Where to Find Carpet Beetle Larvae: A Helpful Guide

Carpet beetle larvae are known for causing damage to fabrics, furniture, and other materials in your home. You may find them hiding in various locations due to their preference for dark and concealed spaces. Identifying where to find carpet beetle larvae is crucial for effective control and to prevent further damage to your belongings.

These little pests are often found burrowed deep into wool, upholstery, or other materials to feast source. Keep an eye out for them along baseboards, underneath large pieces of furniture, or in rarely used drawers and storage areas. Carpet beetle larvae are also known to cause irritation if their hairs are consumed, so it’s important to locate their hiding spots and take appropriate action source.

Remember, detecting carpet beetle larvae can be challenging due to their preference for darker undisturbed areas. Be vigilant and pay close attention to any signs of their presence, such as chewed holes in fabric or carpets. Armed with the knowledge of where these pests are likely to hide, you can effectively tackle any infestations and protect your valuable possessions from damage.

Identifying Carpet Beetle Larvae

Carpet beetle larvae are quite small, typically ranging from 3-7 mm in length. They have a distinct appearance that helps you identify them in your home. These larvae have a tear-drop shaped body and are covered in light brown hairs. They often have alternating light and dark stripes, and their tiny hairs can be “puffed up” when disturbed. To recognize these intruders easily, keep in mind the following features:

  • Small size (3-7 mm)
  • Oval or tear-drop shaped body
  • Light brown hairs covering the body
  • Alternating light and dark stripes

Carpet beetle larvae are not only known to munch on carpets but can be found in various locations throughout your home. They usually feed on high protein foods like animal-based materials, which include pet hair, lint, woolen items, furs, and feathers. However, they also dine on plant material. Because they can hide behind furniture or along baseboards, it’s crucial to be vigilant.

Now that you’re aware of their appearance and characteristics, spotting these little carpet beetles should be much easier. As a result, you can take immediate action to remove them and protect your belongings from damage. Remember; keep an eye out for their distinctive oval body shape and alternating stripes to accurately identify them in your home.

Preferred Habitats of Carpet Beetle Larvae

Carpet beetle larvae are quite versatile when it comes to their preferred habitats. As a result, you may stumble upon them in various places throughout your home. Below, we’ll explore some of the most common spots where these pests tend to thrive.

Carpet beetle larvae are known to have a taste for high-protein food sources, often animal-based, but they can also feed on plant materials. In your pantry, you might find them munching on items like powdered milk, dried meats, or pet food. These creatures also enjoy munching on wool products.

You might also find these pests hidden behind furniture or along baseboards, feeding on lint, pet hair, food crumbs, and other organic debris. In your home, search for them in:

  • Carpets
  • Furniture
  • Closets
  • Window sills
  • Upholstered furniture
  • Dark areas
  • Garages
  • Basements
  • Attics

Carpet beetle larvae can cause significant damage to fabrics and other items. They can leave behind tiny holes and nipped threads on wool sweaters, coats, and pants. When they shed their skin, you might find these casts on your clothing or closet shelves.

In conclusion, it is essential to inspect your home’s aforementioned areas for any signs of carpet beetle larvae. A friendly tip would be to ensure proper cleaning and vacuuming regularly, as this will minimize the likelihood of an infestation developing in your living space.

The Diet of Carpet Beetle Larvae

Carpet beetle larvae are known for their destructive eating habits. They primarily feed on high protein, animal-based materials such as:

  • Fur
  • Wool
  • Hair
  • Dead insects
  • Natural fibers
  • Leather
  • Feathers

In addition to these materials, they may also consume household lint, pet food, wool clothing, and wool rugs, as they can be attracted to items made from these materials [source]. While they do have a preference for animal products, it’s important to note that they can also feed on plant material in some cases.

You may also find carpet beetle larvae in less obvious locations such as inside stored pet food, powdered milk, or dried meats like jerky [source]. To prevent damage, store these food items in airtight containers and clean your pantry regularly.

Carpet beetle larvae are repelled by light and tend to burrow deep into materials like wool and upholstery to feed, making them difficult to find [source]. They are usually located in:

  • Concealed locations along baseboards
  • Under large pieces of furniture
  • Little used drawers or storage areas

By understanding their diet and preferences, you can better protect your home and belongings from these hungry pests.

Signs of Infestation

Carpet beetle larvae can cause significant damage to your home, feeding on materials like wool, carpets, furniture, and clothing. Spotting an infestation early is crucial to prevent extensive damage. Here are some signs to look out for:

Damaged items: If you notice holes or thinning areas in fabrics, particularly wool, it could be the work of carpet beetle larvae. They often target clothing, blankets, and upholstered furniture.Shed skins: These pests shed their skin multiple times throughout their life cycle. Keep an eye out for discarded exoskeletons, which may appear as small, hairy, carrot-shaped particles near the infested items.

Dead insects: Carpet beetle larvae are known to consume dead insects as well. A presence of accumulating dead insects in areas like window sills could hint at the beetle’s own presence nearby.

To ensure the early identification of a carpet beetle infestation, frequently inspect areas where they are more likely to harbor, such as behind furniture or along baseboards. These pests are attracted to accumulated lint, pet hair, food crumbs, and other organic debris 1.

In addition to the damage they cause to your belongings, carpet beetle larvae can also cause irritation if their tiny hairs come into contact with your skin or are ingested [^4^]. So, it’s vital to take action if you suspect an infestation in your home.

Life Cycle of Carpet Beetles

Carpet beetles go through a complete life cycle with four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. In this section, you’ll learn about these stages so you can better understand where to find carpet beetle larvae.

Female carpet beetles lay around 100 eggs that hatch within 1-2 weeks. These eggs are usually laid near possible food sources to increase the chances of survival for their offspring.

Once hatched, the larvae begin feeding immediately. They are tear-drop shaped and covered with light brown hairs, making them easier to spot in your home (source). During this stage, they tend to feed on accumulated lint, pet hair, food crumbs, and more.

Here are some key facts about carpet beetle larvae:

  • They can often be found behind furniture or along baseboards.
  • They prefer high protein, mostly animal-based, foods, but can feed on plant material.
  • Their feeding habits might damage fabrics and furniture.

As the larvae grow, they eventually turn into pupae. The transformation from larva to adult occurs within these pupal casings. Adult carpet beetles emerge from their pupal stage and begin the search for a mate.

In summary, keep an eye out for carpet beetle eggs and larvae near potential food sources and hiding spots, such as behind furniture or along baseboards. Being aware of their life cycle will help you locate and manage these pests more effectively.

Species of Carpet Beetles

Carpet beetles are a common pest found in homes. They can damage fabrics and furniture, and their larval hairs may cause irritation if consumed. In this section, we’ll discuss the different species of carpet beetles and how to identify them.

The black carpet beetle (Attagenus unicolor) is the most common species. Adult beetles are small, black, oval, and about 1/8 to 3/16 inch (3-5 mm) long2. Their larvae are carrot-shaped, golden to dark brown, and can grow up to ½ inch (13 mm) long2.

Another species is the varied carpet beetle. Adult varied carpet beetles are small (3-5 millimeters) and round1. Their wing covers can be dark-colored or patterned, depending on the species, while larvae are similarly sized and have a tapered body1. These larvae have alternating light and dark stripes, covered with tiny hairs1.

The furniture carpet beetle is another species to look out for. These beetles are similar in size and shape to the varied carpet beetle. They can be identified by their patterned wing covers and the hair on their larvae.

Here’s a comparison table to help you distinguish between these species:

SpeciesAdult SizeAdult Color/PatternLarva SizeLarva Color/Pattern
Black Carpet Beetle1/8 – 3/16 inch (3-5 mm)Black and ovalUp to ½ inch (13 mm)Golden to dark brown
Varied Carpet Beetle3-5 millimetersDark-colored or patterned3-5 millimetersLight and dark stripes
Furniture Carpet BeetleSimilar to varied carpet beetlePatterned wing coversSimilar to varied carpet beetleHair on larvae

To prevent infestations, make sure to clean up accumulated lint, pet hair, food crumbs, and dead insects in your home since these areas attract carpet beetles3. Also, keep an eye out for larvae hiding behind furniture or along baseboards.

Management and Prevention

To manage and prevent carpet beetle infestations in your home, maintain a clean environment. Regular cleaning and vacuuming can help remove larvae and beetles. For example, vacuum your carpets, upholstery, and curtains frequently.

In addition to cleaning, use boric acid as a natural and effective way to control pests like carpet beetles. Lightly dust it around the affected areas, but remember, boric acid can be toxic to pets, so use with caution.

Proper sanitation is vital to prevention. Keep your home clutter-free, which will reduce the potential hiding places for carpet beetles. This includes regularly laundering your bed linens and clothing as well.

Increase ventilation in your home by opening windows when possible. Fresh air and sunlight can help deter carpet beetles from settling in.

Store items like clothing, blankets, and linens in airtight containers. This can protect them from any potential infestations.

Consider steam cleaning your carpets and upholstery as high temperatures can kill larvae and beetles. This method is chemical-free and effective in managing infestations.

Remember:

  • Clean and vacuum regularly
  • Use boric acid cautiously
  • Maintain a clutter-free home
  • Open windows for ventilation
  • Store items in airtight containers
  • Steam clean carpets and upholstery

By following these tips, you’ll be well on your way to effectively managing and preventing carpet beetle larvae infestations in your home.

Interesting Facts About Carpet Beetles

You might be surprised to learn that carpet beetles come in various colors and shapes. For instance, their larvae can be round, white, brown, or yellow, depending on the species. Carpet beetles, often found hiding in dark spaces and crevices, are oval-shaped creatures with destructive tendencies. Their ability to fly allows them to move from room to room swiftly, causing more damage.

  • Stripes: Some carpet beetle larvae have distinct stripes visible on their bodies.
  • Hiding spots: These larvae often hide behind furniture or along baseboards and feed on accumulated lint, pet hair, and other organic debris (University of Maryland Extension).
  • What eats carpet beetle larvae? Some wasps and beetles are natural predators that can help control the carpet beetle population.

Adult carpet beetles are known to feed on nectar rather than your fabrics and have different characteristics than their larvae.

 LarvaeAdults
Appearanceround, white, brown, or yellowoval-shaped, often with stripes
Dietfeeds on fabrics, lint, pet hair, etcfeeds on nectar
Ability to flynoyes

Remember to tackle any carpet beetle infestation at the first sight to protect your belongings from their destructive behavior. Keep an eye on dark and hidden areas of your home to catch these tiny insects early.

Footnotes

  1. Oregon State University Extension – Variegated Carpet Beetles 2 3 4

  2. Rutgers University – Carpet Beetles 2

  3. University of Maryland Extension – Carpet Beetles

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Carpet Beetle Larvae

Subject: bug in rug
Location: North Florida
November 8, 2014 7:33 pm
My son is at college and was just cleaning out his room for last minute guests when I found several unexpected guests of a different kind. Initially found them on a towel wrapped around framed artwork his grandfather gave him approximately 3 months ago. My son has visited for a day or 3 but has been away at school for longer. We live in North Florida. The towel came from South Florida. I found the bugs on the towel and on the rug within approximately 3-4′.
Signature: Horrible hostess

Carpet Beetle Larvae
Carpet Beetle Larvae

Dear Horrible hostess,
These are Carpet Beetle Larvae, common, cosmopolitan household pests that feed on a wide variety of organic substances in the home, including wool rugs.

Letter 2 – Carpet Beetle Larva in Canada

Apartment with “charm” has charming bugs too!
Location:  Montreal, Quebec, Canada
September 19, 2010 5:22 pm
On a bathmat (rubber with short-hair pile) in my friend’s bathroom, we found this tiny little guy. The sink pipes are about a foot above the mat. The floor beneath is wood, and we could not find any ’friends’, but the creature is so small, and the floor wood so dark and of uneven colouring, we may have missed any lurkers.
The mat is very close to the toilet bowl. My friend lives in an older building ”with charm”, that has already had mice, chipping paint and a leak from the upstairs neighbour’s bathroom. Foot fungus, fruit flies and moth larvae have also made their appearance.
The little bugger moved relatively fast, so was hard to capture even with a higher quality camera and good macro lens. The bathroom’s light source is harsh and concentrated in one spot, so not diffuse at all – halogen, I believe. Sorry for the lack of visual detail, the rest of the shots were too blurry to tell even the vague shape of the insect. But you CAN still see the small spike at the tail end, and the darker head area, as well as the back stripes.
We are located in Montreal, Quebec (Canada), beginning to get cold temperatures before autumn has even hit, so this might be a factor in determining if the insect was perhaps brought out of hiding unseasonably early. To date the insect has not been spotted anywhere else in the apartment, and the bath mat has been bug free, at least to the casual naked eye.
Is my friend facing a menace or is this bug expected under the circumstances?
Signature:  Montreal bugwatch

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Montreal bugwatch,
This is a Carpet Beetle Larva and it is not a welcome visitor.  Carpet Beetles will feed on many varieties of organic substances, including wool, silk, feathers, pet fur and sometimes stored foods.  Tell your friend it is nearly impossible to keep all insects from the home, despite the lack of “charm” it may possess.  Regarding the Fruit Flies and Moth Larvae infestations, they were probably not left behind by the previous tenant unless rotting bananas and stale oatmeal were left in the cupboards somewhere, or if they were able to penetrate the walls from the neighbors’ apartments.  Those pests may have been introduced with new food, or due to less than meticulous housekeeping habits.

Letter 3 – Carpet Beetle Larva

My neighbor says they have bed bugs
Location: Lawrence, KS USA
October 20, 2010 8:39 pm
I don’t think this is a bed bug but it looks like it was living in my bed. What is it and should I be worried?
Signature: -Nandu

Carpet Beetle Larva

Hi Nandu,
Your neighbor may have Bed Bugs.  We understand they are reaching epidemic proportions in parts of the country including New York and other large cities.  Luckily, your insect is not a Bed Bug.  It is the larva of a Carpet Beetle, and though they will damage certain wool, fur and feather products, they will not pester you in the same way those pestiferous Bed Bugs will.

Thank you so much for the super fast response. I have had nightmares about bed bugs for days.

Letter 4 – Carpet Beetle Larva

New bug in my home
Location: Los Angeles, CA
December 18, 2010 3:34 pm
I’ve recently been seeing more and more of a tiny bug in my home. I usually spot them in the kitchen, but I’ve recently spotted a few in the bathroom. Most of the ones I’ve found have been dead and found on plates or in pots in the cupboard. (yuck!). The bug is about 5mm long, lots of legs and a bit fuzzy. I’m located in the Los Angeles Area. I’ve seen this bug for about the past 6 months.
what is it? and how do I discourage it from living in my home?
See attached photos.
Signature: Fritzy

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Fritzy,
Funning the vacuum cleaner more often to remove human and pet hairs should help control your Carpet Beetle population unless you have wool rugs as they will also feed on wool fibers.

Letter 5 – Carpet Beetle Larva and Mystery Bug

Mite identification
Location: Asheville, NC
December 28, 2010 11:41 am
My house is infested with a small bug, possibly a mite. And my boyfriend now has them at his house and I’ve carried them to my office as well.
I’ve seen something tiny on numerous occasions, but I have only been able to catch one of these bugs, in some oil. These things are tiny (like the period at the end of this sentence and are very quick to hide. They get into everything in the house and are crawling on my body as well.
Can you help me identify this bug? I have bumps and soars on my skin, which may be bites or just a reaction to the bugs.
My photos are at 40x magnification.
Signature: Dee

Mystery Bug

Dear Dee,
It appears that you have two very different creatures represented in your photographs.  One of them is a mystery to us, but it does not look like a mite.  The other, which you have labeled Dees Bug, appears to be a Carpet Beetle Larva which is a common household pest, but we do not believe it is responsible for your skin condition, nor do they move quickly.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to identify your other creature.  In addition to the two images you have sent, you may also have a problem with Mites which are frequently associated with abandoned bird’s nests in the attic areas of the home.

Letter 6 – Carpet Beetle Larvae

Subject: Insect eggs?
Location: Saint Louisville, Ohio
January 5, 2017 9:29 am
Cleaned underneath my stove and found a bunch of these little guys. I believe they have already hatched. Can you please tell me what they are? Thank you
Signature: Cherry

Carpet Beetle Larvae

Dear Cherry,
Hard to reach spots including under the stove and refrigerator, are likely places to find Carpet Beetle larvae, common household intruders that will feed on pet hair, food scraps and other organic material that falls to the floor in the kitchen.

Letter 7 – Carpet Beetle Larva from Croatia

Subject:  What kind of bug and is it dangerous?
Geographic location of the bug:  Split, Croatia, Europe
Date: 12/15/2017
Time: 06:05 AM EDT
Hi, this little bug is about 0,5 cm large and kids constantly find it in their room. It is fall now, winter soon, but the bugs are present whole year. What kind is it and is it dangerous?
How you want your letter signed:  Irena V.

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Irena,
This is a Carpet Beetle larva, a common cosmopolitan pest found in homes.  They will feed on many organic materials found in the home, including shed pet hair and wool rugs.  We are postdating your submission to go live to our site at the end of the month when we are away for the holidays.

Letter 8 – Carpet Beetle Larvae

Subject:  Desperate for help to I’d bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  Croydon under my bed
Date: 11/02/2018
Time: 09:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear bug man I have some plastic boxes under my bed and found these two small bugs under there. I thought both were dead but then one started walking. Opposite my house they cut a large tree down yesterday but it was probably there already. I panicking there bed bugs but I hope it’s not a bug that causes infestation but if it is I need to I’d and sort it.
How you want your letter signed:  Wendy

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Wendy,
This is a Carpet Beetle Larva, a common household pest.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Carpet Beetle Larvae

Subject: bug in rug
Location: North Florida
November 8, 2014 7:33 pm
My son is at college and was just cleaning out his room for last minute guests when I found several unexpected guests of a different kind. Initially found them on a towel wrapped around framed artwork his grandfather gave him approximately 3 months ago. My son has visited for a day or 3 but has been away at school for longer. We live in North Florida. The towel came from South Florida. I found the bugs on the towel and on the rug within approximately 3-4′.
Signature: Horrible hostess

Carpet Beetle Larvae
Carpet Beetle Larvae

Dear Horrible hostess,
These are Carpet Beetle Larvae, common, cosmopolitan household pests that feed on a wide variety of organic substances in the home, including wool rugs.

Letter 2 – Carpet Beetle Larva in Canada

Apartment with “charm” has charming bugs too!
Location:  Montreal, Quebec, Canada
September 19, 2010 5:22 pm
On a bathmat (rubber with short-hair pile) in my friend’s bathroom, we found this tiny little guy. The sink pipes are about a foot above the mat. The floor beneath is wood, and we could not find any ’friends’, but the creature is so small, and the floor wood so dark and of uneven colouring, we may have missed any lurkers.
The mat is very close to the toilet bowl. My friend lives in an older building ”with charm”, that has already had mice, chipping paint and a leak from the upstairs neighbour’s bathroom. Foot fungus, fruit flies and moth larvae have also made their appearance.
The little bugger moved relatively fast, so was hard to capture even with a higher quality camera and good macro lens. The bathroom’s light source is harsh and concentrated in one spot, so not diffuse at all – halogen, I believe. Sorry for the lack of visual detail, the rest of the shots were too blurry to tell even the vague shape of the insect. But you CAN still see the small spike at the tail end, and the darker head area, as well as the back stripes.
We are located in Montreal, Quebec (Canada), beginning to get cold temperatures before autumn has even hit, so this might be a factor in determining if the insect was perhaps brought out of hiding unseasonably early. To date the insect has not been spotted anywhere else in the apartment, and the bath mat has been bug free, at least to the casual naked eye.
Is my friend facing a menace or is this bug expected under the circumstances?
Signature:  Montreal bugwatch

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Montreal bugwatch,
This is a Carpet Beetle Larva and it is not a welcome visitor.  Carpet Beetles will feed on many varieties of organic substances, including wool, silk, feathers, pet fur and sometimes stored foods.  Tell your friend it is nearly impossible to keep all insects from the home, despite the lack of “charm” it may possess.  Regarding the Fruit Flies and Moth Larvae infestations, they were probably not left behind by the previous tenant unless rotting bananas and stale oatmeal were left in the cupboards somewhere, or if they were able to penetrate the walls from the neighbors’ apartments.  Those pests may have been introduced with new food, or due to less than meticulous housekeeping habits.

Letter 3 – Carpet Beetle Larva

My neighbor says they have bed bugs
Location: Lawrence, KS USA
October 20, 2010 8:39 pm
I don’t think this is a bed bug but it looks like it was living in my bed. What is it and should I be worried?
Signature: -Nandu

Carpet Beetle Larva

Hi Nandu,
Your neighbor may have Bed Bugs.  We understand they are reaching epidemic proportions in parts of the country including New York and other large cities.  Luckily, your insect is not a Bed Bug.  It is the larva of a Carpet Beetle, and though they will damage certain wool, fur and feather products, they will not pester you in the same way those pestiferous Bed Bugs will.

Thank you so much for the super fast response. I have had nightmares about bed bugs for days.

Letter 4 – Carpet Beetle Larva

New bug in my home
Location: Los Angeles, CA
December 18, 2010 3:34 pm
I’ve recently been seeing more and more of a tiny bug in my home. I usually spot them in the kitchen, but I’ve recently spotted a few in the bathroom. Most of the ones I’ve found have been dead and found on plates or in pots in the cupboard. (yuck!). The bug is about 5mm long, lots of legs and a bit fuzzy. I’m located in the Los Angeles Area. I’ve seen this bug for about the past 6 months.
what is it? and how do I discourage it from living in my home?
See attached photos.
Signature: Fritzy

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Fritzy,
Funning the vacuum cleaner more often to remove human and pet hairs should help control your Carpet Beetle population unless you have wool rugs as they will also feed on wool fibers.

Letter 5 – Carpet Beetle Larva and Mystery Bug

Mite identification
Location: Asheville, NC
December 28, 2010 11:41 am
My house is infested with a small bug, possibly a mite. And my boyfriend now has them at his house and I’ve carried them to my office as well.
I’ve seen something tiny on numerous occasions, but I have only been able to catch one of these bugs, in some oil. These things are tiny (like the period at the end of this sentence and are very quick to hide. They get into everything in the house and are crawling on my body as well.
Can you help me identify this bug? I have bumps and soars on my skin, which may be bites or just a reaction to the bugs.
My photos are at 40x magnification.
Signature: Dee

Mystery Bug

Dear Dee,
It appears that you have two very different creatures represented in your photographs.  One of them is a mystery to us, but it does not look like a mite.  The other, which you have labeled Dees Bug, appears to be a Carpet Beetle Larva which is a common household pest, but we do not believe it is responsible for your skin condition, nor do they move quickly.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to identify your other creature.  In addition to the two images you have sent, you may also have a problem with Mites which are frequently associated with abandoned bird’s nests in the attic areas of the home.

Letter 6 – Carpet Beetle Larvae

Subject: Insect eggs?
Location: Saint Louisville, Ohio
January 5, 2017 9:29 am
Cleaned underneath my stove and found a bunch of these little guys. I believe they have already hatched. Can you please tell me what they are? Thank you
Signature: Cherry

Carpet Beetle Larvae

Dear Cherry,
Hard to reach spots including under the stove and refrigerator, are likely places to find Carpet Beetle larvae, common household intruders that will feed on pet hair, food scraps and other organic material that falls to the floor in the kitchen.

Letter 7 – Carpet Beetle Larva from Croatia

Subject:  What kind of bug and is it dangerous?
Geographic location of the bug:  Split, Croatia, Europe
Date: 12/15/2017
Time: 06:05 AM EDT
Hi, this little bug is about 0,5 cm large and kids constantly find it in their room. It is fall now, winter soon, but the bugs are present whole year. What kind is it and is it dangerous?
How you want your letter signed:  Irena V.

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Irena,
This is a Carpet Beetle larva, a common cosmopolitan pest found in homes.  They will feed on many organic materials found in the home, including shed pet hair and wool rugs.  We are postdating your submission to go live to our site at the end of the month when we are away for the holidays.

Letter 8 – Carpet Beetle Larvae

Subject:  Desperate for help to I’d bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  Croydon under my bed
Date: 11/02/2018
Time: 09:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear bug man I have some plastic boxes under my bed and found these two small bugs under there. I thought both were dead but then one started walking. Opposite my house they cut a large tree down yesterday but it was probably there already. I panicking there bed bugs but I hope it’s not a bug that causes infestation but if it is I need to I’d and sort it.
How you want your letter signed:  Wendy

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Wendy,
This is a Carpet Beetle Larva, a common household pest.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

8 thoughts on “Where to Find Carpet Beetle Larvae: A Helpful Guide”

  1. I can’t actually make out any bug in the photo but from the description and symptoms two possibilities spring to mind, grass fleas and sand flies (called midgies in Australia, small enough to pass through insect mesh and have a preference for biting below the knees. They will cause itching and lumps and some people can have severe reactions to them and break out in rashes). Grass fleas will happily move inside if there is an opportunity and they particularly like long pile carpets.

    Reply
  2. I have the same mite in my home and on me. Dr. Louis Sorkin at the NY Museum of Natural History believes it is a mite, but needs either more photos or a physical sample. I have only dead ones, that have been through a hot dryer, but no live ones. If the poster has a live one, please add a comment here, and we can collaborate on getting a sample to Dr. Sorkin. I am going to try the IR bulb over soapy water. I will post again if that works or I have any further information on it.

    Reply
  3. administrator – I would be grateful if you could contact the person who posted this photo and advise her that I am trying to reach her. thank you

    Reply
  4. Hi I do not know what that mystery big is a picture of kind of looks like scabies. I also have these on me and its big enough to see without magnification. Can’t see the details or that its a big but u can tell its not part of your body.

    Reply
  5. Persistent or unusual presentations originating from an insect should be further evaluated for bacterial, viral, protozoal and fungal symbionts.

    Certain arthropods infected with, say, klebsiella or wolbachia bacteria, protists, fungi, etc. – can change their feeding and host preferences, even their appearance.

    This is documented between termites and toxocara, mosquitos and filarodeia and enterobius and dientamoeba fragilis.

    The outcome is generally a persistent inflammation of unknown etiology.

    Defining the infection and its symbionts could cure many ailments. Sometimes heartworm, lungworm, stomachworm, bladderworm cysts are mistaken for cancer. Because we assume humans do not get these. But… we’re learning they do. Even in developed countries. Poly or multiparasitism is understudied. Sometimes killing the bacteria involved can starve the others. Sometimes people die. Fascinating.

    Reply

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