Is Vine Hawk Moth Caterpillar Dangerous? Truth Revealed

Vine Hawk moths are beautiful creatures with streaks of silver on their back. They are excellent pollinators and do not cause humans any harm. But is vine hawk mouth caterpillar dangerous? Let’s find out.

You can find vine hawk moths predominantly in Africa, Europe, Asia, and Australia.

These moths belong to the Sphingidae family and are also called silver-striped hawk moths due to the intricate silver-colored markings on their long bodies.

They are the object of attention for many collectors of creepy crawlies.

While the adult moths are harmless, the caterpillars can cause severe damage to host plants. Let’s understand what harm they do and what you can do about it.

However, unlike dragonflies, lacewings keep their wings folded over their backs. These insects earn their name from the veins that crisscross their transparent wings to create a lacy appearance.

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What Is This Bug?

Vine hawk moths (Hippotion celerio) belong to the Lepidoptera order of the Insecta class in the Sphingidae family.

This is one of the largest families of moths in the world, and people usually know them as sphinx moths or hawk moths. The family has as many as 1,450 moth species under it.

Vine Hawk moths are one of the few that do well in captivity; therefore, many people breed them as pets.

These moths are usually crepuscular (nocturnal); their feeding and other activities happen at night. During the day, they like to spend time resting on grass, walls, or rocks.

They are good flyers and look somewhat like hummingbirds when flying. They have a long mouthpart for sucking nectar from flowers which looks almost like a hummingbird’s beak.

As adults, their primary food is nectar from flowers, and this also makes them excellent pollinators that are beneficial to plants.

Unfortunately, these bugs are notorious pests in their larval stage. They infest and defoliate plants like impatiens and grapevines.

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Where Does It Come From?

Vine hawk moths are natives of countries that fall in tropical climates of Asia and Africa. They are migratory and move to southern Europe or Australia during summers.

You can often find these moths in gardens and parks, fluttering near flowers. They are also common in the natural wilderness and the edges of woodlands and grasslands.

Is Vine Hawk Moth Caterpillar Dangerous?
Adult Vine Hawk Moth

What Does It Look Like?

Adult hawk moths are brown. Their forewings have light brown stripes, with the color getting lighter near the edges. The hind wings have additional reddish-brown markings.

The average wingspan of the moth is between 2.3 – 3 inches.

The hawk moth larvae start out as small and green but later grow to become quite big. Their colors change to brown, red, or gray as they age.

There are two pairs of distinctive eye spots on these caterpillars’ first and second abdominal segments.

The large eyespots on the vine hawk moth caterpillar look almost like eyes

While the first eyespot is large and very clearly visible, the second eye spot is smaller.

The eye spots are a defense mechanism against predators, who get confused when they see the large eyes.

The rest of the abdominal segments have lines across the body, and the tail has a horn-like appendage curved backward.

The larvae can grow up to as long as 3 inches. Towards their final instar stages, they start to become browner, and the pupae are completely light brown.

Is It Dangerous?

Adult hawk moths are not dangerous for either humans or animals; they are neither venomous nor do they bite. However, if you ingest one by mistake, you might need medical attention.

The caterpillars are also non-venomous, but gardeners see them as pests because of their huge appetites. They can completely defoliate plants and destroy crops.

Can It Sting or Bite?

This species of moth do not have a mouth as adults; hence they cannot bite anything, let alone humans.

However, the caterpillar can sting you in the larval stage and cause skin irritation. Remember: stings are not the same as bites; bites are only caused when an insect uses its mouth.

These caterpillars have stinging hairs on their bodies, which go away once they pupate.

Is It Poisonous or Venomous?

As mentioned earlier, neither adults nor larvae of hawk moths are poisonous or venomous.

The larvae have fine hairs, which can sting humans when we touch them. The stings can cause minor localized swelling and red bumps that last only a few minutes to hours.

Is It Harmful to Plants?

As adults, hawk moths help sustain plants by pollination. When the adults feed on nectar, their haustellum (beak-like structure) collects pollen.

They can fly long distances and help spread the pollen. Research has shown that these moths can carry it as far as 18 miles!

On the other hand, hawk moth caterpillars are a pest for certain plants like tomatoes, potatoes, and even catalpa trees.

At its worst, this caterpillar can cause the following damage:

  • Stunted growth
  • Half eaten leaves
  • Defoliation
  • Chewed stems

However, the damage is often not as severe as other pests like aphids.

What Plants is it Attracted To?

Adult hawk moths are attracted to scented tubular flowers like Fuschia, carrot, wIllowherb, and papaya. Their flowers have ample nectar to suckle on.

Caterpillars are voracious eaters that primarily feed on foliage. Their common favorites include Himalayan balsam, willowherb, rosebay, bedstraw, grapevines, impatiens, and rumex plants.

How To Protect Your Crops Against This Caterpillar?

Hawk moth caterpillars can cause damage to your crop if they are left unchecked. It is important to identify the infestation before it is too late. Some of the common visible signs include

  • Stunted shoots that seem to have stopped growing.
  • You can spot small green larvae in clusters along the upper leaves of the plants.
  • Leaves have visible holes in them.

Here are a few ways you can control the spread of the damage.

  • If in small numbers, you can remove the larvae by hand and crush their heads manually.
  • Plowing the surrounding soil a few inches deep can expose the pupae. Predatory birds and insects will take care of the rest.
  • Natural pesticides like neem oil and Bacillus thuringiensis are also helpful in removing larvae without harming other insects.
  • Bio-pesticides include Pyrethrin, and Spinosad can also work on them.
  • Parasitoids like Snellenius hippotionus, Braconidae, and Palexorista sp can naturally eradicate the caterpillars.

If nothing else works, you might also turn to pesticides. Some common chemical pesticides used include 4%Phosalone, and 5% Malathion.

The first round of dusting is done a month after sowing, and the second phase is carried out 45 days after the first session.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are hawk moths harmless?

Yes, hawk moths are harmless to humans, pets, and other animals. These moths are non-venomous and non-poisonous. They even help pollinate plants.
However, hawk moth caterpillars are voracious eaters of foliage and can pose a threat to a few types of plants if left unchecked.

What does a vine hawk moth caterpillar eat?

Hawk moth caterpillars are known for feeding on plant leaves and can be seen on the underside of the leaves during day time.
They feed exclusively on plants like Himalayan balsam, willowherb, rosebay, and bedstraw. In gardens, these caterpillars are commonly seen attacking grapevine and Fuschia plants.

What eats hawk moth caterpillar?

Insects like ladybugs are commonly known to feed on caterpillars of any species. The ladybugs attack the larvae when they are small and have just hatched.
Braconid Wasps are among the most dangerous predators for hawk moth caterpillars as they use the moth larvae as an exclusive food source for their babies.

Do hawk moths bite or sting?

Hawk moth adults do not have a mouth to bite. While they do have a haustellum, it is not strong enough to bite. The caterpillars do not have a mouth to bite, either.
They are covered in fine hairs or stings that can cause skin irritation and rashes.

The Good Adults and the Naughty Kids!

Hawk moth adults are crucial for the survival of many plant species because of their excellent pollination abilities.

However, the vine hawk moth caterpillars can cause severe damage to some plants because they feed on their leaves.

Careful control can help utilize the species as pollinators while minimizing damage from them at the caterpillar stage. Thank you for reading!

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts

50 thoughts on “Is Vine Hawk Moth Caterpillar Dangerous? Truth Revealed”

  1. I have just found a Vine Hawkmoth in my Adelaide garden. I wondered if it pupated underground, as it seemed to want to stay on the earth. I had put it back on the vine, thinking it had fallen off.

    Reply
  2. In recent weeks, we have found 3 green Vine Hawkmoth caterpillars in our garden in Maida Vale WA, on our backdoor step courtesy of our retriever – barking & growling at them [presumably in an attempt to warn us of them!] Does anybody know what the adult moth looks like, please?

    Thanks.

    Reply
  3. In recent weeks, we have found 3 green Vine Hawkmoth caterpillars in our garden in Maida Vale WA, on our backdoor step courtesy of our retriever – barking & growling at them [presumably in an attempt to warn us of them!] Does anybody know what the adult moth looks like, please?

    Thanks.

    Reply
  4. Can anybody tell me if the colour of the Vine Hawkmoth caterpillar depend according to sub-specie, or if it is a matter of what it is currently feeding on; or it’s age/maturity? I’ve seen photos of both green or brown caterpillars but the moth itself would seem to be basically brown.
    Curious!

    Thank you; NB

    Reply
  5. Can anybody tell me if the colour of the Vine Hawkmoth caterpillar depend according to sub-specie, or if it is a matter of what it is currently feeding on; or it’s age/maturity? I’ve seen photos of both green or brown caterpillars but the moth itself would seem to be basically brown.
    Curious!

    Thank you; NB

    Reply
    • In our opinion, the coloration is individual variation as individuals feeding on the same plant can often be colored or marked differently.

      Reply
  6. Hi. We found these in our gum trees in Poukawa, Hastings, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand.

    Are they poisonous and what do they turn into?

    Reply
  7. Hi. We found these in our gum trees in Poukawa, Hastings, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand.

    Are they poisonous and what do they turn into?

    Reply
    • The Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar feeds on a wide variety of plants, according to Butterfly House, but that list does not include eucalyptus, so we suspect you have encountered a different species. Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillars are not poisonous, and they will eventually transform into adult Vine Hawkmoths.

      Reply
  8. I found one in southern coastal NSW in Australia and we do have an ornamental grape within close proximity to where I found it. I also found a smaller green one the following day with the same eye markings and spike on the end.

    Reply
  9. Wow!! Thank you for the explanation for this intriguing caterpillar. At lunch time, one almost fell on my cats head from the grape vine on the pergola. Mine has two large white eyes with a black oval center and above the eyes what looks like two little ears and a smiley mouth. It is an olive green colour and when I enlarge the photo you can see that the eyes are false because they have little dots on the black.

    Reply
  10. Have just identified one in our Tokay grapevine that protects the verandah from the western sun, in Malmsbury, central Victoria. While we are diligent in eradicating the young this one slipped by – a very impressive caterpillar.

    Reply
  11. I found one under my Big Pop’s grape vine in Melville Western Australia on 27/05/2017. The cat did not like it and flicked it away.

    Reply
  12. Found one yesterday in Joondalup WA! Freaked us out, but the curator of Entomology Museum of WA helped us out – and also sent us to this site!

    Reply
  13. My neighbour brought one over that she had discovered climbing up her leg. I put it on soft earth under a lillypilly close to our grapevines

    Reply
  14. Last year, I found one of these Hawkmoth Caterpillars on lower part of trellis frame. It seemed to be rather “groggy”, perhaps after gorging itself. As several leaves had been seriously nibbled, it was a very unwelcome visitor! I’ll be keeping a wary eye out this year.

    Reply
  15. Found six green Vine Hawkmoth caterpillars on our grape vine today in Perth, Western Australia! They are huge, the size of my little finger!

    Reply
  16. My son and I have just found one of these moths on our patio. Do you think it would be ok if built a terrarium or something for it so we can watch it go through it’s cycle?

    Reply
  17. I think I’ve found one in Woodvale Western Australia. No grape vine. Not much movement from the big fella.

    Reply
    • Typing “Vine Hawkmoth Australia” into our search engine will lead you here. There are numerous postings of the Caterpillar on our site, but this is likely our only image of an adult. We do not post images pilfered from the internet to our site. We rely solely on submitted images.

      Reply
  18. Hi Nadine, sorry about my late reply. We fed our caterpillars on grape vine leaves and butter leaf lettuce. They ate night and day. The very next day, 2 had turned brown. We thought they’d all died overnight as they had run out of food and were very still. However, they came back to life. Within a couple of days, all had turned brown. They remained active for a day but stopped eating, then wanted to make cocoons, so we had 2 per ice cream container half filled with shredded tissues and a few leaves and sticks. We put tiny holes in the lids and within about 3 weeks, they hatched into moths. It was a terrific experience for my daughter and I. I can’t seem to attach a photo, but the moth is brown, grey and white, with a little red under the wings. It’s about 3 1/2cm long.

    Reply
  19. Just found 15 if these on my grapevine, in central WA. Not much left of the vine! When touched the large ones spat out a green slime- revolting.

    Reply
  20. I have found a small colony of vine hawk moth caterpillers on my seedling grapevine (now leafless!)in Narrogin WA. I have housed them, for the last week, in a large balloon glass (size of a bucket) and they have grown very quickly. I clean them out everyday as the are so messy (but it shows they are feeding well). They nearly strip most of the grapeleaves I give them and also arum lily leaves. They do not seem keen on lettuce. Most are now turning brown although a couple are still green. It is fascinating to observe them.

    Reply
  21. Hi,
    Can someone please email/send me a link for vine hawk moth’s (brown form caterpillar) life cycle?
    I want to show this to my children in the kindergarten.

    Reply
  22. Hi,
    Can someone please email/send me a link for vine hawk moth’s (brown form caterpillar) life cycle?
    I want to show this to my children in the kindergarten.

    Reply
  23. I found a v large hawkmoth caterpillar just now Wed 7 jul 2021 4pm- nowhere near our grapevine. I’m in Perth metro.
    he’s in a jar and I hope he survives long enough until i can take him to my youngest grandson.
    what should I include in the jar with him?
    or is that wishful thinking—
    I recall saving one as a kid in SA where we called them grapevine caterpillars – developed into his flying form.
    today’s is as green as I recall the SA fatties.
    he was hiding in low-growing strappy plants where he could even lie underneath on the warm concrete; even tho it is raining on and off there has been enough sun for his ‘home’ to have warmed.
    from old gamma

    Reply
  24. I found a v large hawkmoth caterpillar just now Wed 7 jul 2021 4pm- nowhere near our grapevine. I’m in Perth metro.
    he’s in a jar and I hope he survives long enough until i can take him to my youngest grandson.
    what should I include in the jar with him?
    or is that wishful thinking—
    I recall saving one as a kid in SA where we called them grapevine caterpillars – developed into his flying form.
    today’s is as green as I recall the SA fatties.
    he was hiding in low-growing strappy plants where he could even lie underneath on the warm concrete; even tho it is raining on and off there has been enough sun for his ‘home’ to have warmed.
    from old gamma

    Reply
  25. Hi,
    We found one of those gorgeous, big, green, with white spots that look like eyes, Vine Hawkmoth caterpillar under our patio, in Karrinyup, Western Australia. We were amazed by it as it was the first time we ever saw one, so thanks to your website, we were able to identify it. It now lives in our Jasmin vine!

    Reply
  26. I have found two Vine Hawkmoths having a wonderful time on my Sultana vine. I was looking for the culprit who was eating the leaves and was shocked when I found them so big! My area is Park Holme, South Australia

    Reply

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