Indian Meal Moth Larvae vs Maggot: Decoding the Differences

Indian meal moth larvae and maggots are two commonly encountered pests in households. While they may appear similar to the untrained eye, the two organisms have distinct differences in their physical appearance, life cycles, and the types of food they infest. Knowing these differences can be crucial for effective pest control and prevention.

The Indian meal moth larvae are small, white, worm-like caterpillars that preferentially infest grain products, seeds, dried fruit, pet food, and spices. Mature larvae are cream-colored, and may vary in hue depending on their food source. In contrast, maggots are the larvae of flies and are often found in decomposing organic matter, such as spoiled food and garbage. Their appearance is more tapered and featureless compared to Indian meal moth larvae.

Some key differences between Indian meal moth larvae and maggots include their preferred habitats, the damage they cause to food items, and specific control measures needed. By being aware of these differences, homeowners can take appropriate steps to ensure their pantry items and living spaces remain clean and pest-free.

Indian Meal Moth Larvae and Maggot: An Overview

Identification and Characteristics

Indian Meal Moth Larvae:

  • Whitish larva with a brown head
  • 1/2 inch long
  • Can produce holes or webbing in packaging
  • Typically found in: grain products, seeds, dried fruit, dog food, spices

Maggots:

  • Legless, white or creamy
  • Can range from 1/8 inch to 1/2 inch long
  • Often found in decaying organic matter or near garbage

Here is a comparison table of Indian Meal Moth Larvae and Maggots:

Feature Indian Meal Moth Larvae Maggots
Size 1/2 inch long 1/8-1/2 inch
Head Color Brown N/A
Body Color Whitish White/Creamy
Preferred Habitat Stored food products Decaying matter

Life Cycle

Indian Meal Moth Larvae:

  • Larvae stage of the Indian meal moth (Plodia interpunctella)
  • General feeder; can infest food products
  • Larvae spin silk to form a cocoon
  • Transform into adults with reddish-copper colored wings

Maggots:

  • Larval stage of various flies and beetles
  • Feed on decaying organic matter
  • Develop into pupae and then adults

In conclusion, Indian meal moth larvae and maggots are quite different in their appearance, habitat, and role in their respective life cycles. While both are considered pests, they infest different areas and have distinct characteristics.

Indian Meal Moth vs Maggot: Infestations

Signs of Infestation

Indian Meal Moth:

  • Larvae produce webbing in infested foods.
  • Adult moths may fly around the house.

Maggot:

  • Visible in rotting foods/decaying matter.
  • Presence of adult flies near food sources.

Food Sources and Habitats

Indian Meal Moth:

  • Prefer grain products, dried fruits, seeds, spices, and pet food.
  • Often found in pantry and cupboards.

Maggot:

  • Feed on rotting food/decaying matter.
  • Commonly found in garbage or compost areas.

Indian Meal Moth and Maggot Comparison Table:

Feature Indian Meal Moth Maggot
Preferred food source Dry pantry items Rotting/decaying matter
Infestation area Pantry, cupboards Garbage, compost areas
Signs of Infestation Silk webbing, adult moths Visible larvae, adult flies
Temperature Warm environments Varied temperatures

Some characteristics of Indian Meal Moth Larvae:

  • White, worm-like caterpillars.
  • Crawl on walls or in food.
  • Leave behind webbing or silk.

Some characteristics of Maggots:

  • Small, soft-bodied, and white.
  • Worm-like appearance.
  • Found in wet and decaying environments.

A few pros and cons of Indian Meal Moth Larvae vs Maggots are:

Indian Meal Moth Larvae:

  • Pro: Can be easier to identify due to webbing.
  • Con: Infest and spoil a wide variety of dry pantry foods.

Maggots:

  • Pro: Typically infest rotting/decaying matter, less likely to spoil pantry foods.
  • Con: Aesthetically unappealing and potential disease carriers.

Prevention and Control Measures

Pest Control Methods

There are various methods to control Indian meal moth larvae and maggots. Two effective ways include:

  • Insecticides: Use of insecticides can help, but only as a supplementary measure to good sanitation and handling practices. Carefully follow the product’s instructions.
  • Pheromone traps: Pheromone traps target adult moths by luring them with a specific scent, reducing their ability to reproduce.
Method Pros Cons
Insecticides Kills larvae May be harmful
Pheromone traps Targets adult moths specifically Not effective on larvae

Cleaning Infested Areas

When dealing with an infestation:

  1. Identify: Find all infested materials around the house, like birdseed, dry pet food, etc.
  2. Vacuuming: Thoroughly vacuum kitchen cabinets, shelves, and any other locations where the pests were found.
  3. Wash: Use a soapy water solution to clean the infested areas.
  4. Dispose: Seal infested materials in plastic bags, and dispose of them immediately.

Preventative Practices

To prevent future infestations:

  • Store dry foods in airtight, glass jars or plastic containers.
  • Always check the packaging for signs of damage before purchasing, as they might come from the store.
  • Monitor the temperature and humidity of your house to create unfavorable conditions for pest development.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Indian Meal Moth and Caterpillar

 

New uninvited guests
Location: Maryland
October 1, 2011 5:46 pm
Hi,
I am trying ti ID these characters.
Don’t know if their related or not.
Finding the grub/larvae mostly on ceiling, and on walls. Has a ”silk” thread. Also, Have seen a fly? with silver/grey/tan on wings both appeared around same time.See third photo. About 7mm-1cm in length. When crushed(sorry)insides leave a very pronounced black stain.
May have come in with some birdseed, though not sure.These insects appear daily, even after thorough removal of all visible specimens. Could really use your help. Thanks
Signature: Eric, The Bugged.

Caterpillar of the Indian Meal Moth

Hi Eric,
The moth in your photo is an Indian Meal Moth,
Plodia interpunctella, a species that infests stored grain products as well as bird seed.  The caterpillar also looks very much like the Indian Meal Moth Caterpillar images posted to BugGuide, and since the appearance of both the moth and caterpillar happened at the same time, it is a fair assumption that they are related.  You might want to remove the bird seed and we would also recommend cleaning out the pantry to make sure they haven’t infested the oatmeal, nuts or cornmeal you might have stored on the shelf. 

Indian Meal Moth

Hi Friends,
Think I have found answer to my dilemma:
Indian Meal Moths!!! But if you have the time please confirm this.
Thanks again for your time, Eric

Hi again Eric,
We did not notice that you had already self identified your Indian Meal Moths prior to our creating this post.

Hello,
Let me first say thank you for your fast reply. I did manage to ferret
out the ID of these. But one thing is for sure I have found another interesting site to visit and
find it to be not only a valuable resource, but rather entertaining.
Best Regards, and Thank You again,
Eric

Letter 2 – Indian Meal Moth Larvae

 

sesame moths?
December 24, 2009
hi bugman.
what are these guys?
i just moved into a sublet and found this little package in the spice closet.  my guess is that it’s been there a while.  it’s still sealed.  they are thriving.
i’m CCing the company that packaged it here in quebec.
perhaps they can say how old it is based on the number on the label –> 08U15V
thanks
michael bailey
montreal

Indian Meal Moth Larvae
Indian Meal Moth Larvae

Hi Michael,
These are the larvae of Indian Meal Moths, Plodia interpunctella.  It was originally native to South America, but now has a cosmopolitan distribution.  It is one of the Pantry Moths that will infest many stored foods, including grain products and spices.  Corn meal, oatmeal, flour, nuts and seeds are all likely sources of infestation, and bird seed seems particularly attractive as a commissary.  The tiny moths fluttering around in the home are a good indication that caterpillars are feeding on some stored food products somewhere in the home.  Often infestations appear in packaged foods, and it is entirely possible that the infestation began at the manufacturer’s packaging plants.  We would guess that the expiration date on those sesame seeds is long expired.  You can find photos of the adult moths on our site and on BugGuide.

Indian Meal Moth Larvae
Indian Meal Moth Larvae

Letter 3 – Indian Mealworms, we believe

 

Subject: Grub type worm
Location: South central PA (Amish country)
October 12, 2013 6:44 am
I have these little yellowish grub type worms crawling up my walls, I had to remove the ceiling tiles to get at them. Every morning and every day I get home from work I collect anywhere from 15-30 of them and I have no clue where they are coming from. What little food I have in my house is all sealed and they’re not coming from my trash can. Usually in the morning I find them hanging by I guess a web they make off the ceiling. It’s been a week now and I can’t get rid of them. They’re just more of a nuisance now. They have little legs and a brown head. I think they are forming into these little brown moths of some sort because I seen a couple flying around.
Signature: Steele H.

Possibly Indian Mealworms
Possibly Indian Mealworms

Subject: Grub type worm? (2nd attempt)
Location: Lancaster County, Pa
October 13, 2013 8:58 am
Got a some kind of bugs in my kitchen. They navigate toward the ceiling. I collect about 15-30 every morning and when I get home from work. Don’t know what they are, where they’re coming from or how to get rid of them.
Signature: Irritated

Possibly Indian Mealworms
Possibly Indian Mealworms

Dear Steele,
We hope you are not irritated with us for not responding yesterday.  We had a very busy day doing public service planning and organizing a ten year anniversary commemoration of Heidelberg Park and we did not answer as many letters as we do in a more typical day.  We believe these are the larvae of Indian Meal Moths, or Indian Mealworms,
Plodia interpunctella.  See BugGuide for verification.  They infest stored grain products like corn meal, oatmeal and even pet food and bird seed.  You are correct that they metamorphose into the moths you are finding.  We suggest you thoroughly search the pantry for the source of the infestation.  If they are appearing in the numbers you indicate, the infestation should not be too difficult to locate.

Thank you very much!! That is what they are!!! Now I just have to get rid of them.  Guess I have to trash what little food I have in my cabinets!! Thank you again!! And I am glad that you offer your help for people like me! I searched all over google and couldn’t find a thing to what they were.
Sincerely
-Steele

Letter 4 – Mating Indian Meal Moths

 

Indian Meal Moths
Sat, Mar 7, 2009 at 4:25 PM
First of all, let me say I love your website. I moved from a fairly new and well-insulated family house into a pretty old appartment building, ground level, a few months ago. I’m no more a bug lover than the next person, so I’m just happy I found this site, which has saved me from freaking out a couple of times. First time with a classic case of house centipedes. Now, I only wish! I haven’t killed them (at least not once I knew what they were), but for some reason there are none around anymore. Maybe because of winter? Anyway, now I found out that I have some Indian Meal Moths. They’ve been around on and off. During summer and fall I was pretty sure they were just some normal moth that came in from outside (especially since there was only one or two of them), but in the middle of the winter, much less probable. So I researc hed your website, ended up cleaning my whole pantry (and yes, some stuff was infested, I’m still grossed out). I do still have a few questions, though. Do these types of moths also have cases at the larva stage, or am I dealing with more than one type of moth if I find discarded or unhatched cases? Might meal moths also infest pasta, raisins or even chocolate (I found a larva in an old Nutella jar, which fortunately I hadn’t eaten from in very long)? Also, they seem to be able to munch through thin plastic wrappings….just how thick a plastic bag can they break open? Last question, apart from transferring everything to plastic and glass containers, is there anything that might keep them away, sort of like cedar wood with clothing moths? I tried a bit of rosemary branches in the past, seemed to work, but when I cleaned up, the little pile of rosemary needles had unhatched cases in it….gross. (For the record, I have cleaned the pantry regularly since I moved and I do throw out anything that sits around too long…)
Thanks for your time, I know there are a lot of questions. I’ve included a picture of two meal moths apparently reproducing, which I found while cleaning the said pantry. Thought it might be an interesting addition to the nice pictures on your website. I guess spring is coming for everyone! 😛
Genevieve
Ottawa

Mating Indian Meal Moths
Mating Indian Meal Moths

Dear Genevieve,
The cases you are finding may be the cast off larval or pupa skins. when the insect metamorphoses, it leaves behind the exoskeleton. The caterpillars form a silken webbing in the food source. According to BugGuide, the larvae of the Indian Meal Moth “infests a wide variety of stored food products such as flour, oatmeal, dried fruits, seeds, nuts, powdered milk, biscuits, chocolate, and bird seed ” and “spin silken threads as they crawl through stored products, creating a matted layer of product, frass, and pupal cases.” Vigilance is the best method for controlling Indian Meal Moths and other pantry pests. Your question regarding chewing through plastic may need an expert to answer.

Update: Mon, Mar 9, 2009 at 8:32 AM
Thank you for the information. I read somewhere online that bay leaves might be a good way to repel insects from your food stores, so I might give it a try. I’ve captured the remaining adults, so as to limit the damages, and was a bit surprised this morning to find eggs in the jar. They’re still laying them, it’s sort of interesting to see. Anyway, I’m keeping tabs on that (taking pictures and everything) from now on, because I strongly suspect an already-infested bag of rice was the source of the problem (the need to pinpoint a source has become quite strong to my curious mind). I put a few rice grains and a bit of what looks disturbingly like eggs in another jar, and I’m also keeping tabs on that. The egg-like grains were already in the bag before I even opened it. Well, this said, I’ll let you know if anything interesting comes up from all of this.
Genevieve, Ottawa, Canada
P.S. I don’t know if it’s of any interest, pantry moths being very common, but I’ve enclosed pictures of the said moths and eggs…they’re kind of blurry, but it’s the best quality I could get out of my generic Canon. The whitish blurs are the eggs (but obviously not the pile of rice grains!)

Thanks for teh update Genevieve.  Your photo is a bit too blurry to post.  Many aromatic plants are said to repel moths, including your previously mentioned rosemary.  We have also heard wormwood (Artemesia), lavender and mint will repel moths.  The cedar you mentioned may also work.

Letter 5 – Indian Meal Moths and possibly Delusory Parasitosis

 

WHAT ARE THE POSSIBILITIES THIS BUG IS PARASITIC? OR MAYBE ITS PARASITES PARASITIC?
Location: Urban ”forest” Surrey BC
May 13, 2011 2:31 pm
Dear Mr. Bug man
moved into ground level condo one year ago 3 months ago rash developed. shortly there after began seeing moth like winged guys (once or twice) very late at night in kitchen. Got extermination stuff. dr said the moth and rash were not related and that rash was scabies. Did treatment washed everything in house steamed extra. while doing scabies treatment small slightly transparent creature came out of my eye and then went under my fingernail. Husband dr. and mother think I am crazy. Other strange occurrences. Husband acnologes moths as pests but refuses to believe my story. I have been under stress at work… dr says the mind is very powerful and my stress has triggered these delusions.
Can you give any insight into this?
Heres some specimens i have collected. There are also ”lint” like cases attached to many of our clothes… which everyone also says I am over reacting to…. Ive never had so much lint. also had two budgies recently die…. related? or have I gone mad?
im hoping I have gone mad…
Christina
Signature: An otherwise normal happy slightly exentric housewife

Indian Meal Moth

Dear Christina,
We need to begin our response with a disclaimer.  We are not doctors and we have no qualifications to diagnose any health related issues, nor are we entomologists, so any insect identifications we provide are questionable at best.  We are artists who have a mission to promote an appreciation of the lower beasts as well as to make people aware of the interconnectivity of all things on our fragile planet and beyond.  With that stated, we are convinced that the moth in your photo is an Indian Meal Moth,
Plodia interpunctella, and that you have also supplied us with a photo of its larva.  You may find information and photos of the Indian Meal Moth on Bugguide and you can also compare your larva to this image of an Indian Meal Moth Larva on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the Indian Meal Moth:  “infests a wide variety of stored food products such as flour, oatmeal, dried fruits, seeds, nuts, powdered milk, biscuits, chocolate, and bird seed”   With that said, it is senseless to try to exterminate your Indian Meal Moth problem with pesticides since they are feeding on your food.  The pesticides would need to be applied directly to your food before they would have any effect on the problem.  You should thoroughly inspect the food in your pantry and definitely discard anything past the expiration date.  Pay close attention to corn meal, oatmeal and any boxed cake mixes or flour products.  You should be able to locate the place where the larvae are feeding and dispose of those items.  Larvae are the destructive stage and adult moths do not feed on stored foods.  It is virtually impossible to rid you home of all insects, but you can take certain precautions to guard your clothing against clothes moths.  Sachet was a popular item in days of yore.  There are certain herbs that are known to discourage insects from damaging clothing.  These dried herbs can be sewn into small silken pouches and hung on hangers with woolens and other organic fibers.  The herbs of choice include lavender, sage, rosemary, wormwood and peppermint.  Not only will this sachet repel moths, it will also make your clothes smell nice.  We do not know what caused your birds to die.  If your doctor believes that stress is contributing to your condition, you should follow his advice or perhaps seek a second opinion.  There is a condition known as Delusory Parasitosis and here is a link to a journal article called Delusory Parasitosis by Nancy C. Hinkle that originally appeared in American Entomologist, Volume 46, Number 1 in Spring 2000.  Stress can cause the mind to trigger delusions, and “Bugs” are an easy target.  We hope your condition improves.

Larva of Indian Meal Moth

Letter 6 – Indian Meal Moth and Larva

 

More pictures of Indian Meal Moth
Hello
I saw that you only received one picture of the Indian Meal Moth so far. Well, the little buggers are infesting my kitchen now, so I might as well make some use of that. Here are a few pictures you are free to use if you like to, I release them into the public domain. I’m sorry they’re not that great.
Ramon
PS: If I’m wrong and it’s not an Indian Meal Moth at all, please let me know!

Hi Ramon,
Your are absolutely correct. We are also terribly amused that your photo was sent on Thanksgiving. Our plans for Thanksgiving dinner on more than one occasion included a last minute trip to the market to replace corn meal that was infested with Indian Meal Moths, Plodia interpunctella. This has happened so many times, not just at Thanksgiving time, that we have started storing corn meal in the refrigerator. The moth will also infest many other stored grain products, and invariably get into the oatmeal after a few months in the pantry. Thank you for you excellent photo of both the adult and larvae. The larvae are form masses of silken webbing in the food stuff.

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

21 thoughts on “Indian Meal Moth Larvae vs Maggot: Decoding the Differences”

  1. We have these infestations of Indian meal moths. They fly around & I am constantly killing at least 8-12 on a given day. Today I found a worm – larvae. Drives me nuts!! Now that I have positively identified what type of moths we have, how do we get rid of them? Will moth balls kill them? I find them hanging out all over in our apt. (walls, ceiling, bathroom, on cabinets in cabinets). Yes, they were in abundance in our cabinet where we have stored nuts. All got thrown away! Any tips would be greatly appreciated! Thank you !!

    Reply
    • We would not recommend any form of eradication except finding the source of food for the larvae and discarding. Nuts are a common food source as are grains like oatmeal and cornmeal.

      Reply
  2. I had a problem with the meal moths due to improperly stored dry dog food in my garage. After sealing the container the moths disappeared in about a month. However, Indian Moth larvae have now appeared in our master bathroom on the opposite side of the house. We don’t eat in the bathroom so there is nothing for them to consume. I find them on the tile floor and believe they are coming from under the base board, but again, there is no food in the frame of the house or anywhere outside (from any conceivable travel distance). Where might they be coming from?

    Reply
    • That seems very strange. We always associate Indian Meal Moths with grain infestations, including the grain used in pet foods.

      Reply
  3. I have been fighting these for 6 months. As far as what they can permeate, I was told it had to be air tight, like Tupperware or Oxo, to be sure. They are surely a pest and hard to get rid of. Thought they were gone, and found them mating this morning on my family room ceiling.

    Reply
    • It is also entirely possibly that new items from the grocery store might have had existing larvae feeding upon products like corn meal or pancake mix, reintroducing Meal Moths into the pantry with every trip to the market.

      Reply
  4. I have a very similar worm/catapiller showing up at my home in Dunedin FL but never on the wall or ceiling Only on the floor in my front hall. I see this 2 to 3 times a day. The body is a little more orange in color but not far off from this worm. Any idea what it may be ? It appears to be coming from my door area.

    Reply
  5. I’m having problem with feeling bug like and worm like thingcrawling under skin What ever they are there fast thay have hair like spikes on there back I’ve done scabbies treatment and the bug is not little and when I’m around a lot of heat they go crazy and one came out and died it looked like a antcrickit and has darkish like stinger as a tale

    Reply
    • I am having similar problems. I’m just at a loss. I just can’t live like this. I don’t know what to do. The last time I told someone about it they sent me to a state mental institution. I have only been home a cpl months and its worse than it ever has been. I’m in a nightmare all alone and I am so afraid.

      Reply
    • I think my dogs have what you have. I have been to the vet 8 times. It is real! I am having a hard time getting someone to believe me. I have a lot of pics but I guess they are unbelievable.

      Reply
  6. Hi I resently found live tiny worm like bugs under my stove and in drawers cabnits and in the bath Rm sink looks kinda like that moth larvae but different this has a brownish red head and a tiny tail point at the other end what is it took a live one out of Are silverware drawer.

    Reply
  7. We found larvae crawling on my kitchen floor this morning. White with little black heads. I squished them and they sorta snapped. Then after cleaning them all up, one appears from no where and they move at a pretty good clip for being on their bellies. Any ideas where they might be coming from? We did get some bird seed, also oatmeal, sun flower seeds, but the only seeds are the sunflower seeds and oatmeal we got from WINCO the other day. There are no traces of any bugs in our pantry. Thanks for your time.

    Reply
  8. I have “worms” under my fingernails and scalp. Just about everywhere. I recently had extracted myself tiny brown bugs. Most are very tiny, but are shaped like oval)round do brown black. Itch ALL OVER! Dogs too! I’ve found some in my bedding and TONS OF SILK FIBERS RIGHER ATTATCHED TO THRN IR STOUND YHRM. The white/silver tiny silk fibers look like kitten hair. I will find them under my bed etc. They also come out if my skin when treated with a heavy dose if steroid cream. I recently came across a close up u took of one of my bloody Abcesses. I looked closer and saw a worm with a head anteanba and thorax, segmented worm body, and z bizarre hook or what looks like a crab claw at the end of its tail. I contacted the CDC and advised that u think I have a caddisflies infection. Anyone else see tiny tiny gnat like flies in the house or pulled from skin;? Caddisflies also have silk threads that come from their heads to form nets/coccoon to catch food. My investigation continued. 4 years

    Reply
  9. I know this post is old as hell but I just want to add this in case someone reads this and has questions.

    OP mentioned that they had birds, and that could actually be important here.

    I’ve owned several birds and worked at stores that actually keep / raise / sell them, and meal moths? They go apeshit over birdfood. Seeds, pellets, mix of the two. They will make themselves at home, complete with setting themselves up with their webby larva-wiggling nests, in birdfood containers in barely a week. And the majority of the time, if you buy the food in bulk? Theres already a good number of moths in there (and snout weevils, maize weevils, and cigarette beetles too.) Even if you’ve got the most perfect and clean arrangement, you can still get a bags worth of the bastards out of nowhere. In my opinion, birdfood is the easiest way to bring a ready-made infestation into your house. That’s why a lot of people are really consistent in their routine of keeping bags of birdfood in the freezer for around 12 hours before trusting the contents. Makes sure no little bastards will come climbing out a la trojan horse.

    The other thing is, theres kind of a split of opinion among bird owners about whether birdfood thats had bugs in it can make a bird sick. I don’t know if that would matter, but op mentioned losing two budgies and it came to mind.

    Reply
  10. I know this post is old as hell but I just want to add this in case someone reads this and has questions.

    OP mentioned that they had birds, and that could actually be important here.

    I’ve owned several birds and worked at stores that actually keep / raise / sell them, and meal moths? They go apeshit over birdfood. Seeds, pellets, mix of the two. They will make themselves at home, complete with setting themselves up with their webby larva-wiggling nests, in birdfood containers in barely a week. And the majority of the time, if you buy the food in bulk? Theres already a good number of moths in there (and snout weevils, maize weevils, and cigarette beetles too.) Even if you’ve got the most perfect and clean arrangement, you can still get a bags worth of the bastards out of nowhere. In my opinion, birdfood is the easiest way to bring a ready-made infestation into your house. That’s why a lot of people are really consistent in their routine of keeping bags of birdfood in the freezer for around 12 hours before trusting the contents. Makes sure no little bastards will come climbing out a la trojan horse.

    The other thing is, theres kind of a split of opinion among bird owners about whether birdfood thats had bugs in it can make a bird sick. I don’t know if that would matter, but op mentioned losing two budgies and it came to mind.

    Reply
  11. You have pictures of real insects you have identified, and the only real proof being testimony of the physically identified rash, the start of proof, verified and treated by the doctor. Why bring up PD?

    Why is this PD thing being promoted out there by people who have not got a hope of knowing enough to identify evidence of unknown parasites off hand, even having seen the evidence, relying on conjecture instead, when the only way to identify, is to do detailed examination and identification of features of samples. That is delusional, imagining that evidence in front of oneself, somehow, doesn’t exist.

    You know we only know a small part of the spectrum of what is out there. Our knowledge is fragmentary, sparse, and fleeting. We don’t have enough knowledge to dismiss all evidence out of hand, only enough evidence to maybe prove something. A lack of conclusion in science, is only an lack of evidence as to what the evidence is.

    Reply
  12. You have pictures of real insects you have identified, and the only real proof being testimony of the physically identified rash, the start of proof, verified and treated by the doctor. Why bring up PD?

    Why is this PD thing being promoted out there by people who have not got a hope of knowing enough to identify evidence of unknown parasites off hand, even having seen the evidence, relying on conjecture instead, when the only way to identify, is to do detailed examination and identification of features of samples. That is delusional, imagining that evidence in front of oneself, somehow, doesn’t exist.

    You know we only know a small part of the spectrum of what is out there. Our knowledge is fragmentary, sparse, and fleeting. We don’t have enough knowledge to dismiss all evidence out of hand, only enough evidence to maybe prove something. A lack of conclusion in science, is only an lack of evidence as to what the evidence is.

    Reply

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