Where Do Scorpions Live? A Quick Guide to Their Habitats

folder_openArachnida, Scorpiones
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Scorpions are fascinating creatures that many people find intriguing. Their unique appearance and intriguing behavior make them a popular topic of study. One of the questions you might have about these arachnids is where they live.

You’ll find scorpions in various environments across the globe. They are most commonly found in deserts but can also thrive in grasslands, savannas, and even some forests. These adaptable creatures can be found on every continent except Antarctica, making them incredibly widespread.

In their habitats, scorpions typically seek shelter in burrows, under rocks, or in crevices. These spots provide protection from predators as well as a hiding place during the day. At night, scorpions venture out to hunt for their prey and find a mate. So, if you ever wondered where scorpions call home, now you know they reside in diverse environments across the world.

General Information About Scorpions

Scorpions are fascinating creatures that belong to the class Arachnida. They are invertebrates and share this class with other arachnids such as spiders and ticks. The group of scorpions specifically falls under the order Scorpiones.

These creatures have some unique features that make them stand out. For instance, they have:

  • Eight legs
  • Two large pincers (pedipalps)
  • A segmented tail with a venom gland and a stinger

Scorpions can be found in various habitats across the globe, including deserts, forests, and grasslands. They have adapted well to their environments and even thrive in harsh conditions.

As an example, the striped bark scorpion is native to Missouri and can be found in dry, warm, rocky areas. Similarly, the most common species in Oklahoma is about two inches long and can also be found in a range of habitats.

In terms of reproduction, scorpions are known for their unique method. They give birth to live young, instead of laying eggs like insects do. A scorpion can have as many as 100 babies in a single brood.

So, now you know a bit more about these fascinating arachnids. Just remember to keep your distance when you encounter them in the wild, because their stingers can pack quite a punch!

Scorpion Habitats

Desert Habitats

Scorpions are mostly found in dry, desert areas. Their preference for sandy and arid regions makes deserts in North America, Africa, and Southwest United States excellent habitats for them. For example, the arid regions of Mexico and the southern parts of the United States are suitable environments where different scorpion species thrive.

Some scorpions live in the deserts of Australia and South America, adapting to the harsh climate and sandy landscape. These species have certain features that help them adapt to desert life:

  • Specialized exoskeletons to reduce water loss
  • Nocturnal lifestyles to avoid extreme heat during the day
  • Efficient burrowing skills to stay cool and hide from predators

Forest Habitats

Although many scorpions are native to desert regions, some species find their homes in forests and grasslands. They prefer hiding under rocks, logs, or leaves, typically being active during the night while hiding from the sunlight during the day.

Here’s a comparison of desert scorpions and forest scorpions:

Characteristics Desert Scorpions Forest Scorpions
Preferred Habitat Arid, sandy landscapes Forests, grasslands, and caves
Climate Hot and dry More varied, sometimes humid
Adaptations Strong burrowers, nocturnal Blends with leaf litter, nocturnal

Urban Habitats

Scorpions aren’t limited to just natural habitats; they can also be found in urban areas. Human dwellings, such as buildings and other human-made structures, can provide adequate shelter and warmth for scorpions. For instance, the striped bark scorpion in Missouri can sometimes be discovered within homes, under piles of wood, and among garbage.

When living in urban habitats, scorpions benefit from:

  • Access to a wider variety of prey
  • Shelter in human-made structures
  • Increased chances to find mating partners

However, there are a few cons in urban environments:

  • Increased exposure to human activities
  • Potential for more predators
  • Loss of natural habit due to urban expansion

Scorpion Anatomy

Body Structure

Scorpions have a unique body structure made up of two main parts: the cephalothorax and the abdomen. Their exoskeleton is tough and made of a protein called chitin, which provides protection and support for their bodies. Scorpions have eight legs, like other arachnids, and an additional two sensory appendages called pedipalps near their mouths.

Tail and Sting

The tail of a scorpion is made up of several segments that end in a sharp, curved stinger. This stinger is used to inject venom into their prey or defend against predators. The venom can cause immense pain and, in some cases, be lethal to humans, though usually only for those who are allergic. The tail is usually raised in an arch over the body, ready to strike when needed.

Claws and Pincers

Scorpions have powerful claws called pedipalps that they use for capturing prey and as weapons. These claws, resembling pincers, allow scorpions to grasp their prey and hold it while they deliver a lethal sting. Additionally, scorpions can use their pedipalps to help manipulate objects in their environment or navigate through tight spaces.

Remember, scorpions are fascinating creatures with unique anatomical features suited to their arid or rocky habitats. Learning about their anatomy can help you understand their behavior and ecological role. Stay curious and enjoy exploring the world of scorpions!

Venom and Predation

Scorpions as Predators

Scorpions are known to be skilled predators. They mostly rely on their powerful venom to subdue and kill their prey. Their diet mainly consists of insects, spiders, and even other scorpions. Bark scorpions, for example, are venomous and particularly skilled in capturing prey despite their small size.

Typically, scorpions ambush their prey using their specialized pincers to hold it in place. Then, they deliver a deadly injection of venom with their stinger. Their venom contains a complex mixture of compounds, some of which have numerous pharmacological properties1.

Scorpions as Prey

Even though scorpions are fearsome predators, they can also become prey for a variety of larger creatures. Vertebrates such as snakes, birds like owls and hawks, and even some mammals like bats and coyotes, are known to prey on scorpions. Centipedes, which are invertebrates, can also feed on them.

However, the act of predation is not without its risks for the hunters. They must deal with the potentially deadly sting from their prey. Scorpions use their venom to not only hunt but also to protect themselves from other predators2.

In conclusion, scorpions play a dual role in their ecosystems as both predators and prey, showcasing the diversity and complexity of the relationships within their natural habitats.

Scorpion Behavior

Reproduction

Scorpions reproduce sexually, involving a unique mating dance called the “promenade à deux.” Females give birth to live young called scorplings, which they carry on their back until the first molt. Some species may produce 20-30 offspring or more in a single brood. A few examples include:

  • Emperor Scorpion: Known for giving birth to around 9-32 scorplings
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion: Usually gives birth to 25-35 scorplings

Adaptation

Scorpions show remarkable adaptability to their environments. They can endure harsh conditions like deserts and live in various habitats from forests to grasslands. Key adaptations include:

  • Burrowing: Scorpions dig burrows in the soil to escape extreme temperatures or predators
  • Exoskeleton: A tough, outer layer that helps them to retain water and protect against predators

Scorpions have developed sensory adaptations like tiny hairs on their body to detect vibrations around them. This helps them locate prey and avoid dangers.

Nocturnal Activity

Scorpions are nocturnal creatures, meaning they are active at night. They do this to stay cool, escape predators, and hunt prey efficiently. When searching for food, they rely on their sensitive pincers and tails to capture and subdue the prey.

To give you an idea, here’s a comparison table showing two common scorpion species and their nocturnal activities:

Scorpion Species Diet Preferred Temperature for Activity
Emperor Scorpion Insects, small mammals Around 75°F
Arizona Bark Scorpion Insects, small spiders Above 75°F

By being nocturnal, scorpions reduce competition with other predators and increase their chances of survival. So, when you’re exploring scorpion habitats, remember to be cautious at night, as they are more likely to be active during that time.

Scorpion Species

Commonly Known Scorpions

You might have encountered a few scorpion species, but there are actually over 1,500 different species of these fascinating creatures. They inhabit every continent except Antarctica, and can be found in various types of habitats. One noteworthy species is the bark scorpion, named for their tendency to reside under tree bark or in crevices.

Another intriguing species you may find is the Isometroides vescus, also known as burrowing spiders. These scorpions prefer to dig burrows in sandy soil, hiding from potential predators.

Dangerous Scorpions

While numerous scorpion species exist, not all of them are dangerous. However, the Arizona bark scorpion is one you should be cautious of. This venomous species has a potent sting, which is usually not fatal but can cause intense pain and discomfort.

Here’s a brief comparison between two scorpion species:

Scorpion Species Length Habitat Danger Level
Bark Scorpion 2.5-3.5 inches Tree bark, crevices Low to Medium
Arizona Bark Scorpion 2-3 inches Desert, rocky regions High

When encountering scorpions, it’s essential to familiarize yourself with their characteristics:

  • Size: Scorpions can range from less than an inch up to 8 inches in length.
  • Color: They come in a variety of colors, including tan, brown, and black.
  • Pincers: Scorpions have two large pincers used for catching prey and defense.
  • Tail: The tail contains the scorpion’s venomous stinger, which can be harmful to humans in some species.

Remember, while some scorpions may pose a threat, most species are harmless and play essential roles in the environment.

Scorpions and Human Interaction

Scorpions in the Home

Scorpions can sometimes be found in homes, especially in areas where they naturally occur. They may enter your house through cracks and crevices, windows, doors, and pipes, seeking shelter and food. To keep scorpions out, seal cracks and ensure that windows and doors are tightly closed. Inside your home, scorpions often hide in dark, cluttered spaces, such as:

  • Logs and boards
  • Caves
  • Beneath clutter or debris

Scorpions are attracted to places with high temperatures and are more active at night. They prey on small insects, like ticks and mites, which can be found in areas with clutter and dampness.

Scorpion Stings and Medical Treatment

Getting stung by a scorpion can be harmful, especially to children and pets. Always be cautious when reaching into hidden areas and check your shoes before putting them on. If you are stung, you might experience symptoms like:

  • Pain and swelling
  • Numbness and tingling
  • Difficulty breathing

If you experience any of these symptoms, seek medical treatment immediately. Not all scorpion stings are life-threatening, but it’s a good idea to get checked out just in case. To reduce your risk of being stung, take precautions like:

  • Wearing gloves when handling logs or boards
  • Shaking out shoes before wearing
  • Keeping clutter to a minimum

By staying vigilant and implementing these preventative measures, you can help protect yourself and your loved ones from harmful interactions with scorpions.

Conclusion

Scorpions are versatile creatures, inhabiting a wide range of environments. For instance, they can be found in dry, desert areas, as well as grasslands, forests, and even inside caves. Central America hosts several species, including some that live in trees. Your encounters with these arachnids will depend on the specific habitat you explore.

You might observe that scorpions protect themselves with potent venom, used for both self-defense and capturing prey. However, remember that the severity of their sting varies across species. Be cautious while exploring their natural habitats, such as soil, under rocks, and in mountains, as they tend to hide during the day, coming out to hunt at night.

Furthermore, scorpions play a vital role in their ecosystem by preying on other insects and small animals like lizards. You can admire their resilience, as they have been on Earth for over 350 million years and can adapt to different climates and environments. Always be respectful of their presence and maintain a safe distance while observing them in their natural habitat.

Footnotes

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5678389/

  2. https://www.nps.gov/bibe/learn/nature/scorps.htm

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

unknown spider
February 10, 2010
found this spider in our bathroom twice. We have never seen this type of spider before and would love to know what type it is.
Annest
South Africa

Scorpion Spider from South Africa

Hi Annest,
We will attempt to identify your spider.  How large is it?

The spider was about 1-2 cm long. We have been told that it is from the gnaphosid family, but we would like a specific name….
Thanks.

The members of the family Gnapnosidae are commonly called Ground Spiders.  BugGuide has a nice representation of North American species.  Spiders are often very difficult to identify to the species level even for experts, which we are not.  An expert would rarely make a conclusive identification from a photograph without actually examining the specimen.  Your photo resembles a photo of Gnaposa bicolor from Czech Republic, but that spider has a range that is listed as Europe to Ukraine, Georgia.  Wikipedia has a list of species and locations as of July 5, 2009, and you may try to web search individual names that are listed in South Africa to see if there are images posted online that match your specimen if your level of investment includes having an exact species name.  If your request to have an exact species name is a question of whether the spider is harmless versus dangerous, the Colorado State University Spiders in the Home website indicates:  “Ground spiders, as their common name implies, are most often found under rocks or logs where they build silken retreats and emerge only to hunt. Some species wander indoors when the weather turns cold. Ground spiders are harmless to humans.

Update: January 26, 2011
T.M. just sent us a comment identifying this unusual spider as a Scorpion Spider in the genus
Platyoides and we found a photo on Snakes.co.za that supports the identification.

Letter 2 – Scorpion from the Bahamas

 

Subject: Is this a dangerous scorpion?
Location: Eleuthera Bahamas
December 1, 2016 5:40 pm
I would like to know what kind of Scorpion this is. And is is deadly? A friend from Eleuthera Bahamas sent me the picture. I didn’t even know we has scorpions in the Bahamas. I live in the main city which is Nassau Bahamas an I never ever seen one.
Signature: Shirrel Douglas

Scorpion
Scorpion

Dear Shirrel,
We believe we have correctly identified your Scorpion as
Centruroides guanensis thanks to The Scorpion Files where the range is listed as “USA (Florida), Caribbean (Bahamas, Cuba).”  Regarding the sting, The Scorpion Files states:  “From Dr. Rolando Teruel’s personal experience: mild venom, sharp painful sting with aftereffects lasting for 1-5 hrs.”

Letter 3 – Scorpion? found in Ohio?? in March????

 

Subject: What is this ?
Location: Garfield Heights Ohio
March 9, 2013 11:58 pm
This is a bug found in Garfield Heights Ohio. This could be a scorpion but it is doubtful because it is in Ohio in the month of March.
Signature: Eman

Scorpion???
Scorpion???

Dear Eman,
The quality of your photo is less than ideal, but this does appear to resemble a Scorpion.  BugGuide has no reports of Scorpions north of Tennessee, so we cannot explain the location nor the timing of this sighting.  Can you please provide additional photos and details regarding the location of the sighting.  Did it occur in a pet store or other area where Scorpions might have been introduced?

Update:  We are still trying to learn more about this mystery.  We have been attempting to learn if there are any substantiated reports of scorpions in Ohio, and we discovered some information on the questionable WikiAnswers site

Letter 4 – Scorpion from South Africa

 

Subject: Unknown Scorpion
Location: South Africa – Pretoria
November 20, 2012 2:02 am
Hi All,
I found this outside my shower and not sure what scorpion this is and how venomous is it ?
Any info would be greatly appreciated
Signature: Newbie

Scorpion

Dear Newbie,
It is our understanding that Scorpions with small pinchers and large tails are more venomous than those with large pinchers and small tails.  When it comes to Scorpions, we do not debate the toxicity of their venom.  We give all Scorpions respect because we understand that they are all capable of stinging.

Stinger of a South African Scorpion

Letter 5 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject:  what is this scary looking spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Johannesburg South Africa
Date: 10/05/2017
Time: 04:25 AM EDT
Hi there i have found three of these spiders in my house and they look pretty darn scary. Are the poisonous? Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Charl Du Toit

Scorpion Spider

Dear Charl Du Toit,
This distinctive spider is a Scorpion Spider.  Almost all Spiders have venom, but the bite of very few species is more than just a localized reaction with tenderness and some swelling.  We have never been able to locate any online information about the bite of a Scorpion Spider, which leads us to believe it is not a serious matter.

Letter 6 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject: Scorpion Spider
Location: Muden, Near Greytown, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
April 19, 2016 10:13 pm
Good Morning
I am attaching a photo of a Scorpion Bug which I took the other day. I found it on my Bed. I do not need any identification. Just thought you might need the information about where it was found for your data base.
Kind regards
Laura Savage
Signature: Laura

Scorpion Spider
Scorpion Spider

Dear Laura,
Thanks for sending us your excellent images of a Scorpion Spider, a species that is harmless, to the best of our knowledge.

Scorpion Spider
Scorpion Spider

Letter 7 – Scorpion-Tailed Spider from Australia

 

Spider with prehensile tail.
April 7, 2010
Ok, this is definitely the wackiest spider I have ever seen – it has a prehensile tail!
The spider is about 20mm long, with it’s tail, and sits in it’s web facing downwards, with it’s tail pointing up (picture 3). the spinnarets are in the middle of the body, not at the end of the tail. If it didn’t have a tail, it’d have basically exactly the same body-shape as, and a similar web to an orb spider.
I think it’s an Arachnura (scorpion-tailed spider), like the one here: http://www.biodiversityexplorer.org/arachnids/spiders/araneidae/ . Any idea what the tail is for? Balance?
By the way, that’s some Justifiable Carnage, right there: I don’t like European cockroaches. This spider did though >:)
Cheers
naught101
Newcastle, Australia

Scorpion-Tailed Spider

Dear naught101,
You are correct.  This is a Scorpion-Tailed Spider, Arachnura higginsi, which is also pictured on the Insects and Spiders of Brisbane website.  This is the first time we have had a Scorpion-Tailed Spider image submitted to our website, and our first attempts at finding out any information have not produced an answer for your questions, though balance doesn’t really seem to be the purpose or more spiders would have this shape.

Scorpion-Tailed Spider

The spinnerets being located so far from the tip of the abdomen eliminates the possibility that the shape has any web spinning purpose.  Perhaps continued research willl reveal an evolutionary purpose for this odd anatomy.  The need to eat is never a consideration in our determination of Unnecessary Carnage.

Scorpion-Tailed Spider

Hi Daniel,
thanks for your response. One point:
>”…balance doesn’t really seem to be the purpose or more spiders would have this shape.”
Evolution doesn’t work this way, it’s entirely possible that only this one genus has evolved this attribute. In any case, it must be beneficial in some way, or they would quickly die out, since they seem to inhabit the same niche as orb spiders, and a bunch of other genera. In any case, they do seem to use the “tail” for balance, but that doesn’t explain the strange shape and colouration of the tip of the tail. Perhaps Batesian mimicry?
>”The need to eat is never a consideration in our determination of Unnecessary Carnage.”
I don’t understand what you mean. I was implying Carnage on my part – I caught the cockroach, and fed it to the spider. I’m dreaming of having a massive spider army with a taste for european cockraches 😀
cheers
ned

Hi Ned,
The balance issue is all speculation.  It is often stated that Orbweavers are quite clumsy if they fall from their webs.  They lead a relatively sedentary life.  We do not believe the tail is for balance.  It seems more likely that it would confuse a predator that might strike at a less vital part of the spider’s anatomy.
Our self determined definition of Unnecessary Carnage involves creatures being killed out of fear and disgust, though in a sense, your disgust for the European Cockroach led you to feed it to this spider.  The death was not an end though, and a greater purpose was served.  Thanks so much for your thought-provoking letters.

Letter 8 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject: “Scorpion Spider ?”
Location: Northcliff / Cresta / Fairland
October 27, 2014 8:32 am
Found it in upstairs bedroom in Fairland close to the N1 & 14th Ave
Signature: Tommy Steyn

Scorpion Spider
Scorpion Spider

Dear Tommy,
Thanks for sending your wonderful images of a Scorpion Spider in the genus Platyoides.  Our first posting on a Scorpion Spider in 2010 resulted in a robust comment exchange, but alas, there is not much information online regarding the bite of a Scorpion Spider, which leads us to speculate that the bites are not dangerous.

Scorpion Spider
Scorpion Spider

Letter 9 – Scorpion in Australia

 

Subject: Baby Scorpion
Location: Bunbury, Western Australia
March 1, 2014 6:41 pm
Dear Bugman,
We have just moved into an old house surrounded by bush in Bunbury, Western Australia. On the day of the move, our things arrived from UK, after spending 3 months in ships.
I found what looked like an ‘ant’ on our white carpets, just where our little boy was playing. When I looked closer, I saw that it had ‘claws’. It was startled and buried itself, head first in the fibres of the carpet, raising it’s ‘sting’ in a threatening way. It was too tiny to appear threatening though. I called my husband to look and he held it with a pair of tweezers. He threw it out without killing it but he thinks he might have hurt its tail.
I managed to get a picture of it. It is about 1 cms in length.
I am curious as to if this is a scorpion and if it is indigenous to Western Australia. Please shed some light. Thanks in advance.
Su,
Western Australia
Signature: Su

Scorpion
Scorpion

Hi Su,
Yes, this is a Scorpion, but beyond that, we cannot say much for certain.  You can find information on Australian Scorpions on The Museum Victoria website which states:  “The Australian species can inflict a painful sting that results in swelling and pain for several hours, and there have not been any confirmed deaths of people from stings from Australian scorpions. Medical advice should be sought if you are stung by a scorpion.”

Letter 10 – Scorpion from the Bahamas

 

Subject: Scorpio
Location: Long island bahamas
September 10, 2016 4:36 pm
What is this and are they poisonous
Signature: shazad ferguson

Scorpion:  Centruroides guanensis
Scorpion: Centruroides guanensis

Dear Shazad,
We believe we have identified your Scorpion as
Centruroides guanensis thanks to the Scorpion Files site where it states that the distribution is:  “USA (Florida), Caribbean (Bahamas, Cuba).”  Regarding the sting, the site states:  “No available data. From Dr. Rolando Teruel’s personal experience: mild venom, sharp painful sting with aftereffects lasting for 1-5 hrs.”  According to Caribbean Medical News:  “people do not usually die from scorpion stings” but there is information regarding the death of a two year old child.

Letter 11 – Scorpion in Iceland!!!!!

 

Subject:  some sort of scorpion
Geographic location of the bug:  akureyri, iceland
Date: 02/15/2020
Time: 05:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  this scorpion was found in akureyri iceland, pretty far from home im guessing, do you know what kind of scorpion it is and if its dangerous?
How you want your letter signed:  icelandic scorpion

Scorpion, from Iceland!!!

Your query leaves many questions unanswered.  It is currently winter in Iceland and we imagine it is quite cold right now.  You did not indicate if this Scorpion was discovered this week, last month or during the summer.  You did not indicate where it was found other than what we have learned is a city in northern Iceland called Akureyri.  Was it found indoors or outdoors?  Was it found in a garden or someplace more wild where there are hot springs that might explain how a Scorpion can survive in Iceland in the winter?  We can’t help but to ponder if this an escaped pet or some symptom of extreme global warming?  Though it is not the ideal citation, we are very amused with this quote from the blog Gagleg Maltaka which states:  “And now it’s time for one of my favorite things ever– today’s word is sporðdreki, the Icelandic word for scorpion. I’ve been fascinated with scorpions for a long time now, and have been keeping select species in captivity since my freshman year of college. If everything goes as planned, one day I will conduct independent research on their behavior/evolution and eventually become the scorpion guy. But enough about that. It’s interesting that there is a native Icelandic word for “scorpion” to begin with, as scorpions are not found in Iceland or anywhere remotely near the Arctic Circle for that matter.”

Letter 12 – Scorpion with Tanzania

 

Subject: Bug (Scorpion)
Location: soitok Research Area NW of Arusha in N Tanzania
January 17, 2016 8:29 am
During my trip to N Tanzania Nov 3 – 23 (mentioned before) I was shown a scorpion in Isoitok Research Area NW of Arusha in N Tanzania Nov 6. One of the local people lookeed it up for me under a little stone in a very stony area (probably Reg-habitat)
Signature: slit

Scorpion
Scorpion

Dear Slit,
We do not feel confident with committing to a definite species, but this does look very much like Parabuthus pallidus that is pictured on The Scorpion Files where it states “Distribution:  Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania).”

Letter 13 – Scorpion from Rwanda

 

Subject:  Is that a scorpion?
Geographic location of the bug:  Kigali, Rwanda
Date: 10/17/2017
Time: 04:21 AM EDT
I saw the bug or whatever it is,  come out of the bathroom hole in the morning when i was gonna baith. Please tell me what that is.
How you want your letter signed:  Any way

Scorpion

This is indeed a Scorpion.

Letter 14 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject:  Scorpion Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Welkom, Free State
Date: 10/25/2017
Time: 07:26 AM EDT
Hi. I caught this scorpion spider. Still alive just a few minutes ago. I would like to know if you want it for examination?
Otherwise I will just throw him outside in the garden.
How you want your letter signed:  Cilliers H. Schultz

Scorpion Spider

Dear Cilliers,
Thank you for your generous offer, but we don’t accept specimens.  Shipping living creatures to remote locations may lead to the introduction of invasive, exotic species into an ecosystem that will not have natural predators to control numbers, potentially creating environmental threats.  This Scorpion Spider is better suited to being released into your garden.

Letter 15 – Scorpion kept in Captivity

 

Subject: Larry
Location: San Diego, CA
March 20, 2013 11:57 am
Around 2am, our roommate woke my boyfriend up quite frenzied about a certain scorpion traveling across the living room floor. He didn’t understand what the big deal was and covered it with a plastic bowl and went back to sleep. The next morning we created a small habitat from my old betta tank and there he(?) is to this day, larger and seemingly quite happy, as you can see by the cricket he munching on. Can you enlighten us as to what type of scorpion it is? He has grown significantly since we first met and gave him a home 🙂
Signature: Adoptive Parents

Scorpion
Scorpion

Dear Adoptive Parents,
We believe your Scorpion is in the genus
Vaejovis, and you can read more about them on BugGuide.  We are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award for your kindness to the lower beasts.

Letter 16 – Scorpion from South Africa

 

Subject: What’s That Scorpion
Location: Edenvale, Gauteng, South Africa
December 9, 2013 1:00 am
Hi What’s That Bug,
I’ve got another one for you. This time a scorpion.
Would you know what kind of scorpion this is? We get quite a few of them in the house during summer. Fattish tail, thin pincers. Not especially aggressive. They come in mostly at night and walk across the floor. They sometimes make their way upstairs.
Again, not fantastic pictures; my phone’s camera doesn’t seem to behave well at night. But the color you see in the pics is pretty much the color these scorpions are.
Thanks a lot.
Signature: Warren

Scorpion
Scorpion

Hi Warren,
We do not recognize your Scorpion.  We have read as a generalization that Scorpions with small pincers depend more upon their venom, and they tend to have more poisonous stings.

Letter 17 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject:  Scorpion spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Secunda, South Africa
Date: 03/10/2019
Time: 03:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this spidey just inside my entrance at night. Decided to coax it outside.
How you want your letter signed:  Manfred

Scorpion Spider

Dear Manfred,
This is a beautiful image of a Scorpion Spider, a species that seems especially feared in South Africa, at least that is what the inquiries we receive tend to indicate.  Because you relocated this fascinating Scorpion Spider to the outdoors, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you, much appreciated!
Kind regards
Manfred

 

Letter 18 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject: scorpion spider
Location: brenthurst brakpan 1451
August 18, 2014 10:59 am
Have you perhaps managed to distinguish whether this spider is poisonous? (Platyoides)
Signature: kind regards binx

Scorpion Spider
Scorpion Spider

Dear binx,
We have located numerous online images of Scorpion Spiders, genus
Platyoides, and most sites repeat the same information.  TrekNature has one of the best images, and the standard information regarding Scorpion Spiders is:  “‘Platyoides‘ scorpion spiders is a genus of spiders belonging to the family Trochanteriidae and found in sub-Saharan Africa and its islands, Madagascar, Réunion, Aldabra and the Canary Islands.   The genus is nocturnal in habit and has developed extreme flattening of the body adapted to living in narrow cracks.”  We believe if they were truly dangerous, that would be stated somewhere.  With that said, nearly all spiders have venom which is used to subdue prey, however very few spiders are dangerous to humans.  Spiders that are not dangerous might still bite if carelessly handled or threatened, but the bites generally produce nothing more than local swelling and tenderness that lasts a short time.

Letter 19 – Scorpion Tailed Spider from Indonesia

 

Subject: Arachnura
Location: Gunung Manglayang, West Java, Indonesia
August 21, 2013 10:45 am
Long time no see Daniel,
I’ve seen that there’s only 1 post about arachnura in whatsthatbug, and recently 07/07/2013 luckily I found one at my favorite observation site Manglayang Mountain.
Signature: Mohamad Idham Iskandar

Scorpion Tailed Spider
Scorpion Tailed Spider

Hi Mohamad,
It is very nice to hear from you again, and your photos are awesome.  When we posted the
Arachnura image in 2010, we learned it is commonly called a Scorpion-Tailed Spider.

Scorpion-Tailed Spider
Scorpion-Tailed Spider

 

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

unknown spider
February 10, 2010
found this spider in our bathroom twice. We have never seen this type of spider before and would love to know what type it is.
Annest
South Africa

Scorpion Spider from South Africa

Hi Annest,
We will attempt to identify your spider.  How large is it?

The spider was about 1-2 cm long. We have been told that it is from the gnaphosid family, but we would like a specific name….
Thanks.

The members of the family Gnapnosidae are commonly called Ground Spiders.  BugGuide has a nice representation of North American species.  Spiders are often very difficult to identify to the species level even for experts, which we are not.  An expert would rarely make a conclusive identification from a photograph without actually examining the specimen.  Your photo resembles a photo of Gnaposa bicolor from Czech Republic, but that spider has a range that is listed as Europe to Ukraine, Georgia.  Wikipedia has a list of species and locations as of July 5, 2009, and you may try to web search individual names that are listed in South Africa to see if there are images posted online that match your specimen if your level of investment includes having an exact species name.  If your request to have an exact species name is a question of whether the spider is harmless versus dangerous, the Colorado State University Spiders in the Home website indicates:  “Ground spiders, as their common name implies, are most often found under rocks or logs where they build silken retreats and emerge only to hunt. Some species wander indoors when the weather turns cold. Ground spiders are harmless to humans.

Update: January 26, 2011
T.M. just sent us a comment identifying this unusual spider as a Scorpion Spider in the genus
Platyoides and we found a photo on Snakes.co.za that supports the identification.

Letter 2 – Scorpion from the Bahamas

 

Subject: Is this a dangerous scorpion?
Location: Eleuthera Bahamas
December 1, 2016 5:40 pm
I would like to know what kind of Scorpion this is. And is is deadly? A friend from Eleuthera Bahamas sent me the picture. I didn’t even know we has scorpions in the Bahamas. I live in the main city which is Nassau Bahamas an I never ever seen one.
Signature: Shirrel Douglas

Scorpion
Scorpion

Dear Shirrel,
We believe we have correctly identified your Scorpion as
Centruroides guanensis thanks to The Scorpion Files where the range is listed as “USA (Florida), Caribbean (Bahamas, Cuba).”  Regarding the sting, The Scorpion Files states:  “From Dr. Rolando Teruel’s personal experience: mild venom, sharp painful sting with aftereffects lasting for 1-5 hrs.”

Letter 3 – Scorpion? found in Ohio?? in March????

 

Subject: What is this ?
Location: Garfield Heights Ohio
March 9, 2013 11:58 pm
This is a bug found in Garfield Heights Ohio. This could be a scorpion but it is doubtful because it is in Ohio in the month of March.
Signature: Eman

Scorpion???
Scorpion???

Dear Eman,
The quality of your photo is less than ideal, but this does appear to resemble a Scorpion.  BugGuide has no reports of Scorpions north of Tennessee, so we cannot explain the location nor the timing of this sighting.  Can you please provide additional photos and details regarding the location of the sighting.  Did it occur in a pet store or other area where Scorpions might have been introduced?

Update:  We are still trying to learn more about this mystery.  We have been attempting to learn if there are any substantiated reports of scorpions in Ohio, and we discovered some information on the questionable WikiAnswers site

Letter 4 – Scorpion from South Africa

 

Subject: Unknown Scorpion
Location: South Africa – Pretoria
November 20, 2012 2:02 am
Hi All,
I found this outside my shower and not sure what scorpion this is and how venomous is it ?
Any info would be greatly appreciated
Signature: Newbie

Scorpion

Dear Newbie,
It is our understanding that Scorpions with small pinchers and large tails are more venomous than those with large pinchers and small tails.  When it comes to Scorpions, we do not debate the toxicity of their venom.  We give all Scorpions respect because we understand that they are all capable of stinging.

Stinger of a South African Scorpion

Letter 5 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject:  what is this scary looking spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Johannesburg South Africa
Date: 10/05/2017
Time: 04:25 AM EDT
Hi there i have found three of these spiders in my house and they look pretty darn scary. Are the poisonous? Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Charl Du Toit

Scorpion Spider

Dear Charl Du Toit,
This distinctive spider is a Scorpion Spider.  Almost all Spiders have venom, but the bite of very few species is more than just a localized reaction with tenderness and some swelling.  We have never been able to locate any online information about the bite of a Scorpion Spider, which leads us to believe it is not a serious matter.

Letter 6 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject: Scorpion Spider
Location: Muden, Near Greytown, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
April 19, 2016 10:13 pm
Good Morning
I am attaching a photo of a Scorpion Bug which I took the other day. I found it on my Bed. I do not need any identification. Just thought you might need the information about where it was found for your data base.
Kind regards
Laura Savage
Signature: Laura

Scorpion Spider
Scorpion Spider

Dear Laura,
Thanks for sending us your excellent images of a Scorpion Spider, a species that is harmless, to the best of our knowledge.

Scorpion Spider
Scorpion Spider

Letter 7 – Scorpion-Tailed Spider from Australia

 

Spider with prehensile tail.
April 7, 2010
Ok, this is definitely the wackiest spider I have ever seen – it has a prehensile tail!
The spider is about 20mm long, with it’s tail, and sits in it’s web facing downwards, with it’s tail pointing up (picture 3). the spinnarets are in the middle of the body, not at the end of the tail. If it didn’t have a tail, it’d have basically exactly the same body-shape as, and a similar web to an orb spider.
I think it’s an Arachnura (scorpion-tailed spider), like the one here: http://www.biodiversityexplorer.org/arachnids/spiders/araneidae/ . Any idea what the tail is for? Balance?
By the way, that’s some Justifiable Carnage, right there: I don’t like European cockroaches. This spider did though >:)
Cheers
naught101
Newcastle, Australia

Scorpion-Tailed Spider

Dear naught101,
You are correct.  This is a Scorpion-Tailed Spider, Arachnura higginsi, which is also pictured on the Insects and Spiders of Brisbane website.  This is the first time we have had a Scorpion-Tailed Spider image submitted to our website, and our first attempts at finding out any information have not produced an answer for your questions, though balance doesn’t really seem to be the purpose or more spiders would have this shape.

Scorpion-Tailed Spider

The spinnerets being located so far from the tip of the abdomen eliminates the possibility that the shape has any web spinning purpose.  Perhaps continued research willl reveal an evolutionary purpose for this odd anatomy.  The need to eat is never a consideration in our determination of Unnecessary Carnage.

Scorpion-Tailed Spider

Hi Daniel,
thanks for your response. One point:
>”…balance doesn’t really seem to be the purpose or more spiders would have this shape.”
Evolution doesn’t work this way, it’s entirely possible that only this one genus has evolved this attribute. In any case, it must be beneficial in some way, or they would quickly die out, since they seem to inhabit the same niche as orb spiders, and a bunch of other genera. In any case, they do seem to use the “tail” for balance, but that doesn’t explain the strange shape and colouration of the tip of the tail. Perhaps Batesian mimicry?
>”The need to eat is never a consideration in our determination of Unnecessary Carnage.”
I don’t understand what you mean. I was implying Carnage on my part – I caught the cockroach, and fed it to the spider. I’m dreaming of having a massive spider army with a taste for european cockraches 😀
cheers
ned

Hi Ned,
The balance issue is all speculation.  It is often stated that Orbweavers are quite clumsy if they fall from their webs.  They lead a relatively sedentary life.  We do not believe the tail is for balance.  It seems more likely that it would confuse a predator that might strike at a less vital part of the spider’s anatomy.
Our self determined definition of Unnecessary Carnage involves creatures being killed out of fear and disgust, though in a sense, your disgust for the European Cockroach led you to feed it to this spider.  The death was not an end though, and a greater purpose was served.  Thanks so much for your thought-provoking letters.

Letter 8 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject: “Scorpion Spider ?”
Location: Northcliff / Cresta / Fairland
October 27, 2014 8:32 am
Found it in upstairs bedroom in Fairland close to the N1 & 14th Ave
Signature: Tommy Steyn

Scorpion Spider
Scorpion Spider

Dear Tommy,
Thanks for sending your wonderful images of a Scorpion Spider in the genus Platyoides.  Our first posting on a Scorpion Spider in 2010 resulted in a robust comment exchange, but alas, there is not much information online regarding the bite of a Scorpion Spider, which leads us to speculate that the bites are not dangerous.

Scorpion Spider
Scorpion Spider

Letter 9 – Scorpion in Australia

 

Subject: Baby Scorpion
Location: Bunbury, Western Australia
March 1, 2014 6:41 pm
Dear Bugman,
We have just moved into an old house surrounded by bush in Bunbury, Western Australia. On the day of the move, our things arrived from UK, after spending 3 months in ships.
I found what looked like an ‘ant’ on our white carpets, just where our little boy was playing. When I looked closer, I saw that it had ‘claws’. It was startled and buried itself, head first in the fibres of the carpet, raising it’s ‘sting’ in a threatening way. It was too tiny to appear threatening though. I called my husband to look and he held it with a pair of tweezers. He threw it out without killing it but he thinks he might have hurt its tail.
I managed to get a picture of it. It is about 1 cms in length.
I am curious as to if this is a scorpion and if it is indigenous to Western Australia. Please shed some light. Thanks in advance.
Su,
Western Australia
Signature: Su

Scorpion
Scorpion

Hi Su,
Yes, this is a Scorpion, but beyond that, we cannot say much for certain.  You can find information on Australian Scorpions on The Museum Victoria website which states:  “The Australian species can inflict a painful sting that results in swelling and pain for several hours, and there have not been any confirmed deaths of people from stings from Australian scorpions. Medical advice should be sought if you are stung by a scorpion.”

Letter 10 – Scorpion from the Bahamas

 

Subject: Scorpio
Location: Long island bahamas
September 10, 2016 4:36 pm
What is this and are they poisonous
Signature: shazad ferguson

Scorpion:  Centruroides guanensis
Scorpion: Centruroides guanensis

Dear Shazad,
We believe we have identified your Scorpion as
Centruroides guanensis thanks to the Scorpion Files site where it states that the distribution is:  “USA (Florida), Caribbean (Bahamas, Cuba).”  Regarding the sting, the site states:  “No available data. From Dr. Rolando Teruel’s personal experience: mild venom, sharp painful sting with aftereffects lasting for 1-5 hrs.”  According to Caribbean Medical News:  “people do not usually die from scorpion stings” but there is information regarding the death of a two year old child.

Letter 11 – Scorpion in Iceland!!!!!

 

Subject:  some sort of scorpion
Geographic location of the bug:  akureyri, iceland
Date: 02/15/2020
Time: 05:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  this scorpion was found in akureyri iceland, pretty far from home im guessing, do you know what kind of scorpion it is and if its dangerous?
How you want your letter signed:  icelandic scorpion

Scorpion, from Iceland!!!

Your query leaves many questions unanswered.  It is currently winter in Iceland and we imagine it is quite cold right now.  You did not indicate if this Scorpion was discovered this week, last month or during the summer.  You did not indicate where it was found other than what we have learned is a city in northern Iceland called Akureyri.  Was it found indoors or outdoors?  Was it found in a garden or someplace more wild where there are hot springs that might explain how a Scorpion can survive in Iceland in the winter?  We can’t help but to ponder if this an escaped pet or some symptom of extreme global warming?  Though it is not the ideal citation, we are very amused with this quote from the blog Gagleg Maltaka which states:  “And now it’s time for one of my favorite things ever– today’s word is sporðdreki, the Icelandic word for scorpion. I’ve been fascinated with scorpions for a long time now, and have been keeping select species in captivity since my freshman year of college. If everything goes as planned, one day I will conduct independent research on their behavior/evolution and eventually become the scorpion guy. But enough about that. It’s interesting that there is a native Icelandic word for “scorpion” to begin with, as scorpions are not found in Iceland or anywhere remotely near the Arctic Circle for that matter.”

Letter 12 – Scorpion with Tanzania

 

Subject: Bug (Scorpion)
Location: soitok Research Area NW of Arusha in N Tanzania
January 17, 2016 8:29 am
During my trip to N Tanzania Nov 3 – 23 (mentioned before) I was shown a scorpion in Isoitok Research Area NW of Arusha in N Tanzania Nov 6. One of the local people lookeed it up for me under a little stone in a very stony area (probably Reg-habitat)
Signature: slit

Scorpion
Scorpion

Dear Slit,
We do not feel confident with committing to a definite species, but this does look very much like Parabuthus pallidus that is pictured on The Scorpion Files where it states “Distribution:  Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania).”

Letter 13 – Scorpion from Rwanda

 

Subject:  Is that a scorpion?
Geographic location of the bug:  Kigali, Rwanda
Date: 10/17/2017
Time: 04:21 AM EDT
I saw the bug or whatever it is,  come out of the bathroom hole in the morning when i was gonna baith. Please tell me what that is.
How you want your letter signed:  Any way

Scorpion

This is indeed a Scorpion.

Letter 14 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject:  Scorpion Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Welkom, Free State
Date: 10/25/2017
Time: 07:26 AM EDT
Hi. I caught this scorpion spider. Still alive just a few minutes ago. I would like to know if you want it for examination?
Otherwise I will just throw him outside in the garden.
How you want your letter signed:  Cilliers H. Schultz

Scorpion Spider

Dear Cilliers,
Thank you for your generous offer, but we don’t accept specimens.  Shipping living creatures to remote locations may lead to the introduction of invasive, exotic species into an ecosystem that will not have natural predators to control numbers, potentially creating environmental threats.  This Scorpion Spider is better suited to being released into your garden.

Letter 15 – Scorpion kept in Captivity

 

Subject: Larry
Location: San Diego, CA
March 20, 2013 11:57 am
Around 2am, our roommate woke my boyfriend up quite frenzied about a certain scorpion traveling across the living room floor. He didn’t understand what the big deal was and covered it with a plastic bowl and went back to sleep. The next morning we created a small habitat from my old betta tank and there he(?) is to this day, larger and seemingly quite happy, as you can see by the cricket he munching on. Can you enlighten us as to what type of scorpion it is? He has grown significantly since we first met and gave him a home 🙂
Signature: Adoptive Parents

Scorpion
Scorpion

Dear Adoptive Parents,
We believe your Scorpion is in the genus
Vaejovis, and you can read more about them on BugGuide.  We are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award for your kindness to the lower beasts.

Letter 16 – Scorpion from South Africa

 

Subject: What’s That Scorpion
Location: Edenvale, Gauteng, South Africa
December 9, 2013 1:00 am
Hi What’s That Bug,
I’ve got another one for you. This time a scorpion.
Would you know what kind of scorpion this is? We get quite a few of them in the house during summer. Fattish tail, thin pincers. Not especially aggressive. They come in mostly at night and walk across the floor. They sometimes make their way upstairs.
Again, not fantastic pictures; my phone’s camera doesn’t seem to behave well at night. But the color you see in the pics is pretty much the color these scorpions are.
Thanks a lot.
Signature: Warren

Scorpion
Scorpion

Hi Warren,
We do not recognize your Scorpion.  We have read as a generalization that Scorpions with small pincers depend more upon their venom, and they tend to have more poisonous stings.

Letter 17 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject:  Scorpion spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Secunda, South Africa
Date: 03/10/2019
Time: 03:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this spidey just inside my entrance at night. Decided to coax it outside.
How you want your letter signed:  Manfred

Scorpion Spider

Dear Manfred,
This is a beautiful image of a Scorpion Spider, a species that seems especially feared in South Africa, at least that is what the inquiries we receive tend to indicate.  Because you relocated this fascinating Scorpion Spider to the outdoors, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you, much appreciated!
Kind regards
Manfred

 

Letter 18 – Scorpion Spider from South Africa

 

Subject: scorpion spider
Location: brenthurst brakpan 1451
August 18, 2014 10:59 am
Have you perhaps managed to distinguish whether this spider is poisonous? (Platyoides)
Signature: kind regards binx

Scorpion Spider
Scorpion Spider

Dear binx,
We have located numerous online images of Scorpion Spiders, genus
Platyoides, and most sites repeat the same information.  TrekNature has one of the best images, and the standard information regarding Scorpion Spiders is:  “‘Platyoides‘ scorpion spiders is a genus of spiders belonging to the family Trochanteriidae and found in sub-Saharan Africa and its islands, Madagascar, Réunion, Aldabra and the Canary Islands.   The genus is nocturnal in habit and has developed extreme flattening of the body adapted to living in narrow cracks.”  We believe if they were truly dangerous, that would be stated somewhere.  With that said, nearly all spiders have venom which is used to subdue prey, however very few spiders are dangerous to humans.  Spiders that are not dangerous might still bite if carelessly handled or threatened, but the bites generally produce nothing more than local swelling and tenderness that lasts a short time.

Letter 19 – Scorpion Tailed Spider from Indonesia

 

Subject: Arachnura
Location: Gunung Manglayang, West Java, Indonesia
August 21, 2013 10:45 am
Long time no see Daniel,
I’ve seen that there’s only 1 post about arachnura in whatsthatbug, and recently 07/07/2013 luckily I found one at my favorite observation site Manglayang Mountain.
Signature: Mohamad Idham Iskandar

Scorpion Tailed Spider
Scorpion Tailed Spider

Hi Mohamad,
It is very nice to hear from you again, and your photos are awesome.  When we posted the
Arachnura image in 2010, we learned it is commonly called a Scorpion-Tailed Spider.

Scorpion-Tailed Spider
Scorpion-Tailed Spider

 

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts
Tags: Scorpion

Related Posts

159 Comments. Leave new

  • vitarkamudra
    April 7, 2010 10:28 pm

    The Wikipedia page on Scorpion-Tailed spiders (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arachnura) suggests that their tails help them mimic dead leaves. Images of the spiders on the Museum Victoria website (http://museumvictoria.com.au/spiders/detail.aspx?pid=14) seem to support that statement. Either way, their tails are pretty amazing. They must provide pretty good mimicry to be able to compensate for their size and bulkiness…

    Reply
  • Vitarkamudra: that does make some sense – all the ones I’ve seen have a small bundle of leaves directly above then in the web. In fact, I think the one in that photo now has an egg case in the bundle of leaves – so that cockroach apparently went to good use 🙂

    Wikipedia actually has a page on this species, as well as the genus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arachnura_higginsi

    Also, I posted another photo (slightly more action-packed) here: http://naught101.deviantart.com/art/Arachnura-Higginsi-159966412
    Feel free to use it here, if you prefer it.

    Reply
  • That’s probably a ‘scorpion spider’, not a gnaphosid but closely related to them:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platyoides

    I found it in the book “Filmer’s Spiders”

    Reply
  • Hi, I found a spider exactly like the one in the picture in our bath in Randburg, South Afica last night. I’ve never seen a spider like this one before. At first glance I thought it was a small scorpion. The body is quite flat and not rounded as most spiders and the legs were bended and flat against the surface of the bath. Are these spiders poisonous?

    Reply
    • Almost all spiders have venom, however, most are not considered dangerous to humans. To the best of our knowledge, Scorpion Spiders are not considered dangerous.

      Reply
    • I found it on my hand while at school almost crapped my pants threw it of and my friend steppedon it

      Reply
  • That’s definitely a scorpion! 🙂

    Reply
    • Thanks for the input. We still want additional information from the person who submitted the query. It is definitely a mystery.

      Reply
  • philostopher
    March 30, 2013 7:05 pm

    Is it possible that it’s a somewhat mangled version of one of these? The males do have the “kit” like a scorpion, though it’s used for an entirely different purpose, and they are found in Ohio:

    http://jimmccormac.blogspot.com/2012/10/scorpionfly-in-beautiful-landscape.html

    Love the site — I’ve visited regularly since we accidentally (in a panic) fatally damaged a cicada-killer wasp and I found an image on your site. I hate when that happens — usually we don’t do that.

    Reply
  • philostopher
    March 30, 2013 7:05 pm

    Is it possible that it’s a somewhat mangled version of one of these? The males do have the “kit” like a scorpion, though it’s used for an entirely different purpose, and they are found in Ohio:

    http://jimmccormac.blogspot.com/2012/10/scorpionfly-in-beautiful-landscape.html

    Love the site — I’ve visited regularly since we accidentally (in a panic) fatally damaged a cicada-killer wasp and I found an image on your site. I hate when that happens — usually we don’t do that.

    Reply
  • Today I kill scorpion, I was very surprised, from where in OH?

    Reply
  • I can’t believe that! I always wanted a scorpion, and wished they were more common in Ohio :L

    Reply
  • found a scorpion in my mailbox. Wooster oh 06/25/2013

    Reply
  • i think i encountered a scorpion in my driveway this morning? medina, oh 6/27/13

    Reply
  • Michael Van Horn
    October 21, 2013 3:13 pm

    Yes, that is indeed a scorpion. I had them in my last two houses in rural Central Texas. There is one species, the southern devil scorpion, that is native to Kentucky. The one in the pic may have been a migrant that was unintentionally brought up from KY by someone moving or through commercial trucking or shipping. They are generally not the kind of scorpions that you find at a pet store. Here is some info on the southern devil scorpion: (http://www.uky.edu/Ag/CritterFiles/casefile/relatives/scorpions/scorpion.htm#common)
    The northern scorpion, mentioned earlier, is found in the Pacific Northwest.

    Reply
  • Michael Van Horn
    October 21, 2013 3:13 pm

    Yes, that is indeed a scorpion. I had them in my last two houses in rural Central Texas. There is one species, the southern devil scorpion, that is native to Kentucky. The one in the pic may have been a migrant that was unintentionally brought up from KY by someone moving or through commercial trucking or shipping. They are generally not the kind of scorpions that you find at a pet store. Here is some info on the southern devil scorpion: (http://www.uky.edu/Ag/CritterFiles/casefile/relatives/scorpions/scorpion.htm#common)
    The northern scorpion, mentioned earlier, is found in the Pacific Northwest.

    Reply
  • Hi all, my son found an identical spider in our pool, also first time I’ve seen one, I stay in radiokop on the West rand.

    Reply
  • just found ome in Knysna, South AFRICA. SADLY 4 weeks ago was bitten by a violin spider and a nasty cytotoxic wound developed with blisters..so not taking any chances..regards..Peter

    Reply
  • Brendan Lee Smit
    February 16, 2014 12:42 pm

    I live in Springs (East Rand), Gauteng, and I have just found a spider crawling out a t-shirt while ironing my laundry. The spider fits the exact same spider illustrated in this post, known to be an Scorpion Spider from South Africa.
    [2014-02-16 | 21H00]

    Reply
  • Brendan Lee Smit
    February 16, 2014 12:42 pm

    I live in Springs (East Rand), Gauteng, and I have just found a spider crawling out a t-shirt while ironing my laundry. The spider fits the exact same spider illustrated in this post, known to be an Scorpion Spider from South Africa.
    [2014-02-16 | 21H00]

    Reply
  • Found exactly this spider a month ago and again last night in my house in Little Falls, Roodepoort, SA. Family kept it in a jar and wanted me to identify it. Viola! Scorpion Spider. Thanks!

    Reply
  • I can’t be certain because of the quality of the picture, but this bears the markings of a Lychas or Cercophonius species (or something similar). These are common on the east coast ofAustralia, but I don’t know whether they occur in Western Australia.

    Reply
  • My daughter saw two scorpion spiders in two weeks. They were in her lounge.they were so huge and she is so terrified of spiders,

    Reply
  • I saw two scorpion spiders in two weeks in my lounge. I’m so terrified of them. I still have nightmareof them.

    Reply
  • how do i upload a photo of a spider i found?

    Reply
  • A guess, but could it be a gravid female Centruroides nigrescens?

    Reply
  • Screw that, wrong range. Still looks Centruroides ish.

    Reply
    • Thanks for attempting to identify our Scorpions.

      Reply
    • Thanks. I suppose it looks a bit Centruroides, though C. tend to have more right-angle-ish tail segments than this one, don’t they? I don’t think its carrying eggs. They all seem to look like this 🙂 with the fleshy abdomen, even the juveniles.

      Reply
  • Johan Meyer
    May 14, 2014 10:38 pm

    Eeek,

    I just found one of these, black, flat and larger than a R5 coin, sleeping with me underneath my bed covers!!!! I nearly jumped out my skin and thought it was a dead cockroach, next thing i knew it started running on the bed! Nearly had a heart attack.

    Luckily broom and doom took care of it. Now, question is, why the hell did it come into my bed?

    I have arachnaphobia, not the best experience 🙁 🙁

    Reply
  • Johan Meyer
    May 14, 2014 10:38 pm

    Eeek,

    I just found one of these, black, flat and larger than a R5 coin, sleeping with me underneath my bed covers!!!! I nearly jumped out my skin and thought it was a dead cockroach, next thing i knew it started running on the bed! Nearly had a heart attack.

    Luckily broom and doom took care of it. Now, question is, why the hell did it come into my bed?

    I have arachnaphobia, not the best experience 🙁 🙁

    Reply
  • Scorpions like any other invasive species can be let loose or escape Into the wild where it has the potential to multiply and thrive . I think we are missing the big picture here and that’s irresponsible pet owners .!! Ignorant persons don’t think about the dangers to people or harm it has on our environment !
    Never seen a scorpion in ohio but then again I’ve never seen one in arizonian when I lived there either!

    Reply
  • Scorpions like any other invasive species can be let loose or escape Into the wild where it has the potential to multiply and thrive . I think we are missing the big picture here and that’s irresponsible pet owners .!! Ignorant persons don’t think about the dangers to people or harm it has on our environment !
    Never seen a scorpion in ohio but then again I’ve never seen one in arizonian when I lived there either!

    Reply
  • today is the 29th of May 2014. Our 4 year old daughter was bitten by what appears to be a scorpion spider on her hand. do you know of any other reported bites and the effects thereof?

    Reply
    • We know nothing about the bite of a Scorpion Spider.

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    • I have been bitten by a spider that resemble a scorpion spider, in KZN The bite burned like a wasp bite and the area got inflamed. I applied bicarbonate of soda and an ice pack which relieved the burning and itching. 5 days later on a course of anti biotic it is still red and clearly visible

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  • sorry, I forgot to include that we live in PE

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  • I found an identical spider to the one in this photo – beneath my pillow yestruday morning whilst making my bed, Boksburg

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  • I found in Perry Ohio two black scorpions in my house, one grayling on tube and one under stove in kitchen alive. Scared me found I had a bug spray for all types od bugs for them to. Hope I do not find another one.

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  • Perry Ohio found two black scorpions one in tub another in kitchen was moping under stove and it came out.. Hope I do not find more ever scary.

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  • We found one of these on our lounge curtain last night. I am not a fan of spiders, so this freaked me out completely. Really hope they are not dangerous. We stay in Pretoria East

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  • I n Arizona it is mostly bark scorpions. I go out every night with a black light on a scorpion safari. My diligence has paid off. What used to be two or three a night is now maybe one or two a month.
    Get rid of their food, other bugs, and they will go to your neighbors yard instead.

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  • I n Arizona it is mostly bark scorpions. I go out every night with a black light on a scorpion safari. My diligence has paid off. What used to be two or three a night is now maybe one or two a month.
    Get rid of their food, other bugs, and they will go to your neighbors yard instead.

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  • We have found this type of spider several times in our house and yard. In brenthurst brakpan. The biggest one yet was about 10cm long including legs.. pretty freaked out by this spider as its the most common one ive seen at our place and cant seem to identify if its poisonous. .

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  • My biggest concern is where or not they are harmful as I am pregnant and have just found a scorpion spider in my bath. Not the first time it’s been in the house. Very freaked out and worried. Can’t seem to find anything that truly answers my question. Just need to know how dangerous these spiders are…

    Thanks
    From Germiston, JHB

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  • My biggest concern is where or not they are harmful as I am pregnant and have just found a scorpion spider in my bath. Not the first time it’s been in the house. Very freaked out and worried. Can’t seem to find anything that truly answers my question. Just need to know how dangerous these spiders are…

    Thanks
    From Germiston, JHB

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    • We are sorry, but as you probably realize from information available on the internet, we cannot locate anything that clearly states that they are either dangerous or harmless. Again, generally when a creature is dangerous, there is some indication, which has resulted in our opinion that Scorpion Spiders do not pose a danger to humans. That is our opinion. We would suggest that you check with your local Natural History Museum.

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  • Just found one. No bigger than 2cm. Does that mean there are more?…or a mother? Hahahaha I’ll play with snakes but don’t like spiders at all cause it’s so difficult to identify them. Sorry, had to kill it… Constantia Kloof West Rand Gauteng

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    • Since Spiders do not appear through Spontaneous Generation, we believe there must be at least one spider of the same species nearby. Here is a quote on Spontaneous Generation from our archives: “A little bit of ancient history provided by Encyclopaedia Britannica: Spontaneous Generation or Abiogenesis was a theory that stated that fully formed living organisms sometimes arise from non-living matter. Aristotle taught the theory as observed fact. The Italian Redi, in 1668, proved that no maggots were “bred” in meat on which flies were prevented by wire screens from laying their eggs. The fact is, flies seem to have a way of magically appearing. Flies were also, in the days of the persecutions, associated with witches. There is no magic, they are breeding on something. Adult flies will live for several weeks, but the maturation cycle varies with the temperature. It can be as short as a week in warm temperatures. “

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  • So since June I’ve had 5 necrotic lesions /bite sites appear. First three appeared together. First a really painful one on my stomach, with a smaller groin and inner thigh appearing literally the next day. At first I thought I had an infestation so I fumigated twice… Now I’m quite sure I have something somewhere. As I got a random bite on my arm, less painful but still definitely from cytotoxic venom like the sac, brown widow, or violin.. Lastly I got bitten in my arm pit while sleeping / hiking 2 weeks ago. After the first 3 I found a brown widow in my yard. After the last one 2 days later I found a scorpion spider climbing out of my denim leg whilst putting my pants on at the girlfriends house. And tonight I found one in my passage on the floor. I suspect that the first stomach bite was the widow, however the other two I’m starting to suspect were in my clothing at home.

    The bite starts out as a typical spider bite pimple with a red area around.. As the pimple is removed the bite starts to become inflamed building pressure under the wound. Your body encapsulates the venom in a sort of glue-like sac which forms and grows under the skin. Best to do I’ve found is to get some sort of antibiotic which fits the infection, when it breaks open and starts oozing slowly, use a sterilized pin to break open the dead skin on top, stretch the skin away from the wound and squeeze it like a pimple.. But of a bloody mess at first but you’ll quickly spot where the sac is. . Once the tissue on top a day or two layer is quite dead. Repeat the process till this chunky type of sac pops out (Alternately get a doctor to Lance it.. It’s my 5th one now so I’m quite used to the process) once the bag is out and the dark blood follows it, use 8trek / Bactroban cleaning and dressing the wound twice a day. It should start healing as soon as the sac is out. If not there may be some left behind. Don’t be alarmed by the bruised or even hardened tissue around the bite site, it seems to be the normal result. Goodluck!! *Miguel from lonehill, Johannesburg, South africa

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  • So since June I’ve had 5 necrotic lesions /bite sites appear. First three appeared together. First a really painful one on my stomach, with a smaller groin and inner thigh appearing literally the next day. At first I thought I had an infestation so I fumigated twice… Now I’m quite sure I have something somewhere. As I got a random bite on my arm, less painful but still definitely from cytotoxic venom like the sac, brown widow, or violin.. Lastly I got bitten in my arm pit while sleeping / hiking 2 weeks ago. After the first 3 I found a brown widow in my yard. After the last one 2 days later I found a scorpion spider climbing out of my denim leg whilst putting my pants on at the girlfriends house. And tonight I found one in my passage on the floor. I suspect that the first stomach bite was the widow, however the other two I’m starting to suspect were in my clothing at home.

    The bite starts out as a typical spider bite pimple with a red area around.. As the pimple is removed the bite starts to become inflamed building pressure under the wound. Your body encapsulates the venom in a sort of glue-like sac which forms and grows under the skin. Best to do I’ve found is to get some sort of antibiotic which fits the infection, when it breaks open and starts oozing slowly, use a sterilized pin to break open the dead skin on top, stretch the skin away from the wound and squeeze it like a pimple.. But of a bloody mess at first but you’ll quickly spot where the sac is. . Once the tissue on top a day or two layer is quite dead. Repeat the process till this chunky type of sac pops out (Alternately get a doctor to Lance it.. It’s my 5th one now so I’m quite used to the process) once the bag is out and the dark blood follows it, use 8trek / Bactroban cleaning and dressing the wound twice a day. It should start healing as soon as the sac is out. If not there may be some left behind. Don’t be alarmed by the bruised or even hardened tissue around the bite site, it seems to be the normal result. Goodluck!! *Miguel from lonehill, Johannesburg, South africa

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  • Just found 1 of these in my kitchen. Freaked me the hell out. Still need to find out if it’s poisonous or not? Honeydew, Westrand

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  • I was cleaning my back room and this thing literally chased me as I ran haha at first I thought it was a big garden spider then it stopped so I caught it I now have it in a jar and I’m going to try keep it alive and see how big it could grow if it stays alive as I have a curly haired tarantula as well let’s see how this process gets on

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  • we killed four in two months that looked exactly like the scorpion spiders as described, live in Randburg Sundowner. not sure if they are poisonous but we are scared

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  • Just found one on a cloth my three year old son was carrying around…. 🙁 Yuck!!! Luckily for the spider, my husband was home, who kindly caught it and threw it over the wall. SO not what I would’ve done! lol… Thought it was a small scorpion, so was very easy to find this site. We are on the East Rand.

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  • Have found two in George,South Africa 27/12/2014……yuk

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  • Hi daar ek het ook van die spiders #3 van hul in my huis in een week gekry en dit weer in die veld gaan los ek bly in Heidelberg GP

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  • Cobus Robbertse
    January 18, 2015 1:07 am

    Just found one in my bedroom climbing up the curtains. I freaked out just a little since I’m no fan of spiders, let alone ugly ones like this.
    After het took a mouth full of Doom and a swim down the toilet, I managed to identify him from this site.
    I stay in Alberton

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  • Cobus Robbertse
    January 18, 2015 1:07 am

    Just found one in my bedroom climbing up the curtains. I freaked out just a little since I’m no fan of spiders, let alone ugly ones like this.
    After het took a mouth full of Doom and a swim down the toilet, I managed to identify him from this site.
    I stay in Alberton

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  • The scorpion spiders have the ability to fold their legs over their bodies. Is this to enable them to fit into rocks and crevices. Or is it purely for defence to resemble scorpions?

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  • Found one late last year in our home, Ventersdorp. Looks like is is getting more known every day.

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  • I found one tonight in my room down stairs! First I thought it was a roach till I came closer it started to become aggressive so I tried catching it but ended up escaping under the hole in the wall….

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  • Hi i found 2 of these scorpion spiders, 1 in the bathroom and one in my bedroom, i am totally freaked out by its appearance and not knowing if this spider is poison or not. If there are any information please let me know!

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  • I found a spider behind my friends bed we were busy ,at first didnt know what it was have seen many kinds never this species, till today saw the same type in our washing basin. Got such a fright opened the tap and down it went felt abit bad tho but im terrified of spiders close up. Wasnt half an hour later there it was again so apparently they dont mind water. Took a photo this time and searched on google looks like a scorpion spider. Now I know

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  • i did a little internet digging and found that there is a species that can be found in southern ohio, and it looks a lot like the one in the photo honestly. Vaejovis Carolinianus is the scientific name. Painful sting, but not known to be dangerous. Surprised to see someone found one that close to home however, ill be looking around cleveland for one of these bad boys now xD

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  • I found one in our bedroom tonight, wife tried to step on it over a book, after several hard steps, it still runs free. Then we tried doom also after 4 or 5 spray, no use. Finally we have to do the toilet route, shame to the little creature, but can’t keep it as we got a little baby.

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  • I found one in my bedroom yesterday afternoon.
    is it , or is it not poisonous.
    needless to say I didn’t sleep in room.

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  • I found one in my bedroom yesterday afternoon.
    is it , or is it not poisonous.
    needless to say I didn’t sleep in room.

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    • We have never been able to determine the answer to this question based on online information. Checking with your local natural history museum might provide some answers.

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  • Ivan van Zijl
    August 31, 2015 1:29 am

    I live on the East Rand and found a Scorpion Spider yesterday.
    Interesting looking creature. I am really fascinated by Spiders and was cautious about this one as a rule of thumb if the fangs are big then its normally a painful bite, not necessarily fatal.

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  • Ivan van Zijl
    August 31, 2015 1:29 am

    I live on the East Rand and found a Scorpion Spider yesterday.
    Interesting looking creature. I am really fascinated by Spiders and was cautious about this one as a rule of thumb if the fangs are big then its normally a painful bite, not necessarily fatal.

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  • I kind of stumbled onto this page by accident but just had to leave my experience. I’m 52 years old and spent the first 15 years of my life in the city of Forest Park, Ohio, a municipality in the northwestern Cincinnati area. In September of 1972 (2nd grade) we were on recess at Forest View Elementary, playing in the creek behind the school looking for crawdads, when my friend said, “I caught a scorpion”, which made us all laugh at him, as though he were an idiot. I walked over and looked into his styrofoam cup at what was indeed a small scorpion. It was a very young Vaejovis Carolinianus, obviously born that summer. We took it inside to show the teacher, who freaked out and took it to the Principal, who put it in a paper lunch bag and took it to the janitor to throw in the incinerator. Nice work academia!!!

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  • We have quite a few of them, however I try and leave them and dont kill as they eat all the insects. They are not poisonous however im sure the bite will be sore.. they tend to hide more than actually appear in the open… I suggest if one is found in your house catch and release outside as its by accident that it came inside. We usually find them by the rocks in our garden or on the bricks.

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  • Ernie van Biljon
    October 25, 2015 6:22 am

    Found one in our bathroom this morning. It is quite tiny, but fast when disturbed and seems to look for the nearest retreat – that could possibly be interpreted as being agressive.
    We live in Rand Park Ext.2

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  • Ernie van Biljon
    October 25, 2015 6:22 am

    Found one in our bathroom this morning. It is quite tiny, but fast when disturbed and seems to look for the nearest retreat – that could possibly be interpreted as being agressive.
    We live in Rand Park Ext.2

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  • 12 Nov 2015 – Found one crawling out underneath my bed! Have NEVER seen it around Norkem Park!

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  • Found a scorpion spider on the floor in our bedroom last night. 2 December 2015 in Chancliff Krugersdorp. First thought was that it is a scorpion. Have never seen such a spider. It moved very slow.

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  • My wife found a scorpion spider today, 8 December 2015. We are on the West Rand, Johannesburg, South Africa. It appears to have entered the kitchen from underneath the back door (needless to say, that was the same way it went out!). The only way we could id the spider was from my wife’s description of it looking like a scorpion! The name was a clear description in this instance. Would’ve like to have had more info on this species though.

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  • Gideon Stapelberg
    December 23, 2015 3:55 am

    Found a scorpion spider this morning at Vryheid Kwazulu-Natal.

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  • We found one today. Adore finding new creatures we have not seen. We get alot of spiders and insects and love to find out about them. And too see if they poisonous or not incase our kiddies or animals get bitten. But we do not kill little creature of any kind big or small. We would love a site where we could get more pics and info. People should not be killing anything. Everything living creature has a reason for being here.

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  • Pam Cartwright
    January 23, 2016 4:10 am

    I foinf one of these on my shoulder. Eeek. Captured it and inspected it. Looks just like the scorpion spider. Port Elizabeth – January 2016

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  • We live in Durban and over the past few years get two or three of these every summer. I found one in the bathroom this morning, rehomed it in the garden.

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  • Hi

    We live in Weltevredenpark, Roodepoort.
    I’ve seen these Scorpion Spiders all over lately.
    I’ve got two kids, 5 years and 1 year, so I’m a bit worried.
    Are they poisonous?

    Thank you.

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  • Hi

    We live in Weltevredenpark, Roodepoort.
    I’ve seen these Scorpion Spiders all over lately.
    I’ve got two kids, 5 years and 1 year, so I’m a bit worried.
    Are they poisonous?

    Thank you.

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  • i just found one on my neck. Looks just like this one. nelspruit 09/03/2016

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  • I want to know if they are dangerous?

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  • Hi. Found a scorpion spider in our bathroom basin in Benoni. Never seen one before, looks pretty dangerous. 28/03/16

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    • Jigg we stay in Benoni aswell and just discovered pne underneath my dog’s pillow. Didnt want take achance as i have small children and animals in the house. No one can say if poisonous…

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  • Bethlehem 05.04.2016 – Found one while getting kiddies schoolwork books. Scary part is my children usually do it. I freaked out, it wasn’t that fast. I went for a bottle and then I couldn’t find it. Can’t seem to find information on whether its venomous or not. Need to know children are 4 and 1.5…

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  • Just found a different looking spider and thanks to this site was able to ID it as a scorpion spider.
    Are they are becoming more common?
    I live in Alberton – JHB.

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  • Just found a different looking spider and thanks to this site was able to ID it as a scorpion spider.
    Are they are becoming more common?
    I live in Alberton – JHB.

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  • Found one in the the bath two days ago.. Its quite pretty. I live in Randhart Alberton. Never seen one before though.

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  • Hi I just found one of these outside by our tap, but it only had 6 legs? Any ideas?

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  • Hantie Brits
    June 20, 2016 11:45 am

    I often find this scorpion spider in my pool area. I have never seen any web or nest. They like to hide under the swimming equipment. I believe that they like moist places.

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  • Hi
    I found one on my bed last night at around 8 pm, Springs Gauteng

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  • Hi
    I found one on my bed last night at around 8 pm, Springs Gauteng

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  • F with Mother Nature and we bound to have our habitats taken over by the ones we left homeless…look industrialization and forefathers and global warming etc etc and someone has to feel the brunt….we pay Prime for our dwellings perhaps at their expense…time to give back…law of the Universe ? easy as that

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  • As a Scorpio who was once stung by a scorpion, I recommend relocation and avoidance whichever involves the least contact. Depending on the size, type (colour?) you can experience significant discomfort, swelling and possible ulceration of the site. Another reason to enjoy/respect anoles, and other critters that eat scorpions. Just my opinion.

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  • Stratham Benoni
    October 3, 2016 3:03 am

    Hi all just a headsup to check all airvents in your home they breed in this type of places, I just had two Scorpion Spiders crawl out of these airvents in last couple of days. Both where quite large and looked full grown to me.

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  • Benny Tarplee
    October 5, 2016 12:45 am

    Pseudolychas ochraceus

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  • Erika Pretorius
    October 5, 2016 11:50 am

    Killed one just now in Helderkruin, Roodepoort. First time ever I saw this type. Found it against the wall in the passage. Dead it is about 1 squared cm.

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  • Desiree Greeff
    October 29, 2016 4:35 am

    Im from Bethlehem freestate. On thursday night one bit me on my shoulder in my bed. I am off balance, sleepy and very drowzy. I have a headache that feels as if my head is exploding. My mouth is dry, my eyes is dry and im nauseas but im not vomiting. I cant eat at all. My muscles is paining, actually my whole body is paining. Im running fevers and keep on sweating. The bite is now a black circle. It was a blister filled with yellow fluid. Now its a black mark with a hole. I caught the spider while it was biting me. It was a sting and then it started burning like hot coal. I went to the drs got antibiotics and pain and fever medication. They say that the symptoms can last up to 48hrs. I havent felt so weak and tired and a headache like this in my whole life. I feel terrible and very sick.

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  • Just found a really big one, about 7cm or more on my curtain railing. Needless to say I flew out of my bedroom. Hubby killed it. Have seen about 10 of them at work in the last week alone.
    Springs. 6/11/2016

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  • Just found a really big one, about 7cm or more on my curtain railing. Needless to say I flew out of my bedroom. Hubby killed it. Have seen about 10 of them at work in the last week alone.
    Springs. 6/11/2016

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  • I have plenty in my yard 🙂 Alberton area if anyone wants a sample. I have been bitten by one late at night in my bed. Found him cosying up to me. My symptoms presented with my head/Skin that felt swollen and I was super hot, the weirdest part was that all my joints felt a burning sensation but only my joints. The bite was in the back of my neck. And typical man after washing off my face with cold water I got back into bed, did not want to worry anyone, luckily felt fine the next day, would not want this to happen to a child I’m sure symptoms would be worse as I am a 120KG…..

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  • I was looking for a black pants of mine in the cupboard, when I pulled it out I saw a white bubble on it which stained the pants. The eggs were dry and collective in the shape of a sphere the size of a peppercorn. My son crushed them and they turned to dust. He then handed the pants back to me. Out of curiosity I decided to check the spot on the pants where the eggs were, and that’s when I saw the mother (most likely), she definitely looked like the spider in the top image of this article. Thereafter my son removed the spider from the house. I’d like to know:

    Could there be more laying around?
    Is it common for them to lay eggs on clothing?

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  • I was looking for a black pants of mine in the cupboard, when I pulled it out I saw a white bubble on it which stained the pants. The eggs were dry and collective in the shape of a sphere the size of a peppercorn. My son crushed them and they turned to dust. He then handed the pants back to me. Out of curiosity I decided to check the spot on the pants where the eggs were, and that’s when I saw the mother (most likely), she definitely looked like the spider in the top image of this article. Thereafter my son removed the spider from the house. I’d like to know:

    Could there be more laying around?
    Is it common for them to lay eggs on clothing?

    Reply
  • Hi these spiders are completely harmless. For more information on scorpion spiders please read “Southern African spiders” by Martin R. filmed. Hope it helps

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  • One just bit my sister. Should we be concerned

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  • I don’t know if it’s urban myth or fact but have heard that the larger the pincers compared to body size the less toxic the venom, and vise versa. Do you guys know if it’s true or not?

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    • We have read the same Trevor. Not sure if it is true or not, but we have repeated it. We don’t want to be accused of disseminating “false news”.

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  • Got one at san lameer kzn. He could live bcoz he was a good boy and stayed outside.

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  • Found one by our front door last night..also thought it was a scorpion at first. I live in Lonehill

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  • I live in Verwoerdpark, Alberton, South Africa. I have done renovations to my house in the last 8 weeks and I have had 3 of these in 2 weeks. I am pretty nervous as I have a 6 year old and 20 month old grandson living in the house. Does anyone know how dangerous it is if a small child is bitten?

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  • One just fell off my dog while I picked her up. I have seen a lot of them while packing wood in my yard. Do you know if it is poisonous?

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    • Most spiders have venom, but we do not believe the bite of a Scorpion Spider is considered dangerous.

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  • 2 spiders of the scorpion spiders species found in kzn, Margate-Ramsgate near the coast side. Was in my bedroom found it lurking on my dressing table and then in my guest bathroom. Horrid things…

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  • Louis venter says:
    November 21, 2016 at 10:41 am
    Hi these spiders are completely harmless. For more information on scorpion spiders please read “Southern African spiders” by Martin R. filmed. Hope it helps. The best thing to do if you suspect it’s a spider bite iso to clean the bite with detol and apply some Bactroban cream available from any chemist. Spiders eat bugs and some bugs carry bacteria that could cause an infection. Please don’t just kill our small gritters….

    Reply
  • Louis venter says:
    November 21, 2016 at 10:41 am
    Hi these spiders are completely harmless. For more information on scorpion spiders please read “Southern African spiders” by Martin R. filmed. Hope it helps. The best thing to do if you suspect it’s a spider bite iso to clean the bite with detol and apply some Bactroban cream available from any chemist. Spiders eat bugs and some bugs carry bacteria that could cause an infection. Please don’t just kill our small gritters….

    Reply
  • My wife was just stung by a scorpion today, in Elyria Ohio

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  • I have just found an identical spider in our living room while watching television. I couldn’t get it over my heart to kill it,not even with an ice block. Right now a plastic bowl is placed over it.

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  • I have encountered two wild scorpions, both in Wakeman OH. One was the size of an full grown emperor scorpion, however, it had a similar complexion to the one posted above.

    about seven years later two houses down from that it had just rained in mid may and I saw another “full size” one just chilling on the gravel walk up path. it was cooler, closer to 61 degrees out.

    they’re out there.

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  • I have encountered two wild scorpions, both in Wakeman OH. One was the size of an full grown emperor scorpion, however, it had a similar complexion to the one posted above.

    about seven years later two houses down from that it had just rained in mid may and I saw another “full size” one just chilling on the gravel walk up path. it was cooler, closer to 61 degrees out.

    they’re out there.

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  • I found one just like it (i think female) in port Elizabeth I think this quite a common spider for these parts. or am I wrong.

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  • Alan Goldsmith
    February 23, 2020 3:10 pm

    This is a fascinating story. I did a little online investigating and Akureyri is home to a botanic garden with a geothermally heated greenhouse, which sounds like the sort of place a scorpion might survive. Scorpions show up as hitchikers surprisingly often – here in the UK there is a least one colony of European scorpions in London and there may be others (at one time at least one Underground station had them).

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  • Scorpio being one of the twelve astrological signs of the zodiac, no surprise that Icelanders translated astrological treatises into their own language hundreds of years ago.
    Using google translate, sporð translates as tail and dreki translates as dragon. So the Icelandic word would mean dragon with a tail. No dragons in Iceland either that I know of.

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  • Scorpio being one of the twelve astrological signs of the zodiac, no surprise that Icelanders translated astrological treatises into their own language hundreds of years ago.
    Using google translate, sporð translates as tail and dreki translates as dragon. So the Icelandic word would mean dragon with a tail. No dragons in Iceland either that I know of.

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  • Betheny Spry
    May 17, 2020 1:16 pm

    I lived in Shadyside Ohio about 9 years ago and I was stung by a scorpion like insect. I have lived in Ohio my entire life and have never seen anything like it before or since and don’t want to!!! It hurt so bad that I screamed and cried in pain and I have a good pain tolerance. I got stung on the upper back side of my thigh and it made every muscle in my leg lock up.. It was the worst sting I have ever experienced!!! I would really like to know what it was. It had a scorpion like tail and it was almost Beatle like with pinchers in the face of it, I wish I had gotten a picture of it!! I would love to know if anybody else has gotten stung by something similar in Ohio??? I really can’t see much towards the head of the insect in this picture but the tail defiantly looks the same as the insect that stung me.

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  • John Louthan
    June 9, 2020 7:16 am

    This small yellow scorpion is common to Kentucky. I used to catch them all the time when my mother and I would visit. I do not have the technical name for it however the sting is generally not dangerous. However my mother’s boyfriend was hit by one on the big toe. He had an allergic reaction that caused him to go crippled on the left side of his body for over a month. They do very well in cold climates. Rarely get over 2 inches long from the tip of their head to the tip of their tail. And apparently like coyotes they have found their way to Ohio.

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  • This is a small scorpion found all over in Kentucky. They generally are not deadly and have a sting that is little more than a bee sting. However I do not have the scientific name for it. It’s not the southern devil scorpion which is much larger. The Scorpion rarely gets over 2 inches long from the tip of its head to the tip of its tail. I used to catch them all the time as a child in Southern Kentucky “Edmonton” and yes they hibernate through the winters there. I don’t believe it would be far-fetched for them to make it to Ohio.

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  • hi
    my 5 month old baby got bitten from thus spider.

    the wound was swollen and he suffered a very bad fever.

    please be aware of this scorpion spider its not safe to have around.

    regards

    Reply
  • hi
    my 5 month old baby got bitten from thus spider.

    the wound was swollen and he suffered a very bad fever.

    please be aware of this scorpion spider its not safe to have around.

    regards

    Reply
  • We found one in the bath, Walkerville South of Johannesburg, S.A.

    Reply

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