Where Do Honey Bees Live? A Friendly Guide to Their Habitats

Honey bees are fascinating creatures that play a crucial role in pollination and maintaining the balance of ecosystems. As you delve into the world of honey bees, you might wonder where these hardworking insects live and establish their colonies.

Typically, honey bees reside in hives or structures built by beekeepers for their housing and management. However, they can also be found in the wild, where they create their homes in hollow trees, rock crevices, and other naturally occurring cavities. To be an ideal home, a location must provide adequate shelter, access to food sources, and protection from predators and the elements.

Understanding the habitat preferences of honey bees can help you appreciate their adaptability and the important roles they serve in our environment. Whether you’re a budding beekeeper or simply curious about these incredible insects, exploring their living conditions offers a glimpse into their busy lives.

Understanding Honey Bees

Honey bees are fascinating social insects that play a crucial role in pollination. They belong to the species Apis mellifera and are divided into three main types: queens, workers, and drones1. Let’s get to know these intelligent creatures better.

Queens are the only female bees capable of reproduction. In a colony, there’s usually one mated queen laying eggs. Before becoming a mated queen, young queens are called virgin queens2. Each queen bee can lay up to 2,000 eggs per day3!

Workers are also female bees but don’t reproduce. Their job is to maintain the hive by cleaning, foraging for food, and caring for the queen and the young bees4. These busy bees focus on everything that keeps the colony alive and thriving.

Drones are the male bees5. Their main purpose is to mate with the virgin queens. Unlike female bees, drones don’t collect food or maintain the hive6. They simply have one crucial mission: to ensure the continuation of the species.

Some interesting features of honey bees include:

  • Efficient pollinators
  • Complex communication systems
  • Division of labor among different types of bees
  • Ability to produce honey

These social insects function together as a cohesive unit, with each type of bee supporting the others. Their collaboration ensures the success and survival of the entire colony.

Remember, honey bees are essential for pollination and our food supply7. By understanding their intricacies, you can appreciate the vital role they play in our ecosystem.

The Hive: Honey Bee Home

Physical Structure of Hives

Honey bee hives are impressive structures made from beeswax. Within the hive, there are hexagonal cells called honeycombs where bees store honey and pollen and raise their young. A hive typically has:

  • Worker comb cells: for raising female worker bees
  • Drone comb cells: for raising male drone bees
  • Honey storage cells: for storing honey
  • Pollen storage cells: for storing pollen

The queen bee lays her eggs in the cells, and the colony continues to expand within the beehive.

Location and Climate Conditions

Honey bees can adapt to a range of habitats, but they prefer temperate climates to survive. They will locate their colonies in the following areas:

  • Tree cavities
  • Hollow logs
  • Beekeeping hives: artificially provided by beekeepers
  • Other small crevices which offer protection

Where beekeepers enable colonies, the hives are often structured to make honey production more efficient using Bee Hotels.

Temperatures within the hive are crucial for honey bees to thrive. They maintain an internal temperature of around 95°F (35°C) to keep the brood healthy and enable proper wax production. Honey bees exhibit remarkable teamwork and take on specific tasks, assigning responsibilities to regulate temperature and ensure the health and functionality of the entire colony.

The Honey Bee Society

The Queen Bee

In a honey bee colony, the queen bee plays a crucial role. She is the mother of all the bees in the colony and is responsible for laying eggs, ensuring the survival and growth of the hive. A queen bee can lay up to 2,000 eggs per day. In a colony, there is usually just one queen bee.

Worker Bees

Worker bees are the female bees that carry out most of the task within the colony. Some of the important functions of worker bees include:

  • Foraging for nectar and pollen
  • Building and maintaining the hive
  • Feeding the larvae
  • Guarding the colony

Worker bees have a lifespan of 6 to 8 weeks, and their roles change as they age.

Drone Bees

Drone bees are the male bees in the colony, and their primary function is to mate with the queen bee. Drones lack the ability to sting and do not forage for food. They rely on worker bees for nourishment. After mating, drones die, and any unmated drones are expelled from the hive when winter arrives.

Caste Function
Queen Bee Reproduction, laying eggs
Worker Bees Foraging, hive building, feeding larvae, guarding
Drone Bees Mating with the queen bee

Remember to appreciate the complexity and efficiency of honey bee society next time you encounter them. Their organization and division of labor ensure the survival of the colony and play a vital role in our ecosystem.

The Life Cycle of Honey Bees

From Egg to Bee

Honey bees have a fascinating life cycle that begins as tiny eggs laid by the queen bee. Fertilized eggs develop into female worker bees while unfertilized eggs become male drones.

The eggs hatch into larvae, and they are fed either royal jelly or worker jelly depending on their future role. Royal jelly helps larvae become queens, while worker jelly nurtures future workers. After several days, larvae enter the pupal stage and transform into adults through a complete metamorphosis.

Mating Patterns

In honey bee colonies, mating happens between queen bees and male drones. A newly emerged queen may go on a mating flight, engaging in a unique swarm event. During the flight, drones compete for the opportunity to mate with the queen.

Once mated, the queen stores sperm from the drones and can produce fertilized eggs for the rest of her life. In some cases, a supersedure occurs, in which a new queen replaces an existing one.

Seasonal Differences

  • Summer workers: These worker bees maintain the colony, gather resources, and play a vital role in reproduction. They tend to have a shorter life span compared to winter workers.

In summary, honey bees have a complex and fascinating life cycle involving eggs, mating, swarm behavior, larvae, metamorphosis, and varying roles within the colony. Understanding their life cycle is essential for maintaining healthy, thriving bee populations.

Survival and Adaptation Mechanisms

Honey bees have developed various mechanisms to help them survive and thrive in different conditions. In winter, they are able to maintain their hive’s temperature by clustering together. They generate heat by shivering their muscles and rotating bees from the outer parts of the cluster to the center, ensuring everyone stays warm.

During the swarming season, honey bees create new colonies by sending out a queen and a group of worker bees. Swarming helps in distributing the bees, increasing their chances of finding suitable nesting sites and resources.

Bee’s innate ability to adapt to fluctuating temperatures is also crucial for their survival. They can regulate their body temperature by adjusting the rate at which they beat their wings. This allows them to continue foraging even when the outside temperature is extreme, like cold mornings or hot afternoons.

Here are some of the key survival and adaptation mechanisms of honey bees:

  • Clustering together in winter to maintain warmth
  • Swarming to create new colonies and find nesting sites
  • Regulating body temperature by adjusting wing movement

Honey bees are remarkable creatures that have developed these mechanisms to ensure their survival and success in an ever-changing world. As you learn about these adaptive behaviors, it’s hard not to be amazed by the resilience and resourcefulness of these tiny insects.

Honey Bees and Pollination

Honey bees are important pollinators, helping with the reproduction of many flowering plants. They collect nectar and pollen from flowers, becoming essential partners in plant pollination.

During their foraging trips, honey bees visit several flowers. As they do so, they collect nectar, which provides energy, and pollen, a protein source. While they’re collecting nectar and pollen, pollen grains from the flowers get stuck to their bodies and are transferred from flower to flower, enabling pollination.

Pollination is crucial for many crops. Honey bees can gather significant amounts of pollen and nectar: a single colony can collect about 40 pounds of pollen and 265 pounds of nectar per year. They are responsible for increasing the value of US crop production annually by over $15 billion.

Here are some benefits of honey bees and pollination:

  • Improved crop yield
  • Enhanced plant biodiversity through pollination
  • An essential resource for ecosystems, supporting wildlife and plants

However, honey bees are not native to North America and have been found to displace native bees, leading to decreased pollination. It is essential to find a balance between honey bee usage in agriculture and protecting native bees and the ecosystems they support.

Keep an eye out for these native pollinators and protect their habitats:

  • Bumblebees
  • Mason bees
  • Sweat bees
  • Leafcutter bees

In conclusion, honey bees play a critical role in pollination and agriculture. They have a significant impact on crop yields and plant biodiversity. However, it’s crucial to maintain a balance between honey bee populations and native pollinators to ensure a healthy ecosystem.

Honey Production

Honey is a natural food source created by honey bees from the nectar they collect from various flowering plants. The process of honey production involves multiple steps and various bee roles within the hive.

Worker bees forage for nectar and bring it back to the hive. Inside the hive, they pass it to other worker bees, who process it by adding enzymes and reducing its water content. This transformed nectar is then stored in honeycomb cells. To further reduce the water content, bees fan their wings to create airflow around the cells. Eventually, the nectar thickens and turns into honey, which is sealed with a beeswax cap to preserve its quality. Honey serves as the main food source for the colony, especially during winter months when food sources are scarce.

Honey production varies depending on the availability of nectar and the efficiency of the hive. Some key factors affecting honey production include the plant species providing nectar, the number of foraging bees, and the weather conditions during the flowering period. For example, certain plants like clover produce more nectar, resulting in higher honey yields. Regions with a rich diversity of nectar-producing plants may have increased honey production as well. The Upper Midwest is the highest honey-producing region in the United States.

In conclusion, honey bees play a significant role in our ecosystem through pollination and honey production. This sweet and natural food source is not only enjoyed by humans but also ensures the survival of bee colonies during periods of limited food availability.

Threats to Honey Bees

Natural Predators

Honey bees face numerous natural predators that can cause significant harm. Some examples include:

  • Bears: Hungry for honey, bears can completely destroy a hive.
  • Birds: Species like the bee-eater bird and woodpeckers prey on honey bees.
  • Insects: Wasps, hornets, and ants are all known to attack honey bee colonies.

However, honey bees have developed various defensive mechanisms to protect themselves when they sense danger, such as stinging and releasing alarm pheromones.

Diseases and Parasites

Honey bees can also suffer from various diseases and parasites that negatively impact their colonies. A few examples are:

  • Varroa mite: A widespread parasite that feeds on honey bees’ bodily fluids and can transmit viruses.
  • Tracheal mite: These microscopic mites infest the honey bees’ breathing tubes, leading to respiratory distress.
  • Foulbrood: A bacterial infection that targets honey bee larvae, causing them to die off.

Beekeepers must regularly monitor their hives to quickly address these issues if needed.

Environmental Challenges

Honey bee populations are also challenged by environmental issues, such as:

  • Pesticides: Exposure to chemical residues can harm bees, affecting their foraging abilities and sometimes leading to death.
  • Habitat loss: The decline of pollinator-friendly plants due to urbanization and monoculture farming reduces the bees’ food sources.
  • Climate change: Unpredictable weather conditions can have adverse effects on honey bees and their flowering food sources.

As a result, honey bee colonies can become stressed, weakened, and more susceptible to diseases and predators. Taking steps to minimize these environmental threats is crucial for sustaining healthy honey bee populations.

The Role of Honey Bees in the Ecosystem

Honey bees are crucial pollinators for various ecosystems, playing a significant role in the growth and maintenance of plants in gardens, meadows, and agriculture. These tiny insects help with the fertilization of flowers, which results in the production of fruits, seeds, and other vital parts of plants.

In your garden, for example, honey bees could be the driving force behind the vibrant flowers and thriving foliage that make your outdoor space welcoming and beautiful. They’re also essential for maintaining diverse and healthy meadow environments, allowing wildflowers to flourish and provide natural habitats for other wildlife.

In agriculture, honey bees have a substantial impact. Many fruit, nut, and vegetable crops rely heavily on honey bee pollination services. In fact, honey bee pollination is responsible for approximately one-third of all the food you consume.

As you can see, honey bees are important to various ecosystems:

  • Gardens: Beautiful flowers and healthy plants
  • Meadows: Diverse plant species and habitats for wildlife
  • Agriculture: Crop pollination, boosting overall food production

However, honey bees are currently facing challenges such as habitat loss, pesticide exposure, and diseases that threaten their survival, which in turn could impact the ecosystems they support. By understanding the essential role these tiny pollinators play in our ecosystem, you can help to protect honey bees and promote their well-being in your own environment.

Conservation and Beekeeping

Beekeeping plays a crucial role in conservation efforts. By maintaining and nurturing honey bee colonies, you contribute to the pollination of various plant species. This helps preserve biodiversity and supports the growth of many essential crops. For example, honey bees increase our nation’s crop values each year by more than 15 billion dollars.

As a beekeeper, it’s important to follow sustainable practices. A few key points to remember include:

  • Providing a safe environment for your bees
  • Ensuring they have access to clean water and abundant forage
  • Adopting non-invasive methods for managing pests and diseases

When choosing your beekeeping location, keep in mind the preferences of honey bees. They enjoy nesting in protected areas, such as tree hollows or artificial hives. Avoid nesting sites near populated areas or in potentially hazardous locations.

By supporting beekeepers and joining conservation efforts, you not only aid in the preservation of honey bees but also contribute to a healthier ecosystem. Purchasing honey and other products from local beekeepers can help sustain their efforts in maintaining thriving bee colonies. Moreover, advocating for environmentally friendly policies and practices in your community can help protect these essential pollinators.

In conclusion, beekeeping and conservation go hand in hand. By nurturing honey bee colonies and following sustainable practices, you can play a part in supporting a healthy environment and preserving these crucial pollinators.

Conclusion

In summary, honey bees live in diverse environments such as forests, meadows, and gardens. They build their homes in hives which can be found both in the wild and managed by beekeepers. Their hives consist of wax cells called honeycombs, where they store their honey and raise their young.

Their importance in our ecosystem can’t be overstated, as they are responsible for pollinating many food plants that make up one-third of our diet. They produce honey and other valuable products like bee bread, which can be used as a health supplement.

As a vital part of our ecosystem and food system, it’s essential to protect and support honey bee populations. You can contribute to their wellbeing by planting diverse flowers in your garden, avoiding pesticide use, and supporting local beekeepers. By doing so, you are not only helping the bees but also ensuring a sustainable future for us all.

Footnotes

  1. USDA APHIS

  2. Clemson University

  3. National Honey Bee Day

  4. Prevention and Treatment of Nuisance Honey Bees

  5. USGS.gov

  6. National Honey Bee Day

  7. USDA APHIS

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Honey Bee on Ancient Coins

 

Ancient representation of which insect?
November 18, 2009
Dear Bugman,
I am studying insects and the ancient economy and am wondering what identification you would assign the insect on these 4th and 3rd century BC coins. It has traditionally been called a “bee” and I would like to know, from an entomological perspective, 1) is this ID accurate and 2) how can one tell? Thanks!
Interdisciplinary friend
Ephesus, Turkey

Honey Bee on an Ancient Coin
Honey Bee on an Ancient Coin

Dear Interdisciplinary Friend,
WE covet those coins.  We agree that this is a Bee, more specifically a Honey Bee.  Most coins have the visage of a powerful and important person depicted.  In the United States, that honor is reserved for dead presidents, but in most places around the world, the current ruler has currency printed and coins minted that reflect who is in power.  With that said, getting a picture on a coin is a big deal.  Honey Bees have been domesticated for millennia, and bee culture or apiculture is one of the hallmarks the rise of civilization.  No other insect would be considered important enough to depict on a coin.  It might also be noted that the sale of honey might have been a significant factor in ancient economy, making the Honey Bee worthy of being on a coin.  Additionally, the anatomy is quite accurate, including the stinger.  Thanks for allowing us to deviate a bit from out typical identification requests.

Honey Bee on Ancient Coins
Honey Bee on Ancient Coins

As an aside, insects often appear on stamps.  In 1988, the U.S. issued a stamp with an image of a Honey Bee.  Our dear friend Lilia, when she saw it, exclaimed “why would they put a fly on a stamp?”  Her error was explained and she was satisfied that a Honey Bee was worthy of being on a stamp while a Fly was not.  The lowly fly was depicted on a British postage stamp, we believe, to commemorate viewing the fly through a microscope.

Honey Bee on an Ancient Coin
Honey Bee on an Ancient Coin

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for your prompt response.  As a student of numismatics, I’m so happy you understand the importance of having a picture on a coin!  Bugs on ancient coins are not as rare as you might think.  There are flies, beetles, and, of course, bees.  Jewelry also depicts cicadas and wasps.  The coins I’m working with are from Ephesus from the fourth through second centuries BC (so, 2,200-2,400 years old).  They represent some of the world’s first coins.  They are considered Lydian, after the kingdom in which they were minted.  I am aware of the importance of apiculture through the millennia (kings were represented by bees in Ancient Egypt), but in this particular valley, I have not found much evidence for it, at least not yet.  Can you tell me specifically what identifies this as a honey bee?  Its eyes?  Its wings?  I could use some entomological vocabulary and reference points.
Finally, these coins are not so rare as ancient coins go, but they’re pretty well-known and coveted for their beauty.  They can be purchased on the art market, but, as an archaeologist, I would advise against this as it promotes looting and results in the destruction of archaeological sites and the permanent loss of data.  Far better to befriend a curator and ask to see a museum’s collection.
Thanks again for your help!
Joanna

Hi Joanna,
First, we need to confess that we do not have any scientific credentials under our belts.  We are artists fascinated by insects, and we have no formal entomological training.  Second, the images on the coins are hardly anatomically correct.  Our response was based on the general morphology of the insect, and not specifics.  The veins in the wings are often used to identify insects, but again, your samples are not accurate renderings, but rather evidence artistic license on the part of the creator of the die.  The stinger is the biggest clue.  The other possibility would be a wasp, though our money is on a Honey Bee.  We would suggest that you post a comment to this posting directly, and then if any real experts provide any information, you will be directly contacted.

Letter 2 – Honey Bee from Turkey

 

Subject:  What are the big shoes on the feet of the bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mersin,Turkey
Date: 03/31/2019
Time: 02:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello there, I was photographing honey bees in yellow folowers, close to sea. and I was wondering what is on their feet. They look like big shoes.
Thanks for your informations.
How you want your letter signed:  Bees

Honey Bee with full pollen sacs

Dear Bees,
Honey Bees are social insects that visit flowers to gather nectar which the bees store in the hive after converting the nectar to honey.  According to BugGuide, Honey Bees feed on:  “Nectar and pollen from flowers. Pollen is most important in feeding the larvae.”  While visiting blossoms, Honey Bees ingest nectar which is regurgitated upon return to the hive, and pollen is collected on pollen sacs on the hind legs.  The “big shoes” you describe are pollen sacs laden with pollen.  Here is an image from BugGuide of a Honey Bee laden with pollen.

Letter 3 – Honey Bee Hive from Saudi Arabia

 

Subject: Bee / Wasp / Fly?
Location: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
August 18, 2015 6:17 am
Hi – found this honeycomb with bee-like creatures on a plant in my garden, and previously I was swarmed near that plant and they felt like flies (no sting). Now on closer examination, they look like bees, but a very distinctive colour set? Are these bees? I haven’t seem similar on photos on google?
Signature: Desert Roamer

Honey Bee Hive
Honey Bee Hive

Dear Desert Roamer,
This is a wild Honey Bee hive as opposed to a domestic hive kept by a bee keeper.  Honey Bees are capable of stinging, but they are not aggressive.  Should you decide to eliminate them, you should find a local bee keeper who will remove the hive, preserving it in captivity to help pollinate orchards.

Thanks!
In that case I will leave them if they are not aggressive, as they seem quite happy at the plant there 🙂
Cheers

Letter 4 – Honey Bee in Winter

 

Cold Honey Bee
Location: Missouri
December 24, 2010 1:34 am
I haven’t submitted anything in awhile…too busy and then it was too cold. I went looking for bugs this evening and found this Honey Bee holding on to our deck. I carefully moved it inside to a temporary studio I set up. I figured I’d try to get some really close shots and thought it was dead. As it warmed, it started to come back around and even stood up for the shot here. I promptly took a few images for a stack (5 in this image) and moved it back outside. Do you know if they hibernate or anything in the cold or does this guy face an inevitable doom in the near future?
Signature: Nathanael Siders

Honey Bee

Hi Nathanael,
We will try to answer you questions to the best of our ability.  During inclement weather, Honey Bees do not leave the hive.  During winter months in colder climates, Honey Bees will not leave the hive.  Your email did not indicate if there was snow on the ground, but on warm winter days, scouts might venture out to see if there is any food to be found.  We are not certain if staying in the hive through the winter constitutes hibernation.  Bees Online has this information:  “What do Honey Bees Do In The Cold Winter ?
Here in the Northeast of the United States it gets pretty cold in the winter. Honey Bees stop flying when the temperature drops down into the 50s (F). They stay inside their hive in what is called a winter cluster which means they get into a big huddle. There is no point to flying outside of the hive as there are no flowers in bloom, hence no pollen or nectar is available. The colder the temperature the more compact the cluster becomes.
The object of this clustering is to keep themselves warm, so warm that the temperature in the center of this cluster, where the Queen Bee stays, is kept at about 80 (F). The outer edge of the cluster is about 46 – 48 (F).
The worker bees create heat by shivering and they also move back and forth between the inner part of the cluster and the outer part. In this way no bee will freeze.
On nice sunny winter days you can see honey bees flying a short distance out of the hive and then quickly returning. Sometimes if they go too far out or stay out too long they can get chilled and will not be able to fly back into the hive. The object of these short flights is to eliminate body waste.

Letter 5 – Honey Bee Killed in Home

 

Subject: GRANNYS BATTLE !
Location: Orange ,CA.
May 26, 2017 7:02 am
Hello there bugman
So my mom and daughter thought this flying bugger was a simple house fly at first until they WHACKED it with the fly swatter ,The thing took a good wallop but didnt phase it just angered it ! LOL after about 20 minutes of running around the house being “chased” by this guy they were finally able to take him out . Not sure if its a wasp or what but we do have a honey bee nest out back in an old boat that every year they come back to ,Never have seen this kind of bee,wasp,hornet whatever it is but if you can identify it that would be AWESOME cuz now my 5 year old daughter has the dead bug in a jar that she wants to take to school and share with her class lol so here i am
PLEASE HELP sincerly justin keefe
Signature: Justin Keefe

Honey Bee

Dear Justin,
This is a beneficial Honey Bee.  Without Honey Bees, the cultivation of apples, almonds and avocados as well as many other important food crops would be seriously, negatively impacted.  There are people who believe farming as we know it might not exist without Honey Bees.  If your family is troubled by having a Honey Bee nest in your old boat, you should contact a local bee keeper who will happily remove the hive for you.  While we acknowledge that removing a Honey Bee from the home without killing it might prove a challenge as a threatened Honey Bee will sting, we strongly recommend attempting to capture it in a wine glass or other glass and slipping a post card under the rim so it can be safely transported outdoors.

Letter 6 – Honey Bee rescued in Portugal

 

Subject: A Fair Trade Bee Story — Part 1
Location: Porto, Portugal
May 11, 2013 3:06 am
Olá!
This is very fitting story (as you’ll see from the pics) since today is World Fair Trade Day:
http://www.fairtraderesource.org/wftd/
Last weekend I was woken up by a captive buzzing up against the window. Not a fly but a honey bee! Obviously the poor thing had been inside all night which is a very long time to be away from the hive.
This would not do, so I found a glass and a card to capture her to assist in locating a now open window, but when I returned I could not find her. I thought she must have flown to another window so I looked for her elsewhere, but not to be seen (I did however find a spider who I took pics of in the meantime, coming soon maybe). Upon returning to my room though I spotted her, exhausted on the sill. She had nothing left in her and I was distressed feeling it was somehow my fault for not being more proactive.
What to do, oh what to do?
To be continued…
Signature: Curious Girl

Honey Bee
Honey Bee trapped indoors

Subject: A Fair Trade Bee Story — Part 2
Location: Porto, Portugal
May 11, 2013 3:12 am
As we left the story in the last chapter, the bee was not fit for flying. How could she ever get back to her sisters?
Then I remembered I had bought some amazing local raw honey when I first arrived. I dipped my momentarily handy citrus zester in and waved it under her nose. Showing instant interest, she tucked in to it and soon had perked up quite a bit. It was really adorable to see her excitement and rejuvenation (and her cute pink tongue).
Do notice the Postcard she is resting and snacking on. 🙂
Within about 10 minutes, off she flew. 🙂
Signature: Curious Girl

Honey Bee
Honey Bee on Fair Trade Postcard with Zester

Dear Curious Girl,
Thanks so much for sending us your Fair Trade Bee Story.  You are being tagged with the Bug Humanitarian Award for your kind treatment of this Honey Bee.  That is our favorite style of zester.

Honey Bee
Honey Bee eats raw honey

Apologies for the delay in answering. Had to travel (new pics coming soon) and filed your email away for answering when I had time then could not remember what i had done with it.
Anyway, I am honored to get the Bug Humanitarian award. Many thanks!
I wasn’t looking for medals but just trying to help another being out and that felt good in itself. It’s not always a happily ever after ending.
And yeah, the zester is fabulous. No lemon gets away without being zested first as the zest is great in salads and in tea. I’m not a big fan of gadgets but I find this one so worthy I even travel with it. 🙂
Glad you found value in the story! 🙂 🙂

Letter 7 – Honey Bee Swarm

 

honey bee swarm
Mon, Jun 22, 2009 at 2:03 PM
thought you might like a picture of a nice summer honey bee swarm for your website. i walked outside this afternoon to take out the trash and found these ladies on a birdbath in my back yard. i would have liked clearer pictures but i didn’t want to stress them out any more than they already were by getting any closer than i did. they’ve been there for about 3 hours now and seem to still be growing in number, not that i mind, i think they’re fascinating, but how long do swarms generally stay in the same place during a relocation like that?
rebekah
summerville, south carolina

Honey Bee Swarm
Honey Bee Swarm

Hi Rebekah,
We are thrilled to post your photo of a Honey Bee Swarm.  The swarm will stay until the scouts find a new location, or until they feel threatened or disturbed.  Last spring, a swarm settled into one of our shrubs in Southern California, and they remained for about three hours.

Letter 8 – Honey Bee Swarm

 

Subject: Bees or Wasps?
Location: Miami, FL 33165
September 28, 2014 12:03 pm
09/28/2014
I live in Miami, FL 33165 and on 09/25/2014, a swarm of bees (or wasps) appeared in my backyard in the trunk of a dead hollow palm tree which has been used by birds for nesting (4 nesting holes). Our present temperature is high 80’s F during the day and mid-70’s F at night. This has been a very wet summer, including September.
Attached you will find copies of photos I have taken to determine what type of insect it is. If they are bees, how can I find beekeepers in this area that might be interested in picking them up.
Signature: Carmen L. León

Honey Bee Swarm
Honey Bee Swarm

Dear Carmen,
These are Honey Bees, and hollow trees are favored, natural sites for hives.  Periodically, an established hive will produce new queens that swarm with workers in an attempt to relocate and produce a new hive.  This can become a problem for homeowners if the new colony attempts to locate the hive in a chimney or attic of a home, but if this hive is high enough in the tree, we don’t imagine they will cause you any problems.  The Honey Bees will help to pollinate your fruit trees and flowers, and they will be a benefit to your garden.  If you decide that relocation is required, there are probably local beekeepers that will attempt to remove the hive.  Try the yellow pages.  It seems this particular colony is finding your hollow tree quite habitable, so removal of the hive may be difficult without cutting the tree.

Honey Bee Swarm
Honey Bee Swarm

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for your prompt reply.  I’m going to contact local beekeepers who might be interested in removing the hive.  The bees are about 8 feet up but next to the house and I’m afraid of possible stings to my dog, visiting children and myself.
Thank you for your help again,
Carmen

Letter 9 – Honey Bee will filled pollen sac

 

Subject: Bee
Location: Long Beach, CA
July 14, 2014 10:47 pm
Ok, so this is a bee (in Long Beach, CA). But what’s that orangey thing on the back of the bee that looks kind of like roe (if this were a fish rather than a worker bee)?
Thanks!
Signature: InfiniteMonkey

Honey Bee with Pollen Sac
Honey Bee with Pollen Sac

Dear InfiniteMonkey,
It appears you already know the answer since your digital file is named “beepollen”
and the location is typical of the pollen sac of a Honey Bee.  Though the pollen collected by your individual Honey Bee appears different, it is not to dissimilar than this image of a Honey Bee from Forestry Images.

Thanks! I was guessing that’s what it was, but I couldn’t find a similar image. (And actually I was thinking more of the pollen collecting when I named the image).
Love your site!

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Honey Bee on Ancient Coins

 

Ancient representation of which insect?
November 18, 2009
Dear Bugman,
I am studying insects and the ancient economy and am wondering what identification you would assign the insect on these 4th and 3rd century BC coins. It has traditionally been called a “bee” and I would like to know, from an entomological perspective, 1) is this ID accurate and 2) how can one tell? Thanks!
Interdisciplinary friend
Ephesus, Turkey

Honey Bee on an Ancient Coin
Honey Bee on an Ancient Coin

Dear Interdisciplinary Friend,
WE covet those coins.  We agree that this is a Bee, more specifically a Honey Bee.  Most coins have the visage of a powerful and important person depicted.  In the United States, that honor is reserved for dead presidents, but in most places around the world, the current ruler has currency printed and coins minted that reflect who is in power.  With that said, getting a picture on a coin is a big deal.  Honey Bees have been domesticated for millennia, and bee culture or apiculture is one of the hallmarks the rise of civilization.  No other insect would be considered important enough to depict on a coin.  It might also be noted that the sale of honey might have been a significant factor in ancient economy, making the Honey Bee worthy of being on a coin.  Additionally, the anatomy is quite accurate, including the stinger.  Thanks for allowing us to deviate a bit from out typical identification requests.

Honey Bee on Ancient Coins
Honey Bee on Ancient Coins

As an aside, insects often appear on stamps.  In 1988, the U.S. issued a stamp with an image of a Honey Bee.  Our dear friend Lilia, when she saw it, exclaimed “why would they put a fly on a stamp?”  Her error was explained and she was satisfied that a Honey Bee was worthy of being on a stamp while a Fly was not.  The lowly fly was depicted on a British postage stamp, we believe, to commemorate viewing the fly through a microscope.

Honey Bee on an Ancient Coin
Honey Bee on an Ancient Coin

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for your prompt response.  As a student of numismatics, I’m so happy you understand the importance of having a picture on a coin!  Bugs on ancient coins are not as rare as you might think.  There are flies, beetles, and, of course, bees.  Jewelry also depicts cicadas and wasps.  The coins I’m working with are from Ephesus from the fourth through second centuries BC (so, 2,200-2,400 years old).  They represent some of the world’s first coins.  They are considered Lydian, after the kingdom in which they were minted.  I am aware of the importance of apiculture through the millennia (kings were represented by bees in Ancient Egypt), but in this particular valley, I have not found much evidence for it, at least not yet.  Can you tell me specifically what identifies this as a honey bee?  Its eyes?  Its wings?  I could use some entomological vocabulary and reference points.
Finally, these coins are not so rare as ancient coins go, but they’re pretty well-known and coveted for their beauty.  They can be purchased on the art market, but, as an archaeologist, I would advise against this as it promotes looting and results in the destruction of archaeological sites and the permanent loss of data.  Far better to befriend a curator and ask to see a museum’s collection.
Thanks again for your help!
Joanna

Hi Joanna,
First, we need to confess that we do not have any scientific credentials under our belts.  We are artists fascinated by insects, and we have no formal entomological training.  Second, the images on the coins are hardly anatomically correct.  Our response was based on the general morphology of the insect, and not specifics.  The veins in the wings are often used to identify insects, but again, your samples are not accurate renderings, but rather evidence artistic license on the part of the creator of the die.  The stinger is the biggest clue.  The other possibility would be a wasp, though our money is on a Honey Bee.  We would suggest that you post a comment to this posting directly, and then if any real experts provide any information, you will be directly contacted.

Letter 2 – Honey Bee from Turkey

 

Subject:  What are the big shoes on the feet of the bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mersin,Turkey
Date: 03/31/2019
Time: 02:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello there, I was photographing honey bees in yellow folowers, close to sea. and I was wondering what is on their feet. They look like big shoes.
Thanks for your informations.
How you want your letter signed:  Bees

Honey Bee with full pollen sacs

Dear Bees,
Honey Bees are social insects that visit flowers to gather nectar which the bees store in the hive after converting the nectar to honey.  According to BugGuide, Honey Bees feed on:  “Nectar and pollen from flowers. Pollen is most important in feeding the larvae.”  While visiting blossoms, Honey Bees ingest nectar which is regurgitated upon return to the hive, and pollen is collected on pollen sacs on the hind legs.  The “big shoes” you describe are pollen sacs laden with pollen.  Here is an image from BugGuide of a Honey Bee laden with pollen.

Letter 3 – Honey Bee Hive from Saudi Arabia

 

Subject: Bee / Wasp / Fly?
Location: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
August 18, 2015 6:17 am
Hi – found this honeycomb with bee-like creatures on a plant in my garden, and previously I was swarmed near that plant and they felt like flies (no sting). Now on closer examination, they look like bees, but a very distinctive colour set? Are these bees? I haven’t seem similar on photos on google?
Signature: Desert Roamer

Honey Bee Hive
Honey Bee Hive

Dear Desert Roamer,
This is a wild Honey Bee hive as opposed to a domestic hive kept by a bee keeper.  Honey Bees are capable of stinging, but they are not aggressive.  Should you decide to eliminate them, you should find a local bee keeper who will remove the hive, preserving it in captivity to help pollinate orchards.

Thanks!
In that case I will leave them if they are not aggressive, as they seem quite happy at the plant there 🙂
Cheers

Letter 4 – Honey Bee in Winter

 

Cold Honey Bee
Location: Missouri
December 24, 2010 1:34 am
I haven’t submitted anything in awhile…too busy and then it was too cold. I went looking for bugs this evening and found this Honey Bee holding on to our deck. I carefully moved it inside to a temporary studio I set up. I figured I’d try to get some really close shots and thought it was dead. As it warmed, it started to come back around and even stood up for the shot here. I promptly took a few images for a stack (5 in this image) and moved it back outside. Do you know if they hibernate or anything in the cold or does this guy face an inevitable doom in the near future?
Signature: Nathanael Siders

Honey Bee

Hi Nathanael,
We will try to answer you questions to the best of our ability.  During inclement weather, Honey Bees do not leave the hive.  During winter months in colder climates, Honey Bees will not leave the hive.  Your email did not indicate if there was snow on the ground, but on warm winter days, scouts might venture out to see if there is any food to be found.  We are not certain if staying in the hive through the winter constitutes hibernation.  Bees Online has this information:  “What do Honey Bees Do In The Cold Winter ?
Here in the Northeast of the United States it gets pretty cold in the winter. Honey Bees stop flying when the temperature drops down into the 50s (F). They stay inside their hive in what is called a winter cluster which means they get into a big huddle. There is no point to flying outside of the hive as there are no flowers in bloom, hence no pollen or nectar is available. The colder the temperature the more compact the cluster becomes.
The object of this clustering is to keep themselves warm, so warm that the temperature in the center of this cluster, where the Queen Bee stays, is kept at about 80 (F). The outer edge of the cluster is about 46 – 48 (F).
The worker bees create heat by shivering and they also move back and forth between the inner part of the cluster and the outer part. In this way no bee will freeze.
On nice sunny winter days you can see honey bees flying a short distance out of the hive and then quickly returning. Sometimes if they go too far out or stay out too long they can get chilled and will not be able to fly back into the hive. The object of these short flights is to eliminate body waste.

Letter 5 – Honey Bee Killed in Home

 

Subject: GRANNYS BATTLE !
Location: Orange ,CA.
May 26, 2017 7:02 am
Hello there bugman
So my mom and daughter thought this flying bugger was a simple house fly at first until they WHACKED it with the fly swatter ,The thing took a good wallop but didnt phase it just angered it ! LOL after about 20 minutes of running around the house being “chased” by this guy they were finally able to take him out . Not sure if its a wasp or what but we do have a honey bee nest out back in an old boat that every year they come back to ,Never have seen this kind of bee,wasp,hornet whatever it is but if you can identify it that would be AWESOME cuz now my 5 year old daughter has the dead bug in a jar that she wants to take to school and share with her class lol so here i am
PLEASE HELP sincerly justin keefe
Signature: Justin Keefe

Honey Bee

Dear Justin,
This is a beneficial Honey Bee.  Without Honey Bees, the cultivation of apples, almonds and avocados as well as many other important food crops would be seriously, negatively impacted.  There are people who believe farming as we know it might not exist without Honey Bees.  If your family is troubled by having a Honey Bee nest in your old boat, you should contact a local bee keeper who will happily remove the hive for you.  While we acknowledge that removing a Honey Bee from the home without killing it might prove a challenge as a threatened Honey Bee will sting, we strongly recommend attempting to capture it in a wine glass or other glass and slipping a post card under the rim so it can be safely transported outdoors.

Letter 6 – Honey Bee rescued in Portugal

 

Subject: A Fair Trade Bee Story — Part 1
Location: Porto, Portugal
May 11, 2013 3:06 am
Olá!
This is very fitting story (as you’ll see from the pics) since today is World Fair Trade Day:
http://www.fairtraderesource.org/wftd/
Last weekend I was woken up by a captive buzzing up against the window. Not a fly but a honey bee! Obviously the poor thing had been inside all night which is a very long time to be away from the hive.
This would not do, so I found a glass and a card to capture her to assist in locating a now open window, but when I returned I could not find her. I thought she must have flown to another window so I looked for her elsewhere, but not to be seen (I did however find a spider who I took pics of in the meantime, coming soon maybe). Upon returning to my room though I spotted her, exhausted on the sill. She had nothing left in her and I was distressed feeling it was somehow my fault for not being more proactive.
What to do, oh what to do?
To be continued…
Signature: Curious Girl

Honey Bee
Honey Bee trapped indoors

Subject: A Fair Trade Bee Story — Part 2
Location: Porto, Portugal
May 11, 2013 3:12 am
As we left the story in the last chapter, the bee was not fit for flying. How could she ever get back to her sisters?
Then I remembered I had bought some amazing local raw honey when I first arrived. I dipped my momentarily handy citrus zester in and waved it under her nose. Showing instant interest, she tucked in to it and soon had perked up quite a bit. It was really adorable to see her excitement and rejuvenation (and her cute pink tongue).
Do notice the Postcard she is resting and snacking on. 🙂
Within about 10 minutes, off she flew. 🙂
Signature: Curious Girl

Honey Bee
Honey Bee on Fair Trade Postcard with Zester

Dear Curious Girl,
Thanks so much for sending us your Fair Trade Bee Story.  You are being tagged with the Bug Humanitarian Award for your kind treatment of this Honey Bee.  That is our favorite style of zester.

Honey Bee
Honey Bee eats raw honey

Apologies for the delay in answering. Had to travel (new pics coming soon) and filed your email away for answering when I had time then could not remember what i had done with it.
Anyway, I am honored to get the Bug Humanitarian award. Many thanks!
I wasn’t looking for medals but just trying to help another being out and that felt good in itself. It’s not always a happily ever after ending.
And yeah, the zester is fabulous. No lemon gets away without being zested first as the zest is great in salads and in tea. I’m not a big fan of gadgets but I find this one so worthy I even travel with it. 🙂
Glad you found value in the story! 🙂 🙂

Letter 7 – Honey Bee Swarm

 

honey bee swarm
Mon, Jun 22, 2009 at 2:03 PM
thought you might like a picture of a nice summer honey bee swarm for your website. i walked outside this afternoon to take out the trash and found these ladies on a birdbath in my back yard. i would have liked clearer pictures but i didn’t want to stress them out any more than they already were by getting any closer than i did. they’ve been there for about 3 hours now and seem to still be growing in number, not that i mind, i think they’re fascinating, but how long do swarms generally stay in the same place during a relocation like that?
rebekah
summerville, south carolina

Honey Bee Swarm
Honey Bee Swarm

Hi Rebekah,
We are thrilled to post your photo of a Honey Bee Swarm.  The swarm will stay until the scouts find a new location, or until they feel threatened or disturbed.  Last spring, a swarm settled into one of our shrubs in Southern California, and they remained for about three hours.

Letter 8 – Honey Bee Swarm

 

Subject: Bees or Wasps?
Location: Miami, FL 33165
September 28, 2014 12:03 pm
09/28/2014
I live in Miami, FL 33165 and on 09/25/2014, a swarm of bees (or wasps) appeared in my backyard in the trunk of a dead hollow palm tree which has been used by birds for nesting (4 nesting holes). Our present temperature is high 80’s F during the day and mid-70’s F at night. This has been a very wet summer, including September.
Attached you will find copies of photos I have taken to determine what type of insect it is. If they are bees, how can I find beekeepers in this area that might be interested in picking them up.
Signature: Carmen L. León

Honey Bee Swarm
Honey Bee Swarm

Dear Carmen,
These are Honey Bees, and hollow trees are favored, natural sites for hives.  Periodically, an established hive will produce new queens that swarm with workers in an attempt to relocate and produce a new hive.  This can become a problem for homeowners if the new colony attempts to locate the hive in a chimney or attic of a home, but if this hive is high enough in the tree, we don’t imagine they will cause you any problems.  The Honey Bees will help to pollinate your fruit trees and flowers, and they will be a benefit to your garden.  If you decide that relocation is required, there are probably local beekeepers that will attempt to remove the hive.  Try the yellow pages.  It seems this particular colony is finding your hollow tree quite habitable, so removal of the hive may be difficult without cutting the tree.

Honey Bee Swarm
Honey Bee Swarm

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for your prompt reply.  I’m going to contact local beekeepers who might be interested in removing the hive.  The bees are about 8 feet up but next to the house and I’m afraid of possible stings to my dog, visiting children and myself.
Thank you for your help again,
Carmen

Letter 9 – Honey Bee will filled pollen sac

 

Subject: Bee
Location: Long Beach, CA
July 14, 2014 10:47 pm
Ok, so this is a bee (in Long Beach, CA). But what’s that orangey thing on the back of the bee that looks kind of like roe (if this were a fish rather than a worker bee)?
Thanks!
Signature: InfiniteMonkey

Honey Bee with Pollen Sac
Honey Bee with Pollen Sac

Dear InfiniteMonkey,
It appears you already know the answer since your digital file is named “beepollen”
and the location is typical of the pollen sac of a Honey Bee.  Though the pollen collected by your individual Honey Bee appears different, it is not to dissimilar than this image of a Honey Bee from Forestry Images.

Thanks! I was guessing that’s what it was, but I couldn’t find a similar image. (And actually I was thinking more of the pollen collecting when I named the image).
Love your site!

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

20 thoughts on “Where Do Honey Bees Live? A Friendly Guide to Their Habitats”

  1. I’d like permission to use the birdbath bee photo from your website for training purposes with kids and new beekeepers in our club and any other opportunity where it would be beneficial. Its a great photo.

    Reply
    • You may use the image. Please credit the What’s That Bug? website and the photographer, though she only listed her first name.

      Reply
  2. HI,

    sorry, my English in not so good, but I try.
    In the beginning of the coinage (from 550 – 350 before Christ) , you see on the Greek coins much attributes of the god or goddess of the city. For the city Ephesos is this the goddess Artemis, the goddess of the hunt and the fertility. That is why you see on de coins of Ephesos a deer (hunt) and a honeybee (fertility). You can see that also on the statuettes of Artemis, you see Artemis, or with bow and arrow (+ a deer), or whit honeybees on her body like this picture .
    Why is the bee the symbol of fertility? To understand this you must go 1000 years earlier… About 1500 b.C. the Hittites were in Anatolia (the region of Ephesos). The Hittites had another world of gods than the Greeks. One of the gods was Telipinu a young God and the son of the king of the gods. Telipinu had a fight with the other gods and he has left the world of the gods. Telipinu was the god of the agriculture and the fertility and because he is not in the world of the gods, the flowers aren’t blooming and the Livestock cannot deliver their calves, so there is no food for the peoples, everybody is starving. The gods are searching everywhere for Telipinu, without result. Then the mother of Telipinu send the bees out to find her son. The bees finding Telipinu and bring him back to the world of the gods. And there is fertility again, the flowers are blooming again, there is fruit and the cattle can have their calves. That is why the bees are the symbol of fertillity by the Hitittes. The Greeks have copy this, they have only replace the god. Like many times in the past, when there are other peoples come in a region, they keep the same habitats of the religion, the only change the gods.

    Reply
  3. HI,

    sorry, my English in not so good, but I try.
    In the beginning of the coinage (from 550 – 350 before Christ) , you see on the Greek coins much attributes of the god or goddess of the city. For the city Ephesos is this the goddess Artemis, the goddess of the hunt and the fertility. That is why you see on de coins of Ephesos a deer (hunt) and a honeybee (fertility). You can see that also on the statuettes of Artemis, you see Artemis, or with bow and arrow (+ a deer), or whit honeybees on her body like this picture .
    Why is the bee the symbol of fertility? To understand this you must go 1000 years earlier… About 1500 b.C. the Hittites were in Anatolia (the region of Ephesos). The Hittites had another world of gods than the Greeks. One of the gods was Telipinu a young God and the son of the king of the gods. Telipinu had a fight with the other gods and he has left the world of the gods. Telipinu was the god of the agriculture and the fertility and because he is not in the world of the gods, the flowers aren’t blooming and the Livestock cannot deliver their calves, so there is no food for the peoples, everybody is starving. The gods are searching everywhere for Telipinu, without result. Then the mother of Telipinu send the bees out to find her son. The bees finding Telipinu and bring him back to the world of the gods. And there is fertility again, the flowers are blooming again, there is fruit and the cattle can have their calves. That is why the bees are the symbol of fertillity by the Hitittes. The Greeks have copy this, they have only replace the god. Like many times in the past, when there are other peoples come in a region, they keep the same habitats of the religion, the only change the gods.

    Reply
  4. Dear Piet,

    It has been a long time since we have corresponded. I am retired now from the Army (Brigadier General) and living in Amarillo, Texas. I would like to keep in touch with you.
    Best regards,
    Leon Robert

    Reply
    • Dear Leon,

      Happy to hear from you again. I hope you are all well. Yes it’s been a long time we have corresponded. I have still 3 years to go for my retirement 🙂 and already 2 grandchildren 🙂
      But the bees on coins still interest me very much. In summer beekeeping, in winter studying about bees on coins. A very interesting topic. I try, together with some “coin-friends”, to visit several Coin- Cabinets in Europe to learn more about the coins. And of course the internet is also a good place to learn about this.
      Best regards, Piet

      Reply
  5. Dear Piet,

    It has been a long time since we have corresponded. I am retired now from the Army (Brigadier General) and living in Amarillo, Texas. I would like to keep in touch with you.
    Best regards,
    Leon Robert

    Reply
    • Dear Leon,

      Happy to hear from you again. I hope you are all well. Yes it’s been a long time we have corresponded. I have still 3 years to go for my retirement 🙂 and already 2 grandchildren 🙂
      But the bees on coins still interest me very much. In summer beekeeping, in winter studying about bees on coins. A very interesting topic. I try, together with some “coin-friends”, to visit several Coin- Cabinets in Europe to learn more about the coins. And of course the internet is also a good place to learn about this.
      Best regards, Piet

      Reply
    • The story of Telepinu and Ephesos you can learn on this interesting film on youtube:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZK1DYwbQT4&t=4s
      It is made for the German Television and some Professors from the Austrian Archeological Institute have help with the film, very interesting, but unfortunately it is in German. The Austrian Archeological Institute have already studying the City of Ephesos for more than 100 years. I think the first excavation was in 1895. So they have build and grand knowledge about Epesos.
      Piet

      Reply
    • The story of Telepinu and Ephesos you can learn on this interesting film on youtube:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZK1DYwbQT4&t=4s
      It is made for the German Television and some Professors from the Austrian Archeological Institute have help with the film, very interesting, but unfortunately it is in German. The Austrian Archeological Institute have already studying the City of Ephesos for more than 100 years. I think the first excavation was in 1895. So they have build and grand knowledge about Epesos.
      Piet

      Reply
  6. Piet,
    Your information about bees and the way that you associate Telepinu with Greek coinage and art is completely ill informed. Because in a single coin you see something that may have appeared elsewhere you cannot make the conclusion that someone copied someone else. I suggest to apply more regour of thought what we go to publicise some of our thoughts, even in easy fora like this one.
    Jhon McCarthy, Leeds West Yorkshire.
    Hestorian

    Reply
  7. Piet,
    Your information about bees and the way that you associate Telepinu with Greek coinage and art is completely ill informed. Because in a single coin you see something that may have appeared elsewhere you cannot make the conclusion that someone copied someone else. I suggest to apply more regour of thought what we go to publicise some of our thoughts, even in easy fora like this one.
    Jhon McCarthy, Leeds West Yorkshire.
    Hestorian

    Reply
  8. Dear Jhon,
    I’m not a Historian, I wrote only what I’ve learned from the University of Vienna. This story is not found by me. But at the University of Vienna, you find many historians, who studying more than 100 years on the live of Ephesos.
    The national German TV channel ZDF made a documentary about Ephesos and the University of Vienna helped them to make this documentary. You can see the documentary also on Youtube at:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ww5XJc3LWE&t=3s
    It is in German, but at about minute 5 after starting you can see the story where I wrote about. It was wrong from me to not report where I’ve learned all of this. I apologize.
    Piet

    Reply
  9. Dear Jhon,
    I’m not a Historian, I wrote only what I’ve learned from the University of Vienna. This story is not found by me. But at the University of Vienna, you find many historians, who studying more than 100 years on the live of Ephesos.
    The national German TV channel ZDF made a documentary about Ephesos and the University of Vienna helped them to make this documentary. You can see the documentary also on Youtube at:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ww5XJc3LWE&t=3s
    It is in German, but at about minute 5 after starting you can see the story where I wrote about. It was wrong from me to not report where I’ve learned all of this. I apologize.
    Piet

    Reply

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