What Do Stink Bugs Do? Discover Their Impact on Your Home and Garden

Stink bugs are a type of insect belonging to the family Pentatomidae, known for their distinctive smell when handled or disturbed. You might have encountered some common species like the green stink bug, brown stink bug, red-shouldered stink bug, or the invasive brown marmorated stink bug. These bugs are found in various habitats, often in gardens, fields, and sometimes even inside your home.

They feed on a wide variety of plants, fruits, and crops, causing damage to the agriculture industry in some regions. These bugs use their straw-like mouthparts to pierce plant tissues and suck out the juices, which may lead to deformed or unmarketable fruits and diminished crop yields. As an invasive species, the brown marmorated stink bug has been causing significant problems both in the United States and other parts of the world.

In addition to their agricultural impact, stink bugs can become a nuisance to homeowners when they seek refuge indoors during colder seasons. Their foul-smelling defensive secretions may be a cause for concern for the residents. While not directly harmful to humans, the presence of these bugs can be frustrating, making it essential to understand their behavior and learn how to manage an infestation effectively.

Stink Bug Identification

Identifying stink bugs can be made easier by focusing on a few key characteristics. First, let’s talk about their appearance:

  • Color: Stink bugs can vary in color, ranging from brown mottled patterns to a distinct green hue, as seen in the green stink bug.
  • Shield-like shape: One of the defining features of stink bugs is their shield-like shape. Their bodies are generally oval or shield-shaped, making them easily recognizable.

Now that you have an idea of these insects’ general appearance, let’s compare some common stink bug species:

Feature Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Green Stink Bug
Size 14-17mm long Similar to Brown Marmorated
Color Brown mottling pattern Bright green
Antennae Last two segments have light & dark bands 5 segments
Egg color Light green or yellow Distinctively pure white

You might also come across predatory stink bugs, like the spined soldier bug. These bugs can be beneficial, as they feed on other pests in your garden or field. To identify them, look for these characteristics:

  • Color: Predatory stink bugs are often brown or yellow with reddish-brown markings.
  • Spines: They have prominent spines on their “shoulders,” which distinguishes them from plant-feeding stink bugs.

Remember these features when you’re trying to identify stink bugs, and you should have little trouble distinguishing them from other insects.

Why do Stink Bugs Stink

Smell as a Defense Mechanism

Stink bugs are known for their distinctive and unpleasant odor, which they emit when they feel threatened or disturbed. But, you may wonder why stink bugs stink? The key reason behind this smell is to serve as a defense mechanism against predators.

Stink bugs possess special glands in their thorax that produce a chemical cocktail responsible for their infamous odor. When these insects sense danger or are harassed, they release these chemicals onto a rough part of their exoskeleton called the evapatorium.

This strong, foul-smelling liquid not only helps to repel potential predators but also sends out an important signal to nearby stink bugs. In a way, it acts as a pheromone, alerting other stink bugs of the impending danger and encouraging them to release their odors as well, creating a combined defense.

Here are some characteristics of stink bug’s smell:

  • Unpleasant scent: The odor is strong and easily recognizable, discouraging predators from getting too close.
  • Quick reaction: Stink bugs can release their odor in a matter of seconds, allowing them to react quickly to threats.

Ultimately, the odor produced by stink bugs serves a critical purpose in their survival. It offers an effective defense mechanism against predators and helps ensure the safety of other stink bugs in the area. So, as annoying as their smell might be, it plays a significant role in the bug’s life.

Stink Bug Habitats

Stink bugs are known to invade homes and other structures, seeking shelter from outdoor weather conditions. You may find them in various parts of your home, including eaves, chimneys, and windows. Here’s a quick overview of stink bug habitats:

They often enter homes through small cracks and crevices in doors, windows, or siding. To protect your home, it’s essential to seal any gaps and use weatherstripping around doors and windows. Missouri Department of Conservation states that stink bugs are generally oval or shield-shaped, which makes it easier for them to sneak into tiny openings.

Once inside, stink bugs prefer to find their way into protected spaces, such as behind walls, in attics, or beneath eaves. They can also hide in chimney spaces and around the foundation of your home. Don’t forget to check for gaps and seal them as necessary.

To summarize, stink bug habitats can be found in:

  • Eaves
  • Chimneys
  • Cracks and crevices
  • Doors and windows
  • Foundation
  • Siding

To avoid stink bug infestations, it’s essential to maintain your home by sealing gaps and cracks where they might enter. Remember, prevention is critical in keeping these unwelcome pests away from your home.

Lifecycle of a Stink Bug

Stink bugs, belonging to the family Pentatomidae, have a fascinating lifecycle spanning from eggs to adulthood. Let’s explore the various stages briefly.

Eggs: In the early stages, female stink bugs lay clusters of 20-30 light green or yellow, elliptical-shaped eggs on plants or other surfaces during May through August. You might have seen these distinctive egg clusters on the underside of leaves in your garden.

Diapause and Hibernation: As temperatures drop, many stink bug species enter a period of diapause – a sort of restful waiting state. You might see them hiding around your home, like in cracks, attics, or walls to escape the cold.

Nymphs: After hatching, young stink bugs go through five stages called instars, gradually developing the features of an adult bug. As they progress, their wing size increases and body color changes. During this phase, they consume plant material to prepare for adulthood.

Adults: Fully grown adult stink bugs carry the infamous shield shape and emit a foul odor when threatened. They feed on various crops, fruits, and vegetables, making them a nuisance to both gardeners and farmers.

So next time you encounter a stink bug, remember the journey it took to reach that stage in its lifecycle, and perhaps thank them for helping you better understand the complex world of insects.

Stink Bugs and Predation

Stink bugs play a unique role in the ecosystem as both predators and prey. In this section, we’ll discuss the predatory aspects of these insects and their importance in biological control.

You may be familiar with the spined soldier bug, a type of predatory stink bug. These beneficial bugs feed on a variety of pests, including beetles and caterpillars. With their ability to tackle over 100 species of insect pests, these predators can be a gardener’s best friend.

In terms of physical features, the beaks of predatory stink bugs are a key identifier. These bugs have beaks that are at least twice as thick as their antennae, allowing them to pierce and suck body fluids from their prey, whereas herbivorous stink bugs have thinner beaks.

When it comes to biological control, the presence of predatory stink bugs can help reduce the need for chemical interventions. By preying on detrimental insects, they assist in maintaining a healthy balance in your garden or farm.

In summary, stink bugs are not just pests; their predatory behavior provides valuable control over harmful insects. By recognizing and encouraging their presence, you can experience the benefits of these natural predators in your own outdoor space.

Dietary Habits of Stink Bugs

Stink bugs are known to feed on a wide variety of plants, including fruit, vegetables, and crops. They use their needle-like mouthparts to pierce the surface of the plant and suck out the sap, causing damage to the plant tissue.

Some common examples of plants and crops that stink bugs target include:

  • Apples
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Corn
  • Beans
  • Garden vegetables
  • Ornamental plants

When feeding on fruit and vegetables, stink bugs can cause noticeable harm. Their feeding can create hard, whitish, callous tissue beneath the skin at the feeding site, leaving cloudy areas of hard yellow spots just under the skin of the fruit. This damage can result in misshapen or shriveled fruits.

Aside from fruit and vegetable plants, stink bugs can also feed on the leaves and stems of various host plants. They have been known to consume plant sap and nectar. As they move between these plants, they can spread diseases, further impacting crop quality and yield.

It’s crucial to monitor and manage stink bugs in your garden or farm to minimize their damage. Early detection and proper control methods can help protect your plants and maintain healthy, bountiful harvests.

Damage Caused by Stink Bugs

Stink bugs can cause significant damage to your crops, plants, and home. These agricultural pests are known for their ability to harm a variety of plants and inflict serious losses in the farming industry.

When stink bugs infest your garden or farm, they do so by feeding on the plants. They insert their mouthparts into the plant tissues, causing direct damage to them. Some common plants affected by stink bug infestations include:

  • Fruits like apples, peaches, and cherries
  • Vegetables such as tomatoes, corn, and beans
  • Ornamental plants

Stink bug infestations can also lead to indirect damage. As they feed, they release enzymes that can impair the plant’s ability to heal, leading to deformities, discoloration, and even increased susceptibility to disease.

Beyond the damage to your plants and crops, stink bugs can also be a nuisance inside your home. When the weather gets cooler, they may seek warmth indoors. Once inside, they release an unpleasant odor when disturbed or threatened, making them unwelcome guests.

Here’s a comparison table to summarize the impact of stink bug infestations:

Impact Description
Direct damage Feeding on plant tissues, affecting fruits, vegetables, and ornamental plants
Indirect damage Releasing enzymes that cause deformities, discoloration, and increased susceptibility to disease
Nuisance factor Invading homes and releasing unpleasant odors

Be aware of the potential damage caused by stink bugs so you can take appropriate measures to protect your plants, crops, and home. By staying vigilant and using effective control methods, you can minimize the risks associated with these pesky insects.

Preventing and Getting Rid of Stink Bugs

DIY Solutions

Vacuuming: You can easily get rid of stink bugs using a vacuum cleaner. Simply vacuum them up, empty the bag, and make sure to discard it properly so the odor doesn’t linger in your home.

Soapy water: Create a mixture of water and detergent. Spray it on stink bugs to kill them. This solution also helps to prevent future infestations.

Essential oils: There are several essential oils that can help repel stink bugs, such as ylang-ylang oil, wintergreen, garlic, garlic spray, clove oil, lemongrass oil, spearmint, and lemongrass. Mix a few drops of your chosen oil with water and spray it around your home, especially in areas where they may enter.

Professional Extermination Solutions

If your infestation is severe, hiring an exterminator might be the best solution. They have access to more potent insecticides and will know the best methods for your specific situation.

Comparison between DIY Solutions and Professional Extermination Solutions:

DIY Solutions Professional Extermination Solutions
Cost-effective More expensive
Easy to implement Requires scheduling and availability of professional
Ideal for small infestations Ideal for severe infestations
May require repeated application Likely to provide a long-term solution

Tips for Prevention

  • Seal off potential entry points, such as broken window screens, utility pipes, and doorways.

  • Keep your yard clean and free of debris that might attract stink bugs.

  • Curtains and blinds can help block light, which attracts stink bugs. Close them during peak hours where sunlight enters your home.

  • Plant stink bug-repelling plants in your garden like squash, cilantro and other Hemiptera-deterrent vegetation.

  • Regularly check your home for signs of stink bugs, especially during late summer and early fall when they are seeking warmth for winter shelter.

Beneficial Aspects of Stink Bugs

Though stink bugs, like the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), can be a nuisance, they do serve some beneficial purposes. Let’s discuss a couple of those advantages in the following paragraphs.

First, stink bugs are a food source for many predators. You might not be a fan of them, but various birds, spiders, and other insects enjoy feasting on these not-so-favorite bugs. This natural predation helps maintain a balance in the ecosystem.

Secondly, certain stink bug species can even help control pests. For example, the twospotted stink bug, Perillus bioculatus, is considered a beneficial predator that feeds on other insects such as the Colorado potato beetle – a major pest for farmers.

Overall, it’s important to remember that while stink bugs can be a nuisance, they also contribute to the environment in their own way. So, the next time you come across one, know that there’s an entomologist out there studying them to better understand their role in our world. And who knows, maybe their benefits will surprise you!

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Say’s Stink Bug crawls out of organic salad on Thanksgiving

 

Subject: Lovely green bug crawled out of my salad!
Location: Bronx, NY
November 27, 2014 7:35 pm
Hi! I found this guy on my salad plate on Thanksgiving. It was an Earthboubd Farms arugula salad. My hostess assured me the greens had come right out of the box. We are in the Bronx & I don’t want to put him outside for fear of the cold. I placed him on a houseplant & he relocated himself to a sweet potato that he was reluctant to leave. What is he??
Signature: Priscilla

Say's Stink Bug
Say’s Stink Bug

Dear Priscilla,
This Stink Bug looks like a Say’s Stink Bug,
Chlorochroa sayi, a species that is found, according to BugGuide, west of the Mississippi River.  We could not find Earthboubd Farms, but seeing as the n is next to the b on the keyboard, we are assuming you made a typographical error and are referring to an organic farm in California known for packaged, prewashed greens.  This should be a lesson to all folks who buy prewashed greens that it doesn’t hurt to do a quick once over to ensure there is no unwanted protein in the salad. 

 

Letter 2 – Red and Black Striped Stink Bug from Turkey

 

Brightly-colored Turkish beetle
Location: Central Turkey – Ihlara valley, Cappadocia
December 28, 2010 11:34 am
This is a picture of what looks like a beetle, taken in June 2009 in the Cappadocia region of Turkey.
We’ve identified some of our other Turkish bugs from this great site, and were hoping you could tell us what this beauty is!
Signature: Dave and Debbie

Red and Black Striped Stink Bug

Dear Dave and Debbie,
Perhaps the reason that you have had difficulty with this particular identification is because you mistook this Stink Bug for a Beetle, a common mistake.  This is a Red and Black Striped Stink Bug,
Graphosoma lineatum, and the Trek Nature website has a photo posted that was taken in Turkey.  BioLib has an image of this species that was taken in Israel, and elsewhere on the BioLib website, the range is listed as “North Africa, Spain?, Southern France?, Sardinia, Corsica.”  In our own archives, you can see an image of a mating pair taken in France.

Letter 3 – Say's Stink Bug

 

Shield Looking Green Beetle in Colorado
Hi Bugman,
Great Site! I looked through all of the beetle pages and could not find this. I also googled beetles native to Colorado and mostly what I found was the june beetle and potato beetle. I am stumped? I live on the front range of Colorado and found this guy in our backyard near the flower garden. He flew pretty high but for only about 20 feet at a time. Took picture on May 30th around 6 pm. Thanks for the help

This is Say’s Stink Bug, Chlorochroa sayi. Stink Bugs are also called Shield Bugs and they are True Bugs in the family Pentatomidae, not beetles..

Letter 4 – Shield Backed Bugs: Nymph and Imago????

 

Daniel aka Bugman,
Thanks for the reply and the positive id. I haven’t graduated from the common names of all the bugs just yet! Between your site and bugguide i have learned alot though and thank you for that. I have to say your site is much easier to navigate than bugguides. I hope when you get a chance you could help me figure out what type of beetle i have here, for the life of me i cannot id these guys. They are quite abundant in my yard i seem to always find them on the plant Axocatzin. I am sending pics of the same beetle, i believe, just different stages of its development. I was also wondering if it was ok to add a link to your site onto my bug page here, http://www.birdnerdnaturephotography.com/canon30dpictures/insectsandwildlife.html if you don’t mind. Thanks for all your time and all that you do!
Tracy Palmer
http://www.birdnerdnaturephotography.com/

Hi again Tracy,
Thanks for asking if you can link to our site. That would be fine. In the future, please limit your submissions to one species as posting letters with photos of both Hemipterans and Ants is quite awkward on our site. Also, please include your location when you send images. We had to peruse your previous email to confirm the images are from Houston, Texas. We are fascinated that you believe these are two stages of the same insect. They are definitely Hemipterans. We found a close, but not perfect match on BugGuide with a Shield Backed Bug in the genus Orsilochides with the only species being Orsilochides guttata. Interestingly, there are no nymphs posted to BugGuide. Though Shield Bugs only go through incomplete metamorphosis, there are sometimes drastic color and marking changes between the nymphs and the adults. It will be interesting to see if your observation is accurate. We will check with Eric Eaton to see if he can add or correct this identification.

Wow, thanks for the quick reply. I’ve found the black and white ones aggregated on the Axocatzin and the next day they were smaller versions of the brown ones, thats what led me to believe they were maybe the same just different phases. The browns ones are always found on the same plant with the nymphs. I’ll find the brown ones flying around the yard but if i see the black and white ones there is always a brown one nearby. The brown ones are a little larger than the b&w and when they turn to adults they look bigger but same color.Attaching a poor pic of the 2 associating together. These were 2 i recently had been observing one had changed to brown the other was still b&w. The brown ones always move alot faster than the b&w ones thats why this is the only pic i have got of them together, if you notice, it looks as though the brown one has remnants of the b&w color towards the edge of the body. Note that on the day i took this pic; in the morning they were both b&w, by the afternoon the one had turned brown. Location is Houston Texas my yard where i find the majority of bugs i take pics of.

Hi Tracy,
Thanks for the clarification. We hope all this additional information will assist Eric Eaton. Though your newest photo is blurry, it is great because it shows a different angle as well as the scale relationship between the two insects.

Letter 5 – Rainbow Shield Bug from Senegal

 

Beautiful W. African beetle
Location: Dakar, Senegal
August 11, 2011 4:11 pm
Greetings from Senegal. I found this beetle dead on my roof/patio today (August). Amazing coloring both top and bottom. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Wayne in Dakar

Rainbow Shield Bug

Hi Wayne,
This is not a beetle.  Its piercing/sucking mouth, revealed in the view of the underside, is an indication that this is a True Bug.  It is a Lychee Shield Bug,
Chrysocoris stolli, which you can verify on TrekNature and on India Nature Watch.  Shield Bugs are sometimes called Jewel Bugs because of their beautiful coloration.  We were not aware that Africa was part of the range of the Lychee Shield Bug.

Rainbow Shield Bug

Correction:  Rainbow Shield Bug
November 13, 2011
Upon creating a new posting today, we have found information that correctly identifies this beauty as a Rainbow Shield Bug. 
Dudu Diaries calls this beauty the Rainbow Shield Bug, but does not provide a scientific name.  It seems in 2009, we received a correction from someone who identified the Rainbow Shield Bug as Calidea dregii, citing a FlickR link.  We have also located a pdf entitled 2010-01_Alert_Rainbow_Shield_Bug that identifies the Rainbow Shield Bug as Calidea dregii and provides some fascinating information on the species including:  “The Rainbow Shield Bug suck the sap from developing seeds leading to seeds dropping prematurely or not developing fully. In cotton it leads to staining and therefore a lower price if the bolls do not drop prematurely. The low number of mature Jatropha seeds observed in Guinea-Bissau is likely caused by seed dropping due to damage from Rainbow Shield Bugs.”  Your photo illustrates a winged adult as well as some immature nymphs.  Now with our new research, we need to correct our archives.

 

Letter 6 – Rainbow Shield Bug from Camaroon

 

Cameroonian Beetle
Location: Northern Cameroon
November 13, 2011 11:43 am
Hi there!
My sister recently started a two and half year appointment with the Peace Corps in Cameroon. She sent me a picture the other day of a beautiful beetle she saw in the extreme north of the country. I would really like to know what it is!
Thank you!
Signature: Liz M.

Jewel Bugs

Dear Liz,
These beautiful insects are not beetles, but True Bugs in the order Hemiptera.  They are further classified as Jewel Bugs in the family Scutelleridae.  In the past, we identified this as a Lychee Shield Bug, Chrysocoris stolli, though we cannot verify that the species is correct as images that we have found online, though similar, have different markings.  We are not certain if there is species variability or if several similar looking species share a common name.  Jewel Bug is a commonly accepted name for the individual members of the family, many of which have bright metallic coloration.  Dudu Diaries calls this beauty the Rainbow Shield Bug, but does not provide a scientific name.  It seems in 2009, we received a correction from someone who identified the Rainbow Shield Bug as
Calidea dregii, citing a FlickR link.  We have also located a pdf entitled 2010-01_Alert_Rainbow_Shield_Bug that identifies the Rainbow Shield Bug as Calidea dregii and provides some fascinating information on the species including:  “The Rainbow Shield Bug suck the sap from developing seeds leading to seeds dropping prematurely or not developing fully. In cotton it leads to staining and therefore a lower price if the bolls do not drop prematurely. The low number of mature Jatropha seeds observed in Guinea-Bissau is likely caused by seed dropping due to damage from Rainbow Shield Bugs.”  Your photo illustrates a winged adult as well as some immature nymphs.  Now with our new research, we need to correct our archives.

Letter 7 – Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Stink Bug

 

Subject: Stink bug eater
Location: Northwest Georgia USA
August 19, 2014 5:57 pm
I saw this huge fly eating on a stink bug at the pool. I took a photo of it thinking it may be a species of dragon fly. There were several Dragon flies around with honey bees in their mouths. . Any clue what this is?
Signature: Scott

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Stink Bug
Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Stink Bug

Dear Scott,
This is a marvelous image of a Red Footed Cannibalfly that we can tag as Food ChainRed Footed Cannibalflies are large, predatory Robber Flies.

Thank you very much. I hope this fly stays around and eats all the stink bugs they can. I’m finding stink bugs in my home. The Red footed cannibal fly is welcome to eat all the stink bugs they can.

Letter 8 – Red Shouldered Stink Bug

 

Subject: Beetle Mania?
Location: Ventura
May 10, 2017 3:17 pm
Dearest Bugman,
This adorable green and red creature joined me in my bathroom this morning whilst I was applying makeup in my vintage Japanese silk kimono. He appeared friendly and narcissistic since he insisted on posing direction on the mirror so as to provide full frontal as well as posterior views. Is this some kind of beetle?
Signature: Melanie on the Irish Chain

Red Shouldered Stink Bug

Dearest Melanie on the Irish Chain,
It appears, compared to this BugGuide image, that your Stink Bug is
Thyanta pallidovirens.  According to the Encyclopedia of Life, it is called a Red Shouldered Stink Bug.  Your wonderful image represents a new species to our site.

Letter 9 – Red Shouldered Stink Bug on Woody Plant (including snarky Facebook comment)

 

Subject:  What’s This Bug on my Super Lemon Haze hybrid?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 08:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I was out inspecting my garden this morning and discovered a new bug on my Super Lemon Haze hybrid.  Is this a friend or foe?  I am especially concerned as my plants are beginning to bud.
Thanks
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Red Shouldered Stink Bug on Woody Plant

Dear Constant Gardener,
This is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, and most members of the family feed on plants by piercing the surface and sucking fluids with a proboscis, while others are predatory and beneficial in the garden.  We quickly identified your individual as
Thyanta pallidovirens thanks to this BugGuide image, but unfortunately, BugGuide does not provide many specifics on the species or its feeding habits.  Encyclopedia of Life calls this species the Red Shouldered Stink Bug.  The University of California Integrated Pest Management System recognizes it as a pest of tomatoes and other crops, so our opinion is “foe.”

Stink Bug, Thyanta pallidovirens, on Woody Plant

Facebook Comment from Jason Stowe:
It seems the easiest way to get a question answered or a bug identified is to take it on a pot plant.

Rebuttal from Our Editorial Staff:
Over the years, we have created tags related to specific plants that have ecosystems associated with them, including Milkweed Meadow, Goldenrod Meadow and Tomato Bugs as well as the recently added What’s on my Woody Plant?, the latter focusing on insects found by home
Cannabis growers.  What’s That Bug? currently has 26,186 unique postings and only 33 are archived on the tag that targets Cannabis growers.  That represents .126% of our postings.  That said, Jason Stowe is exaggerating.  By comparison there are 973 postings currently archived on WTB? Down Under representing 3.72% of our postings, so, in fact, a far easier way to get something identified is to move to Australia.  Also, for the record, what we really hate identifying are victims of Unnecessary Carnage, yet we have identified 263 of them, and that is only the submissions we have posted and tagged, and does not take into consideration replies we have made but not posted.

Letter 10 – Red Shouldered Stinkbugs: Splendor in the Grass

 

While trying to pull out ivy and invasive crawling grasses from around our squash plants, we stumbled upon this Spendor in the Grass: Two Green Stinkbugs embracing. We hurried indoors for the camera and had a difficult time relocting them, but they were very cooperative for the camera.

Ed. Note Update: (12/03/2005)
stink bugs identified!
Greetings Bugman, I am browsing your site and enjoying the information and beautiful photos. Thanks for doing a great service to the public. From my recent work in agricultural entomology, I instantly recognized some of the little stinkers on your site, so I thought I’d point them out. Green Stinkbugs: Splendor in the Grass (07/16/2005) This looks like the red-shouldered stink bug, Thyanta custator. It is fairly common but not as harmful as some other stink bugs like the southern green. It should not be confused with a similar invasive South American species, Piezodorus guildinii, which has a two-toned black and orange or black and white stripe.
Take care,
Heather Spaulding

Letter 11 – Red Shouldered Stinkbugs: Splendor in the Grass

 

While trying to pull out ivy and invasive crawling grasses from around our squash plants, we stumbled upon this Spendor in the Grass: Two Green Stinkbugs embracing. We hurried indoors for the camera and had a difficult time relocting them, but they were very cooperative for the camera.

Ed. Note Update: (12/03/2005)
stink bugs identified!
Greetings Bugman, I am browsing your site and enjoying the information and beautiful photos. Thanks for doing a great service to the public. From my recent work in agricultural entomology, I instantly recognized some of the little stinkers on your site, so I thought I’d point them out. Green Stinkbugs: Splendor in the Grass (07/16/2005) This looks like the red-shouldered stink bug, Thyanta custator. It is fairly common but not as harmful as some other stink bugs like the southern green. It should not be confused with a similar invasive South American species, Piezodorus guildinii, which has a two-toned black and orange or black and white stripe.
Take care,
Heather Spaulding

Letter 12 – Red Shouldered Stinkbugs: Splendor in the Grass

 

While trying to pull out ivy and invasive crawling grasses from around our squash plants, we stumbled upon this Spendor in the Grass: Two Green Stinkbugs embracing. We hurried indoors for the camera and had a difficult time relocting them, but they were very cooperative for the camera.

Ed. Note Update: (12/03/2005)
stink bugs identified!
Greetings Bugman, I am browsing your site and enjoying the information and beautiful photos. Thanks for doing a great service to the public. From my recent work in agricultural entomology, I instantly recognized some of the little stinkers on your site, so I thought I’d point them out. Green Stinkbugs: Splendor in the Grass (07/16/2005) This looks like the red-shouldered stink bug, Thyanta custator. It is fairly common but not as harmful as some other stink bugs like the southern green. It should not be confused with a similar invasive South American species, Piezodorus guildinii, which has a two-toned black and orange or black and white stripe.
Take care,
Heather Spaulding

Letter 13 – Rainbow Shield Bug from Africa perhaps

 

african beetle?
Thu, Mar 12, 2009 at 4:43 AM
this was taken near the shore of lake Victoria in Jinga (source of the Nile), Uganda (east africa)
-kait
Jinga, Uganda, East Africa

Unknown African True Bug
African Rainbow Shield Bug

Dear -kait,
This is not a beetle. It is a True Bug in the order Hemiptera, but we don’t know the species. It sure is a colorful specimen. Perhaps one of our readers will write in with a correct identification or family.

 

Unknown African True Bug

Update: Sun, Mar 15, 2009 at 2:43 PM
Hi, I sent a comment form with this info, but I’m not sure with the newer site how to offer ID info.  I believe this bug is a Rainbow Shield Bug (Calidea dregii).  The colors are just gorgeous!  Hope this helps,
Karen Oram
Shelton, CT

Hi Karen,
The photo sure matches the one posted on Flickr, and the plant seems to be the same as well.  Despite the scientific name, we were unable to locate a reputable scientific link for the species.

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

9 thoughts on “What Do Stink Bugs Do? Discover Their Impact on Your Home and Garden”

  1. Hi, I sent a comment form with this info, but I’m not sure with the newer site how to offer ID info. I believe this bug is a Rainbow Shield Bug (Calidea dregii). The colors are just gorgeous! Hope this helps,
    Karen Oram
    Shelton, CT

    Reply
  2. The lychee has a history and cultivation going back as far as 2000 BC according to records in China. Cultivation began in the area of southern China, Malaysia, and Vietnam. Wild trees still grow in parts of southern China and on Hainan Island. There are many stories of the fruit’s use as a delicacy in the Chinese Imperial Court. It was first described and introduced to the west in 1782.’,*:

    Hottest brief article on our very own web page
    <http://www.homefamilydigest.com

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  3. The lychee has a history and cultivation going back as far as 2000 BC according to records in China. Cultivation began in the area of southern China, Malaysia, and Vietnam. Wild trees still grow in parts of southern China and on Hainan Island. There are many stories of the fruit’s use as a delicacy in the Chinese Imperial Court. It was first described and introduced to the west in 1782.’,*:

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  4. This same little guy was walking the edge of my salad bowl. Though I prefer bugs to chemicals when it comes to my foods, I kinda lost my appetite…

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