Louse Fly: Facts, Behavior, and Prevention Essentials

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Louse flies, also known as keds or hippoboscid flies, are a family of insects that have long been overlooked in the scientific community. These parasites primarily target birds and mammals, and in some cases, have been known to transmit infectious agents to humans and domestic animals. However, much about their biology and behavior remains unknown, making them an enigma in the world of entomology.

One common species of louse fly is the pigeon louse fly (Pseudolychia canariensis), found on pigeons and doves. These dorso-ventrally flattened flies live among their host’s body feathers and are slow fliers. They possess a tough exoskeleton that protects them from being crushed by their host as they maneuver through the plumage or pelage while searching for blood.

Louse Fly Basics

Understanding Louse Flies

Louse flies, also known as keds, belong to the family Hippoboscidae. They are commonly referred to as pupipara. These insects do not hop or fly but are known for their ability to crawl swiftly. They infest various animals, including birds, domestic animals, and even humans.

Louse flies are winged and flat-bodied. Their mouthparts are adapted for piercing and sucking blood from the host. These parasites can transmit disease-causing pathogens to both animals and humans.

Hippoboscidae Family

The Hippoboscidae family contains more than 200 species of louse flies. They share some common features:

  • Winged or wingless
  • Well-adapted for clinging onto host’s fur or feathers
  • Blood-sucking mouthparts
  • Pupiparous (give birth to live offspring)

Comparison Table

Louse Flies Lice
Belong to family Hippoboscidae Belong to order Phthiraptera
Can be winged or wingless Always wingless
Infest various animals including humans Usually infest specific host species
More agile crawlers Less agile crawlers
Larger in size (2-6 mm) Smaller in size (1-3 mm)

Understanding the basics of louse flies and their differences from lice can help in managing their infestations and preventing the spread of diseases they may carry.

Life Cycle and Reproduction

Larvae and Pupation

The life cycle of a louse fly begins with a female louse laying a single larva, known as a first instar larva. Within minutes, this larva undergoes rapid development and turns into a second instar larva. This process is unique compared to other insects’ laying of multiple eggs. After a few more molts, the larva reaches its final instar before pupation.

The prepuparium stage comes next, where the larva finds a suitable spot to pupate. Here, it forms a protective casing called a puparium, within which metamorphosis occurs, giving rise to an adult louse fly.

Adult Lice Lifecycle

Adult lice exhibit the following characteristics:

  • Feeding habits: They feed on the blood of their hosts several times daily.
  • Habitat: Adult lice reside close to the host’s skin to maintain their body temperature.

The adult lice life cycle can be divided into three stages:

  1. Egg: Female adults lay a single larva, which develops into a mature larva after several molts.
  2. Nymph: The larva turns into a nymph after pupation occurs within the puparium.
  3. Adult: The nymph emerges as a mature louse fly, ready to find a host and reproduce.

Here’s a comparison table of Larvae and Pupation vs. Adult Lice Lifecycle:

Larvae and Pupation Adult Lice Lifecycle
Single larva birth Lays a single larva
Rapid development Feeds on blood
Prepuparium stage Resides close to skin
Metamorphosis Three life stages

Hosts and Infestations

Human Infestations

Louse flies, also known as keds, are parasites that can infest various hosts, including humans. They usually feed on blood and can cause itching and discomfort.

  • Scalp: Although not the primary target, human scalps can occasionally be infested by some species of louse flies.

Animal Infestations

Louse flies are more commonly associated with animals. They infest various animal species, causing different levels of discomfort and health issues.

  • Birds: Some louse fly species, such as Lipoptena, preferentially target birds as their hosts, feeding on their blood.
  • Deer: Deer keds, which belong to the Lipoptena genus, are known to infest deer and can cause irritation and hair loss.
  • Horses: Louse flies may infest horses, leading to skin irritation, hair loss, and potential transmission of bloodborne diseases.
  • Dogs: Dogs can also be infested by louse flies, causing discomfort, restlessness, and skin irritation.
Host Louse Fly Effects Example Species
Humans Itching, scalp discomfort Keds
Birds Blood feeding, general discomfort Lipoptena
Deer Hair loss, irritation Lipoptena
Horses Skin irritation, hair loss Hippobosca
Dogs Discomfort, restlessness Melophagus

Diseases and Transmission

Transmission Pathways

Louse flies, also known as keds or hippoboscid flies, are small, winged insects that have adapted to living on various animals. They primarily transmit diseases through:

  • Blood: Keds feed on the blood of their host, which can potentially transfer pathogens.
  • Air: Although less common, airborne transmission of diseases could occur in some cases.

Vectors and Related Diseases

  • Advantages:
    • Flexible: many species of louse flies can feed on multiple host species.
    • Wide distribution: these flies have a very diverse global presence.
  • Disadvantages:
    • Potential disease vectors: can spread diseases between animals and humans.
    • Host irritation: may cause skin inflammation or irritation in their hosts.

Louse flies are known to be vectors of various diseases, mainly in birds and mammals:

  1. Avian malaria: Keds can transmit avian malaria, which affects birds, through blood exchanges while feeding.
  2. Bat flies: These are a subgroup of louse flies that can carry certain pathogens specific to bats.
Disease Animal Group Transmission Example Hosts
Avian malaria Birds Blood Pigeons, songbirds
Bat fly-related Bats Blood Fruit bats, insectivorous bats

In conclusion, louse flies may not be as well-known as other disease vectors, but they still pose a risk for transmitting diseases to both animals and humans.

Identification and Symptoms

Causes and Effects

The Louse Fly is an ectoparasite that feeds on the blood of its host, such as pigeons and doves 1. When these flies infest humans, they can cause:

  • Itching: The louse fly’s bite can lead to itching and discomfort for the affected person.
  • Allergic reactions: Some people may experience allergic reactions to the louse fly’s saliva.

Louse flies primarily infest birds, so infestations in humans are quite rare compared to head lice, which commonly affect children 2.

Distinguishing from Dandruff

Distinguishing between louse fly nits (eggs) and dandruff can be challenging. However, there are some key differences:

Feature Louse Fly Nits Dandruff
Appearance Oval and yellowish White and flaky
Location Attached to hair shaft On the scalp
Movement Fixed in place Easily dislodged

In conclusion, proper identification of louse fly infestations is crucial for appropriate treatment. Being aware of the signs and symptoms and distinguishing them from dandruff can help in effective and timely resolution of the issue.

Prevention and Treatment

Personal Items and Hygiene

  • Keep personal items separate: Avoid sharing clothing, combs, brushes, hats, and hair accessories.
  • Launder items regularly: Wash clothing, bedding, and towels in hot water.
  • Store unworn items: Seal items that are not in use in plastic bags for two weeks.

Examples of good personal hygiene practices include:

  • Shampooing hair regularly
  • Brushing and combing hair daily

Remedies and Medications

Consult a healthcare provider for appropriate treatment options, which may include medications such as:

  • Over-the-counter treatments: Products like shampoos and creams containing permethrin or pyrethrins.
  • Prescription treatments: Oral medication such as Ivermectin or topical treatments like Malathion lotion.

Natural remedies are also an option but must be used with caution. Examples include:

  • Tea tree oil
  • Neem oil

The table below compares the two most common treatment methods:

Treatment Method Pros Cons
Medications Effective, fast-acting, proven results Risk of side effects, possible resistance
Natural Remedies Fewer side effects, safer Might be less effective, limited research

Remember, always consult a healthcare provider before trying any home remedies or treatments to ensure their effectiveness and safety.

Special Cases

Ectoparasites on Livestock

Louse flies are ectoparasites that can cause discomfort to livestock, especially during summer months. They have adapted to mainly staying on their host, with reduced wings for easier movement through the host’s hair or fur.

Example:

  • In cattle, louse flies can lead to significant discomfort, causing the animals to scratch and rub against objects in efforts to alleviate itching.

A suitable repellent for livestock is essential to control louse fly infestations:

Pros:

  • Reduces discomfort for animals
  • Minimizes risk of secondary infections and skin damage caused by scratching

Cons:

  • Some repellents may not be suitable for all livestock
  • Frequent reapplication may be required

Deer Louse Fly

Deer louse flies are another type of louse fly that can cause issues for their hosts. These flies are ectoparasites that specifically target deer populations.

Characteristics of deer louse flies:

  • Wingless, adapted for life on the host
  • Small and flat-bodied, allowing for movement through dense fur

Example of differences between livestock louse flies and deer louse flies:

Feature Livestock Louse Fly Deer Louse Fly
Wings Reduced Absent
Preferred Host Livestock Deer
Size Small Small
Body Shape Flat Even Flatter
Methods of Repellent Chemical repellent Chemical repellent
Frequency of Repellent Application Periodic Periodic

Using appropriate repellents for deer can help control infestations of deer louse flies and reduce their negative impact on deer populations.

Specific Louse Fly Species

Crataerina Pallida

Crataerina pallida is an obligate parasite that is commonly found on swift birds. It is a flightless fly, which means it cannot fly and relies on its host for survival.

  • Obligate parasites: depend on their host for survival
  • Flightless: lacks the ability to fly

Hippobosca Equina

Hippobosca equina, also known as the sheep ked, is a louse fly species that mainly targets horses, deer, and cattle. It feeds on the blood of its host, causing discomfort and potential health issues.

  • Sheep ked: another name for Hippobosca equina
  • Main hosts: horses, deer, and cattle

Pseudolynchia Canariensis

Pseudolynchia canariensis, or the pigeon louse fly, is a common ectoparasite of pigeons and doves. Both adult males and females feed on the blood of their host, affecting the health and well-being of the birds.

  • Main hosts: pigeons and doves
  • Ectoparasite: lives on the external part of the host
Species Hosts Feeding Habits
Crataerina Pallida Swift birds Flightless, obligate parasite
Hippobosca Equina Horses, deer, cattle Blood-feeding, also known as sheep ked
Pseudolynchia Canariensis Pigeons, doves Blood-feeding ectoparasite

Miscellaneous Facts

Natural History of Louse Flies

Louse flies are dorso-ventrally flattened flies that live among the body feathers of various hosts, such as pigeons and doves, and feed on their blood. For example, the Pigeon Louse Fly (Pseudolychia canariensis) is around the same size as a housefly. These flies are slow fliers and have a tough exoskeleton that protects them from being crushed by their grooming host.

There are several genera of louse flies, including Crataerina, Ornithomya, Ornithoica, Olfersia, and Pseudolynchia. Different genera have specific host preferences, such as the Crataerina species, which are specific to swifts.

Some interesting facts about louse flies include:

  • They have unique milk glands that nourish their larvae.
  • Larvae develop within the female’s body.
  • They transmit pathogens to their hosts.

Entomological Dictionary

When exploring the world of louse flies, one might come across some unique and specific terms. Here are a few of the key terms related to louse flies and their characteristics:

Hippobosca: A genus of louse flies known for their flattened bodies and preference for mammal hosts rather than birds.

Neolipoptena: A genus of louse flies featuring members that parasitize deer.

Milk glands: Specialized organs found in louse flies that secrete essential nutrients to sustain developing larvae.

Crataerina: A genus of louse flies that specifically parasitize swifts.

Olfersia: A genus in the louse fly family featuring species that mainly infest seabirds.

Pseudolynchia: A genus of louse flies whose members primarily infest pigeons and doves. Examples include the Pigeon Louse Fly mentioned earlier.

To help better distinguish between a few selected genera, here’s a comparison table:

Genus Host Preference Example Species
Crataerina Swifts Crataerina pallida
Olfersia Seabirds Olfersia fumipennis
Pseudolynchia Pigeons & Doves Pseudolychia canariensis (Pigeon Louse Fly)

Footnotes

  1. Pigeon Louse Fly or Pigeon Fly – Pseudolychia Canariensis (Macquart)
  2. CDC – Lice – Body Lice – Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts
Tags: Louse Fly

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53 Comments. Leave new

  • hi, Sir

    i have watched this fly in my house also, this fly had taken byte to my spouse, after byte that bitten space is looking too reddish & with full of swelling, after that i am confused, thanks to http://www.whatsthatbug.com i had identified on this website….. & thanks for you also…. for informing me about this fly…….

    Anuj Gulati

    Reply
    • We are happy we were helpful. These Louse Flies or Keds seem to be most common where there are flocks of sheep or a healthy deer population.

      Reply
  • I believe this is a thrips. Not sure what it’s doing in Elaine’s hair.

    Reply
  • I thought a fly without wings was called a walk.

    Reply
  • They have wings Timothy. My local vet put up a “guess the bug” post after finding one on an injured bird. The vet nurses were a bit weirded out by it.

    Reply
  • Ps a fly without wings is in fact a raisin

    Reply
  • Annmarie parsley
    November 12, 2014 4:00 pm

    I been finding these deer fly louse in long Island, N.Y. too. Do they die in the winter months and or what pesticides can use them? I have to check my dog and me every time me or dog goes out.

    Reply
  • “deer flea” Lipoptena spp.

    Reply
  • nasty, looks like a tic

    Reply
  • I have seen these insects in N Idaho for many years, but it was especially bad this year. On a warm late October day, right after it rained, the air was thick with them. Almost like mosquitoes swarming around my head. The area had lots of deer around, but I never associated them with deer although I have seen them on the hide of deer I harvested in the past. Pesky little bugs, took several home unsuspectingly in my hair and clothes.

    Reply
  • Today I went hiking near Coeur D Alene, ID and was covered in these things.
    I guess all the rain we had in October contributed.

    Reply
  • Today I went hiking near Coeur D Alene, ID and was covered in these things.
    I guess all the rain we had in October contributed.

    Reply
  • Omg, this is the same exact insect I found in my hair, I was also told it’s all in my head and I have delusional parasintosis. I had been complaining for 6 months something is living in my hair I been to several doc who just said no lice, I was complaining to Docs my hair was moving and wah-lah this little speck came on my comb, I had been seeing specks but never took the time to look at them. I took the speck went to my daughters room put it under her microscope when it focused I almost fainted. I took it to my doc which said it was a louse. But the more I looked at it I can see it is not bcuz I see wings, then a second was on my neck I looked at it under the scope and
    there it was, now Elaine or anyone out there, How in God’s name do I get rid of hair thrips. I have been going through HELL..

    Reply
    • Please let me know I found them in my hair too went to one Dermatologist thought I was a nut case. Trying dog shampoo citronella clove oil in my hair nothing works

      Reply
    • Hi! I’ve had these a couple times as I’m a plant freak and have loads in my house, which makes them pretty common. I also have long hair that I bunch up so they can hide really well. There’s an easy solution you can try out: find some high quality tea tree oil (Australian if you can). Mix a few drops with a carrier oil (olive is amazing as I believe it has insecticidal properties), or you can just use Argan oil which is also great for hair. Get the mix in your hair and scalp and leave it for a few hours. Before washing it out, spray a little vinegar in hair and comb, they’ll all come right out. Don’t freak out when they fall on your shoulders, they seem totally harmless. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  • Omg, this is the same exact insect I found in my hair, I was also told it’s all in my head and I have delusional parasintosis. I had been complaining for 6 months something is living in my hair I been to several doc who just said no lice, I was complaining to Docs my hair was moving and wah-lah this little speck came on my comb, I had been seeing specks but never took the time to look at them. I took the speck went to my daughters room put it under her microscope when it focused I almost fainted. I took it to my doc which said it was a louse. But the more I looked at it I can see it is not bcuz I see wings, then a second was on my neck I looked at it under the scope and
    there it was, now Elaine or anyone out there, How in God’s name do I get rid of hair thrips. I have been going through HELL..

    Reply
  • Has anybody found a solution to thrips in hair?

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  • I had one of these in my van yesterday in Harrisburg, Pa. It was originally crawling up my leg, under my shorts, and I slapped it and it flew out up to the top of my van ceiling. It was walking sideways, and that’s what freaked me out. I hit it with my phone, flat side onto flat ceiling. It wasn’t fazed and walked sideways again. Now I hit it 4 more times, and it starts flying around. Caught it in an empty water bottle, and it got thrown out with the recycle today. Strangest insect experience of my life.

    Reply
  • I returned home from work after a few months and found a huge pigeon nest outside my window. The eggs had already hatched so I didn’t have the heart to throw the nest. After a few.days I noticed this weird black flying tick. It wasn’t from my dog and it was super creepy. It always jumped on my face when I tried to kill it. Then I noticed that late night it would bite me and once it was feasting on my scalp. I was freaked out. I have sprayed HIT insect repellent but am not sure if it will work.

    Reply
  • Judy Falconer
    June 18, 2018 3:19 pm

    My best solution has been mousse as it seems to remove eggs as well as other stages. Say ain’t daily is helpful too . Maui make a coconut hair oil that can be sprayed in the It is very helpful. Leave in 100% of the time. Vegetable oil is helpful too. Pray tell, did these seem to go dormant in the winter and return in the spring? Hi

    Reply
  • I recieved two reports od thrips living in human hair. Searching for similar cases, I ended up here.

    Reply
  • I have a few ideas for you that will help. One is that these need air – drown them. Lie back in the bathtub with your hair under the water and count to 100. Within 6 hours they will have fallen out. I think they get into the pores, maybe lay their eggs in them so they return. There are shampoos that help, one is millcreek botanicals tea tree oil. The conditioner is very good as well. Start out putting whichever on dry hair. I often just use the conditioner in the morning and leave it on for 3 – 4 minutes. Putting it on dry makes a huge difference. Get a hair brush with the old style bristles, goodie make one that Walmart carry. As you brush you loosen what is on the hair . Good luck

    Reply
  • I also had these in my scalp. Neem oil is the only thing that seems to work

    Reply
  • Neem oil helped me I dealt with same thing

    Reply
  • Take Apple cider vinegar with the mother. Vitality Health carry the best brand in a brown jug. It seems to get rid of the ones under the skin. It takes a long time, maybe 3 months to get rid of them.

    Reply
    • Thank you sometimes I think I’m crazy this really affected my life I have been using neem oil in my shampoo that seems to help

      Reply
  • Try apple cider vinegar with the mother from a health food store. a tsp 3 times a day well diluted in water or a juice or smoothies. On hot water with honey and caysnne pepper and lemon is a great way. Millcreek botanicals rea tree oil shampoois good. soak your hair daily in creme rinse, put on dry. sauna. you are not crazy.

    Reply
  • Has anybody got any other symptoms with these things other than their scalp? Such as white little egg looking granules coming out of the skin?

    Reply
  • Sad to report about 5 months after thinking i got rid of them I am finding them again. Any other suggestions would be great

    Reply
  • I reallllly need help. I started getting bitten by bugs. Then I realized that I had eggs in my hair and then checked my kids. They had eggs too. I spent HOURS online looking up what it could be. My son had a bright green bug jump out of his hair and I didn’t think it coo related. I have been collected like 5 different stages of this bug. Some are just small black specks, then there are long skinny white ones that come out of your skin, eggs that come out of your skin, then larger bugs. I FINALLY realized they are this thrip bug.
    This is embarrassing but they have even got my private parts. My husband doesn’t believe me and thinks I’m nuts but the kids were in the pool/hot tub for hours and then clusters of eggs and the long white body things started coming out of their skin the next day- which was yesterday. I want to put me and my young kids in a plastic bubble and run away. I’m afraid to sit on my couch, sleep, etc.
    PLEASE HELP- M.E.D.

    Reply
    • We would strongly suggest you seek medical assistance. We are not qualified to provide medical advice.

      Reply
  • I reallllly need help. I started getting bitten by bugs. Then I realized that I had eggs in my hair and then checked my kids. They had eggs too. I spent HOURS online looking up what it could be. My son had a bright green bug jump out of his hair and I didn’t think it coo related. I have been collected like 5 different stages of this bug. Some are just small black specks, then there are long skinny white ones that come out of your skin, eggs that come out of your skin, then larger bugs. I FINALLY realized they are this thrip bug.
    This is embarrassing but they have even got my private parts. My husband doesn’t believe me and thinks I’m nuts but the kids were in the pool/hot tub for hours and then clusters of eggs and the long white body things started coming out of their skin the next day- which was yesterday. I want to put me and my young kids in a plastic bubble and run away. I’m afraid to sit on my couch, sleep, etc.
    PLEASE HELP- M.E.D.

    Reply
    • Hi Molly,
      I hope your nightmare has ended. Can you please share how did you treat it? I am having same issue and going through the same nightmare you have been through. Thanks

      Reply
  • I have experienced all of this and I have almost goyyen rid of them. First to get rid of most coat ypur hair and scalp with oil. I used crisco. Have a bath in epsom salts. Get Apple cider vinegar capsules, Organika are best and take a few times daily, even up to 6 per day. Very helpful. Also get as much garlic into your system as possible. You can roast it in foil in the oven for 45 mins. youtube will show you to drizzle oil on it but I found the oil upset my stomach. thee is a secret detox drink online, avc, honey or maplexsyrup, ginger etc. Add garlic to it and GET GARLIC Shampoo In Canada there is a Vatika brand for under &6.00. Very helpful. every day should get better but it takes weeks. good luck.

    Reply
    • Hi Judy,
      Have completely get rid of it? can you share your experience please of what things work the best to get rid of it?

      Reply
  • And chlorophyll. Bernard Jensen if you can get ahold of it. esp effective on thrips.

    Reply
  • Contact me if you like. judyf697@gmail.com

    Reply
  • NEEM OIL!

    Reply
  • Nathan R Warner
    October 31, 2019 3:55 pm

    I have been wondering what these things are for years.get them on me almost every time im in the woods.

    Reply
  • Judy Falconer
    April 15, 2020 12:43 pm

    Shampoos with Biotin. Preferably Millcreek Botanicals. Good luck, let me know how it goes.

    Reply
  • I came across this page, because I have same issue. I found this bug in my hair with long antenna for few months now and tried lice treatments, olive oil and Cedar oil..but they don’t go away. I didn’t see them on my body, but i feel like a sting and something crawling but can’t see anything. You are saying it can be under the skin? does it really go away in winter and comes back again in spring?
    what otehr oil to use to get rid of them in my hair and how to know if they are under my skin?
    thank you

    Reply
  • This is crazy. My dog is almost bald from these. They’re all over me. There’s not one place on my body that it doesn’t effect. They’re orange, glittery, black, white egg looking thing. I’m miserable and no one can help. They’re finally sending me to a infectious disease doctor. Also I find rubbing alcohol helps. Also Selsun blue.

    Reply
    • Brittany, please keep us updated! Many of us are in the same boat, with nowhere to turn. If your infectious diesease doctor is good and you are in the United States, please share the info. Or share it anyway. I’ll travel. I would like to know more about what you’re experiencing. I’ve read so many different things from people here. . . eggs in the skin, long white body-looking things coming out in the sauna, eggs in the hair. I would like to know what the eggs look like, whether you’ve had things in your skin, what all the phases of the life cycle are. Perhaps those of us affected should start a yahoo group or some such and share photos to inform ourselves.

      Reply
  • Just found this site. Thank you everyone! Over twelve years ago my pre-k kids brought home lice. I’ve been battling it (I thought) all this time. Last month I went to a freeze lice clinic and they told me I didn’t have lice and was delusional. (The freezing $209 stopped the itching for one week) I purchased a microscope to prove I wasn’t crazy and found a bug I couldn’t identify. Yes, it fits with thrips.
    Thanks for the advice above.
    Today 1 tsp pure neem, 1 tsp dawn in 24 oz spray bottle left on with a plastic bag on my head. They say topical neem can affect the kidneys if used for more than 2 weeks? So I’m doing all you say at the same time. ACV drink throughout the day, just had my first ACV with honey. Garlic pills have been ordered.
    FYI I discovered peppermint essential oil put in the hair stops them biting so I’m putting a splash of that on before the neem mix.

    Reply
  • So everyone who has this problem, I also have this problem and it’s going on my second year. Doctors will say your delusional because they can’t see them, but we know our bodies and we know there is something wrong. The problem is these doctors now days are not smart there all nurse practitioners and anyone can be a doctor, they all look towards the internet to cure people now day watch them when you go to your next visit. Anyway I think I have a cure and I now what it is look closer with a scope and see if they have wings if they do I know the cure just email me and I’ll tell you because I just ordered mine

    Reply
    • Melissa Posey
      May 4, 2023 5:49 pm

      I am having the same issues and yes some of the ones I have do have wings. I would greatly appreciate any information that you may have regarding these things. Body bugs is one of my biggest phobias that I have and this is driving me crazy. Thank you for your help.

      Reply
  • I have had these thrips for years now. I thought they were bedbugs but I was told I didn’t have those.I am told I have prurigo nodularis. Bugs make prurigo nodularis worse. All I know is that I am in pain and I have tried mint oil, Neem oil,tea tree oil, lavender oil, olive oil, African oil, (it’s a blend of oils)and also many other oils. Neem oil and tea tree oil and olive oil are helpful. Petroleum jelly smothers them some. Alochol 91 kills them on contact. I bathe in ebsom salt,and tea tree oil it helps to Sulfur shampos and soaps help kill them off too. My dermatologist told me to use the sulfur.I hope this helps someone.Pest control is needed too, I’m told. So I will do it too

    Reply
  • I CANNOT BELIEVE IT! Stumbled on to this site & am SHOCKED at what I have read! EXACT SAME situation! Symptoms, Diagnoses & ACCUSATIONS by “Dr’s” & Family: DELUSIONAL, SPUN-OUT, Etc. If this post works, will give more details. But Head/Body Lice symptoms, many sores on scalp NOT from picking or scratching! OTC lice treatment give temporary relief anywhere from 2-36 hrs. These things are even IN MY NOSE/SINUSES! Nose bleeds, tickling feelings DIFFERENT from allergies or hairs, weird headaches, shortness of breath with little exhertion, like when I had COVID Pneumonia! Forced to buy microscope to prove bug is REAL! Still no convincing! Had emergency appt with ANOTHER Dermatologist 1 1/2 wks ago. Couldn’t ID critter or see on me, but prescribed me something noone else would. Oral IVERMECTIN. Took 2nd round today. STILL been needing to treat scalp every other day. Hopefully I can attach my pics? Look forward to your replies & comments! & MAYBE, if we all ban together, can get these self-righteous Dr’s to open their minds & admit they’re WRONG! (won’t hold breath)

    Reply
    • Wow what a relief to find this out. Been throw it all as well. Thought I was crazy myself. I’m a hairy guy as it is and thought I had body lice I’m a plumber nothing would surprise me but yea found these thrips instead thanks for the info Rob…..

      Reply

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