Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar: Quick and Essential Guide

The sycamore tussock moth caterpillar is a fascinating creature you may come across in your garden or on a nature walk. Belonging to the genus Halysidota and species Halysidota harrisii, these caterpillars are known for their unique appearance and interesting life cycle. Let’s dive in and learn more about this amazing species.

In their early stages, caterpillars of the sycamore tussock moth feed on leaves and can be easily spotted by their distinct tufts of white and black hairs (setae). As they grow, these caterpillars continue to be solitary feeders or form small groups, eventually reaching a mature stage where they are ready to transform into moths. Adult sycamore tussock moths are typically hairy and showcase subdued colors, such as shades of brown, gray, or white, which help them blend in with their surroundings.

Now that you have an idea about the sycamore tussock moth caterpillar and its life cycle, it’s important to learn how to identify them in their natural habitat. By understanding their unique characteristics, you can appreciate their role in the ecosystem and take proper measures to conserve these beautiful creatures.

An Overview of the Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

The Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar, also known as Halysidota harrisii, is a unique and fascinating creature. It’s commonly found feeding on sycamore trees, but can also be found on other trees like hickory and oak.

Some key features of this caterpillar include:

  • Hairy body with tufts of hairs on its back
  • Distinctive coloring: black head, white and yellow body
  • Can cause allergic reactions or irritation to some people due to their hairs

To recognize a Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar, you can look for its specific appearance in a photo or image, which will show its black head and unique tufts of hairs on its white and yellow body.

In addition, the Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar is also part of the broader Tussock Moth Caterpillar family. Here’s a comparison table to show you its similarities and differences with the related Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar:

Feature Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar
Scientific Name Halysidota harrisii Lophocampa caryae
Color Yellow, white, and black White and black
Habitat Sycamore, hickory, and oak trees Hickory and oak trees

While observing these intriguing caterpillars, be cautious as their hairs can cause itchiness and irritation. If you’re affected, remember to wash the area with soap and water to help alleviate any discomfort.

In conclusion, the Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar offers a captivating glimpse into the world of these tiny creatures. By studying their appearance, habitat, and relation to other tussock moths, you can expand your knowledge of these fascinating insects.

The Life Cycle of Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Eggs: The life cycle of the Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar begins when adult moths lay their eggs. You’ll find these clusters of up to 100 or more eggs on the underside of leaves 1.

Larva: Upon hatching, the young caterpillars feed gregariously on one or a few closely associated leaves. As they grow, they progress through various growth stages called instars. Eventually, older larvae become more solitary, feeding singly or in small groups.

Pupa: After completing their larval stages, sycamore tussock moth caterpillars enter the pupa stage, transforming within a cocoon. This is a resting phase as they metamorphose into adult moths.

Adult Moth: Once fully developed, the adult moths emerge from their cocoons to begin the mating process. This typically occurs once per year, with the adult moths flying between May and June2.

Some key characteristics of the sycamore tussock moth caterpillar’s life cycle include:

  • One generation per year
  • Multiple instars during larval stage
  • Mating and egg-laying in late spring to early summer

Comparing between the stages of their life cycle, you’ll find different features:

Stage Characteristics Duration
Eggs Cluster of up to 100 or more, on leaf undersides Short period
Larva Instars, gregarious to solitary feeding habits Until fully grown
Pupa Cocoon formation, resting phase Varies
Adult Moth Mating, egg-laying, one generation per year May-June2

Throughout their life cycle, sycamore tussock moth caterpillars transform from a cluster of eggs to active, feeding larvae, before pupating and emerging as adult moths ready to mate.

Physical Characteristics of the Caterpillar

Sycamore tussock moth caterpillars are unique in appearance. They have a combination of colors, including tan, white, blue, and brown. These caterpillars can be confused with the banded tussock moth, but there are differences that set them apart.

The sycamore tussock moth caterpillars exhibit distinct features, such as their long hairs or “pencils.” These pencils extend from the front and rear of their bodies, giving them a distinctive look. The caterpillar’s body is covered in short hairs, making them appear soft and fuzzy.

In contrast, the banded tussock moth has a different color pattern, which consists of yellow and black or brown bands. While they also have pencils, they are not as pronounced as those of the sycamore tussock moth caterpillars.

Here’s a comparison of the two caterpillars:

Feature Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar
Colors Tan, White, Blue, Brown Yellow, Black or Brown Bands
Pencils Prominent Less pronounced
Hair coverage on body Short hairs Medium length hairs

When fully grown, these caterpillars will turn into adult sycamore tussock moths with a wingspan of about 35-45mm. Remember to always be cautious around these insects; some people may experience skin irritation when coming in contact with the caterpillar’s hairs.

Habitat and Distribution of Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillars are found mostly in areas where their preferred host plant, the sycamore tree, is present. They have a wide habitat range, primarily in the eastern United States. You can find them in Maryland, particularly in places like Montgomery County.

These caterpillars are most active and feeding from July to September. Adults lay their eggs on the underside of sycamore leaves in clusters of 100 or more. As they grow, older larvae usually become more solitary in their feeding habits.

Sycamore trees provide a suitable environment for the larvae to thrive. They prefer moist areas near rivers, streams, and wooded lots. In addition, their habitat choice can be influenced by factors like climate, availability of host plants, and the presence of predators.

Some key features of the Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar habitat are:

  • Presence of sycamore trees
  • Eastern United States distribution
  • Active primarily from July to September
  • Proximity to rivers, streams, and wooded areas

Remember to pay attention to regional differences when observing these caterpillars. For instance, their population density might vary between a wooded area in Maryland versus a more urban setting like Montgomery County. Overall, understanding the Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar’s habitat and distribution can help you better identify them and contribute to their conservation.

Host Plants and Diet

The sycamore tussock moth caterpillar primarily feeds on the leaves of sycamore trees. These trees often serve as the main host plant for these caterpillars.

However, sycamore tussock moth caterpillars are not limited to sycamore trees. They may also feast on the foliage of other trees and shrubs. For instance, they can consume leaves from various hosts such as maple, oak, and elm trees.

As they eat leaves, the caterpillars enjoy both young and mature foliage. They tend to prefer tender shoots and newly emerged leaves.

Be mindful of nectar sources nearby, as adult sycamore tussock moths may visit them. The nectar serves as an energy source critical for their survival and reproduction.

To sum it up, the diet of sycamore tussock moth caterpillars is versatile. While they mostly feed on sycamore trees, they can also consume the foliage of other tree species and shrubs. Adult moths, on the other hand, depend on nectar as their primary food source.

Interaction with Human and Wildlife

Sycamore tussock moth caterpillars can be quite a nuisance for both humans and wildlife. Here are some of the ways they interact with their surroundings:

  • Damage: The caterpillars can cause defoliation of trees since they feed on the leaves. This affects both the health of the trees and the overall appearance of the affected areas.

  • Pest: While they typically don’t cause widespread destruction, in some cases, they can become a pest, especially when their population grows rapidly. However, it’s important to remember that they are usually managed naturally by diseases, parasites, and predators.

  • Wildlife: The sycamore tussock moth caterpillar is a source of food for many birds and small mammals. Their presence can indirectly affect the ecosystem they live in.

  • Rash: Be careful when handling these caterpillars, as their hairs can cause an allergic rash if you come into contact with their hairs. It’s always best to avoid touching them.

To sum it up, sycamore tussock moth caterpillars can be both a nuisance and an essential part of the ecosystem. While they may cause some damage, they also contribute to the food chain and help maintain a balance in nature. Just remember to keep your distance when you encounter them to avoid any skin irritation.

Prevention and Control Measures

When dealing with sycamore tussock moth caterpillars, it’s essential to take appropriate prevention and control measures. Here are some brief recommendations to help you manage their presence:

Physical Removal

If you encounter a small number of caterpillars, you can manually remove them. Wear gloves to avoid skin irritation from their hairs. Use a stick or a soft brush to gently lift them off the plants and place them in a container for relocation or disposal.

Insecticides

For larger infestations, consider using a natural insecticide like Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis). This bacterial insecticide targets caterpillars and is less harmful to beneficial insects. Apply the Bt product according to the manufacturer’s instructions for the best results.

Biological Control

Encourage natural predators in your garden, such as birds and parasitic wasps, to help control caterpillar populations. Provide a water source, shelter, and plants that attract these beneficial creatures.

To summarize, managing sycamore tussock moth caterpillars involves a combination of physical removal, insecticides, and biological control. Be vigilant and take appropriate measures to prevent these caterpillars from damaging your plants. Remember to always follow the recommended guidelines when using any pesticide or insecticide to ensure the safety of you, your plants, and the environment.

The Role of Predators and Natural Enemies

In the life of a sycamore tussock moth caterpillar, predators and natural enemies play a crucial part in maintaining balance within the ecosystem. These natural enemies help reduce the population of pests like the sycamore tussock moth caterpillar. Let’s dive into the role of predators in the caterpillar’s life.

Predators

  • Birds: They are an important predator of the caterpillar. Birds like chickadees feed on it.
  • Insects: Various insects, such as parasitic wasps, attack and feed on the caterpillar.

These predators help control the sycamore tussock moth caterpillar population. By preying on these pests, they aid in decreasing the damage they cause to trees and plants.

Now, let’s compare the impact of these predators on the ecosystem.

Predators Pros Cons
Birds Efficient in controlling caterpillars Might not target specific pest species
Insects Target specific pests Can be susceptible to pesticides

While birds and insects can help regulate the caterpillar population, it’s essential to remember that ecosystems are delicate. Preserving these natural enemies is key for a balanced and thriving environment.

By understanding the role of predators and natural enemies, you can better appreciate the significance they hold in the life of sycamore tussock moth caterpillars and the wider ecosystem. Remember to consider the importance of these beneficial species while managing your garden or outdoor space.

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar in Popular Culture

You might be surprised to find that the Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar has made its presence felt in popular culture. While it might not have a starring role in movies or music, this fascinating creature has certainly caught the attention of many, thanks to its unique appearance and behavior.

For instance, it has inspired artists and designers and even become a popular subject in macro photography. Many photographers are attracted to the caterpillar’s unusual features, like the tufts of hair and their vibrant colors. You can find multiple images and discussions around the Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar on nature and photography websites.

Here are some key features of the Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar that have made it popular:

  • Distinctive hair tufts
  • Bold coloration
  • Unique patterns

While the Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar may not have achieved the fame of other insects like the Monarch Butterfly, it still plays an essential role in ecosystems. It’s important to remember that this little creature contributes to our world’s biodiversity both in terms of its fascinating appearance and its ecological impact. So next time someone brings up the Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar, you’ll have a little insight into its pop culture connections and significance!

Footnotes

  1. Penn State Extension

  2. Ohio State University 2

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

 

caterpillars
Hi! I found your site several weeks ago after my arm grazed a Saddleback Caterpillar. After several minutes of frantic searching, certain that the bubbling flesh sensation on my arm was a harbinger of death, I was relieved to learn that the toxin is usually just a nuisance. Discovering that there are so many bizarre caterpillars that I?ve never seen before helped me deal with the discomfort of the sting. Since then, I?ve used your site for a few other identifications. Here?s a caterpillar I came across yesterday. It looked rather like the Tussock Moth caterpillars pictured on your site, but not quite. After delving deeper into the Tussock category, I believe it?s a Sycamore Tussock Caterpillar. I don?t think you have a picture of this particular variety. I?m still having trouble identifying this rust-colored caterpillar that looks like it has facial hair. After viewing all of your caterpillar shots, I think it’s vaguely Dagger-ish, but I’m not convinced. Any ideas? I live in southern Maryland. Thanks so much for your great work!
~MM
PS– On the camera front: I?ve also learned that my Cannon Powershot is great for many things, but shooting moving fuzzy caterpillars is not among its strengths. So far, nothing holds a candle to my old Pentax K-1000.

Hi MN,
Thanks for sending us an image of the Sycamore Tussock Moth, Halysidota harrisii. Researching its scientific name led us to a caterpillar site we hadn’t visited before, Tom Murray’s Moth Caterpillars. We agree your other caterpillar is probably a Dagger Moth, but the photo is quite blurry.

Letter 2 – Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

 

Caterpillar Photos
Hello,
I am an avid insect, bug and caterpillar photographer and I really enjoy your sight. I have a 13 month old son who also loves to help me with my pictures. He is fascinated with bugs and is really the reason I began photographing them. Well, I live in San Antonio Texas and have seen most everything but this caterpillar is a new one and I really hope that you can identify it. Unfortunately in our bug exploration, my son was stung by this critter leaving a nasty mark. It was swollena dn nasty for a few days but started getting better until this morning and it’s getting angry red again. I’m afraid it’s some spines trying to work their way out. The doctor said he was fine but I’d like to do some research myself. Any info you may have regarding this fuzzy little guy would be greatly appreciated. As you can see, this one is right next to the door handle of my front door so they are definitely a presence in and around our home so they have me a little worried. I never kill them but would love to know and warnings to assist in my relocation efforts. Thank you in advance for any info you may have. Respectfully,
DanCee Bowers
San Antonio, Texas

Hi DanCee,
We believe this is a Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar, Halysidota harrisii. It matches images found on BugGuide, but there is no mention of it being a stinging caterpillar. We do not have time right now to research its reputation as a stinging caterpillar, but perhaps knowing its name will lead you to the information you desire.

Update: (11/03/2007) Regarding Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar — stinging?
Hi Daniel and Lisa,
In the post you have on the Sycamore Tussock Moth caterpillar from 10/30, Ms. Bowers asks about the caterpillar stinging because it caused some irritation to her son. I’ve found this fairly informative page from Auburn University Entomology Department that gives some very good general information on how caterpillars sting and then lists both stinging and non-stinging caterpillars that can be found in Alabama. Obviously many of the ones cited can also be found elsewhere. Interestingly, the Sycamore Tussock is listed as one of the non-stinging ones. Here’s the webpage: http://www.ag.auburn.edu/enpl /bulletins/caterpillar/caterpillar.htm#the%20sycamore Best regards,
Stefanie Graves
Paducah, KY

Letter 3 – Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

 

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar?
Location:  Suburb North of Atlanta, GA
September 20, 2010 9:28 am
Thanks to your site I think I’ve identified this as a Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar. We’ve seen many of these all over the place this summer. They’re hard to photograph; they don’t like to be still.
Also I’ve seen something very similar to this but with more black than orange hairs spiking out. Is it a variation of the same creature?
Signature:  Resa

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Hi again Resa,
We are quite happy to hear that you successfully self identified your Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota harrisii, which is profiled on BugGuide.  The closely related Pale Tussock Moth or Banded Tussock Moth, Halysidota tessellaris, has a caterpillar with black tufts instead of orange tufts and it also is a local species for you.  It is also profiled on BugGuide.

Letter 4 – Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar with Parasitoid Pupae

 

Subject: Is this an American Daggar Moth Caterpillar?
Location: Cleveland, OH
August 8, 2014 5:28 pm
I have seen so many of these caterpillars this year in my backyard! I think this is an American Dagger Moth Caterpillar, but why does it have these weird things on its back? All of these caterpillars are surrounding my pool and sometimes fall in.
Signature: MissX

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar with Parasitoid Pupae
Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar with Parasitoid Pupae

Dear MissX,
In our opinion, this is a Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota harrisii, and it is host to the pupae of a parasitoid wasp, most likely a Braconid.  Parasitoid Wasps are often very host specific, preying upon a single species or genus.  Parasitoids feed on the internal organs of the host species, eventually killing the host.  See this matching image on BugGuide and this matching image on BugGuide.

Letter 5 – Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

 

Subject: caterpillar
Location: NJ coast on a picnic table
December 19, 2015 10:39 am
I haven’t been able to ID this one
Signature: DaveN

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar
Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear DaveN,
This is a Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota harrisii, and you can verify its identity on BugGuide.

 

Letter 6 – Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

 

Subject:  Southwest va caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Natural tunnel state park
Date: 09/09/2017
Time: 08:13 PM EDT
Is this poisonous?
How you want your letter signed:  Chrystal Brewer

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Chrystal,
BugGuide does not provide any information on Sycamore Tussock Caterpillars having any stinging or utricating hairs.  According to Ohio Birds and Biodiversity:  “Sycamore Tussocks are interesting in that they have great color variation – one might think these were two separate species. A crop of eggs can produce caterpillars that range from lemon-yellow to gray to white.”

Letter 7 – Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

 

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Waxhaw, NC
Date: 09/08/2018
Time: 04:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw it in some fresh laid hay used by our groundskeeper.
How you want your letter signed:  KathyS

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear KathyS,
This is a Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota harrisii, and here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

35 thoughts on “Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar: Quick and Essential Guide”

  1. I wouldn’t think that these guys sting. I pick them up whenever I see them on the table outside, and move them to a bush. Even the banded ones.
    They seem like harmless little pipe cleaners to me. 🙂

    Reply
    • They DO stimg and it hurts. We have a very old Sycamore tree in our back yard and they are, it seems, everywhere. We have to check our lawn chairs before sitting down. RIght now they are small but last year, the one that stung me, was about and inch plus long.

      Reply
  2. I can assure you that the Sycamore Tussock Caterpillar most definitely stings. I am sitting right now with a itchy rash on my neck that is as large as your hand. I felt something that I thought was a hair on my neck and reached up to remove it. When I touched it, it was this caterpillar. Of course, not knowing what it was, I grabbed and threw it on the floor. It stung me. That was five days ago. It also caused hay fever like symptoms of sneezing and runny nose. I have since found their cocoon in the sycamore tree.

    Reply
    • Thank you for supplying this information. Many creatures have utricating hairs that can cause a skin reaction, though in your case, the reaction sounds even more severe. We don’t normally link to wikipedia, but in the Utricating Hair posting has some helpful information. Perhaps there was an allergic reaction as well.

      Reply
  3. I have 2 really big sycamore trees in my yard and these guys are all over the place. When I pick them up they curl into a ball. I’ve not been stung by one. Are they harmful to the trees? Do they or don’t they sting? I don’t kill them but now after reading that some people got stung by them it might be game on. I live in Pennsylvania.

    Reply
    • BugGuide which is generally good about informing about which caterpillars sting does not indicate that this is a stinging species. BugGuide also indicates: “Natural enemies control populations. Pesticides may be needed in some cases.” If you do not have an epidemic, it seems the use of pesticides would likely do more harm than good.

      Reply
    • I got stung by one almost a month ago i broke out in hives all down my left arm and across my upper back. I read that they will eat a sycamore tree as well. I am currently tryin to find away to get rid of them. They are getting in the house and everywhere.

      Reply
  4. hello my names steven. i actually found a sycamore tussock caterpillar in the park just about weeks back. i brought it home in a small cup until i bought a little cage to where i actually saw it turning itself into a cocoon the same day. now ive checked online and everywhere else and i cant find how long does it take to hatch or if im supposed to do anything so it can hatch and what not. i was hoping you can give me some type of answer? please

    Reply
  5. We noticed a very similar caterpillar today–near a sycamore tree. It had many more egg-type sacs on it. They almost looked hollow. Could the wasps have hatched? Near Indianapolis, 9/4/14
    Zionsville, In

    Reply
  6. We noticed a very similar caterpillar today–near a sycamore tree. It had many more egg-type sacs on it. They almost looked hollow. Could the wasps have hatched? Near Indianapolis, 9/4/14
    Zionsville, In

    Reply
  7. I had one of these critters fall from our sycamore tree onto my upper arm….I brushes it away when I felt the nettles. I was swollen and broken out for about 2 weeks…..even a few areas underneath my clothing. I am afraid to even walk under the tree now, as we are still seeing these caterpillars. Maybe I had an unusually bad reaction, but they do seem to have some sort of toxin.

    Reply
  8. They don’t ‘bite’ or ‘sting’ in the traditional sense. When they feel threatened, they drop their hairs, which have a compound on them that can make you break out in hives. How do I know? I live in Alabama, I have a huge sycamore tree in my yard, we are overrun with these caterpillars, I have suffered the rash, and I have a Master’s degree in biology. So I’m sorry, but BugGuide is wrong.
    (One fell from the roof of my porch into the collar of my shirt. By the time I got it off, it had spread the hairs down the side of my neck and across my collarbone. It initially felt like needles, and then was angry and itchy for several more days.)

    Reply
  9. They don’t ‘bite’ or ‘sting’ in the traditional sense. When they feel threatened, they drop their hairs, which have a compound on them that can make you break out in hives. How do I know? I live in Alabama, I have a huge sycamore tree in my yard, we are overrun with these caterpillars, I have suffered the rash, and I have a Master’s degree in biology. So I’m sorry, but BugGuide is wrong.
    (One fell from the roof of my porch into the collar of my shirt. By the time I got it off, it had spread the hairs down the side of my neck and across my collarbone. It initially felt like needles, and then was angry and itchy for several more days.)

    Reply
  10. I can tell you they sting. I have a documented series of pictures to show. A year has gone by and neither of my sting sites have healed 100%. Nasty creatures. Er visit with a shot and oral steroids following second sting. Third sting tonight.

    Reply
  11. One got on my neck 5 weeks ago. I’m still trying to get rid of the rash. I’ve tried several allery medications with no luck. Doctor prescribed a steroidal cream-but after a week of using the cream, the rash still exists. The itching has subsided somewhat but the welts are still on my neck. Not sure what to do next. I’m almost resigned to live with it.

    Reply
  12. Just got stung by one of these tonight. I was mowing through a line of 20 large sycamore trees up a long driveway. I’ve mowed that property hundreds of times now and never had a problem. I’ve even held those caterpillars without a problem. Tonight I pushed a low branch aside and as it rubbed across my torso I was stung in the leg, arm, and stomach! It felt like multiple wasp stings fairly immediately and grew stronger for about a minute. An hour later and the pain is subsided but a burning rash remains at all three spots.

    Reply
  13. How can I get rid of them they are clinging to the side of my house can’t find cacoon have 3 sycamore trees what pesticide will work.

    Reply
  14. Dad’s an old farmer. He said they definitely sting but he’s only experienced it if they get in your clothing or if they are pinched.

    Reply
  15. I got stung, or fuzzed, or nettled, whatever you want to call it as it walked across my neck. Got a terrible rash and came and went for 4 months, but not quite as bad in the last months. The following day I broke out in a terrible itching painful burning rash, put salve on it to relieve the pain. Doc prescribed antihistimine but I stopped taking it after a month, as it had little affect.

    Reply
  16. I have collected some tussock moths from guava plant. I reared it and found parasitoid those had long filliform antennae. Abdomen consists of 11 segmented with alternate white and black colored segments alternately. Please try to send me the name of parasitoid

    Reply
  17. I found one on my neck after it had been crawling for a couple inches. I felt the tickle and wiped it off and through it on the ground. The next day I broke out in a burning, red rash all over the back of my neck. I don’t think it stings; I believe it leaves some type of fluid or acid on the skin from its underside. I used antihistimine tablets and also salve to stop the burning. But the rash lasted a month, and continued to reappear for 3 more months! Some people may not be allergic to it.

    Reply
  18. The DO NOT STING! They are NOT harmful to the trees.
    Their hairs are indeed irritating, a possible defense against predators.
    They are NOT venomous, in the way of the Saddleback caterpillar, Slug Moth caterpillar, or the IO Moth caterpillar. However, if you press the hairs into yourself, they will irritate, and cause a histamine reaction. Happened to me last summer.
    They are not dangerous to people, pets, trees, or anything.

    Reply
  19. The DO NOT STING! They are NOT harmful to the trees.
    Their hairs are indeed irritating, a possible defense against predators.
    They are NOT venomous, in the way of the Saddleback caterpillar, Slug Moth caterpillar, or the IO Moth caterpillar. However, if you press the hairs into yourself, they will irritate, and cause a histamine reaction. Happened to me last summer.
    They are not dangerous to people, pets, trees, or anything.

    Reply

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