What Do Larder Beetles Eat? A Quick Guide to These Intriguing Insects

Larder beetles are common household pests that you might encounter in your pantry. They are known for their appetite for high protein content food items. These beetles have a fascinating life cycle and their feeding habits directly impact their growth and development.

You may notice adult larder beetles in your home, which are black in color with a broad, pale tan, black spotted band across their wing covers. These beetles are on a mission to find food sources to lay their eggs, and ultimately, to provide sustenance for their larvae once they hatch. Some examples of their preferred food include cured meats, cheese, feathers, and pet food.

Despite being pests, larder beetles serve a purpose outdoors as “recyclers” that aid in the breakdown and recycling of organic matter. Understanding their diet can help you take necessary precautions to protect your food storage and minimize their infestation in your home.

Larder Beetles Overview

Larder beetles, scientifically known as Dermestes lardarius, belong to the Dermestidae family, also known as skin beetles. These insects are quite common, and in this section, you’ll learn more about them.

These beetles are usually black in color, with tan markings across their wing covers. Adult larder beetles measure about 1/3 inch in length. Their larvae are reddish-brown and covered with short and long hairs. They also have two curved spines at the tail end.

Larder beetles have a diverse diet. Primarily, they feast on:

  • Animal products
  • Dried meats
  • Cheese
  • Pet food
  • Dried fish
  • Dead insects
  • Animal hair

These beetles can also become a pest in various environments. They can infest your pantry, food storage areas, and even commercial facilities. By knowing their diet and habits, you can take precautionary measures to prevent them from becoming a problem.

To recap, here are the key features of larder beetles:

  • Scientific name: Dermestes lardarius
  • Family: Dermestidae
  • Adult size: 1/3 inch long
  • Color: Black with tan markings
  • Larvae: Reddish-brown with hairs and curved spines

Now that you have a better understanding of larder beetles, you can identify them and address any potential infestations. Remember, awareness and prevention play a significant role in keeping your environment free from these pests.

Appearance and Characteristics

Larder beetles are interesting creatures with unique features. Let’s discuss their appearance and characteristics in a friendly manner:

  • Color: These beetles have a distinct color pattern. Their bodies are mostly black, with a broad, pale tan band featuring black spots across the front portion of their wing covers (elytra) source.

  • Body: Adult larder beetles have a body length of about 1/3 inch. Their larvae are reddish-brown and densely covered with short and long hairs.

  • Legs: Like other beetles, larder beetles have three pairs of legs, which enable them to move efficiently.

  • Antennae: These beetles are equipped with antennae that help them sense their environment.

  • Black setae: You may notice these tiny, dense black hairs on the larvae. They assist in movement and protection.

  • Spines: Larder beetle larvae possess two curved spines on the top of their body’s tip source. These spines serve as a defensive mechanism against predators.

Now that you know more about larder beetles’ appearance and characteristics, it’s easier to identify them in your surroundings. Remember to keep an eye out for their distinctive color pattern and other features.

Life Cycle of Larder Beetles

The life cycle of larder beetles involves several stages: adult, eggs, larvae, pupate, and again adult. Let’s take a closer look at each stage.

First, larder beetles overwinter in protected places like crevices of bark or walls. As spring arrives, they search for suitable food sources.

During the summer months, female larder beetles lay over 100 eggs. It takes about two weeks for these eggs to hatch into larvae. Feeding on high-protein foods, the larvae grow for around 40-50 days.

After that, the larvae seek shelter for transformation. They are known to bore up to 1/2 inches into the wood. In this safe space, they pupate and eventually transform into adult larder beetles.

Here are some notable features of the larder beetle life cycle:

  • Overwinters as adults
  • Females lay eggs on food sources
  • Larval stage lasts 40-50 days
  • Pupation occurs in sheltered areas

Comparing the larder beetle life cycle to other insects, you can see that their transformation and need for high-protein foods are unique characteristics. Keep their life cycle in mind when dealing with larder beetles, as understanding it can help in managing their presence in your home.

Diet and Feeding Habits

Larder beetles primarily feed on a variety of animal products. Some common items in their diet include:

  • Meat: This can be fresh, dried, or cured meats.
  • Cheese: Larder beetles are known to consume various types of cheese.
  • Feathers: These insects are known to eat feathers from various birds.
  • Fur: They can also consume animal fur, making them a potential pest in homes with pets.
  • Fish: Larder beetles are known to consume fish, whether dried or fresh.

Besides animal products, larder beetles may also consume certain plant-based items. These could include:

  • Grains: Larder beetles can eat various grains, which may be found in pantries or pet food storage areas.
  • Dry pet food: These beetles are known to infest dry pet food containers, feeding on the grains and proteins present in the food.

When it comes to the specific feeding habits of larder beetles, it is essential to understand their life cycle. Adult beetles lay their eggs in food sources, where the hatched larvae can feed and grow source.

For instance:

  • Larvae may infest meat products, cheeses, furs, and pet food, among other items.
  • As the larvae grow and develop into pupae, they may also bore into wood or other soft materials for protection.

In summary, the diet of larder beetles is quite varied, primarily consisting of animal products, but also including plant-based items such as grains. Being aware of their feeding habits and potential infestations is crucial for maintaining a safe and clean household.

Habitats and Infestation

Larder beetles are a common pest that can infest various areas in and around your home. They are known to thrive in environments such as:

  • Kitchens: These beetles can be found in pantries and cupboards, where they lay their eggs in food sources like dried meats, cheese, and pet food 1.
  • Basements and Storage Areas: Larder beetles can infiltrate your basement or storage areas, as they typically search for shelter to transform into pupae 2.
  • Outdoors: Adult larder beetles often overwinter outdoors, near animal nests, and in the walls of your home 3.

You might be wondering how larder beetles get into these spaces. Here are some ways they enter your home:

  • Through gaps and cracks in the walls or foundations.
  • Via open doors and windows or permeable screens.

To prevent infestation:

  • Seal potential entry points around your home.
  • Regularly clean and declutter your pantry, kitchen, and storage areas.
  • Store food, especially protein-rich items, in airtight containers.

If you find yourself dealing with an infestation, consider the following methods:

  • Heat treating items at 130°F for two to three hours or placing them in a deep freeze at 0°F for 24 hours to effectively kill adult and larval larder beetles 4.
  • Inspect and dispose of any contaminated food sources promptly.
  • Consult a professional exterminator for severe infestations.

Remember, maintaining a clean environment and taking preventive measures can help keep your home free from larder beetles.

Treatment and Control

Keeping your home clean and free of larder beetle food sources is a crucial step in controlling them. Regular vacuuming and inspecting areas where larder beetles might be hiding, such as cabinets and pantries, can help prevent infestations.

Insecticides

Some insecticides can specifically target larder beetles. Brands that list larder beetles or “general household pests” on their labels may contain chemicals like cyfluthrin, tetramethrin, or permethrin for crack and crevice treatments, providing residual protection against these pests.

Diatomaceous Earth

Diatomaceous earth (DE) is a non-toxic option for larder beetle control. Sprinkle DE around infested areas, and it will help dehydrate the beetles and their larvae, eventually leading to their demise.

Exterminator

If you’re struggling with a severe infestation, calling a professional exterminator might be the best solution. Pest control experts can identify the source and apply the necessary treatments for effective larder beetle removal.

To summarize, the most effective treatment and control methods for larder beetles include:

  • Regular vacuuming and cleaning
  • Using insecticides specifically for larder beetles
  • Applying diatomaceous earth in infested areas
  • Calling an exterminator for severe infestations

Larder Beetles and Other Insects

Larder beetles are known to feed on high-protein materials. For instance, they consume items like animal hides, furs, feathers, meat, cheese, and even dry pet foods source. Apart from that, larder beetles also have a penchant for dead insects and are often found in bird nests, animal remains, and bee or wasp nests source.

Now, let’s compare larder beetles to some other insects:

  • Carpet beetles: These beetles feed on natural fibers, fabrics, and even pollen. They’re not into high-protein sources like larder beetles.
  • Birds: Birds feast on a variety of insects, spiders, and small creatures. They aren’t interested in consuming non-living materials.
  • Spiders: As predators, spiders consume insects and other small arthropods.
  • Boxelder bugs: They focus on feeding on seeds, leaves, and young branches of boxelder trees.
  • Rodents: A rodent’s diet primarily consists of seeds, grains, fruits, and some types of insects.

Here’s a comparison table to summarize key differences:

Insect/Animal Primary Diet Diet Overlap with Larder Beetles
Carpet Beetle Natural fibers, fabrics, pollen No
Bird Insects, spiders, small animals Limited
Spider Insects, arthropods Limited
Boxelder Bug Seeds, leaves, young tree branches No
Rodent Seeds, grains, fruits, insects Limited

In conclusion, larder beetles stand out among these creatures due to their unique dietary preferences. They play a crucial role in breaking down and recycling high-protein materials in the ecosystem. This way, they help maintain a balance and contribute to the overall well-being of their surroundings.

Footnotes

  1. Larder Beetle – Plant & Pest Diagnostics

  2. Larder beetles | UMN Extension

  3. Larder Beetles – Wisconsin Horticulture

  4. PDF Larder Beetles University of Wisconsin Garden Facts

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Larder Beetles

 

Small Brown bug with white/yellow stripe
January 21, 2010
We have been finding these bugs in our kitchen and family room area. The bugs look like a beetle type, they are small dark brown almost black, with a white or yellow band on their backs. We normally find them in the morning laying on their backs on the hardwood floor. I want to spray for these and I am fearful that they are wood eaters. We live in a timber frame home from the early 1970s.
Jeffrey Feiler
South Central Pennsylvania

Larder Beetles

Dear Jeffrey,
Your wooden house is safe, but you are sharing your food.  It is time to clean out the pantry and search for the source of your Larder Beetle, Dermestes lardarius, infestation.  According to BugGuide, this cosmopolitan species will eat food stuff and museum specimens.  You may also need to check your trophy stag heads hanging above the fireplace or the bearskin rug on the floor in the den.  Generally, you need to find the source of the infestation to rid yourself of pantry beetles and general extermination is just a waste of money as it cannot target the source, especially if the Larder Beetles are in edible foods.  You should also check that bargain bag of dog food.

Daniel,
Thank you so much for the help. I thought they didn’t look like wood eaters, but we just moved down to PA from NH. Up there you had just mosquitoes and black flies (which ate my flesh and blood alot). Nothing else survived the winters for the most part. Southern PA has a zillion bugs, especially the annoying STINK BUG which I am convinced will survive nuclear holocaust, those things are more hearty then roaches.
Thanks Again,
Jeffrey Feiler

Letter 2 – Larder Beetle and Larvae

 

Beetle and Larvae?
Location: Kotzebue, Alaska
April 18, 2011 11:57 pm
I am finding these beetles all over the house on the floor, and I just scooped up 7 or 8 of what I believe to be a larvae stage of the beetle. The worms appear to have six legs and at first I thought they were a type of mealworm but I have been finding these beetles all over the house. I live in northern Alaska, close to Russia and I had the bugs outside in sub-zero temperatures and they are still alive. It is strange to me that even with the extreme cold they are still alive. What can they be? The beetles are black and all have a white stripe halfway down the shell.
Signature: Alaskan

Larder Beetle and Larvae

Dear Alaskan,
You have submitted a photo of a Larder Beetle and Larder Beetle Larvae,
Dermestes lardarius.  These are pests of stored foods but they may also infest museum specimens like stuffed animals.  If they are not in your pantry, you may want to closely inspect your taxidermy specimens like hunting trophies.  We are postdating this entry to go live during our holiday later in the week.

They are not only in the pantry, we have been finding them on the floors on the corners of the wall. Even with the best of insulation it is not un-common for insects and mice to spend the winter within a house’s insulation in our area so I assumed they were just one of our winter visitors waking up for Spring. The ones I caught are still alive and kicking somewhere outside so any future beetles I find are heading outside as well, thank you for the ID!

Letter 3 – Larder Beetles

 

Subject: Bugs in my Bathroom
Location: West Michigan
December 29, 2013 8:05 pm
Recently I have been finding these bugs all around on the floor of my bathroom. They are usually lying on their backs and look like they are dead, but when I pick them up they try to crawl away. They are approximately 5/8inch long. Are Blackish brown, with a tannish colored band around them. They don’t seem harmful, but I do not care much for creepy crawlies in my home. I have looked at hundreds of pictures online, but could not find them. I would really appreciate it if you could identify them for me. Thank You!
Signature: Buggy Bathroom

Larder Beetle
Larder Beetle

Dear Buggy Bathroom,
Despite the extreme blurriness of your image, the pattern on this Larder Beetle,
Dermestes lardarius, is very evident.  Larder Beetles infest stored foods, including dried meats and pet food.  Perhaps you have a large bag of pet food that they are feeding upon.  According to the Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences Entomology site:  “The larder beetle is a commercial pest as well as a household pest. This is a cosmopolitan species which was historically a pest of cured meats in Europe, the United States, and Canada. The use of refrigeration, the purchase of meats in small quantities, and the lack of home curing of meats, have decreased the economic importance of this insect. However, these beetles are still common in homes, museums, mills, livestock facilities, and any place that contains a suitable food source. Typically, these would include any animal by-product such as dried dog food, furs, hides, and feathers. Also, many pantry items can become infested. Another potential food source are dead insects in attic and wall voids that become trapped when they seek an overwintering site. In the fall insects such as flies, bugs, beetles and wasps, accumulate in attics and similar spaces in the home. Many of the hibernating insects die, attracting larder beetles which lay eggs on dead insects. The larvae of the larder beetle then feed on the dead insects.”  We would encourage you to search out the site of the infestation, and it might not necessarily be in the bathroom.

Thank You so much, I don’t know how I missed that picture. This is definately what they are. I started seeing the Larve first then the beetles shortly after I bombed my house for fleas, so they may be feeding on other dead bugs in the walls.   Thank you again.

Letter 4 – Possibly a Larder Beetle

 

Subject: Bug from Thrift Store? making me seriously ill
Location: Arvada, Colorado
March 5, 2013 8:56 am
I have noticed this bug for probably a couple of months. The only place that I find the, is usually one at a time, in the mornings on the top of my stove.
At first I thought they were mice feces, until about a week ago when I went to scoop it in the trash & it scurried away!!
I was MIT at a Thrift Store, & 2 weeks into the job, I developed hives & such. I fought it for 15 months, going to my PCP, a dermatologist, and had prick allergen testing, which revealed my only allergies were tov2 trees, & most grasses & weeds I then was sent into Workmans compv& had Patch testing run. This revealed allergies to Indystrial compounds; Chromate, Cobalt, Ethylednaminedihydrochloruse, and Balsam of Puru.
I have suffered recurring rashes covering my hands, neck, face,& scalp. I seem to clear up on steroids & antibiotics, but once off the meds, I reflare with a vengance. Nobody can seem to figure out what is wrong with me, as I continue to suffer. I often feel as though I’m being ”bitten”, and itch incessantly.
I’ve not worked at the Thrift Store since August 2012, but am still suffering and UNABLE to work.
Could THIS BUG be the culprit, & WHAT IS IT?????
I’ve checked my mattress & have not seen any there.
This bug is about 1/8”, brownish in color, no visible legs, apparent antanae on the head.
PLEASE HELP!! I’m freaking out & tired of being sick!! In addition, I need to get this cleared up so U may find different work
Thank you!
Miserable in Coloradi
Signature: Miserable in Colorado

Larder Beetle
Larder Beetle

Dear Miserable in Colorado,
We are not qualified to make medical diagnoses, nor do we have any scientific credentials.  This appears to be a Larder Beetle,
Dermestes lardarius, a species that commonly infests stored food products.  We do not believe it has any relationship to your symptoms.  You might want to suggest that your healthcare providers explore the possibility of Delusory Parasitosis.

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

148 thoughts on “What Do Larder Beetles Eat? A Quick Guide to These Intriguing Insects”

  1. I really must disagree with you on not eating the wood part….I just found the bar in my kitchen is infested with them and have holes bored everywhere!!!

    I am fearful that I am going to have to rip it out to get rid of them, a shame too as it is a custom made bar!

    Reply
    • I have not found them to eat wood but i have 3 messy teenage sons who leave dirty plates ect. Dirty laundry every where in there rooms up stairs i went and spring cleaned there rooms today while they were at school and found the little basterd buds i have also noticed they play dead! I vaccumed them all up and dumped them out side in the trash! I do not find them on my main floor or basement. Never in my food in the kitchen! ONLY in my scummy teen age boys rooms! Also would like to know how rid my home of them. But i think cleanliness so a long way!

      Reply
  2. Have u been tested for scabies? I had “hives” for 10 months, saw an allergist, even got to the point of taking 5 antihistimines and an immunosupressive, then when I took my daughter for her checkup showed her doc ONCE and found out it was scabies! He then gave the whole family a cream you apply at night and rinse off tye next am. As for the beetle, weve had those for years. Often they get in our pantry and love our flour, cereal and other dry goods. Just a nuisance.

    Reply
  3. i have these in my house to i live in northern alberta i do have a dog and will try the microwave and freesing tip but if they live up north freezing prop wont work
    i grab with paper towel and throw in toilet and flush or down the drain in the sink with hot water but throw away bread,cereal and crackers constantly they find their way in to the plastic and cardboard wrappper even through not open. even get in plastic tupperware containers which are sealed. thanks for the ident.

    Reply
  4. i have these in my house to i live in northern alberta i do have a dog and will try the microwave and freesing tip but if they live up north freezing prop wont work
    i grab with paper towel and throw in toilet and flush or down the drain in the sink with hot water but throw away bread,cereal and crackers constantly they find their way in to the plastic and cardboard wrappper even through not open. even get in plastic tupperware containers which are sealed. thanks for the ident.

    Reply
  5. we live in north west ontario and the house we moved into last Sept seems INFESTED with these things, they are dropping from light fixtures and crawling from wall baseboards , and have to be swept up ( yes there are that many) at least 6 times a day. How can i get rid of them ???

    Reply
  6. If a family of Larder beetles have taken up residency in a taxidermy mount how would one go about removing them with out damaging or destroying their trophy??

    Reply
    • You might want to seek the type of professional assistance provided by someone familiar with museum specimen preservation. A local taxidermist might also be able to provide the services needed.

      Reply
  7. I have found these bugs here and there around my house. They are usually already dead though and never have I found one in my kitchen. I have found them in a tote full of clothes for Goodwill and in my laundry room as well as my bathroom. Honestly I have never found them on the main level in our house (a split level).

    Reply
  8. I thought they might be carpet beetles, because that’s where I found them: in the carpet fibers around my cat litter box. But they look like like these photos, especially the one with the penny. Except the larvae don’t look hairy…

    Reply
  9. We have these all over our home. Our home is older and has been moved. I’ve been looking into what these larvae are for a few months now and keep learning a little more. We have had a pretty significant problem with cluster flies and also a significant mouse problem but have been having an exterminator come once a month for almost a year now to help with those issues. I know that they thrive on the fly caucuses and the dead mice. Our mice problem is mainly in our unfinished basement with a door that closes it off from the main living area. I know that we have dead mice in our walls because before I hired the exterminator we could hear them in our walls frequently then smell them for weeks when they die in there. This leads me to my question. How can I get rid of these bettles and larvae? Is there any hope if I can’t get rid of the dead mice in my walls? I’m just so tired of the larvae being in our clothes and I’ve even found one in my daughters diaper that I removed at a wedding…. Please please help!!! Thank you!!!!

    Reply
    • Kendra – I totally know what you are experiencing! I don’t like bugs at all…and certainly NOT IN MY HOUSE!!! Plus, I think those larvae are icky! We live in MN in a newer home and it is happening to us. We primarily have them on our top level. I proved to my husband that they were coming down from the attic through the lights, ceiling fan, smoke detectors, vents etc. by putting big plastic bins on the floor right under each of them. So, when they’d fall from the ceiling, they’d fall into the bins. I JUST KNEW my cleaning wasn’t that poor (especially when I had been on major cleaning sprees since we first discovered them – I even took all of my clothes out of my closet and inspected each garment…I even emptied drawers, vacuumed under/behind/inside etc and washed the items if I found one in a particular area). So, I hired an insulation person (my husband helped). They didn’t see an infestation in our attic – only say dead flies. But, they aren’t going to be able to see all bugs hiding in the insulation. But, I had them take down all of the lights/smoke detectors on our top level and foam insulated up in the ceiling to create a barrier between the inside living part of our house and the attic. They could not do that very well with the exhaust/fan vents since those holes are so big and they go to the outside. I had them do that in April and until last week we have had NONE!!! But, the warmer weather has brought them out. I’m sure that there have been eggs in the house which can explain some of them. But I am soooo hoping/praying they aren’t coming in the ceiling fan, the smoke detectors. The globe lights seem to keep them contained and I can heat them up in there by having the light on for 3-5min which then kills them. I have read that the mature larvae can bore through lead and wood. So, either eggs were up in the globe ‘light’ parts already or they have bored through the foam insulation and got into the lights. I have light carpet and light tile so I can see the larvae on the floor very easily. ‘Can lights’ were also harder for them to seal up but they seemed to have done well with the main one I had issues with (above my sons bathtub…it used to be bad and I had put a sheet of plastic and tape on my ceiling to prevent them from falling in my sons tub). I’m sure people think I’m a weirdo. But, my home is supposed to be my sanctuary…not a bug house. Also, vacuuming along the edges of the floor/wall and furniture with the vacuum tool regularly I believe helps as well….I am praying they aren’t coming down through the walls and under the floor boards. But, my husband says that it is a tight fit with the sheet rock and header boards. (I sure hope that is true…otherwise I will never beat these things…and they will continue to be my battle!!! I can’t imagine still dealing with this when I’m old!!!) With the latest ones (12 in a week) I decided to hang some bins from the ceiling vents/exhaust fans to prevent those from falling down to the floor so they can’t roam my house. If I catch them in the bins then I can see them/kill them. I just put them up yesterday… so none have been in there yet. I also discovered that they must be in between the floors between our top floor and main level as one fell from the ‘can light’ on our main level. So, I may need to have that guy seal up those lights for me too. I hope some of this has been helpful to you. I drive my husband nuts with this but he was very patient with the bins I just hung. I wish you the best and wish me luck too!! God bless!

      Reply
  10. To find these bugs in my home, & recently in my big bag of dog food, I had to.toss it,are these bugs dangerous to my pet’s??? Also, does this mean that somewhere in my home is the home to them,where I will find the bigger problem?.Is there a spray I can use? HELP!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
    • Spraying will not help because you would need to spray things that are being eaten by you and your pets. Larder Beetles are not dangerous, but they do ruin stored foods.

      Reply
    • I had these bugs in my kitchen a few years back. I had been told that my roach control method of 1 part boric acid and 2 parts cocoa would work on them, too. I did find that they like cardboard and chocolate. So, I put all my food stuffs in glass and /or plastic containers that could be sealed. I made up a batch of boric acid and cocoa, and put it in an old mayonnaise jar lid. I then placed it where food could not be contaminated by it and no pets or children could get into it ( under the cook stove or the refrigerator works well). I still keep my food stuff in plastic or glass containers, but I haven’t had problems from them in a long time.
      I am told that with roaches, the boric acid makes them sterile so they can’t reproduce. So, I was banking on the same being true for the larder beetles.

      Reply
    • I had these bugs in my kitchen a few years back. I had been told that my roach control method of 1 part boric acid and 2 parts cocoa would work on them, too. I did find that they like cardboard and chocolate. So, I put all my food stuffs in glass and /or plastic containers that could be sealed. I made up a batch of boric acid and cocoa, and put it in an old mayonnaise jar lid. I then placed it where food could not be contaminated by it and no pets or children could get into it ( under the cook stove or the refrigerator works well). I still keep my food stuff in plastic or glass containers, but I haven’t had problems from them in a long time.
      I am told that with roaches, the boric acid makes them sterile so they can’t reproduce. So, I was banking on the same being true for the larder beetles.

      Reply
  11. I had the same thing happen and before I knew it I found they had also invaded my kitchen cabinets. They were so bad that they were even burrowed into the wood of my custom made cabinets, I had to tear them out and install new cabinets. It took me over a year before I finally stopped finding them. I HATE THEM WITH A PASSION!!!!

    Reply
  12. i have these everywhere, everyone is saying they can from my dogs or my pantry. I haven’t found any in my food or the animals food. I come home from work and they are all over the floors and i cant get rid of them. Every time i tell someone there not in my food they start telling me they are a different bug. They are not a different bug, trust me ive been looking at them for the past 6 months. There have been less of them now that is has been winter but not that its warming up, i see more and more of them and are scared im going to be overwhelmed with them again. People have told me not to use a bug bomb but that’s the only place i can think of them coming from is my basement which is just basically a dirt cellar and no room to go down and spray. Is there a certain kind of bug bomb that will work on them or am i better off just crawling down there and spraying or calling pest control to do it.

    Reply
  13. Marnee, they dont just feed on human food or dog food, we didnt have them in our food either, these little critters will eat anything old dead bugs too.. we live in an area where there are massive amounts of common house flies in every nook and cranny inside and out ., they die in the walls and attic and these larder beetles feed on the carcasses…if you have an older house its nearly impossible to get rid of them . I have used home defense a spray that you use once a month or so and it helped to a degree…they were still dead everywhere but at least they were dead!

    Reply
    • What kind of home defense spray did you use?
      I live in the country and have lots of flies in my siding and attic so have had these pest around for a long time. Have even had orkin but with little luck. I vacuum all the time and still get them, even tried nylar and another insecticide. they are relentless.

      Reply
    • What kind of home defense spray did you use?
      I live in the country and have lots of flies in my siding and attic so have had these pest around for a long time. Have even had orkin but with little luck. I vacuum all the time and still get them, even tried nylar and another insecticide. they are relentless.

      Reply
  14. Ughh… I’ve found them in my house and they make my skin crawl…. I usually just drown them in anything I have…. All I have to say is its Operation kill all =]

    Reply
  15. I just moved into an apartment building…. And have started seeing them spararically I moved in April and I have seen about 5 so far aways on the floor near dirty clothes one on the windowsill behinds my bed on its back in the morning? …… I haven’t encountered any in my food and I haven’t found any together or a swarm of them…… Idk what to do tho I’ve searched my apartment and don’t see a home for them could they be coming from another apartment or through my door? Really want to get rid of them please help!

    Reply
    • If you have Larder Beetles, they must be infesting some stored food product. Do you have any large bags of pet food lying about?

      Reply
  16. I’ve only ever found these in one particular bottom kitchen cabinet where I store my plastic containers and some glass dishes. I just pulled out all the plastic containers to throw away mismatches, and found a bunch of dead ones (about 10). No idea where they come from.

    Reply
  17. The larvae of the Larder Beetle has little hairs on it that can penetrate your skin. In individuals who are allergic/sensitive this will cause exactly the symptoms described here. I know because I am dealing with the swelling and itching at this very moment! The only way to stop it is to get rid of the infestation of beetles. We’re finding that that’s easier said that done!

    Reply
  18. Can Larder Beetles have 4 spots? I realized one was dead on our living room floor I’ve only seen one but realized a hole in my book but can find no other bugs besides the one.

    Reply
  19. I have found 2 dead Larder Beetles next to my tv stand but no where else I have looked in all of our food and our animals food. and still see no more I looked inside the t.v. stand and only realized one of my books have a hole right in the middle. is it possible I only had the two and no more? I also have a guinea pig and Gerbil I wanted to know if the beetles could harm them in anyway?

    Reply
  20. I have found them in my living room and bathroom could they be living in my couch I moved my couch and found shells and larva of them underneath would it help to vaccum out my couch

    Reply
    • I am finding them on my couch and I have 2 Poms that chew treats on couch . I seriously vacuum almost daily through out the house. I had fleas last year and that is the worst. I find vacuuming helps but I am still seeing them. Threw out all powder food and cleaned cupboards and closets. I may have to get help to pull couch out. It’s due but I am unable to pull it out. Thanks for sharing. I also will put boric acid and cocoa in a jar lid under couch.

      Reply
  21. I had a bat in my house throughout the summer until it must have died somewhere in the vast woodwork. I bug bombed twice over two weeks. The bat seems to have died, but larder bugs appeared, many dead or dying from the bombing. They’ve continued to show up in various places on the floor, probably feeding on the dead bat that is hidden somewhere in the ceiling, or walls.

    Reply
    • Too bad you killed the bat 🙁 . They are extremely helpful mammals as they consume two to three times their weight in mosquitoes and other insects each night. Probably could have taken care of most of your larder beetle problems for you. I encourage bats to come to my property by erecting a “bat box” which will house at least 30 bats although I haven’t been lucky enough yet to have any move in – in fact I see no bats in my neighbourhood anymore as so many of them have been wiped out by something called “white nose” disease exclusive to bats. Anyway, this site isn’t about bats, so enough there. I hope you’ve been able to remedy your beetle problems. Diatomaceous earth is very helpful for any infestations and their larvae — google it and read up.

      Reply
    • Only if you are not capable of cleaning out your own pantry. An exterminator will not help unless you locate the source of the infestation, generally stored foods including bargain bags of pet food.

      Reply
  22. i never had these bugs in the house until i got ferrets and i found them all over my floor at the base of the cage and a lot of them but i keep the food in a sealed container but i also found them around my antique cedar hope chest and my bed no food is really kept anywhere there. i redisgned my room and never found them anywhere what do you think i should do?

    Reply
  23. It is May 6, 2015. I have been finding these little bugs alive and dead in my cats dish of food. I buy very expensive grain-free (Fromm -no bad stuff in it) hard cat food for my cats. I have been ordering from the same company for years and never had any problems, so I dont really think its from that. I just started seeing them this past week or two, every since it has got really warm. I have never seen them before in our house.

    Now, my husband has stuffed deer heads we have had for years, but the past winter (about, I think) he has got another stuffed animal that he really doesnt know the history of -he bought it off someone on Craigslist (yes, WHY??!!). So, could this thing be the souce? How do you find out if it is? I will be checking back for any replies. Thanks!

    Reply
  24. It is May 6, 2015. I have been finding these little bugs alive and dead in my cats dish of food. I buy very expensive grain-free (Fromm -no bad stuff in it) hard cat food for my cats. I have been ordering from the same company for years and never had any problems, so I dont really think its from that. I just started seeing them this past week or two, every since it has got really warm. I have never seen them before in our house.

    Now, my husband has stuffed deer heads we have had for years, but the past winter (about, I think) he has got another stuffed animal that he really doesnt know the history of -he bought it off someone on Craigslist (yes, WHY??!!). So, could this thing be the souce? How do you find out if it is? I will be checking back for any replies. Thanks!

    Reply
  25. Hello, I live in winnipeg, canada, I too have a problem with this larder bug. I’m finding them all over the house, I’m a cleaning fanatic so this is just making me crazy. I feel in combat 24/7, last night got up to use the washroom and just did a quick scan of house upstairs and sure enough there was an adult larder bug on my carpet near front door, I was livid! We shampood the whole living room, hallway, master bedroom etc 1 wk ago and I feel somehow this brought them out if thats possible. The cleaning solution affected them somehow and their not sure where to hide now. I’ve had this problem other springs, but not this bad, because they show up in our bedroom floors I’m completely creeped out. My grown son’s bedroom is in the basement, so I did a major cleaning campaign there, and. So far so good, the battle rages on, I’m in my combat gear, bring it on you little b_________ds lol. Wish me luck, and many good wishes to your battle as well. Love cathy

    Reply
    • I am here in Winnipeg with you fighting these devil beetles Cathy ??Can’t stand them and this year2017 hanging on screens trying to get in. I crush everything and vacuum but disabled so find it hard for me but I am in Battle too. Good Luck Everyone.

      Reply
  26. i have these in my 45year old mobile that’s falling apart and they’re doing no harm far as i can see so have no reason to kill them. long as they don’t bother my pets (rescue cats and dogs) i don’t see a reason to harm them. but it’s good to see others have this problem, just don’t get the deal with destroying everything with “bug bombs” and the like. do any of you garden or do you just wipe out all the bugs there too? sorry, it just seems senseless to kill something just because you don’t like it!

    Reply
    • Vivian, I gather the hairs on the beetles can cause an itchy reaction in some people, certainly something I found and Google seems to suggest others have had the same.

      Even if you don’t get the reaction I don’t think it’s unreasonable to want to get rid of them from a home. If you’re ok with them then great but I don’t think the bugs in the garden comparison is a fair one. I have to confess to being a complete wimp where creepy crawlies are concerned and when I had them I wasn’t able to relax in my own home! In the garden I can avoid them by moving away but I haven’t got that option in my house! I was also paranoid about what friends etc would think of me/my cleaning but that was much less of an issue.

      Reply
    • Vivian, I gather the hairs on the beetles can cause an itchy reaction in some people, certainly something I found and Google seems to suggest others have had the same.

      Even if you don’t get the reaction I don’t think it’s unreasonable to want to get rid of them from a home. If you’re ok with them then great but I don’t think the bugs in the garden comparison is a fair one. I have to confess to being a complete wimp where creepy crawlies are concerned and when I had them I wasn’t able to relax in my own home! In the garden I can avoid them by moving away but I haven’t got that option in my house! I was also paranoid about what friends etc would think of me/my cleaning but that was much less of an issue.

      Reply
  27. I found them coming put of a basebord heater in my bathroom about 6 in all and two under my couch while sweeping. I do not have pets. I don’t have dead animals in my home either. Also my pantry consists of maybe 4 bags of what ever about 5.5 feet off the grownd in a pullout shelf kinda pantry and I have not found them in any food products after reading this.
    I basically havnt found any where I thought I might 🙁

    Reply
  28. I found them coming put of a basebord heater in my bathroom about 6 in all and two under my couch while sweeping. I do not have pets. I don’t have dead animals in my home either. Also my pantry consists of maybe 4 bags of what ever about 5.5 feet off the grownd in a pullout shelf kinda pantry and I have not found them in any food products after reading this.
    I basically havnt found any where I thought I might 🙁

    Reply
  29. I just found two of these bugs burrowing into the carpet under my newborns crib, which is far away from any food supply. We have no pets, I don’t understand where they could be coming from. Are you sure they won’t like burrow in her ears or anything like that??

    Reply
  30. Mh husband worked for a bug company and he told customers to put stuff in the freezer for 24 hours if you can. Keep pet food in a plastic bucket with lid. Wash all cupboards and drawers out with soapy water. Keep all cake mixes,cereal, pasta in plasti containers. Wash all pot holders, dish cloths and dish towels before putting away after cleaning. This helped alot. Spring and fall.

    Reply
  31. Hello.
    I’ve never had a problem with these types of bugs, and am not even 100 percent sure that these are them. I’ve googled and looked EVERYWHERE and have found no help. Until I came here. I’m more than certain (other than the provided information) that these are the bugs in my house…. There are some downstairs in the basement, and very little (if at all) in the rest of the house. However, they seem to exist in my bedroom more than anywhere else. I have no food in here. But, I have a cat. He plays with them. lol…. But, yeah. They appeared about 1 -2 months after my cat came here. My cat is not dirty or infested with anything. He is fine. I’m just worried that these little things will crawl into my skin or body while I sleep. I sleep very close to the floor. :/
    What am I suppose to do?… Spray my room and stay out for a day while the bug spray does its job?… Or, search for every single one and put them in a bag and throw them outside somewhere?

    Reply
  32. Hello.
    I’ve never had a problem with these types of bugs, and am not even 100 percent sure that these are them. I’ve googled and looked EVERYWHERE and have found no help. Until I came here. I’m more than certain (other than the provided information) that these are the bugs in my house…. There are some downstairs in the basement, and very little (if at all) in the rest of the house. However, they seem to exist in my bedroom more than anywhere else. I have no food in here. But, I have a cat. He plays with them. lol…. But, yeah. They appeared about 1 -2 months after my cat came here. My cat is not dirty or infested with anything. He is fine. I’m just worried that these little things will crawl into my skin or body while I sleep. I sleep very close to the floor. :/
    What am I suppose to do?… Spray my room and stay out for a day while the bug spray does its job?… Or, search for every single one and put them in a bag and throw them outside somewhere?

    Reply
  33. I’m having the same problems from these bugs. I rent and have been living here for 4 yrs and never had a problem before. They started to come out back in March/April. I have two indoor cats and the way I found them was my cat threw up a fur ball and picked it up to throw away and there was 3 hiding under their fur ball. They are not in any food but now I’m finding their larva every where. Linen closet, dirty clothes hampers. I have been vacuuming and steaming my kitchen and bathroom floors. Help anyone how can I get rid of them??. Is it possible that they got in when an old large tree was cut back away from the house and they got in thru the screens??. I do know they also live in bark and wood piles. Please help Im going crazy.

    Reply
  34. They do bore in to wood i recently Staines my log home had to take boards down around windows on the porch and behind boards i sprayed foam this winter in cracks well those little Black beetle with the tan stripe bored in the foam and in the log ……..Also i had a Ben full of dog food my dog passed away and the food was forgotten about what a mistake it was full of Carpet worms so they were eating very well so my Question is do they bore in wood just to lay eggs or to just make a home?

    Reply
  35. I think I have them burrowing in my fiberglass hot tub….opened it up today and there’s white fluffy dust piles all around the underside of the tub…I can hear chewing but I can’t see any holes…I have poison under there to keep the rodents at bay and there was two little larder beetles in there eating it…I suppose they eat the mice as they die…bomb the underside of the tub????

    Reply
  36. I found one of the beetles inside a sweatshirt hanging in our vacation home closet. Just the one. I am, however, starting to see teeny tiny ants, and it’s bumming me out.

    Reply
  37. We just found these in our dogs food bin, are they harmful to the dog if the dog eats them? I know she has bound to have eaten some of them. She seems fine but now Im worried.

    Reply
    • According to entomologist and author of “Insects of the Los Angeles Basin” Charles Hogue, in writing generally about Pantry Beetles: “several species act as intermediate hosts and vectors fo the human tapeworms.”

      Reply
  38. I been finding these in my bathroom as well, how do you get rid of them, the master bath room and master bed room is where I have them and that is the only place until this morning where I receintly found one on my end table in the living room. I hate creapie crawly things help me tell me what will get rid of these bugs.

    Reply
    • I found these when I moved in .. they were in every room.. when they are larvae i used toilet duck.. citrus freshness… kills them straight away.. for the carpets boric acid.. i do it once a month till i found out recently my next door neighbour had a family of rats.. so now i know were they are came from.. but.. they fly.. they bite.. they dont like light.. so they mostly come out at night .. I used the torch on my phone.. to actually go hunting the brutes..

      Reply
  39. hi my grandmother had these in her bedroom she always had stored food we haven’t seen them in a long time but every once in a while we see one in our kitchen/bathroom sink/tub and on the floor of the bathroom can they be dormant for a while then come back out? my gram has been gone for 3 years
    her room was all redone new floor/paint

    Reply
  40. hi my grandmother had these in her bedroom she always had stored food we haven’t seen them in a long time but every once in a while we see one in our kitchen/bathroom sink/tub and on the floor of the bathroom can they be dormant for a while then come back out? my gram has been gone for 3 years
    her room was all redone new floor/paint

    Reply
  41. I’ve got the solution my grandmother always told me to use garlic powder and cinnamon to get rid of fleas well it works on them bugs so this is what I do one cup garlic powder 1 cup cinnamon one One cup clove one cup baking soda 1 cup corn stocks mix it all in together well sprinkler on my rug and in 15 minutes you can see these bugs crawling out of the rug and bugs and flees you name all the bugs crawling out then I vacuumed them up take them out to the barn pile and burn them mother Humpers I do this once a month to keep them at bay during the summer good luck hope it works for you as well as it does for me

    Reply
  42. Larder beetles DO eat wood. The larvae burrow into the wood and eat it. They even shed their skin and block up the hole so it’s not as noticeable. They destroyed a hard wood armoire, a wide dresser and a night stand in my home. They also made holes through many of the books I used to love reading. The term bookworm applies here. The larvae burrow through and eat the books until they become adults. They even eat through clothing which is why some may have them in their laundry baskets. They will cause little holes in the clothing and you might wonder if you items are tearing or ripping in the washing machine/dryer. I cannot figure out how to get rid of them. The only place I don’t have them is in the pantry and the bedrooms! I have sprayed, I vacuum daily, exterminators go through our apartment building on a monthly basis… We never had them and we’ve had birds for a long time (I always keep their food in sealed containers). The only thing strange was that one of the neighbors was evicted next to us, big clean out, horrid mess, terrible smells. Since that happened we started getting the beetles. I am quite done and frustrated with the hole thing. I keep having to put my birds in the bathroom and spray around the apartment and move furniture. I also have a child on the spectrum which doesn’t help. I can’t give people the time they need because I’m fighting this daily battle. I’ve basically been told to “get rid of anything they are attracted to” by exterminators… So live without furniture, mattress, clothes, etc… I live in an apartment and certainly cannot remove the carpet. How the hell are we supposed to get rid of these things?

    Reply
  43. OK, so, HOW do you actually get rid of them? The nest is inside the door of my refrigerator. They come out around the seal where it is not really firm. The come out in the evening and go back there in the morning early. I kill a number of them, (3 to 5 or more) larger and small, on the door almost every night and morning. Short of throwing away the frig, how would we get rid of them? We’ve tried all kinds of natural and commercial pesticides. 😛 Please help!

    Reply
  44. I have 5 or six inside a light fixture ..the only way they can get in or out…I’m guessing is from the electrical in the ceiling….what concerns me is 6 of them inside…and why…wonder what’s in the ceiling

    Reply
  45. I just moved into my apartment 3 months ago. Its only me and I keep it immaculate. I clean all the time and bleach the floors. My cabinets are immaculate. I do not keep much food in the apt so where do you think these beetles are coming from? I find them in My kitchen near the garbage pail and in my bathroom on the floor. I caught one trying to scurry under the calking at the bottome of my tub. I was able to kill him. I do find them dead and some alive. They lay on their backs also. If they are not in my food, where could they be coming from? I live on the second floor. Could they be coming from the apartment below me or on the side of me? Do they bite? How can I get rid of them? I feel sick now thinking about it.

    Reply
  46. Ugh i just found one in my sock drawer. I hate bugs more than anything and the thought there could be more makes my heart pound. I guess i better check my cabinets?? I do have a cat but we keep his food in an airtight container.

    Reply
  47. I’m not sure, but this sounds like the bug I’m dealing with. They climb in the animal’s water bowl and die. Climb in to lights and die. Lay on the Windows in evening for the sunlight. They just let you kill them and are very slow. About the size of a flea. I can’t find where they are coming from. I had a package of older spaghetti noodles and dumped them into the water and about 100 fell in to the water. Hoped one I got rid of that they’d be home. Nope…. Getting frustrating!

    Reply
    • I believe that I read somewhere that if they are in foodstuffs (pantry), they may be in it all. At the least, go through it all, maybe throw away all opened stuff. Clean off all shelves and make sure stuff that’s put back has none in it. Put stuff in containers, maybe, or ziplock (the big ones) bags.

      I’m pretty sure I read once they find a food supply then it’s harder to get rid of them, and you have to check everything and get rid of all the opened stuff.

      Reply
    • I believe that I read somewhere that if they are in foodstuffs (pantry), they may be in it all. At the least, go through it all, maybe throw away all opened stuff. Clean off all shelves and make sure stuff that’s put back has none in it. Put stuff in containers, maybe, or ziplock (the big ones) bags.

      I’m pretty sure I read once they find a food supply then it’s harder to get rid of them, and you have to check everything and get rid of all the opened stuff.

      Reply
  48. Wow soooo many infestations. I’m SO glad I’m not alone in this fight to get rid of the larder beetle FOR GOOD! Ever since it’s started to get warmer like since the beginning of April I ‘ve been finding them mostly in our bedroom among dirty clothes and a few in the kitchen and bathroom and I’ve been trying to guess what type of beetle they might be and if they’re harmful or just annoying and creepy as anything lol. Well at least I know now and can try to find out where the larder beetles hideout is. For now will spray, vacum them up and sweep clean everything out. Do a complete week spring cleaning and hopefully after that they’ll never come back 🙂 NEVER EVER EVER! lol

    Reply
  49. Dealing with these. Found potential food source from fallen dog food. Got that cleaned and hoping it will help. I did find out accidently that roach/ant bait traps work well against then. Found many dead by them.

    Reply
  50. I have found only 2 or 3 in my house, but my windows are covered with them. They are all over the outside of my house. Why are they hanging out on my screens. We just sanded our deck and are getting reaDy to stain. Could that be the reason.

    Reply
    • They most likely will not leave, but depriving them of a food source will prevent a new generation from perpetuating and plaguing you.

      Reply
  51. I have found a couple tiny bugs that look like this dead in my room and something has been biting me usually while I sleep but I have checked and sprayed for bed bugs and didn’t find any could these be it or is it something else

    Reply
  52. What if you find these in the kitchen and bathroom? I have a large bag of cat food, but it’s in a resealable bag. I’ve just checked it, not really well, but it was sealed (ziplock) and I couldn’t find anything. There are no holes in the bag either. Would or could this still be a problem? I’m going to go through my kitchen as well, but I need to know about this food because this is how I buy it.

    Reply
    • Larder Beetles will infest many types of stored food, and pet food is just one possibility. You need to locate the site of the infestation.

      Reply
  53. so now I know that these things are not only my problem … I bought a bag of economy dog food for my 2 big dogs and opened the bag and poured out a bowl full of these things and they scurried everywhere … had them for around a month or so and they are almost gone now … the larvae crawl into the rug fibers and then grow and presto … more beetles and more larvae … clean up very well and they will be gone … I used a full concentrated fast orange organic liquid , and it does destroy them … if you find a mature beetle , it will have probably left larvae in the area… look very closely and you can find them , squish them /bleach them/ clean that area very well and the infestation will be finished …

    Reply
  54. A few questions related to these beetles, which I’ve just discovered in my home:

    1. Do they eat horsehair plaster walls? (I suspect this to be an issue with my aged house, and with the other person’s old house above in the comments).
    2. What are the white cotton-ball-like webs that I find where I’ve found larvae?
    3. Are there any ways to bait them? (Particularly if they are attracted to the walls of my house and I can’t remove their food source).
    4. Just how durable are the eggs and larvae against wash cycles? I’d rather not dry clean a ton of my clothes, nor can I wash a lot of my clothes on a very high temperature. I’d appreciate any sense of their durability, even though I know that it might not be 100% guaranteed to get rid of them, it would be nice to know I would be likely to get a certain percentage of them at a lower temperature…

    Reply
  55. A few questions related to these beetles, which I’ve just discovered in my home:

    1. Do they eat horsehair plaster walls? (I suspect this to be an issue with my aged house, and with the other person’s old house above in the comments).
    2. What are the white cotton-ball-like webs that I find where I’ve found larvae?
    3. Are there any ways to bait them? (Particularly if they are attracted to the walls of my house and I can’t remove their food source).
    4. Just how durable are the eggs and larvae against wash cycles? I’d rather not dry clean a ton of my clothes, nor can I wash a lot of my clothes on a very high temperature. I’d appreciate any sense of their durability, even though I know that it might not be 100% guaranteed to get rid of them, it would be nice to know I would be likely to get a certain percentage of them at a lower temperature…

    Reply
  56. I found ones that look like those in the picture this summer..> find them in the sink and cupboards and a very fine sawdust in my cupboards,,I have good in jars and containers so don’t know where they came from..they’re under my sink and counters at times. I found a powder at Home Depot but it doesn’t seem to be working on them, I cleaned out ALL my cupboards, poured some of the powder in cupboards, waited 2 days, then vacuumed, washed down with bleach,,,today I found one in sink and one crawled onto a cake I had baked and placed on the counter,,,they’re driving me nuts and I can’t afford an exterminator and don’t want to tear all my cupboards out,,,my house is an older home and I’m thinking they came with it when they moved it here as I’ve seen fine sawdust shavings the last few years but never saw any bugs until this spring,,,I’m at a loss as what to do next!!!

    Reply
  57. I am finding these bugs around my house too. I find like 1 a day or every other day. and I do kill them on sight but not really sure where they came from? I live in a condo complex, would they be coming from another condo? is this something that could be infesting the whole building?

    Reply
  58. I’ve been seeing these bugs in my room around my bed on the floor. I’ve also found a couple on my pelows on my bed when I did I flipped out, just about jump out of my pants. I filed everything off my bed and though it on the floor and got some new sheet and blankets and two clean pelows tryed to keep my self together for the night. Only got like two hours of sleep that night. Reply if anyone has tips to get rid of them

    Reply
  59. Do they fly? I’ve been getting bugs that look exactly like this but they’ve been flying in through the window. I accidentally squished 1 & every time I find 1 I find it dead not too long after. I don’t have any around the house except the living room where the window is open. I don’t mind them they just crawl around on the carpet but I don’t like seeing dead bugs i keep vacuuming but it seems like they visit then die daily is this the same bug?

    Reply
  60. Hey bug man, I know I see everything stating these ae only around food, I never see them around food only in clothing. Is there another bug that resembles the lader beetle that we would find in clothing. Like when I bring out summer clothes that were stored for the winter?

    Reply
  61. Hi Bugman,
    Can these larder beetles feed on dead mice? Having had a mice invasion, many bate stations are in the basement.
    Had one larder beetle dead near floor vent above basement area. Checked entire food supply in kitchen which was already container protected due to possibility of mice getting upstairs.
    No pets / pet food so, cannot find any source… ?

    Reply
  62. Hi Bugman,
    Can these larder beetles feed on dead mice? Having had a mice invasion, many bate stations are in the basement.
    Had one larder beetle dead near floor vent above basement area. Checked entire food supply in kitchen which was already container protected due to possibility of mice getting upstairs.
    No pets / pet food so, cannot find any source… ?

    Reply
    • We are not certain if Larder Beetles will feed on dead mice. Other household pests like Carpet Beetle larvae certainly will. After posting this, we received a comment from Josh who wrote: “they feed on dead insects, mice anything protein related. If you have dead mice they will have lots of food.”

      Reply
  63. I have discovered these bugs in an old forgotten bag of cat food, no prob, just threw it out in the yard for the Blue Jays who scarfed it all up
    . I’ve also found that they like to eat PAPER and have eaten holes through some old paper backs, thankfully no classics, lol.
    And today, after cleaning out a neglected corner of a room behind a chair, I found that the cat had thrown up back there and the larder beetles had been eating the dried throw up, ok, So I cleaned that too.
    About an hour later I was sitting having a phone conversation when suddenly I felt a BURNING pain on the back of my leg and I instinctively swatted it, only to behold a now half dead larder beetle laying on the floor..sucker crawled up my leg and took a little bite outta me !
    Maybe he was upset I busted up his little dried puke eating party ? Anyway,
    now I know, they are capable of biting if you turn your back on them 😀

    Reply
  64. I have discovered these bugs in an old forgotten bag of cat food, no prob, just threw it out in the yard for the Blue Jays who scarfed it all up
    . I’ve also found that they like to eat PAPER and have eaten holes through some old paper backs, thankfully no classics, lol.
    And today, after cleaning out a neglected corner of a room behind a chair, I found that the cat had thrown up back there and the larder beetles had been eating the dried throw up, ok, So I cleaned that too.
    About an hour later I was sitting having a phone conversation when suddenly I felt a BURNING pain on the back of my leg and I instinctively swatted it, only to behold a now half dead larder beetle laying on the floor..sucker crawled up my leg and took a little bite outta me !
    Maybe he was upset I busted up his little dried puke eating party ? Anyway,
    now I know, they are capable of biting if you turn your back on them 😀

    Reply
  65. I had a LOT of Larder Beetles running around in my kitchen when I was feeding dry kibble to my cats. I had suspected they were coming out of the bags of pet food. Someone I know bought the same pet food and had the same Larder Beetles. My remedy was to buy a lidded plastic container large enough to hold my bags of kibble & that ended the problem for some reason. I read up on the beetles and apparently they’re favourite attraction is pet food and pet hair and to get rid of the beetles you just needed to get rid of the source of their attraction. I vacuumed regularly & did a daily search under & around kitchen appliances & got rid of any hiding. Eventually I weaned the cats onto canned food & when I stopped buying the dry food for them, my Larder Beetle problem disappeared. All my investigative sources said they are harmless to both pets & humans but are a nuisance only. If you do as I did to eliminate them and if you think you still might have larvae creeping around the house you can apply a dusting of Diatomaceous Earth found in any hardware store of Co-op around baseboards and other places in the house.

    Reply
  66. I have found these in my new carpet. Never had a bug prob. Maybe a spider or two. I was told to use DIATOMACEOUS. iT IS A POWDER, YOU poof it on the area needed., even in the kitchen. I was told it was ok for pets and food products. It is like valcanic ash. they walk across it and die.????? I used it and have found fewer little critters.

    Reply
    • Glad it’s working for you Mary. Diatomaceous Earth is actually ground up sea shells & if viewed under a microscope it shows that the fragments of the ground shells — or powder— has razor-like edges. When any insect or larvae moves through the shards of powder the razor edges of it cuts through the exoskeletons of the bugs & they get dehydrated & die. Some people give food grade Diatomaceous Earth to their pets in their food to rid them of worms — however — “I” am not one brave enough to put this razor edged stuff into the delicate internal organs of my beloved pets. For that, I opt for a Drontal tablet 🙂 Good luck in eradicating those nuisance beetles.

      Reply
  67. I had a pest control company spray the baseboards in the entire house for $195. They used Cy-Kick–one gallon of water to one ounce of Cy-Kick. I later found it online and purchased it (along with a spray pump) so I don’t have to pay a pest control company again. It’s odorless and dries fast. The larder larvae almost all disappeared and those that I saw days later were slow and appeared to be dying. I can’t find the source. I’ve had 4 people go through the attic–all saw no activity and no dead animals. They saw dead flies but didn’t think there were more than any other house would have. I also had the chimney inspected–nothing in it. The larvae drop from ceiling fixtures and live everywhere. It’s very frustrating that I can’t find a source. It’s our third year in the house and we’ve seen them each year…we start to see larve around end of May and then a decrease in late August. And in the last week I’ve killed three adult larder beetles. At least it seems to be seasonal. But still, if I could find the source the issue would go away I assume. Very annoying.

    Reply
    • Halven if they’re dropping out of your ceiling fixtures I’d suspect they live behind the drywall of the ceilings & probably inside the walls. Anyone inspecting your house wouldn’t be able to see bugs or larvae living in these areas. Just a suggestion here, but if you haven’t already tried something in that area you could try to make some holes & blow a quantity of Diatomaceous Earth into the ceilings & walls of the rooms where they are appearing & repatch & paint the holes. Any larvae or beetles moving through that powder would get shredded – along with any other bugs living in those areas including spiders. Diatomaceous Earth doesn’t expire, it will always be there doing its job once applied. I don’t know what you could use to blow the powder in there but possibly a shop vac as they can blow out the contents of their tanks as well as contain anything sucked in.

      Reply
  68. Terry, I find this all very interesting. Would you happen to know of the origin of these things. We live in Alaska and in our home for 35 years and only a spider or two. I just got new carpet and that is when the problem began. I’m not saying it came in the carpet but it is a thought. The carpet man said I needed the origin and maybe he could track something down, If they are native to where he gets his carpet. Thank, you have been most helpful already.

    Reply
    • Here’s one link I found and it looks like the Larder may have indeed embedded itself in your carpet, probably at the store where it was shipped from. https://search.yahoo.com/search?p=Photo+of+Canadian+Bobcat&fr=ush-mailn&fr2=p%3Aml%2Cm%3Asb
      When they were in my house a few years ago they were clearly from the Kirkland dry cat food bags I’d purchased at Costco. I must have been lucky enough to have eradicated them before an infestation got underway but sweeping, vacuuming, and not only storing the bags of dry food in sealed plastic containers but actually weaning my cats onto canned food and buying no more dry food for them. A friend’s son had bought the Kirkland dry food for his dog & had seen these same Larders in his kitchen. Not trying to put down the Kirkland dry pet food brand though, as they can originate from any of the various products you bring into your home…..perhaps even only the eggs or larvae of such which can’t be seen rather than the adults. What I had read up about them was that they were very attracted to pet food and hair…..in your case, the carpeting and it said Larders were easy to get rid of simply by removing the source of their food/attraction, which luckily happened in my case. It does seem likely that your carpet hosted them in its travels.

      Reply
    • Here’s one link I found and it looks like the Larder may have indeed embedded itself in your carpet, probably at the store where it was shipped from. https://search.yahoo.com/search?p=Photo+of+Canadian+Bobcat&fr=ush-mailn&fr2=p%3Aml%2Cm%3Asb
      When they were in my house a few years ago they were clearly from the Kirkland dry cat food bags I’d purchased at Costco. I must have been lucky enough to have eradicated them before an infestation got underway but sweeping, vacuuming, and not only storing the bags of dry food in sealed plastic containers but actually weaning my cats onto canned food and buying no more dry food for them. A friend’s son had bought the Kirkland dry food for his dog & had seen these same Larders in his kitchen. Not trying to put down the Kirkland dry pet food brand though, as they can originate from any of the various products you bring into your home…..perhaps even only the eggs or larvae of such which can’t be seen rather than the adults. What I had read up about them was that they were very attracted to pet food and hair…..in your case, the carpeting and it said Larders were easy to get rid of simply by removing the source of their food/attraction, which luckily happened in my case. It does seem likely that your carpet hosted them in its travels.

      Reply
    • Here’s another link that might be helpful. Looks like since you live in Alaska you could roll up your carpet this winter & leave it outside to freeze for about a week & while it’s out there, vacuum everywhere thoroughly to get up any eggs or larvae that might have originated from the carpet — even do the walls, as larvae are well known to climb walls & find places to nest — I found this out many years ago when I found larvae from Guinea Pig food finding its way out of the bag & climbing up the walls where the bag of food was kept — no doubt had hatched out from the Sunflower seeds and other seeds in the bag. I found some of the larvae half way up the wall in the room where the Guinea Pigs lived in my apartment. If you have hardwood floors I don’t doubt many of the eggs have dropped down between the boards in the floor so I’d suggest getting Diatomaceous Earth down between those boards…..all of them….and that will kill any larvae hatching out from the eggs. Don’t vacuum the Earth out of there, leave it down between the boards for as long as you are able to and I know that thorough vacuuming will remove a lot of the Earth from there so you’d want to keep applying more of it after vacuuming. http://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/pdf/larderBeetle.pdf

      Reply
    • Mary, we are in Alaska, too. Is your problem seasonal (summer months) or all year-round?

      (Just FYI, one pest control company told me that some carpets have a protein in the glue (in the actual carpet, not glued down type necessarily) and larder beetles like the glue. Sometimes I wonder if the source is our carpet. I read that Cy-Kick could be applied to the carpet but I haven’t tried it. I just had baseboards sprayed so far.)

      Reply
    • Mary, we are in Alaska, too. Is your problem seasonal (summer months) or all year-round?

      (Just FYI, one pest control company told me that some carpets have a protein in the glue (in the actual carpet, not glued down type necessarily) and larder beetles like the glue. Sometimes I wonder if the source is our carpet. I read that Cy-Kick could be applied to the carpet but I haven’t tried it. I just had baseboards sprayed so far.)

      Reply
  69. hi I’ve started to find a little zig zag black n cream beetle in my bedroom I’ve been told their carpet beetle is the beetle above the same thing or something different I do have a floordrobe so thinking I need a spring clean only find them in the spring

    Reply
  70. Always find no more than 1 or 2 around cat food, especially when we put out wet cat food.. didn’t know where were coming from for year or 2 until finally moved stove to paint – bingo! P.s. they like to PLAY dead

    Reply
  71. My biggest shock was that they can fly! Maybe it is only at certain stages. Had one fly and land in my sink an hour ago. I know they come in various dry food packages because shortly after opening the seal on the product they appear and not singly, way sooner than one finding an open package and reproducing. Glad to hear I am not alone.

    Reply
  72. I have them in my car I have emptied out every thing covered it in borax overnight and they still are there Help!! I can’t even drive my car!!

    Reply
  73. I read a lot of the comments, and many of the commenters, are definitely not seeing this particular insect in their homes…the sizes mentioned, locales, etc. didn’t add up.

    Larder Beetles and their larvae, are not tiny really…the larvae range from 3/4 to almost an inch in length.

    …the adult beetles are a bit smaller.

    If you find something that looks similar, but is smaller (grain of rice size)…it’s more likely a Carpet Beetle, both insects are a bummer to be infested by.

    The larvae for this insect don’t eat wood, but DO burrow holes in it, to hide/and or pupate.

    …they are drawn to protein based food sources.

    Your pet’s food, your fur coat, your leather Ugg boots…basically anything organic, protein based and preferably with a fatty content.

    …they are also carrion eaters, the more rotten the better.

    They love cheeses, cured meats…but will even eat the dead carcasses of some other insects.

    …if you find a beetle, you don’t necessarily have an infestation, but if you find one or more larvae, you like do, somewhere.

    Finding their food source is objective number one.

    …get rid of it, be sure it is well maintained in plastic, if possible.

    Check pantry food sources.

    …if you don’t see any signs of the larvae, but you want to be sure.

    Put the food stuffs into plastic containers (not bags, they can easily chew through those, or glass…then freeze it.

    …sometimes that is even good before disposal of a known batch, because then they aren’t just going to make their way back inside after disposal.

    If you can’t find them in pet food, or the pantry…they also like insect collections, hunting trophies/taxidermy, any animal products.

    So check those items too, though most leather, sheepskin, etc..would titillate a Carpet Beetle more.

    …if you don’t have pets or small children, you can place small pieces of cured bacon in an easily accessible containers around the house.

    That will attract them quickly, and you can more likely pinpoint what room they are in at that point.

    …if they are in the walls, likely living off of Cluster Fly carcasses or a dead animal, just call an exterminator. 😛

    Reply
  74. I read a lot of the comments, and many of the commenters, are definitely not seeing this particular insect in their homes…the sizes mentioned, locales, etc. didn’t add up.

    Larder Beetles and their larvae, are not tiny really…the larvae range from 3/4 to almost an inch in length.

    …the adult beetles are a bit smaller.

    If you find something that looks similar, but is smaller (grain of rice size)…it’s more likely a Carpet Beetle, both insects are a bummer to be infested by.

    The larvae for this insect don’t eat wood, but DO burrow holes in it, to hide/and or pupate.

    …they are drawn to protein based food sources.

    Your pet’s food, your fur coat, your leather Ugg boots…basically anything organic, protein based and preferably with a fatty content.

    …they are also carrion eaters, the more rotten the better.

    They love cheeses, cured meats…but will even eat the dead carcasses of some other insects.

    …if you find a beetle, you don’t necessarily have an infestation, but if you find one or more larvae, you like do, somewhere.

    Finding their food source is objective number one.

    …get rid of it, be sure it is well maintained in plastic, if possible.

    Check pantry food sources.

    …if you don’t see any signs of the larvae, but you want to be sure.

    Put the food stuffs into plastic containers (not bags, they can easily chew through those, or glass…then freeze it.

    …sometimes that is even good before disposal of a known batch, because then they aren’t just going to make their way back inside after disposal.

    If you can’t find them in pet food, or the pantry…they also like insect collections, hunting trophies/taxidermy, any animal products.

    So check those items too, though most leather, sheepskin, etc..would titillate a Carpet Beetle more.

    …if you don’t have pets or small children, you can place small pieces of cured bacon in an easily accessible containers around the house.

    That will attract them quickly, and you can more likely pinpoint what room they are in at that point.

    …if they are in the walls, likely living off of Cluster Fly carcasses or a dead animal, just call an exterminator. 😛

    Reply
  75. And, to further your horror… I moved into a nice clean apartment and discovered it was infested with these bugs. I asked my neighbors if they had a problem and neighbor 1 said No but neighbor 2 said “um, neighbor 1 is a hoarder and we continually have problems with bugs”. Then, I complained to the office and they called in the “bug guy”. He went up in the attic above my apartment and found a long-dead rat that the bugs were feeding on. He sprayed as well. Haven’t seen another larder beetle in 2 years.

    Reply
  76. These insects also got me, no matter how much I fought, nothing came out.
    A friend of mine suggested lakewood Exterminating to me.
    A few weeks later, I finally decided to contact them.
    Specialists quickly found these insects in the attic, and finally got rid of the Ants. Recommend guys)

    Reply

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