Do Carpet Beetles Bite? Debunking Myths and Revealing Facts

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Carpet beetles are common household pests that can cause damage to fabrics, fur, and other items made of animal fibers.

However, many people wonder if these tiny insects can actually bite humans. The answer to this question might surprise you.

Adult carpet beetles, which usually measure around 1/16 to 1/8-inch in length, do not bite nor feed on fabrics.

Varied Carpet Beetle

Instead, they feed on flower pollen and nectar outdoors. Although they might be an unwelcome sight in homes, adult carpet beetles are harmless to humans.

On the other hand, carpet beetle larvae are the culprits behind any damage to fabrics and other materials.

While they don’t bite humans, their tiny hairs can cause skin irritation in some people, often being mistaken for bites.

Do Carpet Beetles Bite?

Is It a Bite or an Allergic Reaction

Carpet beetles do not bite humans. Instead, some people might experience an allergic reaction due to contact with carpet beetle larvae.

The larvae have tiny hairs that can cause:

  • Irritation
  • Rash
  • Redness

This reaction might resemble an insect bite, leading to confusion. For example, it could be mistaken for bites from other pests like:

Comparing insect bites and reactions:

Insect Symptoms Harmful
Carpet Beetle Rash, irritation, redness No
Bed Bug Red welts, itchy, swelling No
Flea Small red bumps, itchy No
Clothes Moth None (larvae damage fabric) No

It’s essential to correctly identify the cause of your skin reaction. People with sensitive skin may experience more severe symptoms.

To prevent carpet beetle infestations, consider:

  • Regular vacuuming
  • Laundering clothes and fabrics frequently
  • Sealing cracks and crevices in your home

Keep your home clean and free of potential food sources to minimize the risk of an infestation.

 

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Identification and Life Cycle

Types of Carpet Beetles

There are three main types of carpet beetles:

  1. Varied carpet beetle: Small, rounded beetles with dark or patterned wing covers.
  2. Furniture carpet beetle: Similar to varied carpet beetles, but with more distinct white, yellow, and black scales.
  3. Black carpet beetle: Solid black and larger than the other two types.

Recognizing Signs of Infestation

Signs of carpet beetle infestation include:

  • Damaged fabrics, fur, and feathers.
  • Tiny molted skins from larvae.
  • Adult beetles around windows and on windowsills.

Life Cycle

Carpet beetles have a four-stage life cycle: egg, larvae, pupa, and adult. Here are its features:

  • Adult carpet beetles feed on flower pollen and nectar outdoors.
  • Adults do not cause damage to fabrics.
  • Larvae are responsible for damaging indoor materials made from animal fibers.

To understand the carpet beetles’ life cycle better, here’s a comparison of the different stages:

Stage Duration Characteristics
Egg 8 to 15 days Female lays 40 to 90 white eggs on suitable larval food sources.
Larva Varies by species Larvae are tiny and have a tapered body, feed on fabrics and animal fibers.
Pupa Varies by species Transition period before adult emerges, found in protected locations.
Adult Several weeks Small beetles, feed on pollen and nectar outdoors, may enter homes through windows, do not damage fabric.

It is essential to identify the species and life cycle stage to effectively deal with a carpet beetle infestation.

Damage and Habitat

Fabrics and Materials Affected

Carpet beetles are known for causing damage to various fabrics and materials. They mainly target:

  • Wool: They are attracted to woolen items such as carpets, rugs, and clothes.
  • Silk: They can damage silk items including clothing and upholstery.
  • Natural fibers: Carpet beetles feed on natural fibers such as cotton and linen.
  • Leather: They may damage leather products like shoes, belts, and furniture.
  • Feathers: They are known to eat feathers found in items like pillows and stuffed animals.
  • Animal skins: Carpet beetles can cause damage to fur garments and accessories.
Carpet Beetle

Common Hiding Places

Carpet beetles prefer quiet and undisturbed areas, these pests can be found in:

  • Carpets: Carpet beetles can infest carpets, especially those made of wool or natural fibers.
  • Furniture: Upholstered furniture, cushions, and fabrics can serve as hiding places for these pests.
  • Clothing: Infestations may occur in woolen, silk, or linen clothing.
  • Pet bedding: The pests can target pet beds, especially if they are made using natural fibers.
Carpet Beetles Bedbugs
Mainly target fabrics Target humans and pets
Prefer quiet, undisturbed areas Found near human sleeping areas
Do not bite humans Bite humans, causing red, itchy welts

Prevention and Treatment

Cleaning Methods and Tools

One effective way to prevent and treat carpet beetle infestations is through meticulous cleaning. Here are some recommended steps:

  • Vacuum: Regularly vacuum floors and upholstered furniture to get rid of dust and food sources.
  • Steam cleaning: Use a steam cleaner to treat fabrics, carpets, and curtains, as it can kill carpet beetle larvae.
  • Dust: Wipe down surfaces, baseboards, and air vents to remove potential nesting areas.

A thorough cleaning routine can significantly reduce the chances of an infestation. Remember to pay special attention to:

  • Closets and storage areas
  • Wool carpets and rugs
  • Hard-to-reach corners and crevices

Pest Control Options

If you are dealing with a more severe infestation, you might need to resort to pest control treatments. Here are some common options:

  • Insecticides: Apply a targeted insecticide to affected areas. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for safe and efficient use.
  • Diatomaceous earth: This natural powder can be sprinkled around infested areas to dehydrate and kill carpet beetles.
  • Boric acid or vinegar: Mixing these substances with water can create a solution that can be applied to fabrics to deter carpet beetles.
  • Pest control company: Contact a professional, such as Terminix or Orkin, for expert advice and treatment options.

By combining a regular cleaning routine with targeted pest control treatments, you can successfully prevent and get rid of carpet beetles from your home.

Remember to monitor for signs of infestation to avoid allergic reactions or damage to your belongings.

 

Bug Control Recommendation Tool

What type of pest are you dealing with?

How severe is the infestation?

Do you require child/pet/garden safe treatments (organic)?

Are you willing to monitor and maintain the treatment yourself?


Additional Tips and Information

Distinguishing Carpet Beetles from Other Pests

Carpet beetles can be easily mistaken for other pests, so it’s important to learn how to distinguish them:

  • Size: Adult carpet beetles are small, around 3-5 millimeters long1.
  • Wing covers: Their wing covers can have dark color or patterned designs, depending on the species1.
  • Larvae: They have a tapered body with alternating light and dark stripes and tiny hairs1.

Commonly mistaken bugs include:

  • Moth larvae, which are usually longer and have a caterpillar-like appearance2.
  • Bed bugs, which are reddish-brown, oval-shaped, and flat-bodied3.
Bed Bug

Conclusion

In conclusion, carpet beetles, while not harmful through bites, can cause damage and allergic reactions through their larvae.

We have explained above about the identification, life cycle, and types of carpet beetles, emphasizing the importance of recognizing signs of infestation and implementing preventive measures.

We have also shared various treatment options, both natural and chemical to manage these common pests.

By staying informed and proactive, individuals can effectively safeguard their homes against carpet beetle infestations.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do carpet beetles bite?

Carpet beetles do not bite humans but can cause a rash or discomfort due to their shed hairs4. If you suspect carpet beetles, look for the following signs:

  • Damaged fabrics, such as clothing, drapes, and felt 5.
  • Presence of adult carpet beetles around windows or windowsills6.

How can I prevent carpet beetles?

To avoid carpet beetle infestations, take these precautionary measures:

  • Store clothes in sealed bags or containers.
  • Regularly vacuum and clean drawers and dressers7.
  • Seal cracks around your home’s exterior foundation8.

What are some treatment options for carpet beetles?

If you have a carpet beetle infestation, consider the following methods:

  • Use a flying insect fogger, but make sure to cover food and follow instructions carefully9.
  • Vacuuming infested areas thoroughly and disposing of the vacuum bag outside10.
  • Laundering infested fabrics at high temperatures, ideally above 120°F11.

Footnotes

  1. Finding and removing variegated carpet beetles 2 3
  2. Clothes Moths and Carpet Beetles: Identifying and Controlling Fabric Pests
  3. Bed Bugs | University of Kentucky Entomology
  4. Carpet beetles: symptoms, bites, infestations, and treatment
  5. Carpet Beetles: How to Prevent Infestations
  6. Clothes Moths and Carpet Beetles: Identifying and Controlling Fabric Pests
  7. Carpet Beetles: How to Prevent Infestations
  8. Carpet Beetles – School IPM – USU Extension | USU
  9. How to get rid of carpet beetles
  10. Finding and removing variegated carpet beetles
  11. A Guide to Identifying and Controlling Carpet Beetles

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about carpet beetles. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Carpet Beetle Larvae from Iran not causing Bites

larve or worm
Location: iran/tehran
October 30, 2010 9:30 am
Hi I’m Maryam. My family and I are living in Iran.
During the last month my parents suffered from some kind of rash or bite…!
Who did not understand what causes allergies.
Until we find a large number of very small worms under their bed.

Their length is about 4 mm… We do not know exactly where they live..!?
Do they live in textiles, mattress or in soils and between the tiles..?
Because they also existed under the carpets
Is it possible they eat blood?
Because some of them had a reddish color…
How we destroy them?
Thanks for your help
Signature: allergen worms

Carpet Beetle Larvae

Hi Maryam,
The insects in your photo are Carpet Beetle Larvae, probably in the genus
Attagenus based on comparison with some photos on BugGuide

Carpet Beetles have a cosmopolitan distribution and they are responsible for doing considerable damage to museum collections that contain animal specimens including insect collections, taxidermy specimens, and human textiles made of wool and other organic materials, but they are not responsible for the bites in the second photo you have submitted. 

The Carpet Beetle Larvae will also feed on pet hair and human hair, but they may be damaging your wool rugs.  The bites are another matter entirely, and we are not sure what might be causing them.

Unknown Bites

Letter 2 – Carpet Beetle Larva and Adult from Canada

Subject: strange location
Location: Toronto, Ontario
December 9, 2014 11:04 am
Hello!
I’m hoping you can help me identify these two critters. I live on the 28th floor of a condo building in Toronto. I seem to find these bugs all year round. The first I often find near my patio door (both dead and alive…this one was alive until I caught it for the photo op). It crunched when I squished it. Its about the size of a sesame seed.

The second one I found in the bottom of a laundry basket full of dirty laundry, though I feel like I’ve seen them elsewhere before. It was more wriggly and is about the size of a grain of rice.

I should also mention I’ve found little beetles in my cupboard, which I assumed were something like a grain beetle (though a couple were munching on some rogue chocolate the other day). I wasn’t as concerned about them since their location made sense.
Signature: Thanks! Meg

Carpet Beetle Larva
Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Meg,
The “wriggly” larva is that of a Carpet Beetle, and since you have reported adult beetles as well, we are presuming that they are the same species.  The adult looks like it might be
Attagenus rufipennis based on this image on BugGuide.  Carpet Beetles are cosmopolitan household pests. 

The larvae feed on a variety of organic items found in the home, including stored foods and organic fibers, even wool, fur and feathers.  Adults feed on pollen, so finding them near windows makes perfect sense, as does finding them dead.  Since they can’t get outside to feed, they die seeking the light. 

Carpet Beetle may be Attagenus rufipennis
Carpet Beetle may be Attagenus rufipennis

Am I allergic to this hairy bug
Location: Boston MA
November 13, 2010 3:22 pm
Hi Daniel,
Great website! I love learning from what you’ve put together. You’ve made me very curious about bugs.
In particular, I have a bug that I am having trouble identifying. I’ve found them in my home, in the bedroom and a few other places.

Bugs I have observed are 1/8th inch to almost 1/4 inch long. The one in the attached pictures is 3/16ths inch long (just short of 1/4 inch). It’s the biggest one I’ve found. It has hair tufts along its body.

My best guess is a Carpet Beatle / wooly bear, but I am not sure that is right. Is this the larva of Anthrenus verbasci beetle? Or what do you think it is?

What can I expect from this bug living in my home? I have asthma, and have noticed I have been having more irritation with my lungs since I noted these insects, especially after spending a night in the bedroom where I found them. Could I have some allergy to their presence / fur?

If I need to remove them from my home, can you recommend a method?
Thanks so much, Daniel!
Signature: Justin Molloy

Carpet Beetle Larva

Hi Justin,
We are not medical professionals and we feel very reluctant to provide any opinion regarding the possibility of Carpet Beetle Larvae being connected to a complex syndrome like asthma that can be triggered by stress as well as the physical environment.  We will try to address you letter as best we can. 

We agree that this larva is in the genus Anthrenus (see BugGuide), however we are very reluctant to provide an exact species identification, though Anthrenus verbasci is a strong possibility.  According to BugGuide, the habitat of Carpet Beetles is:  “An abundant household ‘stored product pest.’

In nature they inhabit the abandoned nests of birds and mammals, as well as old wasp nests where the larvae scavenge on accumulated fur, feathers, skin flakes, and dead insects” and additional comments include: 

“Controlling carpet beetles can be achieved by keeping your home free of accumulated hair and dust (dust is mostly shed skin flakes of people and pets), discarding infested items and properly storing vulnerable items. Store dry foods (including dry pet food) in glass or metal containers with tight-fitting lids.

Store woolens, furs, silks in a cedar chest. Forget mothballs and moth crystals. They are ineffective and carcinogenic respectively.

Because the larvae may feed upon fur, hair and skin flakes, it is possible that environmental factors are contributing to your asthma and that the presence of the Carpet Beetle Larvae is a symptom of an underlying problem that might be corrected by more frequent vacuuming and cleaning of accumulated debris.

Hi Daniel,
Thank so much.  This info is very helpful, and is the link to your site on Anthrenus.
Really appreciate your guidance!  Have a great day.
Justin

Letter 4 – Carpet Beetle

tiny spotted flying bug!
Location: Columbus Ohio
February 12, 2011 1:19 am
i have had these tiny black/brown/beige spotted bugs for about a year now. They used to only hang out in my living room window sill during the spring when we would have our windows open (we have screens, not sure how they got in). Recently, they’re abundant in my bedroom.

On my walls, bedposts (metal bed) and crawling on my pillows (what a delight to wake up to!). They tend to hang around by my cats food on the carpet, but they have never been IN his food or on my cat. I have no bites.

I thought they were harmless until lately I see them flying with their hidden wings around my room. But mostly they crawl. Haven’t noticed any holes in bedsheets, even checked my cats ears but they’re not in there either! Haven’t seen any in my closet either. They seem to be less than a cm large…Please Help!
Signature: Nikki Ater

Carpet Beetle

Hi Nikki,
This ia a Carpet Beetle in the genus
Anthrenus, which you may confirm on BugGuide.  This is a common household pest that is also responsible for doing major damage to museum collections.  Your photo that includes the orange carpet amuses us.

Letter 5 – Carpet Beetle in the UK

Subject: house insect
Location: aylesbury Buckinghamshire, england UK
March 16, 2015 5:50 am
Hiya i keep seeing these bugs around our home and just wondered what they are. There is not a lot of them and only see them every so often just dont know whether its a house bug or or something that crawling in through windows etc.
Signature: elliott tunbridge

Carpet Beetle
Varied Carpet Beetle

Dear Elliott,
This is a Varied Carpet Beetle, Anthrenus verbasci, a common household pest.  The larvae of Carpet Beetles are often found indoors where they feed on shed pet hair and other organic materials.

Adults feed on pollen and though they do not damage the home or its furnishings, they can become a nuisance when they are plentiful and they gather on window sills in an effort to get outside.  They often die indoors.

We have been receiving Carpet Beetle identification requests daily right now, and we have not posted a new image recently.  Your image is of a good quality, so we have determined it is time for a new Varied Carpet Beetle posting that can be featured.

Letter 6 – Household Bugs: Carpet Beetles, Fly Puparia or other?????

Subject: whats this bug?
Location: Refrigerator and freezer
October 26, 2013 8:53 pm
Hello,
I just signed the lease of my new apartment (10/25/2013) and started moving in (10/26/2013). I typically do a thorough cleaning from top to bottom of any new place I move into. When I went to the kitchen to clean I opened the refrigerator and saw what looked like fried rice or pieces of brown rice sticking to the top and a few were on the bottom.

I opened the freezer and there were a few in there as well. These bugs were not moving so I assumed that it was just that, perhaps old food left behind so I got the cleaning supplies and went to work. Once I finished, I placed a pack of bottled water in the refrigerator, shut the door and continued to clean the rest of the apartment.

An hour or two I came back to grab a bottle of water and these ”brown rice” looking bugs were back!! a few were on my pack of bottled water and at the bottom of the frige again. DISGUSTING!! The refrigerator is kinda old and has some rust on the inside in some places.

I also noticed th e refrigerator does not get that cold at all Im extremely pissed and will be heading to the rental office first thing Monday morning!!!! What are your thoughts on what this could be?
Signature: as professional as possible

Blurry Bugs in Refrigerator
Blurry Bugs in Refrigerator

Dear asap,
Your photos are quite blurry and we cannot make an exact identification due to the poor quality, however, we suspect you may have Carpet Beetle Larvae.  Our second guess would be Fly Puparia.

Blurry Bugs on Water Bottle
Blurry Bugs on Water Bottle

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts
Tags: Carpet Beetle

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26 Comments. Leave new

  • I actually just finished raising three of these exact larvae, and they did indeed grow up to be Anthrenus verbasci. As for the asthma bit, my mother also had asthma attacks when the carpet beetles were present in the home. After the house was thoroughly cleaned to get rid of the carpet beetles (except for my three) her asthma flare up became a lot less frequent. However, the same thing happens when the house is quite dusty even without the carpet beetles, so I definitely think it’s most likely related to the environment, and not the larvae themselves.

    Reply
  • Not bites: stings. One can develop an allergy / hypersensitivity to the urticating hairs, sometimes loaded with toxins, that these pritnear omnipresent, if almost always hidden, beasties lob at their unsuspecting hosts. Contact dermatitis is the most common effect. I spent most of the last two years blinded by corneal ulcers after catching debris from pupae in my eyes, despite safety goggles, while scraping/prepping walls and ceilings of my last rental home for paint. White papers suggest the allergy can be either trauma-related or a cumulative exposure type thing, so gloves and respirators are a good idea when cleaning out attics, basements, or anywhere these guys are found to congregate. While they don’t bite, the stings can be crippling, even deadly to the right person in the wrong colonized circumstance. Vacuum cracks and crevices, day & night, and toss infested clothing/furniture/rugs/bedding/etc: it will be less costly than trying to restore your most beloved personal articles, if the infestation is visibly active. I learned the hard way, over 4 yrs with this allergy. The month in ICU this summer was awful, but [ahh] carpet-beetle-larvae-free.

    Reply
    • This is fascinating information. Thank you for providing our readership with your personal experience regarding Carpet Beetle Larvae.

      Reply
    • After reading this I am convinced that this is what has been the issue in my home. Over the last year I have been losing an unhealthy amount of hair and am curious if these pest could have something to do with it since my doctor cannot seem to find any answer for it. Thank you for sharing your struggle and I am glad you are beetle free. I am not looking forward to this.

      Reply
  • I too have been and still am suffering from Carpet Beetle Larvae Urticaria. Past four years, I am really suffering with this and no matter how much I vacuum, clean, steam, etc, I can’t catch a break. I have the larvae in my car and every night on my drive home from work I suffer. I can’t seem to get rid of them, especially the fibers in my clothes I’ve washed several times. How can I get rid of these quickly and how can I get the non healing sores they seem to cause, to stop? Several biopsies confirmed insect bite reaction and I’ve found 3 mature beetles in my house. I clean 5 hours everyday and exhausted by this, I refuse to believe it’s Morgellons. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank You.

    Reply
    • We are sorry, but we do not provide extermination advice.

      Reply
    • Virginia Vaquera
      October 26, 2021 6:41 am

      I’m tried cleaning with vinegar it does work because I think I’m going to the same thing and the only thing that honestly works for my skin is going to be the vinegar as well apple cider vinegar it does Sting on the parts where the hairs I guess you want to say get stuff in your skin I thought it was mold floors I haven’t ruled that out yet cuz I think it’s a combination of both but I do shower with Head and shoulders Believe it or not regular cleaning classic Head and shoulders will help you but you have to wash your body first with a dry wash cloth soaked apple cider vinegar rub all your body vigorously like that first and then get in the shower and email

      Reply
  • I have a carpet beedle infestation in my home. they are in frig, leather couch and my bed. everywhere.
    I have cleaned and cleaned but cant seem to be rid of them. now they are affecting my body.
    I have an allergic reaction to the hairs which are now giving me bite like marks especially on lower legs, my heel (used full strength tea tree oil) a lot better now, at least I can walk without too much pain. they are also in my hair (but cant get a good look on scalp. but I can feel them. I put boric acid on scalp (think it helps). they get in my clothes.
    I went on vacation (taking clothes that were bagged). it was a nightmare. they were in the bed crawling on me constantly. its the same at home. I use a sticky roller on kitchen counter tops to remove them, but they keep coming back.
    what can I put on my skin to keep them off me. my hands are swollen with a horrible itch, also legs are same. a lot of times they get into my underwear. I am at my wits end. seems nobody knows what to do. or they don’t believe it.
    do you know how to get rid of this allergy so I can enjoy life again. I am now age 67 and retired…but life is horrible.
    I cant even make food, i.e soup..they seem to fall into it.
    have used peppermint oil, neem paste..alchohol (maybe I should drink it) haha, nothing helps
    please help me

    Reply
    • I believe you because I have the same thing going on. My hair is infested with them and so is my carpet. My copd and asthma have been affected greatly. Family doesn’t see them and think I’m crazy. They are eating my hair away, they even eat the shampoo as I’m washing my hair. I won’t eat because I can see them crawling in the food. Nothing seems to kill these creatures.

      Reply
    • Virginia Vaquera
      October 26, 2021 6:46 am

      Earthkind.com use a spider supplement for the laundry and for showering videos of a washcloth and apple cider vinegar all over your body first before getting in the shower after that’s done and you clean your body’s early you may have to use more than one washable off wash with Head and shoulders clean and classic or an antibacterial soap probably dial be your best bet original Marshall lattice of London doesn’t have perfume in it that’s what makes it lather you do not want that it makes worse than what it is more slimy more sticky we do not want to email me from one information I think I went broke finding out exactly what the clue to this thing actually was

      Reply
  • I have a carpet beedle infestation in my home. they are in frig, leather couch and my bed. everywhere.
    I have cleaned and cleaned but cant seem to be rid of them. now they are affecting my body.
    I have an allergic reaction to the hairs which are now giving me bite like marks especially on lower legs, my heel (used full strength tea tree oil) a lot better now, at least I can walk without too much pain. they are also in my hair (but cant get a good look on scalp. but I can feel them. I put boric acid on scalp (think it helps). they get in my clothes.
    I went on vacation (taking clothes that were bagged). it was a nightmare. they were in the bed crawling on me constantly. its the same at home. I use a sticky roller on kitchen counter tops to remove them, but they keep coming back.
    what can I put on my skin to keep them off me. my hands are swollen with a horrible itch, also legs are same. a lot of times they get into my underwear. I am at my wits end. seems nobody knows what to do. or they don’t believe it.
    do you know how to get rid of this allergy so I can enjoy life again. I am now age 67 and retired…but life is horrible.
    I cant even make food, i.e soup..they seem to fall into it.
    have used peppermint oil, neem paste..alchohol (maybe I should drink it) haha, nothing helps
    please help me

    Reply
  • I must also mention I had orkin spray my house for carpet beedles, which they had confirmed, but they couldn’t fix the problem..

    Reply
  • I have tiny black flying beetles ? carpet? they fly on my arm etc… they die in my kitchen , get into dry goods,, they are more rounded than weevels i have seen dry goods,,,how can i use home remedy to get rid of them? Spray carpet with vinagar water? or ?? Any suggestions? I live in hot dry high desert town….. PLEASE HELP,, contact me on here,,, thank you.

    Reply
  • I only find one or two of them at a time and only ever find them on my bedding and pillows. I do not have any pets that shed hair either.

    Reply
  • Hi there just spootted this while trying to id bugs i keep finding all over my flat…moved in 8 weeks ago and im over run with them..warm weather seems to be bringing them out. Any idea if they pose a health risk? I suffer with asthma and copd. Thanks in advance.

    Reply
  • I live in PA and the Carpet Beetles have been here two springs in a row. I have seen them only in my laundry room in the winter. But only a few. What do we have to do to get them out of the house, if that is possible.

    Reply
  • I have a bug thats on my bed every night how can i post a picture of it to show u thanks

    Reply
  • yup…just found one my pillow. Interestly, a week ago I changed the padding under my old carpet, and about 3 weeks ago, i got new carpet in my basement… I wonder if that has anything to do with it. Its still cold, and we just had a major snow this past weekend…so I’m thinking this guy did not come from outside…My question is, what do they do?

    Reply
  • Francine Gallagher
    March 31, 2018 11:24 am

    I have an investigation of carpet beetles. I’ve seen two different types the black and the brown speckled. I have suffered for over a month and a half with terrible rashes and bites. I have read that they do not bite although I have actual have bites and irritations. i’m not sure if they carry some type of mite. I originally thought I had scabies and I had been treating myself to no avail. The dermatologist are useless they’re just looking to shoot Botox and filler’s. Right now I’m feeling really good my rash is healing and my inflammation is decreasing.
    Okso this is what I have done of course clean like crazy throw out anything infested. Somethings can’t be washed because they just have too many hairs remaining almost impossible to get out of clothes. I have been bathing in Dead Sea salt , baking soda, avocado oil and epson salt, I soak for an hour.
    I’ve been using aloe vera and for some reason they’re not biting me. I also had my house sprayed for carpet beedles.

    Reply
  • Francine Gallagher
    March 31, 2018 11:24 am

    I have an investigation of carpet beetles. I’ve seen two different types the black and the brown speckled. I have suffered for over a month and a half with terrible rashes and bites. I have read that they do not bite although I have actual have bites and irritations. i’m not sure if they carry some type of mite. I originally thought I had scabies and I had been treating myself to no avail. The dermatologist are useless they’re just looking to shoot Botox and filler’s. Right now I’m feeling really good my rash is healing and my inflammation is decreasing.
    Okso this is what I have done of course clean like crazy throw out anything infested. Somethings can’t be washed because they just have too many hairs remaining almost impossible to get out of clothes. I have been bathing in Dead Sea salt , baking soda, avocado oil and epson salt, I soak for an hour.
    I’ve been using aloe vera and for some reason they’re not biting me. I also had my house sprayed for carpet beedles.

    Reply
  • I have an investigation of carpet beetles. I’ve seen two different types the black and the brown speckled. I have suffered for over a month and a half with terrible rashes and some type of mite. I originally thought I had scabies and I had been treating myself to no avail. The dermatologist are useless they’re just looking to shoot Botox and filler’s. Right now I’m feeling really good my rash is healing and my inflammation is decreasing.
    Okso this is what I have done of course clean like crazy throw out anything infested. Somethings can’t be washed because they just have too many hairs remaining almost impossible to get out of clothes. I have been bathing in Dead Sea salt , baking soda, avocado oil and epson salt, I soak for an hour.
    I’ve been using aloe vera and for some reason they’re not biting me. I also had my house sprayed for carpet beedles.

    Reply
  • I have an investigation of carpet beetles. I’ve seen two different types the black and the brown speckled. I have suffered for over a month and a half with terrible rashes and some type of mite. I originally thought I had scabies and I had been treating myself to no avail. The dermatologist are useless they’re just looking to shoot Botox and filler’s. Right now I’m feeling really good my rash is healing and my inflammation is decreasing.
    Okso this is what I have done of course clean like crazy throw out anything infested. Somethings can’t be washed because they just have too many hairs remaining almost impossible to get out of clothes. I have been bathing in Dead Sea salt , baking soda, avocado oil and epson salt, I soak for an hour.
    I’ve been using aloe vera and for some reason they’re not biting me. I also had my house sprayed for carpet beedles.

    Reply
  • Vicki Scarff
    July 2, 2020 7:51 pm

    Hi everyone im so glad i came across this ! Im in my 3rd year of this nightmare im in the uk, i was bitten over 50 times by mozzies and horseflies me and hubby just started our own landscaping business a few weeks later i started feeling unwell with bouts of sickness and dihorreah i lost nearly 4 stone in 2 months im losing my teeth just waiting for full extraction i had a private parasite test by pci, and results said i have live nematode but they couldn’t say what as it hasnt hatched, also fungal infection, anemia, staph infection, i had bilaterial palsy, my immune system was failing i had body tremor lost vidion and hearing in left side my finger tips and toes are constantly numb now my infectious disease dr has just discharged me as he cant find anything and thinks its mental health… its crazy im so sick of trying to find the answer but tonight i found a bag of clothes and thought omg whatt the hell theres maggotts but cant be because they had legs then came across powder post beetle which lead me here… my whole family are suffering and i feel stuck 🙁 like you guys i cant breathe in my home i feel sick and closterhobic but when im away im great how do i get drs to look at me and take me serious

    Reply
  • Sharon taylor
    March 6, 2022 4:40 am

    I keep finding these in my bedroom, on my bed. I’ve also recently been getting bitten like gnat bites,is it these that are causing them? If so how can I stop/get rid of them? Please

    Reply

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