8 Key Differences Between Wasp and Bee: What You Need to Know

Wasps and bees look alike, fly alike and sting alike. So why are they categorized separately? In this article, we look at wasp vs bee, and their key differences and similarities as well.

Both wasps and bees are stinging insects belonging to the order Hymenoptera.

However, there are several differences between them – starting from their looks to their behavior.

Also, many species of wasps share overlapping characteristics with bees and vice versa.

We have compiled a comprehensive guide for you to recognize the differences between the two based on their nests, behavior, size, sting, and more.

What Are Wasps?

Definition-wise, wasps are referred to as all the insects in the Hymenoptera order, which cannot be classified as either ants or bees.

They are flying insects with a sting that mostly live in large colonies.

Wasps feed on insects and nectar, which makes them invaluable in horticulture.

They help control pests such as whiteflies while also being moderately good pollinators.

What Are Bees?

Ancestry-wise bees have evolved from wasps but now are under the suborder of Apocrita.

Bees are a highly successful insect species found almost everywhere in the world.

They are the most important pollinator in your garden and the major source of honey in the world (note – we did not say “only”, and we will cover that in later sections).

Their sharp decline over the years has resulted in many commercially managed hives around the world to help with pollination.

Differences Between Wasps and Bees

Physical differences

Bees are smaller in stature than wasps. They measure between 0.4 to 0.5 inches depending on the type of bee

Yes, there are many types, including bumble bees, honey bees, and masonry bees.

Bees are hairy, with stocky bodies (there is not much distinction between the 3 body segments) colored brownish to golden. Their appendages are black.

Wasps, on the other hand, are larger – between 0.4 to 0.8 inches in size.

They have slimmer and smoother bodies and only have hair along their head and thorax.

Their bodies have a bright yellow color with black bands. The abdomen and the thorax have marked differences in size.

The wasp waist is often characterized as having an “hourglass” figure.

Wasp Vs Bee
Wasps have a narrow waist and slender physique

Social or Solitary?

Bees are eusocial, which means they live in highly structured colonies with defined hierarchies.

The structure of the colony differs based on the species. For example, honeybee colonies are generations long, whereas bumble bees create colonies annually.

Their colonies are also much smaller in size than those of honeybees.

However, over 200 species of bees live solitary lives and nest alone. Despite being solitary, they do live close to other bees. But they do not fall under the category of queen, worker, or drone.

A majority of wasps are solitary; in fact, over 20,000 species of them!

Around 900 wasp species, though, live in structured, eusocial colonies. These colonies consist mostly of female wasps.

Differences in nest making

Bee hives are large structures with individual hexagonal components, housing up to 40,000 bees.

These cells store food and eggs and provide housing for the drones. The hives can be within cavities or completely aerial and exposed.

Each nest has a single, low-hanging, south-facing entrance. The hive is made from chewed wax, and the inner walls are coated with plant resin.

Most social wasps use paper pulp to create their nests.

Paper wasp nest

They chew wood and use the substance to make burrow-like structures in the ground, within plant stems, or in other sheltered areas like unused crevices and attics.

Some, like the paper wasp, chew stems and create a brown paper substance.

Solitary wasps construct mud cells or multiple vase-like cells along a wall or inside the ground.

Predatory wasps burrow in the group or, in some cases, do not create any nests.

Differences in habitats

Bees generally reside in hives, which they make in cavities (on rocks, trees, or even buildings).

They are found on every single continent except Antarctica. Bees generally live in green areas such as parks, woodlands, meadows, orchards, large gardens, and forests.

Solitary wasps can create mud cells along walls or rocks. At the same time, social wasps can live on trees or create burrows within the soil.

Wasps are found around trees in shrubbery, orchards, and forests. However, they are also found in urban settings, cities, and rocky areas with some mud.

As with bees, they are found in all climate zones except Antarctica.

Lifecycle & How Long They Live

The queen bee lays eggs, examines them, and places them side by side in the colony.

Fertilized eggs result in queen bees, and unfertilized eggs produce male worker bees.

Both larvae are fed “royal jelly” for the initial few days, after which only the females have access to it.

After multiple instar stages, the larvae will cover the cell with wax and pupate.

From the pupa, an adult bee will emerge. The pupal stage varies based on the type of bee. After this, each bee falls into their line of work.

Queen bees can live for up to 5 years. Worker bees, on the other hand, only live for around 2 to 6 weeks.

Queen wasps only build a nest after fertilization. After making a small nest, she lays eggs within a chamber.

The eggs hatch into larvae, which are fed by the queen, and, after pupating, emerge as adult worker bees.

The first round of worker bees then takes over nest-building and feeding the remaining larvae.

Queen wasps live for a year, while worker wasps only live for about 22 days.

Aggression

Bees are less aggressive by temperament, with bumble bees being quite docile.

They do possess a stinger, but since it can only be used once, bees only attack when highly threatened.

Wasps are more aggressive and can easily sting anything or anyone that touches them.

Most solitary wasps, however, are not aggressive and don’t sting.

What They Eat

Bees are exclusively herbivorous and feed on pollen and nectar.

This is collected by the older worker bees from various flowers for themselves as well as for the other bees in the hive.

They can also drink sugary drinks and honey. If you find an injured or tired bee, it’s a good idea to give it a few drops of sugared water.

Adult wasps are omnivorous, and their larvae are carnivorous. This makes them more likely to appear around humans who are simply enjoying their food.

Most wasps feed on sugary diets, which include nectar and pollen from flowers as well as the sugary liquid (honeydew) produced by aphids and some wasp larvae.

They might attack fruits, carrion, or any open food item. Some, like the yellow jackets, feed on flies and bees.

Adult wasps have short lifespans – hence, they mainly eat carbohydrates.

Stingers

Bees may or may not have stingers. Stingless bees are called drones. Drones usually live within the hive, and as such, it’s rare to encounter one.

Bees with stingers are nonetheless non-aggressive.

They will only sting if you get too close or are perceived as a danger to their hive.

Bees can only sting once and die after losing their stinger.

Usually, a large swarm of bees signifies a swarm returning home after collecting pollen, and as such, they are not aggressive or dangerous.

Among wasps, only the females possess stingers. It is hypothesized that the “stinger” is merely an ovipositor, which is the case for most wasps.

They are more prone to aggression than bees.

Wasps can sting an endless number of times. Their stings are extremely painful, such as those of the tarantula hawks.

Ability to make honey

Honey is produced by bees from nectar collected from flowers.

The collected nectar is packed in the cells, covered, and subjected to a warm breeze made from their wings.

This turns the nectar into honey. Once dry, they cap the cell with beeswax.

Most wasps cannot produce honey. However, they do steal honey from other beehives!

The Mexican honey wasp is the only one that can make honey, but in much smaller quantities than bees.

Frequently Asked Questions

Who is stronger bee or the wasp?

In a fight between a bee and a wasp, stings are rarely used and jaws are the primary weapons.
Wasps have a tougher exoskeleton, more powerful jaws, and are more durable and agile.
In some cases, two wasps usually corner a single bee and tear apart its sting and head, ultimately taking its belly.
Even in one-on-one fights, the bee’s fate remains the same.

Is a wasp sting worse than a bee?

Both wasp and bee stings can be painful and cause swelling, and some people may have more severe reactions or even go into anaphylactic shock.
The potency of the venom in wasps is typically greater, but there is no easy answer when it comes to deciding which sting is worse, as it varies from person to person.
It is important to carry an EpiPen if you are allergic to bee or wasp stings and seek medical help immediately if you have a severe reaction.
Knowing how to avoid stings is also a good idea – the best strategy is always to just stay at a safe distance from either.

Can a wasp sting you 10 times?

Yes, wasps can sting you multiple times. They have smooth stingers, which are meant specifically to plant their eggs into host insects multiple times.
Practically, they use these stingers several times during their lifetime for this purpose.
Hence, it is possible for them to sting you many times if they perceive that they are being attacked.
The same is not the case with bees. Their stingers are curved and get lodged into your skin when they sting you.
This means that the bee effectively dies in the act of stinging.

What is the cure for a wasp sting?

Wasp stings can cause large, local reactions that may be life-threatening if they occur in the mouth, nose, or throat.
Treatment for local skin reactions includes removing the stinger, washing the area, applying a cold or ice pack, and using over-the-counter products or home remedies to reduce pain and itching.
If the sting occurs in a sensitive area or if serious symptoms occur, immediate medical attention is necessary. 
Emergency treatment may include IV antihistamines, epinephrine, corticosteroids, lab tests, and breathing support.

Wrap Up

Bees and wasps are beautiful creatures that help pollinate our gardens. While wasps eradicate pests, bees give us honey.

Both should be appreciated rather than shunned or shooed away.

In any case, nature has equipped these insects with stingers, which is why they should be approached with care.

Wasp stings are especially painful.

However, both can result in an allergic reaction leading to anaphylactic shock. It’s best to seek immediate medical attention if that happens.

Thank you for reading.

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

112 thoughts on “8 Key Differences Between Wasp and Bee: What You Need to Know”

  1. Does the Blue Flower wasp go under ground ?Because I have one flying around my house.Does it hurt when you get stung I have children.

    Reply
  2. Hello, I live in the Hudson Valley of NY and I know many people in the Hudson Valley usually bring flowers or plants from Europe and other countries. Anyway people can get their hands on organic and nicely kept plants they plant inside and outside their homes or greenhouses. I have had a wasp nest live in my home this summer. I have seen either 1 or 2 or the same Solitary hunting wasp fly around through my dining room to the back porch. And I have been seeing dead blue flower wasps UPSTAIRS in my home. next to the windows one at a time. At the moment having 1 at each window sill and had picked up the first one I found and looked at with amazement because I have never seen an irridescent blue wasp in NEW YORK state. Seeing that they are native in Australia is interesting. Sorry for this being very long. Looking to find anyway why they are in NY. Could it be from people bringing plats from Europe and I’m not sure about Australia since I dont know of any one from Australia around where I live.
    Thank You
    Roseann Sorrentino

    Reply
  3. Hello, I live in the Hudson Valley of NY and I know many people in the Hudson Valley usually bring flowers or plants from Europe and other countries. Anyway people can get their hands on organic and nicely kept plants they plant inside and outside their homes or greenhouses. I have had a wasp nest live in my home this summer. I have seen either 1 or 2 or the same Solitary hunting wasp fly around through my dining room to the back porch. And I have been seeing dead blue flower wasps UPSTAIRS in my home. next to the windows one at a time. At the moment having 1 at each window sill and had picked up the first one I found and looked at with amazement because I have never seen an irridescent blue wasp in NEW YORK state. Seeing that they are native in Australia is interesting. Sorry for this being very long. Looking to find anyway why they are in NY. Could it be from people bringing plats from Europe and I’m not sure about Australia since I dont know of any one from Australia around where I live.
    Thank You
    Roseann Sorrentino

    Reply
  4. Pretty sure I killed one of these in Wisconsin. Are they like the yellow and black wasps? Do they sting? Where can I find out more information about these?

    Reply
    • The Blue Flower Wasp is native to Australia, and to the best of our knowledge, they have not been reported from Wisconsin. Additional information on the Blue Flower Wasp is available on Csiro. You may also follow the links on our posting.

      Reply
  5. We, (my wife and I), live in north east Pennsylvania. This year we have a new bug flying around the garden. It looks like a blue flower wasp, however the colors are opposite; The wings are black and the body is irridescent blue, kind of a pretty color when it sits in the sun. The wasp looking insect avoids our presents when we step outside and the birds will not come to the feeder when the insects are about. Last year we had a swarm of June bugs and a smaller amount of the June bugs this year. These insects are doing exactly what you say thay are suppose to, flying around digging in the dirt, I think laying their eggs in the June bug grubbs. But WHAT are they? This could be what Georgia and Wisconsin are talking about.? Thank you for your help and time in this matter. Charles J. Shuck Sr., (Chuck), ghostwriter72@hotmail.com

    Reply
  6. Mr. Bugman, After looking at all the photos, we have strike-one. I am not up on the names of the body parts of a wasp, but these guys have larger wings that cover them like a lighting bug when they sit. The body is by no way as thin as any of the wasps in the pics. They look very much like the Steel Blue Cricket Hunter, but again they do not have a womens waist, nor the light wings. I know the Blue Mud Dauber, so that leaves him out. They are by no way a light weight wasp. Looks like I will have to catch and pin one of these for pics, even though I don’t like killing anything unless there is a reason, I will send a copy of the pics to you if I am lucky and take this one to the Penn. State annex for Id. Again thank you for your time and help. Chuck, (ghostwriter72@hotmail.com

    Reply
    • This is the first time that I have ever seen a blue flower wasp in my twenty odd years of gardening, hence my looking at this site. The coincidence is that I live in Mount Eliza where the previous respondent also lives. They are very lovely looking insects!

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  7. I was blueberry picking. I went into the raspberry isle. A black bug landed on me (I didn’t know it was a wasp. I freaked out. It stung me (my very first time). I started screaming and then I started crying. My Dad found me and he helped me get back home.

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  8. I forgot to say that I am seven years old and have never been stung before. It was quite an experience. Thank you for explaininng the black flower wasp to me. Evelyn

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    • Thank you for all the info and photos on black flower wasps. I’ve had two around in the garden and bird bath with rocks in it for me safety. The wasps didn’t last for long maybe laid their eggs then die soon after. I put them on a bench away from the ants, and then my 2 regular magpies came along and had them for breakfast.

      Reply
  9. Hi, My name is Rose and I live in the ACT. I am pretty sure we have these wasps in our garden and have had for a couple of years. They are continuously flying around the garden and never landing,that we see anyway. I happened to catch one this morning, I thought it was caught in the fence, however after reading this blurb, maybe she was burrowing into the soil. Do they do any damage to the garden is my question? Is there a benefit to having them? They are mostly here in the morning hours. I have a photo of it.

    Reply
  10. Have spotted 6 of these glorius wasps i n my front yard in Mornington Victoria.
    I haven’t seen these big beauties for 40 years when i lived in Frankston.

    Reply
  11. Have spotted 6 of these glorius wasps i n my front yard in Mornington Victoria.
    I haven’t seen these big beauties for 40 years when i lived in Frankston.

    Reply
  12. I went for a walk this morning in a local park in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne. I saw a little swarm of these wasps flying low around some shrubs. I stood amongst them for about 10 minutes, hoping I could see one landing. It never happened. So I caught one out of the air with my hand. But didn’t dare to hold on to it because it tried to pinch me. Unfortunately still didn’t managed to get a glimpse of it.
    Their bodies were about 20mm long, never saw the wings.

    Reply
  13. I went for a walk this morning in a local park in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne. I saw a little swarm of these wasps flying low around some shrubs. I stood amongst them for about 10 minutes, hoping I could see one landing. It never happened. So I caught one out of the air with my hand. But didn’t dare to hold on to it because it tried to pinch me. Unfortunately still didn’t managed to get a glimpse of it.
    Their bodies were about 20mm long, never saw the wings.

    Reply
  14. Hello Bugman.
    I seem to have a nest of Black Flower Wasps in my compost heap.
    I have been at this house almost a year now and would like to use some compost but don’t want to annoy the wasps.
    What do I do?

    Reply
    • We suspect the Black Flower Wasps may be searching through your compost pile to find Scarab Larvae. You can try removing compost from the parts of the heap where there is no Wasp activity.

      Reply
  15. Hello Bugman.
    I seem to have a nest of Black Flower Wasps in my compost heap.
    I have been at this house almost a year now and would like to use some compost but don’t want to annoy the wasps.
    What do I do?

    Reply
  16. Forgot to say these wasps have only arrived since I planted blue flowering perennials in my front garden. Who would have thought…

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  17. Just spotted one in my front yard in yallambie victoria. First time I’ve ever seen one. Particularly large and intimidating thing. Beautiful colour! The blue in the light is mesmerizing. I reckon a sting would suck from one of these.

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  18. One today In Kilmore Victoria, was like a flying alien jewel, it flew around and around me many times as I turned almost dancing to watch in turn.

    I could never call this a black flower wasp, was luminous blue …and so beautiful

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  19. One today In Kilmore Victoria, was like a flying alien jewel, it flew around and around me many times as I turned almost dancing to watch in turn.

    I could never call this a black flower wasp, was luminous blue …and so beautiful

    Reply
  20. My first sighting of a blue flower wasp .. it was having a drink of water from my bucket. I managed to take a few photos as it appeared to be enjoying sitting in the water for 5 minutes having a bath! Beautiful coloured wings.

    Reply
  21. I saw a Blue Flower Wasp fly up to the back porch step this year. I live in North Coburg Vic. It only stayed a few seconds but it made a lasting impression being such a beautiful colour blue. It was about the same size as a European wasp.

    Reply
  22. My daughter and I just had 2 black wasps inside our home (this a first)my question is where do they commonly reside and do I have to get pest control

    Reply
  23. We live in south central texas and believe we just encountered one of these wasp. I’m well rounded in i.d most of the local wild life since I look for reptiles to photograph, but had to do a search for this one, where I came across this site. Good job btw and thanx for making it easy for me to find what I was looking for.

    Reply
    • Since this is an Australian species, we suspect you encountered a different species, possibly a Steel Blue Cricket Hunter which is reported from California based on BugGuide data.

      Reply
  24. Have been onbsering these beauties for the last 3 weeks – have never seen them before either here in Bayside Brisbane or in Mt Martha Vic…
    pleased to know they are relatively harmless….,

    Reply
  25. Have been onbsering these beauties for the last 3 weeks – have never seen them before either here in Bayside Brisbane or in Mt Martha Vic…
    pleased to know they are relatively harmless….,

    Reply
  26. I just found a black wasp flying around my house and freaked out. I’m not sure if it was a male or female but I’m glad that I found out they don’t usually sting. Also, right now I have no idea where it went would it have stayed inside if the door was open?

    Reply
  27. Bermagui, NSW. January, 2018. Ten or so blue wasps have taken up residence in my herb and vegetable garden. They particularly seem to like the passionfruit. Beautiful. Glad they are friends not foes.

    Reply
  28. I’ve seen two of these interesting critters this morning while out with my chooks. One I rescued from one of the chooks water dishes, the other I rescued from another dish. Never seen them here in the 14 years I’ve been here. Nice to know I rescued a “Nice” bug 😉

    Reply
  29. We currently have a population explosion on our farm near Junee, NSW – possibly associated with hot weather and the flowering of eucalyptus citriodora (lemon scented gum). Although beautiful, their sting is extremely painful – more painful than a bee sting. One was caught in my shirt and stung three times before I managed to free it. The pain from the stings lasted all day and then the site became extremely itchy. The swelling/welts kept spreading and covered at least 10-15 cms, taking 8 days to ‘settle’ despite applications of antihistamine cream. So, care should be taken, especially if you have small children.

    Reply
  30. Very common in Australia. you hardly see even though common in our garden because they fly very fast. you can see the swarm of these wasp flying 25-35 degree temperature. Very beautiful metallic colour wings. Monash University Clayton Campus has a lot and around urban area of Victoria.

    Reply
  31. I had one of these wasps fly into my bedroom yesterday and I must say it scared the hell out of me as I have never seen anything like it before and thanks to this site I now know what it was.
    I am glad that I did not try to kill it I managed to catch it in a big box and took it out on my balcony and it flew away free.

    Reply
  32. I had one of these wasps fly into my bedroom yesterday and I must say it scared the hell out of me as I have never seen anything like it before and thanks to this site I now know what it was.
    I am glad that I did not try to kill it I managed to catch it in a big box and took it out on my balcony and it flew away free.

    Reply
  33. I found a dead blue flower wasp on my indoor windowsill. what a beautiful insect. Have a lovely photo of it. A few weeks ago I found a turquoise pray mantis in the garden, alive and also beautiful. I live in Boya W a.

    Reply
  34. Following the Mt Eliza thread of this conversation, I too have spotted one in my garden this afternoon. I wonder why they are in our area all of a sudden? I’ve never seen them here before either.

    Reply
  35. I have just noticed many of these this morning for the first time. I’m in inner northern suburbs of Melbourne. There are at least a dozen of them flying around our lemon tree. I’m hoping they’re not detrimental to the citrus. Anyone know?

    Reply
  36. Think I just saw one of these in my garden near the flowering blue salvia, I’m in the Noarlunga area, SA, never seen one before and we’ve been here for 16 years. may be because it’s the second year of the salvia which has gone a bit feral! and as it is so hot and dry over here, the salvia edges the veg patch, so it is considerably cooler and the ground would be softer… did not get a photo as was trying to work out whether it was friend or foe!

    Reply
  37. Watching around 50 vivid Blue Flower Wasps flying low around a mulched regrowth area at Tidal River, Wilson’s Prom, Victoria. Took ages to spot one on the ground to get a good look then found this web site and was able to identify them. Beautiful. Seems the ones that are landing for a minute or two are larger and are visited for a few seconds by smaller ones. Mating?

    Reply
  38. I have had what I believe to be Black Flower wasps hanging around for about 2 weeks. I don’t see them flying around outside very much …. but every day I am getting between 6 to 12 wasps per day being caught between the fly screen and the bedroom window. We have found a couple inside the bedroom. If they have a nest, I don’t know where it is. What can I do?

    Reply
    • Black Flower Wasps are not social wasps that build a large nest. It is our understanding that many members of this family do not build a true nest, but rather, the female lays an egg on the larva of a Scarab Beetle that is located underground. The egg is laid on site where the Beetle Grub is found and the female Wasp does not construct a true nest.

      Reply
  39. I’d never seen these before but today two were outside and one flew into my house, it was so loud and made a huge ‘thud’ as it flew into a wall. I thought it might be aggressive but I hate killing bugs, so I threw a tea towel over it and managed to safely take it outside.
    I’m glad they are native and not aggressive, and reading the comments here would encourage people to try safely capture and remove them rather than using pest control measures.

    Reply
  40. I’d never seen these before but today two were outside and one flew into my house, it was so loud and made a huge ‘thud’ as it flew into a wall. I thought it might be aggressive but I hate killing bugs, so I threw a tea towel over it and managed to safely take it outside.
    I’m glad they are native and not aggressive, and reading the comments here would encourage people to try safely capture and remove them rather than using pest control measures.

    Reply
  41. Saw one of these in my garden yesterday for the first time, what a wonderful looking insect, it flew under some black plastic where there was some pine mulch and was digging underneath, looking for a grub to lay eggs I think!! Amazing wings…

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  42. I found one of these beautiful wasps caught inside a net over my veggie bed. I safely let it out but wished I’d grabbed my phone to take a photo first. So beautiful and large. The black and blue features were so deep! Happily flew away when let out.

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  43. 2 of these superb insects sighted in the garden over the past fortnight, in Mount Martha. Took some research to identify them. Sue

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  44. I just spotted one of these digging next to my veggie patch – so beautiful! First time I’ve ever seen one in my life – I take it my garden is heathy for insect life – which I am keen for

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  45. Living in Maryland, I found a seemingly unidentifiable arachnid. I tried to examine it well before I flushed it. It was about 1.5 to 2 inches long and about 3/4 inches high. It had a “hard shiny shell” & looked like a tiny toy train. From under the thorax ONLY, were 4 teensy feet showing beneath on each side. The shell’s two parts were rectangular & a bright blue, and at the base of the shell and for its entire length (from thorax to abdomen) was one bright red stripe. It had NO long legs, no body hair, no wings, no feelers, no points or other patterns. I can’t remember what the face looked like. It was underneath my toilet seat. Never seen anything like it before or since. Can not find it on the internet.

    Reply
  46. Just watched one flying around.
    Thought it was very attractive until I found out it is a singing wasp.
    Could this wasp be part of the reason for the massive decline in Christmas Beetles as they are their preferred food

    Reply
  47. Just watched one flying around.
    Thought it was very attractive until I found out it is a singing wasp.
    Could this wasp be part of the reason for the massive decline in Christmas Beetles as they are their preferred food

    Reply
  48. We are on the Central Coast and quite a large number of these large beautiful insects suddenly appeared in my top garden. They zoom around close to the ground and don’t seem to rest (so getting a good look in order to identify one was quite difficult). Thank you for the information. I now understand why they are there.

    Reply
  49. Thrilled to see such a large, glossy insect just outside our house in Darlinghurst, Sydney. I had earlier swept lots of spent blossoms from the Queensland Box onto the pavement plantings as mulch, and this wasp was hovering around them in the afternoon. I had never seen one before.

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  50. Kids identified one through in the backyard yesterday (Shell Cove, NSW) and confirmed through this website. Great info, thanks!

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  51. Just found a dead one outside my back door. Very hot and windy day here so that may have been the cause of its demise. What a wonderful looking insect.

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  52. I have seen two for the first time in my Glen Waverley, Melbourne garden a couple of days ago, first one on lavender bush, then it buried itself in the mulch below. Second one (or maybe same one) two days later in front garden checking out mulch. Beautiful insect. Identified it via this website, many thanks.

    Reply
    • I just researched and found a bluebottle was an ? so totally different insect.. But never the less,anything with a big stinger is still a bit scary for me.. It was great to be able to find out about it from this web site so thanks.

      Reply
  53. Found a dead one in my back yard in St Kilda today. Never seen one before, so researched it, and found this informative post – thanks everyone! Really beautiful insect.

    Reply
  54. I haven’t seen one of these for forty years, it landed on my brothers head and we were all screaming. So when I saw one today flying in my backyard in Scoresby, I freaked out then looked up what it was, beautiful colour but I was scared of it. I think we called it a bluebottle back then.

    Reply
  55. Was able to identify this cute bug via this website. I had never seen them before in 40 years of gardening- neither here in Vermont South nor in central Victoria. First time has been this year. As mentioned above I also don’t see them land- except briefly one did just now. What stunning blue wings they have!

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  56. I just saw one in my basil pot. What lovely blue wings it had. Striking looking black insect. It flew away just as I got closer to take a photo of it. I live in Pascoe Vale South, Melbourne. It is my first time seeing one of these black beauties.

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  57. Hi, I live in Ohio.. I have a Kwanzan tree. These blue wasp are full in my tree. Why? and will they eat the leaves like the Japanese beetle do? I have had my tree for 3 years and this is the first year I’ve seen these wasp before. The Japanese beetle was on the same tree last year. Sprayed them and they went away. These wasp are here to stay no matter what I spray.

    Reply
  58. I have so many of these flying around my port wine magnolia hedge. How can I trim the hedge safely without disturbing them too much and avoid being stung?

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  59. Seen two blueblack hairy flower Wasps in Seymour at howards pl at kids playground borrowing in and out of the wood chips on the ground covering at park. There really a beauty to see with there eye catching iridescent blue black wings, My child who 2and half was calling them a dragonfly. Had to worn of the danger but she was persistent wanting to touch them, So we had to find another playground to play in.

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  60. I have a huge stump in my front yard, had big beautiful Christmas beetles there around Christmas, and the last couple of have been seeing gorgeous wasps, my favourite colour is blue so I was very interested to find out what they where since I’ve never seen them before, they are very hard to see properly as they rarely seem to land and stay still, thanks for the info

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  61. Just saw one in my Garden. Was a veggie patch where I often throw down fruit and veggies to rot and become compost with the soil and there is also a lemon tree. This beautiful winged was so blue it captured my eye as it was digging in the ground. I am based in Western Sydney – NSW.

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  62. We have seen multiple sightings of this handsome wasp here in Narooma (NSW far south coast) this, and the previous, summer flying low over our mulched garden beds. I will no longer feed the curl grubs I find to the magpies, in case there is an egg in there.

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  63. I had a visit today and like many, had never seen before, took a video and photo, they are so stunning. I researched and ended on this site so thank you

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  64. We had one in our bedroom here in Mitta Mitta, nth eastern Vic, last night, the first time we’ve encountered one here, so pretty and it also lead us to this site! Thank you

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  65. I nicknamed them cosmic wasps, such a deep shiny blue color as though they came from outer space or something… They are so pretty and I’m glad they have found their way into my garden. The grubs were getting on my nerves anyway, we have a plague of curl grubs in the yard. The wasps will thrive! Newcastle NSW.

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  66. Hi, this looks exactly like one (blue flower wasp?) in my food forest garden, but instead of borrowing into the ground, it seems to be trying to lay eggs into and all over a tomatoe plant leaf! Is it trying to lay eggs into grubs on that jleaf? Do you think it is a parasytic wasp. It’s not trying to eat tge leaf.
    I’d love to hear your comments about this.
    Cheers Lani

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  67. Thank you for all the info and photos on black flower wasps. I’ve had two around in the garden and bird bath with rocks in it for me safety. The wasps didn’t last for long maybe laid their eggs then die soon after. I put them on a bench away from the ants, and then my 2 regular magpies came along and had them for breakfast.

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