Tachinid Flies: A Deep Dive into Their Ecology and Behavior

Tachinid flies may resemble house flies at first glance, but they play a crucial role in the ecosystem. These flies come in various colors, sizes, and shapes, such as gray, black, or striped, and can be identified by their distinct abdominal bristles 1. As adults, they feed on liquids like nectar, as well as honeydew produced by aphids and scale insects [^2^].

These flies are particularly important for their parasitic behavior. Tachinid flies target the immature life stages of various insects, including beetles, butterflies, moths, earwigs, grasshoppers, sawflies, and true bugs [^3^]. By doing so, they help control the populations of these pests, making them a beneficial presence in gardens and agricultural fields.

As you learn more about the fascinating Tachinid fly, you’ll discover a diverse world of insects that contribute significantly to the natural balance within ecosystems. By understanding their life cycle, behavior, and impact on other insects, you can appreciate how these unassuming flies play a vital role in our environment.

Understanding Tachinid Flies

Tachinid flies belong to the family Tachinidae, which is part of the order Diptera. They are a diverse group, with over 1,300 species in North America alone. Some well-known genera in this family are Voria Ruralis and Lydella Thompsoni.

These flies are not the most striking insects, as they often resemble ordinary house flies. However, you can generally identify tachinid flies by their unique characteristics, such as:

  • Stripes on their body
  • Gray or black color
  • Distinct abdominal bristles

Tachinid flies are essential for maintaining ecological balance. As parasitic insects, they mainly target immature life stages of various pests, such as beetles, butterflies, and moths. Helping to control these pest populations makes tachinid flies valuable allies for farmers and gardeners alike.

Adult tachinid flies have a rather simple diet, feeding on liquids like nectar and the honeydew produced by aphids and scale insects. This makes them beneficial pollinators, just like bees and butterflies.

When it comes to reproduction, tachinid flies have some interesting strategies. Females will either lay eggs directly on or inside the host’s body, or deposit them on the host’s food plant. This ensures that the larval tachinid flies have a ready supply of food once they hatch.

As you learn more about tachinid flies, you’ll appreciate how they play a vital role in their environments. From serving as biological control agents to pollinating plants, these small flies pack a big punch in natural ecosystems.

Life Cycle of Tachinid Flies

Egg Stage

In the egg stage of the tachinid fly life cycle, adult flies lay their eggs on or near potential host insects. The selection of a host is crucial, as the developing parasitoid larvae depend on the host for nutrition and survival. Some tachinid flies are specific to certain types of insects, while others have a broader host range.

Larval Stage

Once the eggs hatch, the larvae, or maggots, begin their parasitic relationship with the host insect. They penetrate the host’s body and start feeding on its internal tissues. The larval stage is the most destructive phase for the host insect, as the maggots eventually consume enough to kill it. The duration of this stage may vary depending on the tachinid fly species and their host.

Pupate Stage

After completing their development within the host insect, the tachinid fly larvae emerge and transition into the pupal stage. During this time, the pupae remain motionless and undergo metamorphosis. Pupation may occur inside the host’s remains or in the surrounding environment. This stage can last for several weeks, depending on the species and environmental conditions.

Adult Stage

When the metamorphosis is complete, adult tachinid flies emerge from the pupae. These adults are responsible for continuing the life cycle by locating suitable hosts to lay their eggs on. The adults also contribute to pollination as they feed on nectar from flowers. The adult stage is relatively short, with some tachinid flies living only a few days, while others may live for several weeks.

The tachinid fly life cycle can vary greatly depending on the species. Some species complete only one generation per year, while others have multiple generations and finish their life cycle in 3-4 weeks 1. In any case, tachinid flies play a crucial role in biological control, acting as parasitoids to control populations of various insects.

Habitats of Tachinid Flies

Tachinid flies are beneficial insects that you can often find in various environments. They thrive particularly well in gardens, as there is an abundance of flowering plants and insect hosts for them to feed on. Some common habitats include:

  • Gardens: These flies are known to be helpful in controlling harmful pests. They can often be found around flowering plants and crops, assisting with pollination and pest control.
  • Soil: The larvae of tachinid flies develop inside their hosts, which usually inhabit the soil, such as beetle and moth larvae.

Tachinid flies are not picky when it comes to feeding, and you can observe them in action on different types of flowering plants. For example:

  • Asters: Tachinid flies can often be seen visiting asters, as they provide nectar for adult tachinid flies to feed on.
  • Crops: Since many crops attract potential host insects for tachinid flies, you might notice these helpful flies around your crop fields.

A good habitat for tachinid flies should include a variety of flowering plants that supply the necessary nectar for adult flies. This ensures a steady source of food, helping them survive, reproduce, and keep your garden or crops pest-free.

To attract tachinid flies to your garden, consider planting a diverse array of flowering plants. By doing so, you create a friendly environment for these helpful insects to keep your plants healthy and less susceptible to harmful insect infestations.

Role in the Ecosystem

Tachinid flies play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ecosystems. They are known as beneficial insects, mainly due to their role as parasites and parasitoids of different insect pests.

Adult tachinid flies feed on insect honeydew and flower nectar, which provide them with energy for mating and searching for hosts. This process helps in pollination as they transfer pollen between flowers while feeding.

As biological control agents, the larvae of these flies parasitize various insect pests such as beetles, butterflies, moths, grasshoppers, sawflies, and true bugs. For example, the feather legged fly attacks stink bugs and leaf footed bugs, including squash bug and green stink bug.

In addition to reducing pest populations, tachinid flies also help increase the presence of other beneficial insects. Being natural enemies of pests, these flies indirectly aid in pest control and contribute to a balanced ecosystem.

Remember, tachinid flies play a critical role in supporting healthy ecosystems by acting as both pollinators and biological control agents. By reducing the population of harmful insects, tachinid flies maintain the delicate balance and promote the growth of beneficial insect populations.

Tachinid Flies as Garden Helpers

Tachinid flies can be a great help in maintaining the balance of your garden. They act as natural predators of many common garden pests, especially caterpillars. By doing so, they keep the populations of these pests under control, without the need for harsh chemicals.

These beneficial insects are parasitic, laying their eggs on the host insects, such as caterpillars and other pest insects. Once the eggs hatch, the larvae feed on their host, eventually killing them. This process is essential for maintaining the health of your garden vegetation.

As a gardener, you may find that using tachinid flies can be an eco-friendly way to protect your plants from various pests. They can be attracted to your garden through the use of plants with ample nectar, such as yarrow and cilantro, which serve as a food source for adult tachinid flies.

In conclusion, tachinid flies can play a crucial role in keeping your garden pest-free. By targeting some common garden pests, they allow your vegetation to thrive, while also reducing your reliance on chemical pesticides. So, next time you spot a tachinid fly in your garden, know that they’re quietly helping you maintain a healthy growing environment.

Key Preys of Tachinid Flies

Targeting Beetles

Tachinid flies act as internal parasites, preying on various insects. One common group of prey they target is beetles. For example, they can be found attacking the larvae of the Colorado potato beetle and the Japanese beetle.

Concern for Butterflies

Sadly, butterflies and moths also fall victim to Tachinid flies. They can parasitize caterpillars of the Lepidoptera order, such as the cabbage looper, gypsy moth, and other moth species. The presence of Tachinid flies can pose a threat to butterfly populations.

Feasting on Bugs

Tachinid flies don’t discriminate when it comes to true bugs. They often target squash bugs, stink bugs, and similar insects. In one instance, feather-legged flies of the Tachinid family lay pale, oval eggs on the side of squash bugs.

Other Notable Preys

Other insects that serve as prey for Tachinid flies include:

  • Grasshoppers: they can act as both hosts and prey for various species of Tachinid flies.
  • Houseflies: some Tachinid flies resemble house flies, making them hard to distinguish.
  • Armyworm: Tachinid flies can parasitize the larvae of armyworms, helping in controlling their population.
  • Earwigs: specific Tachinid flies have been known to attack earwigs.
  • Sawflies and sawfly larvae: they become hosts to Tachinid flies, eventually falling victim to the parasitic relationship.
  • European corn borer: Myiopharus doryphorae, a specific Tachinid fly species, has been reported to parasitize this moth larva.

In summary, Tachinid flies have a wide range of prey, making them versatile internal parasites that can have both positive and negative impacts on ecosystems.

Management and Control

To manage and control tachinid flies, it’s essential to adopt an integrated approach. Since these flies are beneficial insects that control pests, you should focus on preserving their population to maintain a natural balance.

In your garden, avoid using broad-spectrum insecticides. These chemicals can harm tachinid flies and other beneficial insects. Instead, opt for targeted insecticides to control specific pest problems.

Here’s a comparison table of two management methods:

Method Pros Cons
Broad-spectrum Insecticides Effective in controlling various pests Harmful to beneficial insects, including tachinid flies
Targeted Insecticides Minimally affects tachinid flies and other beneficial insects May not cover all pest issues

To promote tachinid fly populations, consider planting flowers they feed on. These insects prefer nectar-producing plants, such as Queen Anne’s lace and dill.

In summary:

  • Avoid broad-spectrum insecticides
  • Use targeted insecticides for specific pest issues
  • Plant nectar-producing flowers to support tachinid fly populations

By following these guidelines, you’ll be able to effectively manage and control pests while preserving the valuable natural enemy – the tachinid fly.

Conclusion

In this article, you’ve learned about the fascinating world of Tachinid flies. These unique insects serve an essential role in controlling pest populations, ultimately benefiting both farmers and gardeners.

Tachinid flies have evolved various methods of parasitism to successfully attack their hosts. This versatility allows them to target a wide range of insect pests. As a result, they are valuable for maintaining the balance within various ecosystems.

You can also benefit from these flies in your garden by fostering an environment that attracts them. By planting nectar-rich plants and providing shelter, you can ensure a thriving population of this helpful insect.

Footnotes

  1. WSU Tree Fruit | Washington State University 2

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

93 thoughts on “Tachinid Flies: A Deep Dive into Their Ecology and Behavior”

  1. These are common in Saskatchewan in low areas with flowering vegetation. I photographed one by east shore of Little Quill Lake in 2001. I have to confirm the lines on the wings.

    Reply
  2. Having visited Florida uncountable times in my life, having seen this variety of insect in Florida many times and being a resident of Ontario myself, I can totally corroborate having seen this exact insect in Ottawa, Ontario on at least one occasion. I’d guess it was a transient hitching a ride on a vehicle and not likely born locally.

    Reply
  3. Hello Daniel and Nick:

    I believe this may be a blowfly (Calliphoridae: Aminiinae) in the genus Amenia. The genus is endemic to Australia and, although there are only a handful of species, I haven’t been able to find an image that matches exactly. Those that I have been able to find, however, look very similar. As a group, they appear to be called snail parasite blowflies. Here are some links:

    http://anic.ento.csiro.au/insectfamilies/image_details.aspx?OrderID=26547&BiotaID=46391&ImageID=4172&PageID=families

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jean_hort/2835966512/

    Reply
  4. I don’t know what kind of fly this is, is but think its flashy appearance could be due to a fungal infection, perhaps by Entomophthora muscae. There are numerous photos on the internet that look very similar to this this. The white banding occurs as the fungus bursts out between the abdominal segments (presumably just before the victim expires). For more information you could check out: http://www.hort.wisc.edu/mastergardener/features/insects/entomophthora/entomophora.htm or check out the photos at: http://magickcanoe.com/blog/2006/09/07/mystery-fly-and-crumby-internet-connections/

    Reply
  5. The CSIRO’s giant tomes “The Insects of Australia” has a colour plate with one of these – but gives it as Formosia speciosa. Annoyingly, I can find no other mention of the species or genus online :/

    Reply
    • Please send the link. A search of Formosia speciosa and CSIRO did not produce any hits. Perhaps the source material you cited was an actual printed volume.

      Reply
  6. The CSIRO’s giant tomes “The Insects of Australia” has a colour plate with one of these – but gives it as Formosia speciosa. Annoyingly, I can find no other mention of the species or genus online :/

    Reply
  7. I would be willing to bet a buck that this pupae belongs to Ormia ochracea, a tachinid fly occurring across the southern US and into central america. The appearance of the pupae (color, surface, size) matches O. ochracea perfectly, and the host looks right. I did my master’s research on this species, and am still quite fond of it:)

    Reply
    • Thanks for your comment. Based on your credentials, which are much more impressive than our own, we defer to your knowledge and we will update the post with your identification. Thanks again for the input.

      Reply
  8. Hi, I think that may be a species of Caligo, aka Owl Butterfly. We raise a lot of these in Montezuma, CR, and some of the earlier instars look very similar to this picture.

    Reply
    • Thanks Arlo,
      That confirms our suspicion that this is a Nymphalid. We have put in an identification request with Keith Wolfe and we are awaiting his response.

      Reply
  9. We just found a tachinid fly today August 10 2013. In Grande prairie Alberta. It’s a rainy day and plus 19. Found him flying around the trees on the side of the house.
    Interesting looking Fly. We didn’t know what it was would like to learn more about it.

    Reply
  10. We just found a tachinid fly today August 10 2013. In Grande prairie Alberta. It’s a rainy day and plus 19. Found him flying around the trees on the side of the house.
    Interesting looking Fly. We didn’t know what it was would like to learn more about it.

    Reply
  11. Hi guys
    We have just seen a specimen of above at Mt Wellington , Tasmania 22/01/14.
    We took photos for reference but other information is scant. We found an image of Amphibolia vidua by John Gardner taken at Oyster Bay 01/13 on Insects of Tasmania, but to my eyes, although similar, the markings are substantially different. I don’t think they’re the same. Maybe a subspecies?

    Reply
    • Um, thanks for the glib reply ‘bugman’. I’m quite aware of the myriad possibilities. That wasn’t much help to a genuine enquiry. To reiterate, the fly we snapped is IDENTICAL to Dee Stephens. photo. The specimen photographed by John Gardner AND LISTED as A.vidula has similar but definitely DIFFERENT markings.
      Therefore , either John’s specimen has been mislabeled, or Dee’s & OUR specimen is NOT A.vidula. Obviously it’s likely to be a related species so, what is it? Any Entymologists around?

      Reply
  12. Hi guys
    We have just seen a specimen of above at Mt Wellington , Tasmania 22/01/14.
    We took photos for reference but other information is scant. We found an image of Amphibolia vidua by John Gardner taken at Oyster Bay 01/13 on Insects of Tasmania, but to my eyes, although similar, the markings are substantially different. I don’t think they’re the same. Maybe a subspecies?

    Reply
    • Um, thanks for the glib reply ‘bugman’. I’m quite aware of the myriad possibilities. That wasn’t much help to a genuine enquiry. To reiterate, the fly we snapped is IDENTICAL to Dee Stephens. photo. The specimen photographed by John Gardner AND LISTED as A.vidula has similar but definitely DIFFERENT markings.
      Therefore , either John’s specimen has been mislabeled, or Dee’s & OUR specimen is NOT A.vidula. Obviously it’s likely to be a related species so, what is it? Any Entymologists around?

      Reply
  13. I just want to clarify my mistake, FWIW. This particular critter was photographed a few miles from where I originally indicated – at Tanglewood Preserve in Lakeview/Rockville Centre, NY, not Oceanside.

    Reply
  14. Hello Drhoz

    Here is a link to Formosia Speciosa – that, and Amphibolia Vidua both occur in Australia, and both in Tasmania. The one I photographed is Amphibolia Vidua (2 dots on white strip on abdomen); Formosia Speciosa has 1 dot on the white strip, with a couple of extensions from its white band towards its ‘tail’, and its eyes are closer together.
    I have posted my photo here a little earlier, but being all new here, only got here because I was looking to identify ‘my’ fly, I don’t know where it would have ended up.
    cheerio
    Marlies

    Reply
  15. Hello Drhoz

    Here is a link to Formosia Speciosa – that, and Amphibolia Vidua both occur in Australia, and both in Tasmania. The one I photographed is Amphibolia Vidua (2 dots on white strip on abdomen); Formosia Speciosa has 1 dot on the white strip, with a couple of extensions from its white band towards its ‘tail’, and its eyes are closer together.
    I have posted my photo here a little earlier, but being all new here, only got here because I was looking to identify ‘my’ fly, I don’t know where it would have ended up.
    cheerio
    Marlies

    Reply
  16. Hi there – 🙂 well … ‘Marlies’ is a Dutch name, that’s how my father named me, but ‘Bugmann’ is a Swiss name. The lady who submitted the mantis post is not me, she is Dutch.

    My post – an identification request – was titled ‘Bristle Fly / Tachinid Fly / Amphibolia vidua?’ and read:
    Hello – On Tuesday, 9 Dec 2014, my husband photographed this blowfly sitting above the headlight of our car. It took me several days to get to here, to see similar photos of this fly. Has anyone definitely identified it yet? Gosh …

    (that was before I found out what I know now).

    And I sent the photo with it (I would send it again, but I cannot see an upload to this response window). Your auto responder sent me a reply, it also sent me a reply to my second post, which read thus:
    Dear Sirs – I think this http://biocache.ala.org.au/occurrences/1f1319a4-d231-4b1c-acf2-86627aff3fb9;jsessionid=9203058C513D7BAD7223F7123AD42FA6 could also be relevant to identifying that ‘Bristle Fly’ or otherwise – the Formosia Speciosa.

    I do apologise if I confuse everyone, the cyber world confuses me at times.

    Anyway, what I’ve been able to ‘snoop and deduce’ is that Amphibolia vidua has 2 black dots on the white band [and even if they join, they still are identifyable as 2], and Formosia Specia has one black dot on the white band, with 2 white extensions towards the fly’s tail. Their eyes are set differently, too. Both occur in Tasmania, and Australian mainland.

    cheers from down under
    Marlies Bugmann

    Reply
  17. Hi there – 🙂 well … ‘Marlies’ is a Dutch name, that’s how my father named me, but ‘Bugmann’ is a Swiss name. The lady who submitted the mantis post is not me, she is Dutch.

    My post – an identification request – was titled ‘Bristle Fly / Tachinid Fly / Amphibolia vidua?’ and read:
    Hello – On Tuesday, 9 Dec 2014, my husband photographed this blowfly sitting above the headlight of our car. It took me several days to get to here, to see similar photos of this fly. Has anyone definitely identified it yet? Gosh …

    (that was before I found out what I know now).

    And I sent the photo with it (I would send it again, but I cannot see an upload to this response window). Your auto responder sent me a reply, it also sent me a reply to my second post, which read thus:
    Dear Sirs – I think this http://biocache.ala.org.au/occurrences/1f1319a4-d231-4b1c-acf2-86627aff3fb9;jsessionid=9203058C513D7BAD7223F7123AD42FA6 could also be relevant to identifying that ‘Bristle Fly’ or otherwise – the Formosia Speciosa.

    I do apologise if I confuse everyone, the cyber world confuses me at times.

    Anyway, what I’ve been able to ‘snoop and deduce’ is that Amphibolia vidua has 2 black dots on the white band [and even if they join, they still are identifyable as 2], and Formosia Specia has one black dot on the white band, with 2 white extensions towards the fly’s tail. Their eyes are set differently, too. Both occur in Tasmania, and Australian mainland.

    cheers from down under
    Marlies Bugmann

    Reply
  18. You’re welcome. Would you like me to reupload the ‘request for ID’ picture? Or would you be happy to lift it from the facebook album? I don’t mind either way. This photo, which my husband took (he gives permission to use – and for copyright completeness I should really state his name, David Irwin), shows great detail in the face of the fly. I have several images, as the fly stayed put, no matter how close we came. Though we couldn’t get too close, because on that occasion, he had the large 600mm zoom mounted and needed to get a few metres away for it to focus. It also had a very deep hum when it eventually flew off (when I went to compare size to my thumb). However, the one posted on fb (and vanised here) is the clearest. Handholding a heavy zoom lense is difficult.
    cheers
    Marlies

    Reply
  19. You’re welcome. Would you like me to reupload the ‘request for ID’ picture? Or would you be happy to lift it from the facebook album? I don’t mind either way. This photo, which my husband took (he gives permission to use – and for copyright completeness I should really state his name, David Irwin), shows great detail in the face of the fly. I have several images, as the fly stayed put, no matter how close we came. Though we couldn’t get too close, because on that occasion, he had the large 600mm zoom mounted and needed to get a few metres away for it to focus. It also had a very deep hum when it eventually flew off (when I went to compare size to my thumb). However, the one posted on fb (and vanised here) is the clearest. Handholding a heavy zoom lense is difficult.
    cheers
    Marlies

    Reply
    • Since we cannot locate your original submission, please resubmit images using our standard form which may be accessed by clicking the Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site. Please include any information you would like to appear with the image as people might not refer to the extensive comments you made on a distinctly different posting. Please include a clear subject line like “Tachinid Fly from Australia” or something similar to get our attention.

      Reply
  20. Hello – doing so at present. Hope it goes through this time – have taken a screen shot of the submit window, just in case.
    Cheers
    Marlies

    Reply
  21. Hello – doing so at present. Hope it goes through this time – have taken a screen shot of the submit window, just in case.
    Cheers
    Marlies

    Reply
  22. OH, MY … I’ve written ‘size of a human thumb – of course it is not – it is approximately the size of a human THUMB NAIL … feet and wingtips probably protruding a little further. But it is not the size of a human ‘thumb’. With all this back and forth, I’ve outsmarted myself and this typo sneaked in – would you please correct it? Thanks.

    cheerio
    Marlies

    Reply
  23. OH, MY … I’ve written ‘size of a human thumb – of course it is not – it is approximately the size of a human THUMB NAIL … feet and wingtips probably protruding a little further. But it is not the size of a human ‘thumb’. With all this back and forth, I’ve outsmarted myself and this typo sneaked in – would you please correct it? Thanks.

    cheerio
    Marlies

    Reply
  24. Do these flies bite, sting, or leave prongs in a person? I stepped on something looking like this on a Florida beach and had to pull a long stinger or prong out of my foot…boy it hurt and itches. My foot swelled up, it was awful! The swelling has subsided but it still itches and is still irritated more than a week after! What to do?

    Reply
  25. Is there something similar found on the Florida coast that may have thorns or stingers? It was black, fuzzy, and had re on its hind side under the black. It was stuck in my foot and left a large hole and swelled across the whole arch and bottom of the foot. Any suggestions?
    Thank you

    Reply
  26. Is there something similar found on the Florida coast that may have thorns or stingers? It was black, fuzzy, and had re on its hind side under the black. It was stuck in my foot and left a large hole and swelled across the whole arch and bottom of the foot. Any suggestions?
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Tachinid Flies are found across North America and in much of the world. We do not believe your injury was due to a Tachinid Fly.

      Reply
  27. out of the corner of my eye this morning i saw something round, black and fuzzy flit into a flowering hanging bush then it disappeared. i thought’wow that is a big bee’. how big is this fly?

    Reply
  28. We just found one in our back yard. We liv in central Alberta and never seen this before. Do they sting or bite? Very allergic to bug bites.

    Reply
  29. They have something to do with a fungal, bacterial, parasitic, biofilm infection that is affecting 97% of the American population, as well as other countries. Its a new global problem. Look up unknown disease mites, itchy skin parasites. I have a page on my facebook page,, It is a petition on the Center for Disease Control website regarding this, with hundreds of peoples pleas, and stories of these microscopic , insects. Please if you wish I can send the link, or you can go to my fb page and check it out. Margaret Vance. Dallas, Tx

    Reply
  30. I was just bit or stung by one of these flies. We were driving with our windows down in Oregon and it must have gotten caught in my shirt. I leaned back and it bit/ stung me 3 times before I got out out off my shit. The “bites” were like a sting from a yellow jacket. It left 3 painful welts on my back. I identified it easily as the bee-like tachinid fly….small, rust-colored fuzz with black wings. I’m sure he was defending himself, but they are really big welts for such a tiny fuzz-ball of a fly!

    Reply
  31. I just seen one of these bee like tachinid fly’s where i work . it scared me it looks prehistoric. I have to work in the room where i saw it . i don’t want to get stung while im working. Is this bee/ fly aggressive? Or will it leave you alone?

    Reply
    • Thanks Cesar.
      We have noticed that in some browsers, especially Safari, that happens. We will try to look into this matter.
      Thanks for the Tachinid link. We will update the posting with your information.

      Reply
  32. I have just seen one of these up loudoun hill in Ayrshire Scotland and been searching everywhere for what it is . Any idea anyone.

    Reply
  33. while rearing snowberry clearing moths i accidentally reared 4 of these flies i dicovered allot about them i was wondering how much was already known and dose this fly have a common name i tried and i cant find allot of info about it

    Reply
  34. I had about 7 flies appear over night in my bathroom. Never had this kind before. All were the same. They were large dark and spikey. Pretty scary looking. We live in the country, our neighbor’s have horses but never saw this kind of a fly out here before, we have lived out here for 30 years. This summer was very hot, 110 or more. We live in Arizona. Would like to find out what type of fly it was. Do you have any idea ?

    Reply
  35. My dad was bitten by something like this, but he has never seen this until today. I cant find anything about these flies. If it helps my dad says it was painful but it stopped after 30 minutes I think? We live in central Europe.

    Reply
  36. I vote Fungus….Ive seen 2 that I remember and they are always dead. Went out on my deck for coffee this morning and 1 laying on the table, nothing around it, dead.

    Reply

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