction courtesy of renowned Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki
Hi Daniel,
Not a Microcentrum but Scudderia. Very interesting, pink forms are not common in this genus.
Cheers,
Piotr

Subject:  can you tell me what this one is?
Geographic location of the bug:  Nepal
Date: 08/23/2019
Time: 04:04 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I can’t find this beetle by searching & wondered if you could help me identify it. I was originally wondering if it could fly.
This image was taken in the mountains in Nepal
How you want your letter signed:  Nicola

Big Legged Bug

Dear Nicola,
The best we are going to be able to do at this time if to provide you with a family.  This is a Big Legged Bug in the family Coreidae.   It looks like the individual in this image on India Biodiversity Portal, but it is only identified to the family level.  It can fly.

Subject:  Looks like string but moves
Geographic location of the bug:  Tampa
Date: 08/15/2019
Time: 11:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I am attaching a picture but I also have videos I have no idea what this is I thought I was losing my mind when I saw it move
How you want your letter signed:  Debbie

String That Moves

Dear Debbie,
We prefer not to weigh in on the state of your mind, but this looks to us to be a string that moved.  The object on the end of the toothpick appears to be of fibrous nature, possible plant or animal fibers, though we would not rule out it might be synthetic.  Light weight fibers will stir with the slightest breeze.

Update:  August 24, 2019
Thank you so much I Thought it look like that but it seem to move I’m thinking maybe it was static electricity or some airflow thank you for your response I appreciate it