Uses of Cockroach: Surprising Benefits and Applications You Should Know

Cockroaches, often seen as pests, have some surprising uses in various fields. These insects have been around for millions of years, and their remarkable adaptability has piqued the interest of scientists and researchers.

One of the primary uses of cockroaches is in scientific research, particularly in studies related to their biology and behavior. For example, researchers are investigating their resilience and adaptability to develop better pest control methods. Additionally, these insects have been found to possess antibacterial properties, which could potentially lead to the development of new antimicrobial agents.

In some cultures, cockroaches are utilized as a food source, providing protein and nutrients. However, it is important to note that consuming cockroaches caught in the wild or from infested areas may pose health risks due to potential contamination or pathogens they might carry.

Cockroach Basics

Cockroach Species

Cockroaches are ancient insects which date back to the Carboniferous period. They have diversified into many species, some of which are commonly found in human dwellings. For example, the American cockroach is one of the largest cockroaches in the Northeast. Another species, the Oriental cockroach, is often referred to as a “waterbug” due to its preference for damp habitats.

Size and Habitats

Cockroaches vary in size, from small species like Megaloblatta longipennis, to the larger Macropanesthia rhinoceros and Blaberus giganteus. Size comparison between some common species:

  • Macropanesthia rhinoceros: up to 75 mm (3 inches)
  • Blaberus giganteus: up to 60 mm (2.4 inches)
  • American cockroach: about 40 mm (1.5 inches)
  • Oriental cockroach: about 2.5 cm (1 inch)

These insects are found in diverse habitats, from tropics to human dwellings, and even outside in gardens. They are good at adapting to different environments.

Ecological Role

Cockroaches play an essential role in natural ecology. Their primary contribution is breaking down organic matter and recycling nutrients back into the ecosystem. Some roles include:

  • Decomposers: They help break down dead plants and animals, returning their nutrients to the soil.
  • Food source: Cockroaches are a prey item to many animals, including birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians.
  • Indicators: Due to their sensitivity to environmental changes, they can act as indicators of ecosystem health.

Despite their ecological importance, some species have become pests and can cause problems in human habitats by contaminating food, spreading diseases, and causing allergies. Nonetheless, understanding cockroach basics and their place in the environment can help us appreciate their roles while managing their populations in our homes effectively.

Cockroaches and Human Health

Disease Transmission

Cockroaches can transmit various food-borne pathogenic microorganisms that can cause illnesses. Examples include:

  • Salmonella
  • E. coli
  • Staphylococcus

These bacteria may get transmitted through:

  • Contact with contaminated surfaces
  • Ingestion of contaminated food

Allergies and Asthma

Cockroaches can also trigger allergies and asthma, especially among allergy sufferers. Common allergens include:

  • Cockroach feces
  • Shed skin particles

Table: Cockroach Allergen Effects

Allergens Effects
Feces Sneezing, itchy eyes, skin rashes
Shed skin Nasal congestion, wheezing, asthma flare

To reduce health risks:

  • Clean surfaces regularly
  • Store food in sealed containers
  • Seal cracks and crevices to deter infestations

Cockroach Pests and Control

Common Household Cockroaches

In the US, the most prevalent types of cockroaches found in homes are the German cockroach and the American cockroach. Their characteristics include:

  • German cockroach: 12 to 17 mm long, tan to light brown, with two dark brown stripes behind the head
  • American cockroach: Larger than German cockroaches, reddish-brown, with a yellowish margin on the pronotum

Prevention and Deterrence

To prevent and deter cockroach infestations:

  • Keep living spaces clean and free of food debris
  • Seal cracks and crevices around doors and windows
  • Regularly empty and clean trash bins
  • Store food in sealed containers

Cockroach Repellents and Treatments

There are various products and methods available for dealing with cockroach infestations, including:

  1. Baits: Effective bait products can be found at hardware stores and online.
  • Pros: Low toxicity, safe for use at home
  • Cons: May take time to show results
  1. Boric acid: A popular dust for cockroach control, most effective in clean, dry areas.
  • Pros: Inexpensive, easy to apply
  • Cons: Ineffective in damp conditions, may need reapplication
Product/Method Pros Cons
Baits Low toxicity, safe for use May take time to show results
Boric acid Inexpensive, easy to apply Ineffective in damp conditions

Remember, to eradicate a cockroach problem in your home, it’s crucial to implement both preventative measures and treatment options. Regular inspection and maintenance can help ensure a pest-free environment.

Cockroaches in Science and Medicine

Potential Antibiotic Benefits

Cockroaches have been studied for their potential antibiotic benefits. They harbor bacteria within specialized bacteriocytes that recycle nitrogen from host waste products. These bacteria may hold the key to developing novel antibiotics.

For example:

  • Blattabacterium spp.: Unique to cockroaches, helps in nitrogen recycling!
  • Enterobacter: Mostly harmless, yet can yield potential antibiotic properties.

Radiation Resistance

Cockroaches are well-known for their radiation resistance. They can withstand high levels of radiation compared to other insects. Here’s a comparison table showing their radiation resistance:

Insect Radiation Resistance (Gy)
Cockroach 6,000-20,000
Fruit Fly 1,000
Honeybee 150
  • Cockroach: Impressive resistance to radiation, higher than fruit flies and honeybees!
  • Fruit Fly: Moderate radiation tolerance, much lower than cockroach.
  • Honeybee: Lowest radiation resistance among the three insects compared.

This unique feature of cockroaches has led to numerous scientific investigations. Understanding their underlying biology could provide insights into developing more effective radiation treatments for humans.

Keep in mind:

  • Pros: Uncovering potential antibiotic properties and radiation resistance mechanisms.
  • Cons: Ethical concerns in using cockroaches for research; potential for exaggeration.

Cockroaches as Food and Nutrition

Cultural Culinary Practices

In some cultures, eating cockroaches is considered a delicacy. Countries like China and Thailand have markets where cockroaches are sold for consumption. People enjoy eating them fried, grilled, or even in soups.

Cockroach Protein and Nutrients

Cockroaches are surprisingly nutritious, containing high levels of protein and essential amino acids. Here are some quick facts:

  • A significant source of protein
  • Rich in amino acids
  • Low in fat

Example: In the Chinese medicinal market, dried and powdered cockroaches are used to treat various ailments such as burns and diarrhea.

Cockroach Milk and Other Products

Cockroach milk, derived from the Pacific beetle cockroach, is a protein-rich substance that offers potential nutritional benefits. Some interesting products include:

  • Cockroach milk: Rich in protein and nutrients
  • Syrup: Contains cockroach extracts
  • Powdered cockroach: Used for medicinal purposes

Pros:

  • Sustainable protein alternative
  • Potentially higher nutritional value than conventional milk

Cons:

  • Public perception remains negative
  • Limited research on long-term consumption

Comparison Table:

Product Nutrition Sustainability Public Perception
Cockroach Milk Rich in protein High Negative
Cow’s Milk Standard Moderate Positive

In conclusion, cockroaches have potential as an alternative source of nutrition and as ingredients in traditional medicine, making them a fascinating topic to explore.

Cockroaches in Popular Culture and Technology

Literary and Cinematic References

Cockroaches have appeared in various forms of literature and film. For example, Franz Kafka’s famous novella, The Metamorphosis, features a protagonist who turns into a cockroach-like creature. In cinema, movies like Joe’s Apartment use cockroaches as a source of humor, depicting them with distinct personalities.

Role in Emerging Technologies

Scientists are exploring the use of cockroaches in technology development. One notable example is the creation of robotic cockroaches, or RoboRoaches, designed to navigate difficult environments due to their resilience and adaptability to various climates.

Pros:

  • Robotic cockroaches could access hard-to-reach areas, like disaster zones or unsafe buildings
  • Can inspire future innovations in robotics

Cons:

  • Potential ethical concerns regarding the use of animals in technology

Comparison Table

Feature Literature & Film Emerging Technologies
Purpose Entertaining or thought-provoking Problem-solving or innovation
Tone Varying: comedic, dark, or existential Exploratory or practical
Popularity More widespread recognition More niche communities

In summary, cockroaches have found a place in both popular culture and technology, serving various roles and purposes. They continue to fascinate and repel us with their resilience, adaptability, and unique characteristics.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Cockroach

 

Black and Yellow Bug
Location: Millbrae, CA
August 23, 2011 5:45 pm
Hello,
I found this guy hanging out under the sunny part of my bathroom closet door. It was yesterday, at Millbrae, CA (94030). I can’t figure out what this is. It moved really really super fast like a silver fish does. Its underside was white with a lot of tiny parallel segments. It’s very mysterious, I’ve never seen it before. I thought it was going to move like a lady bug but it did not. It also has long skinny black legs and antenna. What is this? And did he travel here from a flower? Or is from this area? Never seen it in my life.
Thank you! -Crystal
Signature: Crystal

Cockroach

Hi Crystal,
We will identify this Cockroach in the morning.  We really love your photo which would be an excellent image if we ever do another calendar.

PS. I think that two long antennas were actually coming from his butt side.  As you can see, he has a small head and smaller antenna on the other side. When I caught him with my insect looker, he moved forward from the side that is opposite of those 2 really long antennas you see up top.
Crystal

Hi Crystal,
Your Cockroach is
Phyllodromica trivittata, and BugGuide provides some interesting information, beginning with:  “Recently introduced into California, apparently now in Marin, Petaluma and Cotati” and “Reports of high abundance both indoors and outdoors make it likely that reproduction is occurring outdoors with subsequent invasion of nearby structures. As this species adapts to this new environment, studies will need to be conducted to confirm this.”  Here is a final remark regarding its origins:  “Known from dry habitats around the Mediterranean. It has been recorded from Morocco; Algeria; Spain; Italy (Sardinia Island); Italy (Sicily); Libya; and Israel. Given that it has not been recorded as being a pest in buildings in those countries (as far as I’m aware) it is unlikely to invade buildings in the USA. Comment by George Beccaloni (The Natural History Museum, London, UK).”  The head is actually on the side with the long antennae.  The shorter appendages are known as cerci and BugGuide has a nice definition of them.


Thank you for identifying this mysterious creature… but cockroach does make sense, especially its swiftness, its one piece body – which eliminated the cucumber beetle idea, its cerci, and its non-beetle looking underside… it’s a pretty cockroach.  But the idea that it’s a cockroach is kind of creepy, especially because its American cousin is a pest. 🙂
Thanks again!
-Crystal

Letter 2 – Cockroach

 

bug indentification
I just recently move to Florida and I have found two of these insects in my apt. what is it…please email me back….I have tried to find it online and i am not having any luck…Thank you so much…
Have No Clue

You have some type of cockroach, probably immature. It is difficult to tell exactly what is going on in your photo. It appears as though the cockroach has endured some type of bodily harm.

Letter 3 – Cockroach

 

roach??
dear bugman,
I sent you info, but no picture about these which live outside (and now some inside as of a month or so ago) our southeast michigan home. i now have photos. they are about 3/8 to 1/2 inch long, walk around during the day (and we assume night too). they are very light brown, but don’t have any dark lines like the german roaches. I saw one fly only once, they usually walk or run. What are they and will they try to make a home in our house?? thanks a lot.
LN

Hi LN,
You certainly have a cockroach. I can only guess you home would be attractive to them. You are correct in guessing it does not look like a German Cockroach, but I can’t help you on the species.

Letter 4 – Cockroach

 

what is this insect?
October 17, 2009
In late summer 2006, I started noticing some kind of unidentified roach-like bug in the garden & around the house.
Observed in daylight, doesn’t run to avoid light. Body is ~6 mm long, semi-translucent, with darker brown stripes lengthwise down the back side of body, and one central brown stripe. Feelers approx as long as body, 2 mandible-type extensions near base of feelers, 6 legs, rearmost legs longest, with hairy extensions on them, two spikey extensions at rear end. Body is segmented, no obvious wings. A captured one was observed to have a very large object attached to it, which it eventually shed after about a day (at right). Is this some kind of egg case?
(see attached jpg images)
Thank you, JD
Petaluma, California

Cockroach
Cockroach

Hi JD,
This is a species of Cockroach, and we believe it is Phyllodromica trivittata, a Mediterranean import that BugGuide reports from California.  BugGuide has this comment:  “Known from dry habitats around the Mediterranean. It has been recorded from Morocco; Algeria; Spain; Italy (Sardinia Island); Italy (Sicily); Libya; and Israel. Given that it has not been recorded as being a pest in buildings in those countries (as far as I’m aware) it is unlikely to invade buildings in the USA. Comment by George Beccaloni (The Natural History Museum, London, UK).
”  In many species of Cockroaches, the female carries the ootheca, or egg case, and your description and photograph support this, though that photo is a bit blurry and we will not be posting it.  The Cockroach Forum has some nice images.

Cockroach
Cockroach

Letter 5 – Cockroach

 

Subject: Unknown Beetle
Location: Maryland
November 6, 2014 3:18 pm
Hello, I was wondering if you could tell me what type of Beetle this is. It was photographed in a garage in November.
Signature: Jeremy

Cockroach
Cockroach

Dear Jeremy,
This is a Cockroach, most likely an immature nymph, but we would not rule out that it might be a wingless, adult female Cockroach.

Letter 6 – Cockroach

 

Subject: Bug
Location: All areas inside house
December 6, 2016 11:22 am
What is a brown bug, an inch plus long and has wings. I keep finding them in my house.
Signature: Deena Williams

Cockroach
Cockroach

Dear Deena,
It sounds like Cockroaches are thriving and reproducing in your home.

Letter 7 – Cockroach

 

Subject: found this in my sink
Location: warsaw, indiana, in my sink
April 5, 2017 7:46 pm
found this in my sink and i am freaking out! please tell me it isnt what i think it is!
Signature: amy

Cockroach

Dear Amy,
This is an immature Cockroach, but we think you suspected as much.

Letter 8 – Cockroach

 

Subject:  Cockroach??
Geographic location of the bug:  North Jersey
Date: 12/13/2017
Time: 10:34 PM EDT
Found this staring at when I opened my pantry. Found another dead one in the upstairs bathroom tub that is never used
How you want your letter signed:  Mary

Cockroach

Hi Mary,
This certainly is a Cockroach, and the image is too blurry to be certain, but it looks to us like a German Cockroach, a species that frequently infests homes.

Thank you so much, I think. : o
We’ve been in this house for over 10 years, is there a reason I am just seeing them (2 so far, one alive one dead) now? We did have our basement remediated for mold and they used something called Tim-Bor to treat the wood. Does it mean they’ve been in our house all this time? I’m disgusted to say the least.

German Cockroaches have adapted to living near humans and have benefitted from cohabitation, especially because of the food we provide for them.  You may have introduced Cockroaches to your home in a purse taken to a restaurant, in a brown bag brought home from the grocery, or even in a basket taken to a laundromat.

Letter 9 – Cockroach

 

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Midwest (Chicago area)
Date: 02/02/2019
Time: 11:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen a couple of these bugs throughout our apartment. I thought they have been cockroaches but my landlord thinks otherwise. Can you help?
How you want your letter signed:  BH

Cockroach

Dear BH,
Your landlord is wrong.  This is a Cockroach.

Cockroach

Letter 10 – Cockroach

 

Subject:  Unknown Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  San Francisco Bay Area, California
Date: 05/10/2019
Time: 05:12 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these bugs in my backyard and two of them have gotten into my house, I safely relocated them back outside but I want to know if they are dangerous or can infest my house and what kind of beetle it is.
How you want your letter signed:  To whom it may concern

Cockroach

You have Cockroaches.  This appears to be an Oriental Cockroach.  You may read more about them on BugGuide where it states their habitat is “Relatively cool, damp areas – basements, crawl spaces. Not usually found on higher floors of buildings.”

Letter 11 – Cockroach Crayfish

 

Subject: Cockroach Crayfish
Location: Jaragua State Park, São Paulo, Brazil
April 10, 2013 9:11 am
Hi, guys!
These freshwater crustaceans are Aegla paulensis, and I found the common name cockroach crayfish in this page: http://fishopolis.wordpress.com/2010/09/30/cockroach-crayfish-aegla-platensis/
It seems that the genus Aegla is the sole member of the family Aeglidae and are endemic to South America.
Hope you enjoy it!
Signature: Cesar Crash

Cockroach Crayfish
Cockroach Crayfish

Hi Cesar,
When we first saw the subject line, we thought someone had found a Mole Cricket.  How wonderful to get a new posting of a Brazilian Crayfish from you.

Cockroach Crayfish
Cockroach Crayfish


Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Cockroach

 

Black and Yellow Bug
Location: Millbrae, CA
August 23, 2011 5:45 pm
Hello,
I found this guy hanging out under the sunny part of my bathroom closet door. It was yesterday, at Millbrae, CA (94030). I can’t figure out what this is. It moved really really super fast like a silver fish does. Its underside was white with a lot of tiny parallel segments. It’s very mysterious, I’ve never seen it before. I thought it was going to move like a lady bug but it did not. It also has long skinny black legs and antenna. What is this? And did he travel here from a flower? Or is from this area? Never seen it in my life.
Thank you! -Crystal
Signature: Crystal

Cockroach

Hi Crystal,
We will identify this Cockroach in the morning.  We really love your photo which would be an excellent image if we ever do another calendar.

PS. I think that two long antennas were actually coming from his butt side.  As you can see, he has a small head and smaller antenna on the other side. When I caught him with my insect looker, he moved forward from the side that is opposite of those 2 really long antennas you see up top.
Crystal

Hi Crystal,
Your Cockroach is
Phyllodromica trivittata, and BugGuide provides some interesting information, beginning with:  “Recently introduced into California, apparently now in Marin, Petaluma and Cotati” and “Reports of high abundance both indoors and outdoors make it likely that reproduction is occurring outdoors with subsequent invasion of nearby structures. As this species adapts to this new environment, studies will need to be conducted to confirm this.”  Here is a final remark regarding its origins:  “Known from dry habitats around the Mediterranean. It has been recorded from Morocco; Algeria; Spain; Italy (Sardinia Island); Italy (Sicily); Libya; and Israel. Given that it has not been recorded as being a pest in buildings in those countries (as far as I’m aware) it is unlikely to invade buildings in the USA. Comment by George Beccaloni (The Natural History Museum, London, UK).”  The head is actually on the side with the long antennae.  The shorter appendages are known as cerci and BugGuide has a nice definition of them.


Thank you for identifying this mysterious creature… but cockroach does make sense, especially its swiftness, its one piece body – which eliminated the cucumber beetle idea, its cerci, and its non-beetle looking underside… it’s a pretty cockroach.  But the idea that it’s a cockroach is kind of creepy, especially because its American cousin is a pest. 🙂
Thanks again!
-Crystal

Letter 2 – Cockroach

 

bug indentification
I just recently move to Florida and I have found two of these insects in my apt. what is it…please email me back….I have tried to find it online and i am not having any luck…Thank you so much…
Have No Clue

You have some type of cockroach, probably immature. It is difficult to tell exactly what is going on in your photo. It appears as though the cockroach has endured some type of bodily harm.

Letter 3 – Cockroach

 

roach??
dear bugman,
I sent you info, but no picture about these which live outside (and now some inside as of a month or so ago) our southeast michigan home. i now have photos. they are about 3/8 to 1/2 inch long, walk around during the day (and we assume night too). they are very light brown, but don’t have any dark lines like the german roaches. I saw one fly only once, they usually walk or run. What are they and will they try to make a home in our house?? thanks a lot.
LN

Hi LN,
You certainly have a cockroach. I can only guess you home would be attractive to them. You are correct in guessing it does not look like a German Cockroach, but I can’t help you on the species.

Letter 4 – Cockroach

 

what is this insect?
October 17, 2009
In late summer 2006, I started noticing some kind of unidentified roach-like bug in the garden & around the house.
Observed in daylight, doesn’t run to avoid light. Body is ~6 mm long, semi-translucent, with darker brown stripes lengthwise down the back side of body, and one central brown stripe. Feelers approx as long as body, 2 mandible-type extensions near base of feelers, 6 legs, rearmost legs longest, with hairy extensions on them, two spikey extensions at rear end. Body is segmented, no obvious wings. A captured one was observed to have a very large object attached to it, which it eventually shed after about a day (at right). Is this some kind of egg case?
(see attached jpg images)
Thank you, JD
Petaluma, California

Cockroach
Cockroach

Hi JD,
This is a species of Cockroach, and we believe it is Phyllodromica trivittata, a Mediterranean import that BugGuide reports from California.  BugGuide has this comment:  “Known from dry habitats around the Mediterranean. It has been recorded from Morocco; Algeria; Spain; Italy (Sardinia Island); Italy (Sicily); Libya; and Israel. Given that it has not been recorded as being a pest in buildings in those countries (as far as I’m aware) it is unlikely to invade buildings in the USA. Comment by George Beccaloni (The Natural History Museum, London, UK).
”  In many species of Cockroaches, the female carries the ootheca, or egg case, and your description and photograph support this, though that photo is a bit blurry and we will not be posting it.  The Cockroach Forum has some nice images.

Cockroach
Cockroach

Letter 5 – Cockroach

 

Subject: Unknown Beetle
Location: Maryland
November 6, 2014 3:18 pm
Hello, I was wondering if you could tell me what type of Beetle this is. It was photographed in a garage in November.
Signature: Jeremy

Cockroach
Cockroach

Dear Jeremy,
This is a Cockroach, most likely an immature nymph, but we would not rule out that it might be a wingless, adult female Cockroach.

Letter 6 – Cockroach

 

Subject: Bug
Location: All areas inside house
December 6, 2016 11:22 am
What is a brown bug, an inch plus long and has wings. I keep finding them in my house.
Signature: Deena Williams

Cockroach
Cockroach

Dear Deena,
It sounds like Cockroaches are thriving and reproducing in your home.

Letter 7 – Cockroach

 

Subject: found this in my sink
Location: warsaw, indiana, in my sink
April 5, 2017 7:46 pm
found this in my sink and i am freaking out! please tell me it isnt what i think it is!
Signature: amy

Cockroach

Dear Amy,
This is an immature Cockroach, but we think you suspected as much.

Letter 8 – Cockroach

 

Subject:  Cockroach??
Geographic location of the bug:  North Jersey
Date: 12/13/2017
Time: 10:34 PM EDT
Found this staring at when I opened my pantry. Found another dead one in the upstairs bathroom tub that is never used
How you want your letter signed:  Mary

Cockroach

Hi Mary,
This certainly is a Cockroach, and the image is too blurry to be certain, but it looks to us like a German Cockroach, a species that frequently infests homes.

Thank you so much, I think. : o
We’ve been in this house for over 10 years, is there a reason I am just seeing them (2 so far, one alive one dead) now? We did have our basement remediated for mold and they used something called Tim-Bor to treat the wood. Does it mean they’ve been in our house all this time? I’m disgusted to say the least.

German Cockroaches have adapted to living near humans and have benefitted from cohabitation, especially because of the food we provide for them.  You may have introduced Cockroaches to your home in a purse taken to a restaurant, in a brown bag brought home from the grocery, or even in a basket taken to a laundromat.

Letter 9 – Cockroach

 

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Midwest (Chicago area)
Date: 02/02/2019
Time: 11:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen a couple of these bugs throughout our apartment. I thought they have been cockroaches but my landlord thinks otherwise. Can you help?
How you want your letter signed:  BH

Cockroach

Dear BH,
Your landlord is wrong.  This is a Cockroach.

Cockroach

Letter 10 – Cockroach

 

Subject:  Unknown Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  San Francisco Bay Area, California
Date: 05/10/2019
Time: 05:12 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these bugs in my backyard and two of them have gotten into my house, I safely relocated them back outside but I want to know if they are dangerous or can infest my house and what kind of beetle it is.
How you want your letter signed:  To whom it may concern

Cockroach

You have Cockroaches.  This appears to be an Oriental Cockroach.  You may read more about them on BugGuide where it states their habitat is “Relatively cool, damp areas – basements, crawl spaces. Not usually found on higher floors of buildings.”

Letter 11 – Cockroach Crayfish

 

Subject: Cockroach Crayfish
Location: Jaragua State Park, São Paulo, Brazil
April 10, 2013 9:11 am
Hi, guys!
These freshwater crustaceans are Aegla paulensis, and I found the common name cockroach crayfish in this page: http://fishopolis.wordpress.com/2010/09/30/cockroach-crayfish-aegla-platensis/
It seems that the genus Aegla is the sole member of the family Aeglidae and are endemic to South America.
Hope you enjoy it!
Signature: Cesar Crash

Cockroach Crayfish
Cockroach Crayfish

Hi Cesar,
When we first saw the subject line, we thought someone had found a Mole Cricket.  How wonderful to get a new posting of a Brazilian Crayfish from you.

Cockroach Crayfish
Cockroach Crayfish


Authors

  • Daniel Marlos

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

16 thoughts on “Uses of Cockroach: Surprising Benefits and Applications You Should Know”

  1. We saw these cockroaches all over Lake Sonoma Liberty Glenn Campround in Sonoma County. I saw them in the campground bathroom/showers and the camp sites peripherally. I accidentally brought one home in my backpack. Should I worry about them infesting my home?

    Reply
  2. Seriously people, I had NEVER seen a cockroach before moving to North America. Cut this person some slack, your “every day” isn’t the same as everyone else’s

    Reply
  3. We had a bunch of these in my folk’s house north of Santa Rosa about the same as this was posted. Saw them for a few weeks and then they up and disappeared. They were pretty cute when we discovered they were adults and not nymphs.

    Reply
  4. Um, wait!

    “The German cockroach is best identified by small size and two parallel lines running from back of head to wings”. http://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/german-cockroaches

    There are no stripes on this one’s pronotum!

    I looked through bugguide’s section on common house roaches (on the Order Blattodea page), and it looks like none of them. My first thought was that it was a small, harmless forest/garden ectobiid which had wandered into the house, but a quick scan through harmless ectobiids on bugguide didn’t find any obvious matches. Of course, it is entirely possible that the pronotal stripes were blurred out by the poor lighting of the photo, but I would be very very cautious before assuming there is an infestation.

    Cheers

    Reply
  5. Um, wait!

    “The German cockroach is best identified by small size and two parallel lines running from back of head to wings”. http://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/german-cockroaches

    There are no stripes on this one’s pronotum!

    I looked through bugguide’s section on common house roaches (on the Order Blattodea page), and it looks like none of them. My first thought was that it was a small, harmless forest/garden ectobiid which had wandered into the house, but a quick scan through harmless ectobiids on bugguide didn’t find any obvious matches. Of course, it is entirely possible that the pronotal stripes were blurred out by the poor lighting of the photo, but I would be very very cautious before assuming there is an infestation.

    Cheers

    Reply
    • Thanks AlexW, extreme entomophile.
      We could not detect stripes either. The only reason we even suggested an infestation is that two individuals were found. We never suggested fumigation or any drastic measures, but being vigilant to the potential presence of other Cockroaches could help prevent a serious infestation.

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