White Spotted Sawyer Beetle Bite: Poisonous or Harmless?

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When you come across a white-spotted sawyer beetle, you might wonder if its bite is poisonous. Rest assured, these fascinating insects are not known for being venomous or posing a significant threat to humans. The white-spotted sawyer beetle is a native wood-boring species found throughout the Northeast, and in the Northwest to Alaska, and is commonly mistaken for the Asian longhorned beetle source.

These beetles are usually found feasting on dead or damaged pine trees, and pose no real harm to our forests source. However, getting bitten by one might still be a painful experience, but it’s important to remember that this isn’t due to toxins or venom. In case you come across these insects in your surroundings, remember to appreciate their beauty while also respecting their space.

Identification of White Spotted Sawyer Beetle

The white-spotted sawyer beetle, scientifically known as Monochamus scutellatus, is a native species of wood-boring insect found throughout the Northeast and Northwest regions of North America, extending up to Alaska. It’s essential to correctly identify them since they can easily be confused with the invasive Asian longhorned beetle (ALB).

The most distinguishing feature of a white-spotted sawyer beetle is its large size and the single white spot at the top center of its wing covers. This white spot differentiates it from the ALB, which has approximately 20 white spots on each wing cover. The body of a white-spotted sawyer beetle is more subdued in color, compared to the shiny black appearance of an ALB.

Additionally, these beetles have long antennae, often longer than their body. Males tend to have longer antennae than females. Please note the white-spotted sawyer beetle has the following notable characteristics:

  • Single white spot at the top center of wing covers
  • Dull-colored body, in contrast to ALB’s shiny black body
  • Long antennae, especially in males
  • Native to the Northeast and Northwest regions of North America

When comparing the white-spotted sawyer beetle to the ALB, the differences are noticeable upon close inspection. But it’s essential to understand these distinctions to ensure proper identification and management.

Remember, recognizing the white-spotted sawyer beetles correctly is crucial for promoting effective management strategies and conserving the wood resources in the ecosystem.

Life Cycle of White Spotted Sawyer Beetle

The life cycle of the White Spotted Sawyer Beetle consists of four stages: eggs, larva, pupa, and adults.

Eggs
Female sawyer beetles lay their eggs in the crevices of dead or dying conifer trees. The eggs hatch after a few weeks, and the newly emerged larvae start to bore into the wood for shelter and food.

Larva
The larvae feed on the wood for about 1 to 3 years. They create tunnels through the wood, causing it to weaken over time. As the larvae grow, they molt several times before reaching the pupal stage.

Pupa
When the larva has matured, it forms a protective chamber called the pupal cell. Inside the pupal cell, the larva undergoes a transformation into an adult beetle. This stage usually lasts for a few weeks.

Adults
Once the transformation is complete, the adult sawyer beetle emerges from the pupal cell. Adult beetles are strong flyers, and they search for mates to continue the life cycle. Males have longer antennae than females, making it easier to find them.

Remember, the White Spotted Sawyer Beetle is not poisonous. Their bite is not dangerous to humans. While the sawyer beetles may cause damage to weakened trees, they mostly feed on dead or dying trees, acting as natural decomposers in forest ecosystems.

So, if you come across a White Spotted Sawyer Beetle, you can observe its fascinating life cycle without fear, knowing it poses no threat to your health or safety.

Habitat and Range

The whitespotted pine sawyer beetle is a native species in North America, predominantly found in the Northeast and Northwest regions, extending up to Alaska source. They are commonly found in habitats where their coniferous host trees, such as pines and spruces, are present.

These beetles are quite adaptive and can inhabit a variety of environments, from dense forests to suburban areas. The primary condition for their survival is the availability of their preferred host trees. If you spot one, it’s most likely they’re living off damaged or diseased trees in your area.

It’s important to note that while these beetles might appear intimidating, they’re not known to have poisonous bites. So, you can rest assured that you don’t have to worry about being bitten by them. In fact, they mostly feed on dead or dying trees and are an essential part of their ecosystem source.

In conclusion: The whitespotted pine sawyer beetle is a native species found in various habitats across North America, playing a crucial role in maintaining the health of their host trees. And while they might look intimidating, they don’t pose any threat to humans with their bites.

Diet and Behavior

White-spotted sawyer beetles, native to Northeast and Northwest regions, are not known for biting or being poisonous to humans. These beetles feed on a variety of coniferous trees such as pine and spruce.

The larvae of these beetles play a significant role in nutrient cycling within forest ecosystems. They feed on the inner bark and wood of weak, damaged, or diseased coniferous trees, breaking down dead wood and aiding in natural decomposition processes.

In their adult stage, white-spotted sawyer beetles are black and shiny, with a distinctive white spot between their elytra at the base. They are often mistaken for the invasive Asian longhorned beetle, which unlike sawyer beetles, targets healthy hardwoods like maple trees. To differentiate the two, remember that sawyers have a single distinctive white spot instead of 20 white spots on their wing cover like the Asian longhorned beetle.

Adult sawyer beetles lay eggs on the bark of weakened trees. The hatched larvae then bore into the wood, feeding on it for up to two years before emerging as adults. As the larvae feed, they help to break down and recycle nutrients, providing benefits to the surrounding environment.

When caring for coniferous trees in your yard, it’s essential to keep them healthy and monitor for signs of infestation. By doing so, you can minimize potential damage from white-spotted sawyer beetles and maintain a thriving habitat for these beneficial insects.

Impact on Ecosystem

The White Spotted Sawyer Beetle plays a role in the ecosystem, especially in coniferous forests. They feed on the phloem and cambium layers under the bark of coniferous hosts, like pine and spruce trees. Though their bite is not poisonous, these beetles can still have an impact on the health of trees.

After a fire or storm event, they are attracted to the burned forests due to the abundance of dead or dying trees. This makes them nature’s clean-up crew, helping to break down dead wood and return nutrients to the soil.

However, their feeding on weakened trees can sometimes lead to problems. Their tunneling can reduce a tree’s ability to transport water and nutrients, causing further stress and sometimes death to the host tree.

Let’s look at some features of the White Spotted Sawyer Beetle’s impact on the ecosystem:

  • Prefer coniferous hosts
  • Attracted to fire-damaged or storm-weakened trees
  • Feed on phloem and cambium layers
  • Beneficial in breaking down dead wood in forests
  • Can potentially stress weakened trees

Remember that the beetle’s bite is not poisonous, but their role in the ecosystem might contain both positive and negative effects. As you enjoy the outdoors, it’s essential to recognize the creatures’ importance and how they contribute to maintaining a healthy forest ecosystem.

Relation with the Logging Industry

As you may know, the white-spotted sawyer beetle is a wood-boring insect that often targets weakened or dead trees, which may impact the logging industry. These beetles infest a variety of trees, affecting the quality of wood harvested for various industries.

Logs infested with white-spotted sawyer beetles can cause a decrease in the overall value of the lumber. For example, an infestation can lead to the need for additional processing to remove damaged areas, increasing costs for the logging industry.

When the logging industry is cutting trees vulnerable to infestation, it’s important to take preventative measures to reduce the likelihood of attracting these wood-boring beetles. One effective way is to promptly remove and process the weakened or dead trees before the beetles have a chance to lay eggs.

In comparison to other wood-boring insects, white-spotted sawyer beetles are not considered the most harmful to the logging industry. However, they can still be a significant concern, especially when large numbers are present.

To sum up, the white-spotted sawyer beetle can have a substantial impact on the logging industry, especially when infestations occur in large numbers. Being mindful of preventative measures can help minimize the beetle’s effect on the logging operations and overall wood quality.

Bite of White Spotted Sawyer Beetle

The white-spotted sawyer beetle is a native species of wood-boring insects found in various regions, including the Northeast, Northwest, and Alaska. You may come across them in wooded areas, and their presence may raise concern about their bite.

Although white-spotted sawyer beetles have a set of mandibles that allow them to chew on wood, they are not generally considered harmful to humans. In case you ever find one on your skin, it is quite unlikely that it will bite you. Even if a bite does occur, it would not be poisonous or particularly harmful. It might cause some temporary discomfort, but nothing severe.

Remember, these beetles are primarily focused on feeding on wood and laying their eggs in dead or dying conifer trees. So, instead of worrying about the possibility of a bite, it’s better to appreciate their role in helping regulate forest ecosystems.

If you’re concerned about misidentifying white-spotted sawyer beetles in the future, remember to note the distinctive white spot on their elytra, which makes them easier to distinguish from potentially harmful insects like the Asian longhorned beetle.

Preventive Measures and Control

The white spotted sawyer beetle, also known as the spotted pine sawyer, is a pest that can cause damage to trees, but their bites are not poisonous to humans. However, it’s still essential to take preventive measures and control these pests to protect your trees and surroundings.

Firstly, to protect your trees from infestation, keep them healthy and well-watered. A stressed tree is more likely to attract sawyer beetles. Regularly inspect your trees for signs of damage or infestation, such as exit holes, sawdust-like frass, or weakened branches.

If you find sawyer beetles on your property, consider the following steps:

  • Remove any infested branches or trees promptly to reduce the likelihood of the problem spreading.
  • Dispose of the infested material away from other trees to prevent larvae from spreading to healthy trees.

When dealing with spruce sawyer beetles specifically, try to:

  • Avoid stacking firewood near healthy trees, as it could attract the adult beetles.
  • Cut down and remove spruce trees that have been seriously damaged by storms or other factors, as they are more prone to infestations.

In summary, staying proactive by maintaining your trees’ health and removing infested materials can help prevent and control sawyer beetle infestations. Remember, their bites are not poisonous, but you should be aware of their potential impact on your trees and surroundings. Stay vigilant, and your trees will thank you!

Comparison with Similar Species

In this section, we’ll compare the white-spotted sawyer beetle with some similar species such as the Asian longhorned beetle, spruce bug, and other beetles in the genus Monochamus and family Cerambycidae. Comparing their appearances and characteristics will help you identify the white-spotted sawyer beetle correctly.

The white-spotted sawyer beetle is a native species found throughout North America, with a distinctive white spot between its head and wing covers. It mainly attacks dead or dying trees, including pines, spruces and other conifers, without causing any significant harm to the forests. source

On the other hand, the Asian longhorned beetle is an invasive species that poses a significant threat to various hardwood trees, especially maples. Unlike the white-spotted sawyer beetle, the Asian longhorned beetle has about 20 white spots on each wing cover, and its body is shiny black. source

Here is a comparison table to highlight the differences:

Feature White-Spotted Sawyer Beetle Asian Longhorned Beetle
Origin Native Invasive
Spot pattern Single white spot 20 white spots
Body color Dull black Shiny black
Target trees Dead/dying conifers Healthy hardwoods

Now, let’s talk about spruce bugs and other Monochamus beetles. The spruce bug is another beetle that belongs to the family Cerambycidae, but it is not as closely related to the white-spotted sawyer beetle. Spruce bugs are often found on spruce trees, feeding on the needles and young shoots. They are typically smaller and have a different color pattern compared to the white-spotted sawyer beetle.

Finally, other closely related beetles in the genus Monochamus have long antennae and similar body shapes as the white-spotted sawyer beetle. However, their color patterns and markings can help you differentiate them. For example, some Monochamus species have a mottled appearance while others may lack the distinct white spot of the white-spotted sawyer beetle.

In conclusion, by carefully observing the features and characteristics of these beetles, you can accurately identify the white-spotted sawyer beetle and avoid confusion with other similar species.

Additional Information

The white spotted sawyer beetle is a common wood-boring beetle found throughout North America. They are known for their distinctive black body with white spots and very long antennae. While these beetles might look intimidating, their bite is not poisonous. In fact, they are more interested in seeking out trees like eastern white pine, jack pine, black spruce, and balsam fir for feeding and breeding purposes.

These beetles play a role in the natural decomposition process of fallen trees. Their mating behaviors are interesting, as males use their long antennae to locate females emitting pheromones. Once they have found a female, they mate, and females lay their eggs within the bark of affected trees.

There’s no need to worry about these beetles causing harm to your health. However, they can negatively impact the trees they infest. Some of the trees affected by white spotted sawyer beetles include:

  • Eastern white pine
  • Jack pine
  • Black spruce
  • Balsam fir

In summary, the white spotted sawyer beetle is not a danger to humans but can cause damage to certain tree species. It’s essential to be aware of their presence and take steps to protect trees if necessary.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – White Spotted Sawyer with Phoretic Mites

 

Unknown Borer Beetle
Location: Rocky Mountain House, AB, Canada
October 20, 2011 12:24 am
I saw this beetle at the front entrance to the Visitor Center at Rocky Mountain House National Park in Alberta in June. I took the picture and went inside and asked if anybody could tell me what it was. One person walked outside and said it was a June Bug and to be careful as it may bite, then stomped on it. It doesn’t look like a June Bug as I remember growing up in Colorado. It has very much the shape of a Banded Alder Borer. Maybe 40 mm including antenna. Also, if you look closely around the thorax, does it have an infestation of lice?
At the Canadian border this week, I picked a brochure titled ”DON’T MOVE FIREWOOD”. Prominently displayed on the front of the brochure is, I think, a picture of this beetle, implying that it is some kind of invasive species, but it doesn’t identify it. What is it?
Signature: R. Reed

White Spotted Sawyer with Phoretic Mites

Dear R. Reed,
Your beetle is one of the native Longhorned Borers, specifically
Monochamus scutellatus, the White Spotted Sawyer which is named for the white scutellum, the triangular shaped marking at the base of the elytra or wing covers.  According to BugGuide, other common names include Longicorne noir in French speaking Canada and the intriguing names Oil Sands Beetle and Tar Sands Beetle.  Here is the BugGuide explanation for those names:  “The local (to Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada) common names of Oil Sands Beetle and Tar Sands Beetle are due to the attraction of this insect to oil sands. Apparently the attraction is the scent of bitumen, chemically similar to compounds released by the diseased or damaged coniferous trees where they are attracted to lay their eggs.”
The infestation you mentioned are actually Mites, and we were at first uncertain if they were parasitic Mites or opportunistic Mites using the beetle for transportation purposes, a phenomenon known as phoresy.  We found a photo on BugGuide of a White Spotted Sawyer with Mites, but no explanation.  Additional research led us to an online article on the Canadian Entomologist website with the lengthy title:  “REVIEW OF MITES OF THE GENUS MUCROSEIUS (ACARI: MESOSTIGMATA: ASCIDAE) ASSOCIATED WITH SAWYER BEETLES (CERAMBYCIDAE: MONOCHAMUS AND MECYNIPPUS) AND PINE WOOD NEMATODES [APHELENCHOIDIDAE: BURSAPHELENCHUS XYLOPHILUS (STEINER AND BUHRER) NICKLE], WITH DESCRIPTIONS OF SIX NEW SPECIES FROM JAPAN AND NORTH AMERICA, AND NOTES ON THEIR PREVIOUS MISIDENTIFICATION.”  The article begins:  “Six new species of Mucroseius having adult females phoretic on adult sawyer beetles of the genus Monochamus are described,” and that was sufficient to indicate that these mites are interested in the beetles for transportation purposes, though we are curious as to the intricacies of the relationship between these organisms.  Alas, we have no time to delve deeper.
We are somewhat troubled by your experience at the Visitor Center at Rocky Mountain House National Park in Alberta in June.  We can’t help but to wonder if the person who misidentified this Sawyer, mistaking it for a June Bug and promptly stomping on it was a park employee.  That does not seem like appropriate behavior for a national park employee at a visitor center.  We suspect it was more likely another tourist.  The brochure on firewood is noteworthy.  Even native species can have their range expanded through human actions.

Letter 2 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

anyone know what this is???
Location: St.Lewis NL Canada
October 2, 2011 6:03 am
this summer we have been spotting some very strange bugs for around these parts of Labrador…but this one topped the cake yesterday when we saw it outside…
Signature: Cara

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Cara,
Your insect is one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles or Longicorns.  The species is
Monochamus scutellatus, and in French speaking Canada it goes by the common name Longicorne noir.  For English speakers, it is commonly called the Whitespotted Sawyer, though BugGuide also lists Oil Sands Beetle and Tar Sands Beetle as common names and provides this explanation:  “The local (to Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada) common names of Oil Sands Beetle and Tar Sands Beetle are due to the attraction of this insect to oil sands. Apparently the attraction is the scent of bitumen, chemically similar to compounds released by the diseased or damaged coniferous trees where they are attracted to lay their eggs.”

Letter 3 – White-Spotted Rose Beetle from Italy

 

Subject:  Italian Insect Question
Geographic location of the bug:  Albenga, Italy (Liguria)
Date: 04/15/2019
Time: 10:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I now live in Italy and am having a difficult time finding a good resource to answer insect questions.
Today (April 15), I stumbled upon this curious critter chowing down or sleeping in thistle. I even tried to lift her body a little to get a better photo, but she was really locked into that place. Looking closely, I see hairs all over her body including a thicker patch on the underside. Is this some kind of hairy beetle? Yelp!
Thanks in advance for your wisdom. I would love to know a good go-to place to answer my insect questions. I’m seeing some beautiful beings here I’d like to identify.
How you want your letter signed:  Kenda

White-Spotted Rose Beetle

Dear Kenda,
This is indeed a hairy Beetle.  We are relatively certain it is a White-Spotted Rose Beetle, which we identified on RawBirds.com where it states:  “The White Spotted Rose Beetle
(Oxythyrea funesta) is plant eating (phytophagous) beetle in the family Cetonidaewhich is in the genus Oxythyrea. It is also known as The Mediterranean Spotted Chafer. Over wintering larvae, which feed on plant roots, emerge as beetles in late Spring. They feed on the flowers of a wide variety of plants up until early Autumn.”  This image on Insecta.Pro nicely illustrates the hair that covers the body.

White-Spotted Rose Beetle

Thank you very much Daniel! I really appreciate your knowledge and assistance! Do you recommend I use the Rawbirds.com site as my go-to site despite the fact they don’t specifically focus on Italy or is there a more Italy-specific site I can rely on?
Grazie mille,
Kenda

Hi Kenda,
Unfortunately, we have no recommendation for a good site for the average person to use to identify Italian insects.

Letter 4 – White-spotted Sawyer

 

Noticed here in southern New Hampshire (Merrimack) and I have never seen anything like it…. Any ideas?

Totally awesome photograph of a White-spotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus. These large Long-horned Borer Beetles, Family Cerambycidae, are black with a bronze sheen and white markings. The males have extremely long antennae, like your specimen. They attack felled or dead pine trees. Because the larvae make a buzzing sound, they are called “Sawyers”. Though they usually feed on freshly cut logs, they may attack living trees.

Letter 5 – White Spotted Sawyer

 

ID request #2
Location: near Lutsen, MN
July 20, 2011 7:30 am
Recently got back from a trip to the North Shore area of MN. We were hiking the SHT and found two insects that we weren’t able to ID on 6-25-11
The second is a long-horn beetle. He was the largest long-horn I’ve ever seen. Body about 2-3 inches in length. Each antenna about 6 inches.
Thanks again! I
Signature: Heather

White Spotted Sawyer

Hi again Heather,
The white triangular patch where the wings meet, known as the scutellum, is a distinctive marking of the White Spotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus.  Your individual is a male.  Males have significantly longer antennae.

Letter 6 – White Spotted Sawyer

 

Subject: Asian Longhorned Beetle or Spotted White Pine Sawyer?
Location: Saxtons River, Vermont
June 4, 2016 11:33 am
Found her on my house in southeastern VT. If she’s an Asian Longhored beetle, that’s bad news, since they’re a destructive invasive. I’m thinking it is a female Spotted White Pine Sawyer, but it is best to ask the experts (I also reported her to the state dept. of agriculture, just to be safe)
Signature: Patrick

Whitespotted Sawyer
Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Patrick,
This is not the Asian Longhorned Beetle or Starry Night Beetle,
Anoplophora glabripennis, an invasive species.  We agree with you, because of the white scutellum, that this is a Whitespotted Sawyer, and you may compare your image to this BugGuide image for verification.

Letter 7 – White Spotted Sawyer in Canada

 

Subject: What is this Bug?
Location: Fulford, Quebec, Canada
July 6, 2017 12:15 pm
Hello bugman,
I found this bug on my garbage can lid.
I am from Fulford, Quebec, Canada, part of the Eastern Townships.
I would like to know what kind of bug this is. I posted it on my facebook page and was told a pine bug?
I would like an expert opinion please.
Thank you, appreciate your help.
Signature: Tawnia

White Spotted Sawyer

Dear Tawnia,
At first we thought your Longicorn might be the invasive, exotic Starry Night Beetle or Asian Longhorn Beetle,
Anoplophora glabripennis, a species according to BugGuide:  “recently introduced to e. N. Amer. (1996, NY), and spreading (ne. US & so. ON, as of 2007); native to south-central China”, but we realized this is really an especially well marked White Spotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus, which is pictured on BugGuide and which can be identified by the white scutellum.  According to BugGuide:  “Scutellum is the little triangle at the front of the elytra, or wing covers.”

Letter 8 – White Spotted Sawyer with Phoretic Mites

 

Big Mystery Beetle
Location: Algonquin Park, southeastern Ontario, Canada
April 1, 2012 8:12 pm
Hi – we spotted this beetle on our van while stopped on the roadside in Algonquin Park in Ontario, Canada last summer (July 1st, 2011).
At first, we thought about the Asian Long-Horned beetle, but checked out pics of the ALHB and saw some significant differences (white spots, etc.)
The roof rack doesn’t help much to demonstrate scale but, as I remember, this guy was about 1.5 – 2 inches long (head to tail), and the antennae were at least 3-5 inches long.
No idea what the red dots are on the beetle, but they look as though they aren’t a part of him…
Can you help us identify this one?
Thanks
Signature: Allan

White Spotted Sawyer

Hi Allen,
Your large beetle is one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles or Longicorns in the family Cerambycidae, and it is in the same family as the Asian Longhorned Beetle, but your individual is a native.  We posted a letter last year of another White Spotted Sawyer from Canada and at that time we identified the hitchhikers as Phoretic Mites.  Here is a link to that posting.

Letter 9 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Hi I am wondering what this bug is?
This bug landed on my shoulder while camping in the Rocky Mountains in B.C. and I am very curious about it. Do you know what it is? Thanks,
Kara

Hi Kara,
This is a Whitespotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus. They are found in coniferous forests and according to BugGuide: “Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc. Common hosts are: Balsam fir, spruces and white pine.” This beetle is known as the Longicorne noir for French Canadians.
.

Letter 10 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Cottonwood Borer??
Location: Catskill, NY
May 30, 2011 9:59 pm
I Was A Bit Confused When I Seen This Bug…2 People Told Me It Was A Stink Bug, But I Didn’t Know What That Was! So I Just Looked Up Info On Here, And The Closest I Came To Was The Cottonwood Borer. Im Always So Curious About Types Of Bugs! Thanks So Much
Signature: Lorrie C.

Whitespotted Sawyer

Hi Lorrie,
You had the right family, but the wrong species.  Both the Cottonwood Borer and your insect, the Whitespotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus, belong in the Longhorned Borer family Cerambycidae.

Letter 11 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject: what is this?
Location: assonet, ma
May 27, 2014 8:13 am
Found this bug on my deck and I was hoping to get info on it. Is it harmful is the main ?
Signature: idk

White Spotted Sawyer
Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear idk,
This is a Whitespotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus, one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae.  The white spot refers to the scuttelum, the triangular shaped area where the wings attach to the body.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc.”  That indicates they are not a threat to healthy trees nor to milled lumber.  We don’t understand what you mean by:  “Is it harmful is the main ?”

Im sorry it was a typo. What I was trying to ask, is it harmful to humans?

The mandibles are quite strong, and they might provide a painful nip and possibly even draw blood if the Whitespotted Sawyer is carelessly handled, but they do not provide a threat to humans.

Letter 12 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject: Flat Faced Longhorn Beetle
Location: Dorrington, CA (Sierra Nevada)
September 11, 2014 6:42 pm
Based on what I’ve seen here and elsewhere, I believe this to be a Flat Faced Longhorn Beetle. This photo was taken in early July, 2012 at our cabin near Dorrington, California, elevation about 5,000 ft. We don’t see these every year, but 2012 we saw at least a half dozen of these large (two-inches of body, four inches total), intrepid beetles on our property. They don’t scare easily, and can be picked up and moved around (which I did so he wouldn’t get smooshed by an errant foot). I don’t know why they show up some years and not others, but they are always startling to see them crawl over a railing a foot from your face.
Signature: Typeaux — SF Bay Area, California

Whitespotted Sawyer
Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Typeaux,
You are correct that this is a Flat Faced Longhorn Beetle in the subfamily Lamiinae, and we can be even more specific.  It is a
Whitespotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus.  According to BugGuide:  “Two-year life cycle. Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc. Common hosts are: Balsam fir, spruces and white pine.”  Perhaps their sporadic appearances are connected to some event that affected the trees.

Letter 13 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject: whats this bug
Location: east hardwick vt
August 24, 2015 8:34 pm
This bug was found climbing up the string attatched to my outside light. Has been a very warm day and inly moved when wind blows did not move when we pulled the string to shut off the light
Signature: thank you sarah

Whitespotted Sawyer
Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Sarah,
This sure looks like a Whitespotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus, to us.  According to BugGuide:  “Two-year life cycle. Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc. Common hosts are: Balsam fir, spruces and white pine.”

Whitespotted Sawyer
Whitespotted Sawyer

Letter 14 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject: Beetle Found in Northern Minnesota
Location: Emily, MN
July 1, 2017 4:09 pm
I’ve never seen a beetle like this one which prompted me to figure out it’s identity. I came outside and spotted it on the hood of my truck. He was patient while I took several photographs. Eventually he walked a couple feet across the hood and took off flying. His body was a little less than an inch long with antennae as long or longer than the body.
Signature: Daniel

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Daniel,
This is a Whitespotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus, and according to BugGuide:  “Similar to others of its genus, but scutellum white. (Scutellum is the little triangle at the front of the elytra, or wing covers.)”  The white scutellum is clearly visible in your image.

Letter 15 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject:  What bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Connecticut
Date: 03/14/2018
Time: 09:49 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have been finding these in my house for two days now, first one yesterday, now two already in less than 1/2 hour. They have been in the kitchen area. Please help. I did put one in a container but have no clue where to take it to find out what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Sue

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Sue,
This looks to us like a Whitespotted Sawyer which is pictured on BugGuide.  The Whitespotted Sawyer is a species of Longicorn and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc. Common hosts are: Balsam fir, spruces and white pine.”  The only explanation we have for them appearing in your home during the winter is that they are probably emerging from firewood.  Do you have a fireplace or wood burning stove?  Have you been storing firewood like pine and spruce indoors? 

Thank you so much for your response. I do have a wood-burning stove but I recently purchased a wood-carved bear that I have had in my house for 2-3 weeks and I believe that is where the problem stemmed from. I see holes in the wood and it has been splitting. Needless to say I put the bear outside and have not had any problems. Thank you again so much!
Susan

  

Letter 16 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject:? Beetle in Teton NP
Geographic location of the bug: Teton NP Death Canyon Trail at the overlook, Wyoming
We were hiking August 20, At the overlook, a friend spotted this bug on his leg. I’m sorry the photo isn’t sharper.
Signature:  D Austin

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear D. Austin,
The white scutellum indicates that your Longhorned Beetle is a Whitespotted Sawyer, and we verified on BugGuide that its range does extend to Alaska.

Thank you so much for your quick response. I wanted to clarify that this beetle was found in Teton National Park in Wyoming. I’m assuming that the range of this beetle, the Whitespotted Sawyer, includes Wyoming.
Thank you,
Debra Austin

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – White Spotted Sawyer with Phoretic Mites

 

Unknown Borer Beetle
Location: Rocky Mountain House, AB, Canada
October 20, 2011 12:24 am
I saw this beetle at the front entrance to the Visitor Center at Rocky Mountain House National Park in Alberta in June. I took the picture and went inside and asked if anybody could tell me what it was. One person walked outside and said it was a June Bug and to be careful as it may bite, then stomped on it. It doesn’t look like a June Bug as I remember growing up in Colorado. It has very much the shape of a Banded Alder Borer. Maybe 40 mm including antenna. Also, if you look closely around the thorax, does it have an infestation of lice?
At the Canadian border this week, I picked a brochure titled ”DON’T MOVE FIREWOOD”. Prominently displayed on the front of the brochure is, I think, a picture of this beetle, implying that it is some kind of invasive species, but it doesn’t identify it. What is it?
Signature: R. Reed

White Spotted Sawyer with Phoretic Mites

Dear R. Reed,
Your beetle is one of the native Longhorned Borers, specifically
Monochamus scutellatus, the White Spotted Sawyer which is named for the white scutellum, the triangular shaped marking at the base of the elytra or wing covers.  According to BugGuide, other common names include Longicorne noir in French speaking Canada and the intriguing names Oil Sands Beetle and Tar Sands Beetle.  Here is the BugGuide explanation for those names:  “The local (to Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada) common names of Oil Sands Beetle and Tar Sands Beetle are due to the attraction of this insect to oil sands. Apparently the attraction is the scent of bitumen, chemically similar to compounds released by the diseased or damaged coniferous trees where they are attracted to lay their eggs.”
The infestation you mentioned are actually Mites, and we were at first uncertain if they were parasitic Mites or opportunistic Mites using the beetle for transportation purposes, a phenomenon known as phoresy.  We found a photo on BugGuide of a White Spotted Sawyer with Mites, but no explanation.  Additional research led us to an online article on the Canadian Entomologist website with the lengthy title:  “REVIEW OF MITES OF THE GENUS MUCROSEIUS (ACARI: MESOSTIGMATA: ASCIDAE) ASSOCIATED WITH SAWYER BEETLES (CERAMBYCIDAE: MONOCHAMUS AND MECYNIPPUS) AND PINE WOOD NEMATODES [APHELENCHOIDIDAE: BURSAPHELENCHUS XYLOPHILUS (STEINER AND BUHRER) NICKLE], WITH DESCRIPTIONS OF SIX NEW SPECIES FROM JAPAN AND NORTH AMERICA, AND NOTES ON THEIR PREVIOUS MISIDENTIFICATION.”  The article begins:  “Six new species of Mucroseius having adult females phoretic on adult sawyer beetles of the genus Monochamus are described,” and that was sufficient to indicate that these mites are interested in the beetles for transportation purposes, though we are curious as to the intricacies of the relationship between these organisms.  Alas, we have no time to delve deeper.
We are somewhat troubled by your experience at the Visitor Center at Rocky Mountain House National Park in Alberta in June.  We can’t help but to wonder if the person who misidentified this Sawyer, mistaking it for a June Bug and promptly stomping on it was a park employee.  That does not seem like appropriate behavior for a national park employee at a visitor center.  We suspect it was more likely another tourist.  The brochure on firewood is noteworthy.  Even native species can have their range expanded through human actions.

Letter 2 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

anyone know what this is???
Location: St.Lewis NL Canada
October 2, 2011 6:03 am
this summer we have been spotting some very strange bugs for around these parts of Labrador…but this one topped the cake yesterday when we saw it outside…
Signature: Cara

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Cara,
Your insect is one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles or Longicorns.  The species is
Monochamus scutellatus, and in French speaking Canada it goes by the common name Longicorne noir.  For English speakers, it is commonly called the Whitespotted Sawyer, though BugGuide also lists Oil Sands Beetle and Tar Sands Beetle as common names and provides this explanation:  “The local (to Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada) common names of Oil Sands Beetle and Tar Sands Beetle are due to the attraction of this insect to oil sands. Apparently the attraction is the scent of bitumen, chemically similar to compounds released by the diseased or damaged coniferous trees where they are attracted to lay their eggs.”

Letter 3 – White-Spotted Rose Beetle from Italy

 

Subject:  Italian Insect Question
Geographic location of the bug:  Albenga, Italy (Liguria)
Date: 04/15/2019
Time: 10:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I now live in Italy and am having a difficult time finding a good resource to answer insect questions.
Today (April 15), I stumbled upon this curious critter chowing down or sleeping in thistle. I even tried to lift her body a little to get a better photo, but she was really locked into that place. Looking closely, I see hairs all over her body including a thicker patch on the underside. Is this some kind of hairy beetle? Yelp!
Thanks in advance for your wisdom. I would love to know a good go-to place to answer my insect questions. I’m seeing some beautiful beings here I’d like to identify.
How you want your letter signed:  Kenda

White-Spotted Rose Beetle

Dear Kenda,
This is indeed a hairy Beetle.  We are relatively certain it is a White-Spotted Rose Beetle, which we identified on RawBirds.com where it states:  “The White Spotted Rose Beetle
(Oxythyrea funesta) is plant eating (phytophagous) beetle in the family Cetonidaewhich is in the genus Oxythyrea. It is also known as The Mediterranean Spotted Chafer. Over wintering larvae, which feed on plant roots, emerge as beetles in late Spring. They feed on the flowers of a wide variety of plants up until early Autumn.”  This image on Insecta.Pro nicely illustrates the hair that covers the body.

White-Spotted Rose Beetle

Thank you very much Daniel! I really appreciate your knowledge and assistance! Do you recommend I use the Rawbirds.com site as my go-to site despite the fact they don’t specifically focus on Italy or is there a more Italy-specific site I can rely on?
Grazie mille,
Kenda

Hi Kenda,
Unfortunately, we have no recommendation for a good site for the average person to use to identify Italian insects.

Letter 4 – White-spotted Sawyer

 

Noticed here in southern New Hampshire (Merrimack) and I have never seen anything like it…. Any ideas?

Totally awesome photograph of a White-spotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus. These large Long-horned Borer Beetles, Family Cerambycidae, are black with a bronze sheen and white markings. The males have extremely long antennae, like your specimen. They attack felled or dead pine trees. Because the larvae make a buzzing sound, they are called “Sawyers”. Though they usually feed on freshly cut logs, they may attack living trees.

Letter 5 – White Spotted Sawyer

 

ID request #2
Location: near Lutsen, MN
July 20, 2011 7:30 am
Recently got back from a trip to the North Shore area of MN. We were hiking the SHT and found two insects that we weren’t able to ID on 6-25-11
The second is a long-horn beetle. He was the largest long-horn I’ve ever seen. Body about 2-3 inches in length. Each antenna about 6 inches.
Thanks again! I
Signature: Heather

White Spotted Sawyer

Hi again Heather,
The white triangular patch where the wings meet, known as the scutellum, is a distinctive marking of the White Spotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus.  Your individual is a male.  Males have significantly longer antennae.

Letter 6 – White Spotted Sawyer

 

Subject: Asian Longhorned Beetle or Spotted White Pine Sawyer?
Location: Saxtons River, Vermont
June 4, 2016 11:33 am
Found her on my house in southeastern VT. If she’s an Asian Longhored beetle, that’s bad news, since they’re a destructive invasive. I’m thinking it is a female Spotted White Pine Sawyer, but it is best to ask the experts (I also reported her to the state dept. of agriculture, just to be safe)
Signature: Patrick

Whitespotted Sawyer
Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Patrick,
This is not the Asian Longhorned Beetle or Starry Night Beetle,
Anoplophora glabripennis, an invasive species.  We agree with you, because of the white scutellum, that this is a Whitespotted Sawyer, and you may compare your image to this BugGuide image for verification.

Letter 7 – White Spotted Sawyer in Canada

 

Subject: What is this Bug?
Location: Fulford, Quebec, Canada
July 6, 2017 12:15 pm
Hello bugman,
I found this bug on my garbage can lid.
I am from Fulford, Quebec, Canada, part of the Eastern Townships.
I would like to know what kind of bug this is. I posted it on my facebook page and was told a pine bug?
I would like an expert opinion please.
Thank you, appreciate your help.
Signature: Tawnia

White Spotted Sawyer

Dear Tawnia,
At first we thought your Longicorn might be the invasive, exotic Starry Night Beetle or Asian Longhorn Beetle,
Anoplophora glabripennis, a species according to BugGuide:  “recently introduced to e. N. Amer. (1996, NY), and spreading (ne. US & so. ON, as of 2007); native to south-central China”, but we realized this is really an especially well marked White Spotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus, which is pictured on BugGuide and which can be identified by the white scutellum.  According to BugGuide:  “Scutellum is the little triangle at the front of the elytra, or wing covers.”

Letter 8 – White Spotted Sawyer with Phoretic Mites

 

Big Mystery Beetle
Location: Algonquin Park, southeastern Ontario, Canada
April 1, 2012 8:12 pm
Hi – we spotted this beetle on our van while stopped on the roadside in Algonquin Park in Ontario, Canada last summer (July 1st, 2011).
At first, we thought about the Asian Long-Horned beetle, but checked out pics of the ALHB and saw some significant differences (white spots, etc.)
The roof rack doesn’t help much to demonstrate scale but, as I remember, this guy was about 1.5 – 2 inches long (head to tail), and the antennae were at least 3-5 inches long.
No idea what the red dots are on the beetle, but they look as though they aren’t a part of him…
Can you help us identify this one?
Thanks
Signature: Allan

White Spotted Sawyer

Hi Allen,
Your large beetle is one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles or Longicorns in the family Cerambycidae, and it is in the same family as the Asian Longhorned Beetle, but your individual is a native.  We posted a letter last year of another White Spotted Sawyer from Canada and at that time we identified the hitchhikers as Phoretic Mites.  Here is a link to that posting.

Letter 9 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Hi I am wondering what this bug is?
This bug landed on my shoulder while camping in the Rocky Mountains in B.C. and I am very curious about it. Do you know what it is? Thanks,
Kara

Hi Kara,
This is a Whitespotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus. They are found in coniferous forests and according to BugGuide: “Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc. Common hosts are: Balsam fir, spruces and white pine.” This beetle is known as the Longicorne noir for French Canadians.
.

Letter 10 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Cottonwood Borer??
Location: Catskill, NY
May 30, 2011 9:59 pm
I Was A Bit Confused When I Seen This Bug…2 People Told Me It Was A Stink Bug, But I Didn’t Know What That Was! So I Just Looked Up Info On Here, And The Closest I Came To Was The Cottonwood Borer. Im Always So Curious About Types Of Bugs! Thanks So Much
Signature: Lorrie C.

Whitespotted Sawyer

Hi Lorrie,
You had the right family, but the wrong species.  Both the Cottonwood Borer and your insect, the Whitespotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus, belong in the Longhorned Borer family Cerambycidae.

Letter 11 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject: what is this?
Location: assonet, ma
May 27, 2014 8:13 am
Found this bug on my deck and I was hoping to get info on it. Is it harmful is the main ?
Signature: idk

White Spotted Sawyer
Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear idk,
This is a Whitespotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus, one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae.  The white spot refers to the scuttelum, the triangular shaped area where the wings attach to the body.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc.”  That indicates they are not a threat to healthy trees nor to milled lumber.  We don’t understand what you mean by:  “Is it harmful is the main ?”

Im sorry it was a typo. What I was trying to ask, is it harmful to humans?

The mandibles are quite strong, and they might provide a painful nip and possibly even draw blood if the Whitespotted Sawyer is carelessly handled, but they do not provide a threat to humans.

Letter 12 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject: Flat Faced Longhorn Beetle
Location: Dorrington, CA (Sierra Nevada)
September 11, 2014 6:42 pm
Based on what I’ve seen here and elsewhere, I believe this to be a Flat Faced Longhorn Beetle. This photo was taken in early July, 2012 at our cabin near Dorrington, California, elevation about 5,000 ft. We don’t see these every year, but 2012 we saw at least a half dozen of these large (two-inches of body, four inches total), intrepid beetles on our property. They don’t scare easily, and can be picked up and moved around (which I did so he wouldn’t get smooshed by an errant foot). I don’t know why they show up some years and not others, but they are always startling to see them crawl over a railing a foot from your face.
Signature: Typeaux — SF Bay Area, California

Whitespotted Sawyer
Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Typeaux,
You are correct that this is a Flat Faced Longhorn Beetle in the subfamily Lamiinae, and we can be even more specific.  It is a
Whitespotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus.  According to BugGuide:  “Two-year life cycle. Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc. Common hosts are: Balsam fir, spruces and white pine.”  Perhaps their sporadic appearances are connected to some event that affected the trees.

Letter 13 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject: whats this bug
Location: east hardwick vt
August 24, 2015 8:34 pm
This bug was found climbing up the string attatched to my outside light. Has been a very warm day and inly moved when wind blows did not move when we pulled the string to shut off the light
Signature: thank you sarah

Whitespotted Sawyer
Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Sarah,
This sure looks like a Whitespotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus, to us.  According to BugGuide:  “Two-year life cycle. Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc. Common hosts are: Balsam fir, spruces and white pine.”

Whitespotted Sawyer
Whitespotted Sawyer

Letter 14 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject: Beetle Found in Northern Minnesota
Location: Emily, MN
July 1, 2017 4:09 pm
I’ve never seen a beetle like this one which prompted me to figure out it’s identity. I came outside and spotted it on the hood of my truck. He was patient while I took several photographs. Eventually he walked a couple feet across the hood and took off flying. His body was a little less than an inch long with antennae as long or longer than the body.
Signature: Daniel

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Daniel,
This is a Whitespotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus, and according to BugGuide:  “Similar to others of its genus, but scutellum white. (Scutellum is the little triangle at the front of the elytra, or wing covers.)”  The white scutellum is clearly visible in your image.

Letter 15 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject:  What bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Connecticut
Date: 03/14/2018
Time: 09:49 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have been finding these in my house for two days now, first one yesterday, now two already in less than 1/2 hour. They have been in the kitchen area. Please help. I did put one in a container but have no clue where to take it to find out what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Sue

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Sue,
This looks to us like a Whitespotted Sawyer which is pictured on BugGuide.  The Whitespotted Sawyer is a species of Longicorn and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc. Common hosts are: Balsam fir, spruces and white pine.”  The only explanation we have for them appearing in your home during the winter is that they are probably emerging from firewood.  Do you have a fireplace or wood burning stove?  Have you been storing firewood like pine and spruce indoors? 

Thank you so much for your response. I do have a wood-burning stove but I recently purchased a wood-carved bear that I have had in my house for 2-3 weeks and I believe that is where the problem stemmed from. I see holes in the wood and it has been splitting. Needless to say I put the bear outside and have not had any problems. Thank you again so much!
Susan

  

Letter 16 – Whitespotted Sawyer

 

Subject:? Beetle in Teton NP
Geographic location of the bug: Teton NP Death Canyon Trail at the overlook, Wyoming
We were hiking August 20, At the overlook, a friend spotted this bug on his leg. I’m sorry the photo isn’t sharper.
Signature:  D Austin

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear D. Austin,
The white scutellum indicates that your Longhorned Beetle is a Whitespotted Sawyer, and we verified on BugGuide that its range does extend to Alaska.

Thank you so much for your quick response. I wanted to clarify that this beetle was found in Teton National Park in Wyoming. I’m assuming that the range of this beetle, the Whitespotted Sawyer, includes Wyoming.
Thank you,
Debra Austin

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts
Tags: White Spotted Sawyer Beetles

Related Posts

13 Comments. Leave new

  • The mites are phoretic deutonymphs (next-to-last instar) in the family Uropodidae. Many uropodids live in decaying wood or the galleries of beetle larvae, so this association is commonplace. Mucroseius mites look rather different, being more elongate and having much longer legs.

    Reply
  • We have some great specimens in lucite (necklaces) http://tinyurl.com/2czw659

    Reply
  • The phoretic mites are in the family Uropodidae. These are commonly found riding on wood-boring beetles. They are not Mucroseius, as mentioned in the previous post about this association. Uropodid mites are typically round and attach to the insect via a stalk secreted at their back end.

    Reply
  • We have purchase a pine log bed –recently made, it appears that these bugs are coming out of the bed…. what do we do? How do we stop them?

    Reply
    • If the larvae were present in the wood when the bed was constructed, there is nothing you can do but to let the adults emerge. They will not lay additional eggs in the finished bed. Only the larvae that were present prior to the wood being milled will develop within the finished piece of furniture.

      Reply
  • How do you not attract them? are they attracted to cigarette smoke and urine smells?

    Reply
  • Ray tremblay
    July 21, 2016 2:29 pm

    I’ve seen this bug and others like it around labrador. My question is are they dangerous or poisonous? They are disgusting looking so I’m just curious lol

    Reply
  • I am from alberta and, although I have no Idea the actual name of these beetles, I can say that I have always heard them referred to as June bugs as well. Due to their extremely painful bite and ferocious nature if disturbed (grabbing one by the antenna will elicite immediate reaching with strong snapping jaws that can be quite intimidating.), they may be the most feared insect here and as a result tend to get stomped on sight, especially ones that are unfortunate enough to land on an unsuspecting person. If you want to see someone jump and panick, flicking their hand wildly at it, point one out on their collar…

    As for the pamphlet, it may have been for northern pine beetle, which has devistated tens of millions of acres of timber across western canada in recent years.

    Reply
  • I am from alberta and, although I have no Idea the actual name of these beetles, I can say that I have always heard them referred to as June bugs as well. Due to their extremely painful bite and ferocious nature if disturbed (grabbing one by the antenna will elicite immediate reaching with strong snapping jaws that can be quite intimidating.), they may be the most feared insect here and as a result tend to get stomped on sight, especially ones that are unfortunate enough to land on an unsuspecting person. If you want to see someone jump and panick, flicking their hand wildly at it, point one out on their collar…

    As for the pamphlet, it may have been for northern pine beetle, which has devistated tens of millions of acres of timber across western canada in recent years.

    Reply
  • Do white spotted sawyers sleep at night I find in the cooler mornings there none to be seen but when it warms up there everywhere

    Reply

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