Hummingbird Clearwing Moth: Essential Facts and Tips

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The hummingbird clearwing moth is a fascinating creature known for its unique appearance and behavior. These moths closely resemble hummingbirds as they hover over flowers, sipping nectar with their long proboscis during the day. Although they are part of the sphinx moth family, their distinct features and daytime habits have earned them a special spot in the hearts of nature enthusiasts.

These moths can be found throughout various parts of the United States, with their range extending from the Pacific Northwest to the southeastern areas of the country. Their favorite flowers to feed on include honeysuckle, dogbane, and members of the rose family, like hawthorn and cherries source.

The adult hummingbird clearwing moth has a furry greenish-yellow or tan body, a reddish-brown band across the abdomen, and a wingspan of 1½ to 2¼ inches source. As they go through a complete metamorphosis, starting from a larva and transforming into a winged adult, these moths play a vital role in pollination, making them essential to our ecosystem.

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth Basics

Identification and Characteristics

The hummingbird clearwing moth is a fascinating insect that resembles a hummingbird in appearance and behavior. They belong to the Sphingidae family, also known as sphinx moths.

  • Body: fuzzy olive to golden olive above, whitish below in the front part
  • Wings: transparent with reddish-brown borders
  • Wingspan: 1½ to 2¼ inches

Their unique features, such as a protruding head, large eyes, and a furry thorax, make them resemble bumblebees (source). They also have a conical abdomen and hover over flowers to feed on nectar, using a long proboscis.

Sphinx Moth Family

Hummingbird clearwing moths belong to the Sphingidae family, which consists of numerous species known for their rapid flight and agile hovering abilities. The hummingbird clearwing is a species in this family that mimics hummingbirds and bumblebees to blend in while visiting flowers.

Sphinx Moth Family Key Traits:

  • Rapid flight and hovering abilities
  • Large, prominent eyes
  • Feeds on nectar from various flowers

While hummingbird clearwing moths are generally found during the day, most other sphinx moths are nocturnal. However, they all share a common need for specific food plants for their larvae, such as honeysuckle, dogbane, and members of the rose family (source).

Comparison Table

Feature Hummingbird Clearwing Moth Other Sphinx Moths
Wingspan 1½ to 2¼ inches Varies by species
Coloration Olive, golden olive, and reddish-brown Varies by species
Active Time of Day Daytime Mostly Nighttime
Larval Food Plants Honeysuckle, dogbane, rose family Varies by species
Predators Birds, spiders, larger insects Birds, spiders, larger insects

Behavior and Life Cycle

Feeding and Pollination

The Hummingbird Clearwing Moth feeds on nectar from various flowers, including honeysuckle, dogbane, and some members of the rose family, like hawthorn, cherries, and plums1. They exhibit pollinator behavior by hovering over flowers and using their long proboscis to feed on nectar2.

Reproduction and Development

  • Female moths lay eggs on specific food plants.
  • After hatching, caterpillars feed on these plants.
  • Larvae develop into pupa and form a cocoon.
  • The adult moth eventually emerges.

Predators and Defense Mechanisms

  • Main predators: birds, bats, and spiders3.
  • Defense mechanism: camouflage and convergent evolution4.

Comparison Table: Hummingbird Clearwing Moth vs. Bumblebee

Feature Hummingbird Clearwing Moth Bumblebee
Body Fuzzy olive to golden olive above, whitish below5 Mostly black, with yellow stripes
Wings Clear portions with some black scales6 Opaque, usually black or brown
Legs Black Black or brown
Pollination Yes Yes
Feeding Nectar from flowers Nectar and pollen from flowers

Habitat and Geographic Distribution

Hummingbird clearwing moths are mainly found in North America. They’re also observed in parts of Asia and Europe, but not in Africa. These fascinating moths are widespread across North America, from Newfoundland to Texas.

Their preferred habitats include:

  • Meadows
  • Fields
  • Open woods
  • Gardens

These moths are common in areas with diverse flora, as they feed on nectar from various flowers1. Their larvae specifically need food plants like honeysuckle, dogbane, and some members of the rose family, such as hawthorn, cherries, and plums2.

In summary, the hummingbird clearwing moth can be found in various habitats across North America and some parts of Asia and Europe. They prefer meadows, fields, and other open areas with diverse flora to support their nectar and larval food needs.

Attracting and Supporting Clearwing Moths

Garden Plants and Flowers

To attract hummingbird clearwing moths to your garden, consider planting flowers rich in nectar that they can feed on. Some examples of flowers preferred by clearwing moths include:

  • Phlox: These flowers come in various colors and can easily attract clearwing moths to your garden.

  • Verbena: This plant has beautiful blooms that offer plenty of nectar to support clearwing moths.

It is noteworthy that clearwing moths are also attracted to other flowering plants such as honeysuckle and dogbane.

Host Plants

Besides providing nectar-rich flowers, it is essential to offer host plants for the larvae of hummingbird clearwing moths. Some common host plants include:

  • Hawthorns
  • Cherry and plum trees
  • Viburnums

These plants belong to the rose family and have leaflets that cater to the dietary needs of the clearwing moth larvae. Offering a variety of host plants in your garden can help support the entire lifecycle of these fascinating creatures.

Different Species of Clearwing Moths

Hummingbird clearwing moths are fascinating creatures that belong to the sphinx moth family, scientifically known as Sphingidae. These moths are often mistaken for hummingbirds due to their similar size and hovering behavior while feeding on nectar.

There are several species of clearwing moths that exhibit unique traits and appearances. Some notable species include the Snowberry Clearwing, Hemaris diffinis, and the White-lined Sphinx.

The Snowberry Clearwing (Hemaris diffinis) is distinguished by its bumblebee-like appearance. Some features of this species are:

  • Olive to golden olive color on the upper body
  • Dark burgundy or blackish abdomen
  • Whitish legs and front part of the body

In contrast, the Hemaris diffinis or the Hummingbird Sphinx, also known as the Common Clearwing, exhibits a slightly different appearance:

  • Reddish-brown coloration on parts of the body
  • Clear portions on their wings, earning them the “clearwing” name

Lastly, the White-lined Sphinx is another hawk moth species with distinct characteristics:

  • Large size and striking patterns on its wings
  • White lines across the wings and pink bands across the abdomen

Here’s a comparison table of the three species mentioned:

Species Colors Wing Pattern Similar To
Snowberry Clearwing Olive to golden, dark burgundy Clear portions Bumblebee
Hemaris diffinis Reddish-brown Clear portions Hummingbird
White-lined Sphinx White lines, pink bands Bold patterns Hawk moths

These clearwing moth species play an essential role as pollinators, benefiting various plants and ecosystems. It’s crucial to protect and preserve these delicate Lepidoptera, as they are an integral part of maintaining a healthy environment.

Interesting Facts and Comparisons

Hummingbird clearwing moth (Hemaris spp.) is a fascinating species of moths from the Sphingidae family. They are also known as diurnal or day-flying moths.

  • Unique features of clearwing hummingbird moths include their hovering behavior, similar to hummingbirds.
  • With their long proboscis, they feed on nectar from flowers like bee balm.

These moths have several striking characteristics:

  • Furry body
  • Large eyes
  • Protruding heads
  • Conical abdomen

Compared to other moths and butterflies, they have some interesting differences:

Feature Clearwing Hummingbird Moth Other Moths Butterflies
Antennae Short and thick Feathery Clubbed
Legs Long and strong Varied Long
Activity Period Diurnal Nocturnal Diurnal

Their caterpillars primarily feed on specific plants, such as honeysuckle and dogbane. When it comes to pollination, clearwing hummingbird moths play an essential role as pollinators.

In conclusion, Hemaris spp. – the hummingbird clearwing moth – is an extraordinary day-flying moth with unique hovering capabilities and beautiful physical characteristics that make them stand out among other moths and butterflies.

Footnotes

  1. https://www.fs.usda.gov/wildflowers/pollinators/pollinator-of-the-month/hummingbird_moth.shtml 2

  2. https://hort.extension.wisc.edu/articles/hummingbird-moth-hemaris-thysbe/ 2

  3. https://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/hummingbird-clearwing

  4. https://education.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/hummingbird-clearwing

  5. https://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/hummingbird-clearwing

  6. https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/bumblebee-moth-and-hummingbird-moth

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Name this bug! : )
Hi,
Loved your site, very helpful. Last night, after 2 years of desperately trying to describe and/or photograph one, my Husband finally caught a glimpse of the mysterious "Lobster Bug" I have been raving about, and he was able to get a photo of it with his new camera. It is amazing in the photos, so I am sending you two shots. (They’re big). The weird thing is, this one is quite colorful, while the one I caught last summer was just shades of gray and dark gray, with no colors at all, and the end of the "lobster bug" tail was just like a real lobster tail – shaped like an open fan (Note the segmented tail, like a lobster tail, even on this one). I don’t know why this one is so colorful or brush-like on the tip. Maybe it’s a male/female thing, like birds, etc, one bright, one dull? This red one seems a bit furry, too, compared to my gray one. I found photos online that said it was "Hemaris gracilis", but I wonder if the gray one I caught last year was, too. Do they have a female gray version? (Or male). My gray one was a bit smaller, too, I think. I hope you like the shots and can use them on your page. They’re about 1 to 1.5 inches long, so the photos are deceptive. Think moth – not bird, for size estimates. It’s sitting on my Butterfly bush, so those masses of flowers beneath it are really quite small. My husband was astounded when he saw it, and I’m just glad to finally have proof. He thought it might be a baby hummingbird because it is sucking nectar, but it is a bug for sure. Look at the legs, and wings. It is not a bird – of any kind. It’s a bug. Please let me know if you can tell me anything about the gray one. We’ve lived here in Southern New Hampshire for 5 years, and I’ve only seen one gray one, and one colored one, so they’re not common, and I’d like to know if they’re the same bug.
Thank you in advance,
Karen Malnati

Hi Karen,
Your husband’s images of the Hummingbird Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe, are pretty amazing. The gray moth you describe is probably another species of Sphinx Moth or Hawk Moth, Family Sphingidae.

Letter 2 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Clearwing moth? which one
Location: Chester New Jersey
July 30, 2011 8:56 am
Is this a Clearwing Snowberry or a clearwing Humingbird.
I think it is a Snowberry but Iam not very good at this
thanks
Don Christian
Signature: Don Christian

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hi Don,
In our opinion, this is a Hummingbird Clearwing, and we are basing that on the light legs and the coloration of the back of the insect.  The best place to identify Sphinx Moths is the Sphingidae of the Americas website, then go to Sphingidae of the United States, and you can categorize by state, and by going the the New Jersey sightings, you will learn that there are three different species of diurnal Sphinxes in the genus
Hemaris that have been reported in New Jersey.  We believe this diurnal sphinx most closely resembles Hemaris thysbe, the Hummingbird Clearwing.

Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Letter 3 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Weirdest bug I’ve ever seen!
Hi,
Attached are a few high resolution pictures that I took at my friend’s house in Southern Illinois on Saturday, June 25th. As you can see in the pictures, the flying thing stayed close to the petunias and hovered just like a hummingbird does, flapping it’s wings very quickly, making them a blur (but it was NOT a hummingbird). The body of it was as big as my thumb, and it had black antannaes and a weird "tail"–kind of like a shrimp. It was also very silent–not buzzing like a bee or a wasp. I’d love to know what the heck this is, just to satisfy my curiousity. Thanks for any info you can provide!
-Sara

Hi Sara,
We’ve been getting numerous photos recently of Hummingbird Moth, and the species most often confused with the hummingbird is the Common Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe, one of the Sphinx or Hawkmoths.

Letter 4 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Clearwing?
I think this is the Hummingbird Clearwing. Saw it yesterday, for the first time, in Arkansas.
R. Smith

Hi R,
You are correct. This is Hemaris thysbe, the Hummingbird Clearwing. We have gotten numerous excellent images recently and it seems we rotate the image on the homepage every few days.

Letter 5 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Is this a clearwing moth
Tue, Oct 21, 2008 at 2:26 PM
Took this photo in northeastern Illinois. I believe that it is a clearwing moth, but I do not know what type.
Norm Carl
northeastern Illinois near Chicago

Hummingbird Clearwing
Hummingbird Clearwing

Hi Norm,
We are happy to see that you figured out how to send the photo before we had a chance to respond.  We believe this is a Hummingbird Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe, but there are closely related species in the genus Hemaris that sometimes confuse us.  You can find lots of great information and photos on Bill Oehlke’s excellent website.

Letter 6 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Flying Crustacean?
Location:  11768 (Fort Salonga, NY)
August 10, 2010 9:54 pm
This beautiful mothlike creature, which looked like a crayfish with wings, was fluttering around my butterfly bush (buddleia, 8/6/09). The sound of its wings resembled that of a card stuck in bicycle spokes (it flew continuously while gathering nectar). I’d love to know what it was!
Nancy M. Hollinshead

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hi Nancy,
Though we already responded personally with a brief identification, upon rereading your email, we love your vivid description of both the appearance and sound, so we decided to post your letter and fine photograph of a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, Hemaris thysbe, so that our readership will know that if they hear the sound of a card stuck in bicycle spokes while in the garden, there may be a specimen nearby.  You may read more about the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth on Bill Oehlke’s excellent website.

Letter 7 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Bug or Bird?
Location: Bucks County, PA
July 6, 2011 8:17 pm
My wife took some pics of this bizarre creature. She thought it was a hummingbird, but closer inspection of the pics reveal what looks like insect legs, antennae and a proboscis. She said it was bright orange, had a fast wingbeat and was able to hover about the flowers. It was about 1 1/2 to 2 inches in length and was not afraid of her getting close. We live in suburban Philadelphia and have no idea what this thing is as we have never seen anything like this before.
Signature: Jack

Hummingbird Clearwing

Bird or Bug
Location: Philly
July 6, 2011 8:46 pm
I just sent you a photo of a hummingbird type bug. I have since found it online and identified it as a type of hummingbird moth called a hummingbird Clearwing. I never knew these type of insects existed!
Signature: Jack

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hi Jack,
The differences between a hummingbird and one of the diurnal Sphinx Moths in the genus
Hemaris are much more apparent in a photograph than they are while watching them as the flight patterns are so similar.  Both insect and bird are capable of hovering still while feeding from flowers.

Letter 8 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Subject: Type of fly?
Location: Kent State University, Kent Ohio
August 13, 2012 3:43 pm
Spotted outside, close as we could get.
Overcast conditions, 78 degrees.
Signature: Brad Visker

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hi Brad,
This is a lovely photo of a Hummingbird Clearwing,
Hemaris thysbe, a diurnal species of moth that is frequently mistaken for a hummingbird because of its manner of flight.  You can read more about Hummingbird Clearwings on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Letter 9 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Subject: Whats this bug
Location: Mio, MI
July 2, 2013 6:20 pm
Me and the wife would appreciate to know what is this bug. Found on this plant near our house in Mio, MI
Signature: Paul Heist

Hummingbird Clearwing
Hummingbird Clearwing

Hi Paul,
The diurnal Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, Hemaris thysbe, is frequently confused for a hummingbird when it is seen hovering over flowers.
  See Sphingidae of the Americas for additional information.

Letter 10 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Subject: Srtange moth??
Location: Flushing MI 48433
July 25, 2013 6:22 pm
I have a bug/ moth in my patunias. Wondering what it is.
Signature: Mary Weaver

Hummingbird Clearwing
Hummingbird Clearwing

Hi Mary,
This is one of the Clearwing Moths in the genus
Hemaris, most likely the Hummingbird Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe, so called because they are frequently confused for hummingbirds when they are seen hovering in the air nectaring at blossoms.  Hummingbird Moths can fly forward and backward as well as hovering in place, just like their namesake.  You can read more about the Hummingbird Moth on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Letter 11 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Subject: Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, I think
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
July 15, 2014 11:23 am
I think I know what this insect is, a hummingbird clearwing moth. We’ve had hawk moths and hummingbird moths in this part of Alaska for the past few years, but I don’t ever remember seeing them here as a child – and I think I would have remembered, always being a bit of a buggy kid.
I like this picture because the moth is not actually flying, so you can see it more clearly. I thought perhaps it would be useful to your other readers. If not, well, you needn’t bother posting it 🙂
Thanks, as always for your fascinating site!
Signature: bugalaska

Hummingbird Clearwing
Hummingbird Clearwing

Dear bugalaska,
Your identification of this Hummingbird Clearwing,
Hemaris thysbe, is spot on.  The white legs distinguish it from the closely related Snowberry Clearwing, Hemaris diffinis.   See Sphingidae of the Americas for more information on the Hummingbird Clearwing.

Letter 12 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Subject: bug or bee
Location: Belleville, PA in a flower garden
July 28, 2014 4:20 pm
This bug flies like a bee, it is all around my flowers and acts like a bee. I have never saw it until this year. It is yellow, then green, then black. Sometimes the yellow and green are reversed.
Signature: Deb

Hummingbird Clearwing
Hummingbird Clearwing

Dear Deb,
You need an extremely fast shutter speed, in excess of 1/1000 second, to freeze the wings of this Hummingbird
Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe, a diurnal species of Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  Another member of the genus, Hemaris diffinis, is smaller and is called the BumbleBee Moth.

Letter 13 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Subject: hummingbird moth
Location: Savage, MN (Scott County)
August 3, 2014 10:03 am
Can you tell me what kind of hummingbird moth this is? I’ve seen him two consecutive days in the wildflowers behind our house in Minnesota. Thanks for your help. (The second photo isn’t very clear but shows a bit more of his coloring.)
Signature: Sue H

Hummingbird Clearwing
Hummingbird Clearwing

Hi Sue,
You are correct that this is a Hummingbird Clearwing,
Hemaris thysbe, and it is a lovely image, with just enough wing movement to show it is beating the wings and to provide a feeling of movement while “freezing” the body.  See Sphingidae of the Americas for additional information on the Hummingbird Clearwing.

Letter 14 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Subject: Unknown Insect
Location: Hillsville, VA 24343
September 3, 2015 8:50 pm
Aloha,
This specimen looks like a cross betwen a bee and a dragon fly.
Thank you fot your time and consideration.
Signature: Lance in Hillsville, VA

Hummingbird Clearwing
Hummingbird Clearwing

Hola Lance,
This diurnal Sphinx Moth owes its common name to its likeness to a totally different winged phylum.  The Hummingbird Clearwing can be distinguished from its genus members by its light legs and white underbelly.  This image from BugGuide illustrates those traits.  A faster shutter speed like 2000 should freeze its rapidly beating wings.  The flights of the Hummingbird Sphinx and its namesake are remarkably similar.

Hummingbird Clearwing
Hummingbird Clearwing

Letter 15 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Subject: What is this bug or bird?
Location: Doylestown, Pa
August 4, 2016 8:15 am
We have this creature flying around our butterfly bush and my 5 year old daughter loves to catch butterflies in her net and look and admiring then setting them free but we caught this amazing insect bird? Please tell us. Of course just took couple pictures then set it free.
Signature: Bird, bug, you tell me

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

This is a Hummingbird Clearwing moth, Hemaris thysbe.  According to the Sphingidae of the Americas site:  “Hummingbird Clearwing Moth or Common Clearwing (wingspan 38-50 mm), readily visits flowers by day throughout the eastern half of the U.S. and Canada … . It is not difficult to see why many gardeners would mistake an Hemaris thysbe moth for a small hummingbird as it hovers, sipping nectar from flowers through a long feeding tube.  The moth hovers briefly, sipping for only a few seconds before darting off to a new flower. Green body “fur” and burgundy wing scales suggest a small ruby throated hummingbird.”

Letter 16 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Subject: Hummingbird Lepidopteran
Location: Bronx NY
August 19, 2016 8:01 am
Found this beauty outside the butterfly garden I worked at this summer. Had large transparent patches on its wings.
Signature: Anthony Macchiano

Hummingbird Clearwing
Hummingbird Clearwing

Dear Anthony,
Though there are several similar looking, closely related species in your area, we agree that this is most likely a Hummingbird Clearwing,
Hemaris thysbe, and you can read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

Letter 17 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Subject:  I have never seen anything like this
Geographic location of the bug:  Clifford o tario
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 07:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was sitting on the deck and this flying insect was at my petunias could you please tell me what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Marlyn wein

Hummingbird Clearwing

Dear Marlyn,
We started our research by verifying your location, which we were guessing might be somewhere in Ireland, and we felt pretty foolish when we eventually realized you failed to capitalize the “O” and you dropped the “n”.  This is a diurnal Sphinx Moth in the genus
Hemaris.  Four members of the genus are reported in “o tario” on Sphingidae of the Americas, and our best guess is that this is the Hummingbird Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  “readily visits flowers by day throughout the eastern half of the U.S. and Canada, where it ranges far to the north, … It is not difficult to see why many gardeners would mistake an Hemaris thysbe moth for a small hummingbird as it hovers, sipping nectar from flowers through a long feeding tube.  The moth hovers briefly, sipping for only a few seconds before darting off to a new flower. Green body ‘fur’ and burgundy wing scales suggest a small ruby throated hummingbird.  Adults can be quite variable.

Letter 18 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Subject:  Unknown bug/moth/bee/fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Rothesay New Brunswick Canada
Date: 08/06/2019
Time: 07:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please see pictures of the strangest bug I’ve ever seen. No one we’ve showed pictures to knows what it is!
Pictures taken this week (summer Atlantic Canada)
How you want your letter signed:  D. Gregory

Hummingbird Clearwing

Dear D. Gregory,
This is one of the diurnal Sphinx Moths in the genus
Hemaris, and according to Sphingidae of the Americas, there are four possible species that are found in New Brunswick.  Based on images posted to Sphingidae of the Americas, we strongly suspect your individual is a Hummingbird Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe.  We want to commend you on your excellent images from three different camera angles.  Diurnal Sphinx Moths are often mistaken for small hummingbirds.

Hummingbird Clearwing
Hummingbird Clearwing

Letter 19 – Hummingbird Clearwing Caterpillar

 

Reply ASAP!
Hi,
I just stumbled across your site in my rush to find out what kind of bug this is I photographed. It’s being submitted to a local magazine, but I need the name of it before the deadline Sunday night! This was a last minute thing. I don’t even know if your site is ‘current’…or how often you receive/reply to emails. I’m crossing my fingers at how soon or “if” I might hear back from you. I’ve bookmarked your site–I can’t wait to look through the other pages. Love the Luna Moths! Oh, by the way this picture was taken here in Maine where I live….in case that helps. In the meantime, I’ll continue my own research on it! ugh!! Thank you,
Stephanie Lovell

Hi Stephanie,
This is a Hummingbird Clearwing Caterpillar, Hemaris thysbe. Good luck getting your photo published. Meanwhile, we will have it on our homepage for a few days.

Letter 20 – Hummingbird Clearwing Caterpillar

 

Caterpillar
Hello
Can you tell me what kind of caterpillar this is? It was found in Kalispell, Montana.
Thank you
Margaret

Hi Margaret,
We believe this is a Hummingbird Clearwing Caterpillar, Hemaris thysbe. There are some nice photos on Bill Oehlke’s Site.

Letter 21 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Hummingbird clearwing moth?
Based upon your website — this looks like a hummingbird moth — also spotted in Northern NJ.
Open & Jim Banks

Hi Open and Jim,
You are absolutely correct. We have decided to remove the Dobsonfly from the top of our webpage and put your image since we are getting so much mail wanting this rapid flying beauty’s name. Very few photos actually show detail in the wings. Good job.

Letter 22 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Moth identification
I captured this moth on film on the phlox on our deck. Is this a Hummingbird Hawk Moth?
Thanks
Danny

Hi Danny,
Yes, this is one of the Hummingbird Clearwing Moths.

Letter 23 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

I think that this is another hummingbird clearwing moth. If not, let me know. Thought you might like to have this pic. Thanks,
Carol

Hi Carol,
Thanks for the photo. It appears to be a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, Haemorrhagia thysbe, but it is impossibl to be sure from your photograph. It might be a closely related species.

This pic shows a different angle of the same bug. Maybe it will help to identify it.
Carol

Our best guess is Haemorrhagia axillaris, the summer form of the Snowberry Clearwing.

Letter 24 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

I found this bug feeding at my lilacs in southcentral Alaska . I have never seen anything like it. I thought at first it was a bee, But others said it must be a moth. I am looking for something more definite. I have several other pictures of this critter from several angles, as it hovered quite calmly while I snapped away. Can you shed some light?

Hi Dorothy,
Your photo shows a moth from the genus Haemorrhagia, possibly H. axillaris, known as the Snowberry Clearwing, or H. thetis which is reported to range from Colorado and Wyoming west and north to Oregon and British Columbia. These moths belong to the Family Sphingidae, or Hawk Moths, also called Sphinx Moths. The clearwings are a day flying group.

Thanks. It was from your web page that I got excited believing that you would probably have the answer! I was wondering if Alaska is a bit north for its range. We definitely have the flowers needed to attract the moth. But we have a short season compared to others and a really cold climate for a longer time. Also we have extremes of light and dark. Since this a day flying moth, no doubt it loves the summers. Guess it survives the winters as well. I will keep trying to contact folks in the University here to see how common this fellow is.
Dorothy A. Hight

Letter 25 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Thought you might enjoy this picture of a hummingbird clearwing moth (I think). This was shot in northeastern PA at about 1/1000 shutter speed, illustrating the wings nicely.
Jim Pawelczyk

Hi Jim,
Thank you for the wonderfully detailed image.

Letter 26 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

What Bug
Hi there,
I took this picture tonight in southern Ontario. I’m not sure what kind on moth this is. could you please identify this for me.
Thank you
Sonja Fagnan

Hi Sonja,
We really must keep a photo of the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth on our homepage all summer. We are putting yours, which is very nice, at the top right now.

Letter 27 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 


After identifying this little jewel from my garden in South Carolina, through your website, I thought I would go for bug of the month. Or is that moth of the month ? Please reply back if it makes that honor !!
THANK YOU !!
John Bridges

Hi John,
Thank you for sending in your image of a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, one of the Sphinx Moths. We haven’t really decided on a Bug of the Month for October yet, but we do have an idea. We generally choose a seasonal creature based on identification volume from prior years.

Letter 28 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
I don’t have a question about this (now that I found it on your site), but I thought you’d enjoy the picture (you said clear ones are hard to come by). This little guy stuck around for about 10 minutes, plenty of time for me to snap a few pics. I’ve never seen a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth before and probably wouldn’t have been able to identify it without your site. Keep up the good work!
Brent H.
Boston NY

Hi Brent,
Your photo of a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth is an especially fine one.

Letter 29 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

hummingbird clearwing moth
Hi – enjoying your web site. I took this picture today and was doing research trying to determine what it is. It looks like a hummingbird clearwing moth. Could you please confirm? Thanks,
Judy in Loudon TN.

Hi Judy,
You are correct. This is a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth. We get many photos requesting identification of Hummingbird Clearwings, and we post so few as many are blurry. Yours is exceptional and we are happy to be able to replace the image that has been on our homepage for several weeks now.

Letter 30 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Butterfly or Bee? HOW STRANGE
At first when I saw this on my Butterfly Bush, I thought it was a bee, but my husband looked closer and told me it was some kind of Butterfly! I have never seen anything like this here in Missouri and I am a Native. Thanks
Lorre & Garrett Fossum
Harrisonville, MO

Hi Lorre and Garrett,
This is neither a butterfly nor a bee, but a moth. It is a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, one of the diurnal Sphinx Moths.
.

Letter 31 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

can you identify this bug
We live in Nasonworth, New Brunswick, Canada. This creature was polinating our petunias. I thought it was a baby humminbird until I saw the pictures.
Les Jones

Hi Les,
This is one of the most amazing images of a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth we have seen.

Letter 32 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Hummingbird clearwing
Hi Bugman,
I’ve already identified this bug quite easily by "googling" "hummingbird insect and then choosing your site on the first try. And, there it was, exactly like the picture I’d taken of the same insect. I’m writing you to thank you for the efforts extended in maintaining the site and to submit an even better (my own opinion, only) specimen of Hemaris thysbe. You can zoom in quite a bit before the picture becomes grainey. I’ve left the picture in its native jpg format and size. Thanks,
Carl Stevens

Hi Carl,
We are pleased to post your photo and are also pleased to inform you it is no longer necessary to use quotation marks with google. The verb has officially entered the lexicon after just a few years of popular usage and it has been accepted as a true word.

Letter 33 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Interesting photos
Just thought you might enjoy these pics for your site…and since I use your site to ID many insects I’m not sure about, I wanted to pass them on to you. The Sphinx eggs came about when my wife brought the adult moth home from work for me to photograph. While in the terrarium it laid eggs and they hatched within 6 days, and are growing fast. Every egg but one hatched. The Hummingbird Moth came from a tip by a friend, and once we went looking we had no problem locating it. Your site is excellent and its obvious that alot of hard work and hours are what keep it going.
Tom Rook
Brantford, Ont.
www.stockfullofnature.com

Hi Tom,
We will post your Hummingbird Clearwing Moth on our third Sphinx Moth page along with a link back to your site. We hope your numbers spike.

Letter 34 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 


Dear Bugman,
Here is the coolest bug (and I hate bugs) I have ever seen. Thanks to your site I know the name of this flying lobster.
Lisa Marie

Hi Lisa Marie,
We get so many requests for the identification of the Clearwing Sphinx Moths in the genus Hemaris, that we try to always have a photo on our homepage. This appears to be Hemaris thysbe, the Hummingbird Clearwing.

Letter 35 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Beautiful Bug!
Hello! I live right outside of Baltimore, Maryland and have seen this beautiful bug over the past few days, but today is the first time I could get a picture. It looks like just a lobster and moves quickly, so it was hard to get a good shot. Unfortunately, you can’t see the whole bug, but it has a long, thin proboscis and very thin and delicate legs. The green furry part is quite striking! I’ve searched to identify it, but can’t find it. Any help is appreciated.
Denise

Hi Denise,
We always try to keep a photo of one of the Sphinx Moths in the genus Hemaris on our homepage during the summer as we get so many identification requests. This is a Hummingbird Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe, and your photo is quite nice. They are often mistaken for Hummingbirds, Bees and some people liken them to flying shrimp.

Letter 36 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Hawkmoth
I noticed in one of the photos of a hawkmoth that you said it’s hard to get good details of the wings. I got a few you may like. Theses were taken in my front yard yesterday.
Shawn M. Buss

Hi Shawn,
Your photos of a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, Hemaris thysbe, are wonderful. We wish your location explanation included more information than merely your “front yard”.

Letter 37 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

what is this large, hovering nectar seeker
July 13, 2009
In northern Virginia, we occasionally see this large hovering insect? hovering over our butterfly bush. We thought upon casual looks that it was a hummingbird, –obviously not!
Thanks for any help
George Nossaman
Clifton, VA
hummingbird_clearwing_george
Hi George,
Mistaking the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, Hemaris thysbe, is a common mistake.  You may read more about this fascinating moth on Bill Oehlke’s awesome website.

Update
July 15, 2009
Daniel,
Many thanks for the help.   Guess I’ve got to get a book on bugs, and begin to bone up on these critters.   Here’s a shot later in the afternoon, where I caught the moth in flight.   He’s either curling or uncurling that long tongue.  Fascinating!
George

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Thanks for the update George, and the additional photo.

Letter 38 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Seen with honeybees
July 20, 2009
Hi, I spotted an unfamiliar insect in my privet hedge. These insects are approx 2cm in length. They have a hovering habit. They can be seen to unfurl a longish (1cm +) tongue into the tiny privet blossoms. My property is in a semi-rural setting surrounded by a greenbelt of mixed forest (spruce/balsam fir assorted hardwoods).
I have a new found respect for anyone who shoots bugs on the wing — these are the best of about 300 photos taken over 3 days! (Photos taken 20 July 2009)
Ian in Nova Scotia
Saint Margaret’s Bay, Nova Scotia approx 44deg 6min north latitude

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hi Ian,
This is a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, Hemaris thysbe.  On his excellent website, Bill Oehlke writes:  “Hemaris thysbe, the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth or Common Clearwing (wingspan 38-50 mm), readily visits flowers by day throughout the eastern half of the U.S. and Canada, where it ranges far to the north, even into the Yukon. Ken Philip reports them in Alaska: Interior Alaska: Fairbanks vicinity; Southcentral Alaska: Index Lake.  It is not difficult to see why many gardeners would mistake an Hemaris thysbe moth for a small hummingbird as it hovers, sipping nectar from flowers through a long feeding tube.  The moth hovers briefly, sipping for only a few seconds before darting off to a new flower. Green body “fur” and burgundy wing scales suggest a small ruby throated hummingbird.

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Letter 39 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Can you identify this insect?
August 5, 2009
Bees are regular visitor to our Bee Balm flowers. Today we saw what we thought was a small humming bird, but the pictures reveal six legs. It is larger than a bubble bee, and flies like a humming bird. It is August in Wisconsin.
Paul Sanders
Waukesha, Wisconsin

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hi Paul,
Diurnal Sphinx Moths in the genus Hemaris are often confused for hummingbirds, hence the common name of Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, Hemaris
thysbe.

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Letter 40 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Bumblebee/Butterfly in Pennsylvania
September 10, 2009
Hi, I saw this great bug outside of a butterfly exhibit in north central Pennsylvania this summer. The butterfly “experts” were not able to identify it. Any thoughts?
Thanks, Ben
North central Pennsylvania, Allenwood, Clyde Peeling’s Reptileland park

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hi Ben,
In defense of the butterfly experts, probably just like many of the workers in the giant hardware store chains, they are untrained students who work for a very low wage and are not given much on the job training or information.  When was the last time the person in the plumbing department was able to answer your question?  Your insect is a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, Hemaris thysbe.  You can see more images and get additional information on Bill Oehlke’s excellent website.

Letter 41 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Looked like a cross between a…
Location:  Castalia, Ohio 44824
July 18, 2010 8:36 pm
Looked like a cross between a humming bird, a bumble bee and a moth. It was feeding on our flowers and seemed to pay no mind to us. The pix are taken in macro and are quite striking at full zoom. We decided to call it a ”Humble Moth”. It had translucent wings, the body of a Bee, the beak of what could be described as a Humming Bird’s beak, eyes and long antenna of a moth….
What’s that Bug??!!
very Curious

Hummingbird Clearwing

Dear very Curious,
This may be any one of three Sphinx Moths in the genus
Hemaris that range in Ohio.  Our best guess is that this might be the Hummingbird Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe.  You can read more about it on Bill Oehlke’s excellent website.

Daniel,
Thank you so much for your prompt reply. What an interesting creature this little thing was. I enjoyed your site and the other you recommended too!
Again, Thank you!
Tony

Letter 42 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

is this a moth????
Location:  baltimore
August 4, 2010 7:45 pm
what a beautiful insect! My brother in law thinks it’s a moth but I can’t find pictures that resemble this guy . . .
what do you say, bugman??
in love with a bug

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Dear in love with a bug,
Your brother-in-law is correct.  This is one of the Hummingbird Clearwing Moths in the genus
Hemaris.

Amazing!! I kept telling him that it looked like a hummingbird had a wild night with a moth!!
Thank you!!!
-masha

Letter 43 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Hummingbird Moth
Location:  Central Massachusetts
September 7, 2010 2:38 pm
I had seen your answer to a previous writer about these cool creatures and I wanted to forward a few pictures of them to you. All this time we thought they were possibly baby hummingbirds only to find out they are moths.
But, none the less are are amazing creatures and appear to have no fear. they would buzz around my wife as she was trimming the butterfly bushes in our yard. Enjoy.
Signature:  Brian Dicks

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hi Brian,
We are happy to post your photo of a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth.  It seems we have answered at least two identification requests for this creature every day for the past few weeks, but either the photos were not that good, or the letter was not engaging, or we had too many other letters we wanted to post, but whatever the reason, we have responded directly without posting the letters to our website.  We like that you took the time to identify your Hummingbird Clearwing Moth and that your letter is enthusiastic about nature, and that your image quality is very good, so we are posting your letter and photo of a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth,
Hemaris thysbe, which you may read about on Bill Oehlke’s excellent website.

Letter 44 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Moth?
Location: Northern Virginia
April 5, 2011 12:15 pm
I took this photo last year in the Leesburg area of Virginia.
What I found odd about this ”bug” is that it flew like a humming bird. Very fast wings and it would hover over flowers and drink from them.
Can you tell me what this is?
Signature: AZ

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hi AZ,
This is a Hummingbird Clearwing, one of several diurnal Sphinx Moths that are often confused for hummingbirds.  You can see the Sphingidae of the Americas website for additional information.

Letter 45 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Subject: moth, buterfly or other
Location: New York
July 8, 2012 7:30 pm
What kind of bug is this. It visited our butterfly bush this evening. It hovers like a hummingbird to feed. It is quick, wings translucent, Not afraid and stuck around for a while visiting different flowers on the bush. We live in New York on the Southern edge of the Catskill Mountains. Wings were clear but did have some red detailing in them.
Signature: bugman

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hi bugman,
Your first guess is correct.  This is a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth,
Hemaris thysbe, and you may verify that on Sphingidae of the Americas, the website devoted to new world species from your moth’s family.  As moths go, Hummingbird Clearwings are very atypical.  They are diurnal rather than flying at night.  The are frequently mistaken for hummingbirds as they hover before flowers drinking nectar.  Thanks for sending your wonderful photo. 

Letter 46 – Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

 

Subject: Large Orange Bee like bug
Location: Maine
August 19, 2014 7:30 am
This bug was seen flitting about a group of flowers. It was the size of a large bumble bee, and moved as such. It was Orange colored on the back half, and greyish on the front half. The wings in the photos looked more butterfly like. It had fairly long antenna and tongue. It looked like a cross between a bee and a hummingbird.
Found flitting about medium sized white clustered flowers within a few yards of the shore of a Maine fresh water lake.
The photos were taken by my sister, and she will be sending me larger copies soon, but I attached what I have so far.
Signature: J from Maine

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Dear J from Maine,
This is a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth,
Hemaris thysbe, a diurnal Sphinx Moth.  We don’t need larger copies, but since one image looks like it was taken from a television screen and the other is just plain blurry, it you have sharper images with more clarity, we would love to post those instead.

Letter 47 – Hummingbird Clearwing

 

Can you identify this insect
Location:  Beallsville,MD
August 14, 2010 7:10 pm
The insect in the photo hovers at the flowers and drinks the nectar, much like a hummingbird. This photo was taken in Maryland in July, 2010
Eddie

Snowberry Clearwing

Hi Eddie,
This moth is a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth,
Hemaris thysbe.  It is frequently mistaken for a hummingbird.

Correction
correction re Hummingbird Clearwing
August 14, 2010 9:50 pm
Daniel:
the photos today (Aug. 14th) that you ID’ed as Snowberry Clearwing actually appear to be Hemaris thysbe, often called a Hummingbird Clearwing.  According to BugGuide.net, the correct binomial for Snowberry Clearwing is Hemaris diffinis.
It’s the one without the combo of rust and light green.  Thanks for maintaining your site, it must be a lot of work!
regards, Dave Fallow in Madison WI

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts
Tags: Clearwing Moth

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35 Comments. Leave new

  • Hi Norm: According to the checklists of moths of Illinois there are only two species of clearwing moths in that state; the Hummingbird Clearwing (Hemaris thysbe) and the Snowberry Clearwing (H. diffinis). H. diffinis is a yellow and black bumblebee mimic with a narrow outer forewing margin, so that leaves H. thysbe. This species is most easily confused with the very similar Slender Clearwing (H. gracilis), a species apparently not reported from Illinois but that does occur in states to the north and east. H. thysbe and H. gracilis are distinguished from each other by markings on the flanks below the wings (unfortunately not visible on your photo) and on the forewings. The uneven inner edge of the reddish-brown border of the forewing indicates that yours is H. thysbe. Regards.

    K

    Reply
  • Hi Ian

    I took pictures of the exact same species on July 19th in Nine Mile River, NS. We have been debating what he was. At first my husband thouht he was a baby hummingbird, then I got a great closeup. We were calling ours a BumbleBird, just until we found out what it was.

    Have you seen many around? I am fascinated with them now.

    Reply
  • I was able to identify one of these little guys on my butterfly bush thanks to this website 🙂

    Reply
  • That is one really awesome bug!

    Reply
  • Rita Pearson
    April 28, 2013 7:47 pm

    I took several truly awesome pics today of a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth! I was sooooo excited! I have seen pics on this site and mine are much better! Would you like me to send them to you? Thanks, Rita Pearson Mechanicsville, VA USA

    Reply
  • linda schmit
    June 21, 2013 6:16 pm

    Hummingbird Clearing Moth. I have found the moth in my my garden.I live in Waukesha County,
    Wisconsin. If anyone has more info on this moth I would like it. Thank You.
    This is a very BUSY MOTH thank you. I hope someone has Info??

    Reply
  • linda schmit
    June 21, 2013 6:16 pm

    Hummingbird Clearing Moth. I have found the moth in my my garden.I live in Waukesha County,
    Wisconsin. If anyone has more info on this moth I would like it. Thank You.
    This is a very BUSY MOTH thank you. I hope someone has Info??

    Reply
  • Mother and Sun Bug Lovers
    July 22, 2013 8:33 am

    I know this is such an old post that Dorothy may never see my response, but I thought she might be interested to know that some years lately we have had quite a few hawkmoths way up here in Fairbanks. I grew up in Fairbanks and I am pretty sure we didn’t have hawkmoths back then, so perhaps like some other species they have moved north as the climate has warmed.

    Reply
  • Is it a moth or a hummingbird?

    Reply
  • saw one of these yesterday hovering over my dog’s poop, never saw one before ever! pretty amazing insect even my husband was amazed!

    Reply
  • Zach Rediess
    July 21, 2014 3:24 pm

    My family and I found one of these today on our front porch in Eau Claire Wisconsin

    Reply
    • We believe we have A H Bird Clearwing Moth in our back yard…amazing. I have never seen one before…we live in CT

      Reply
  • Dear Bugalaska,

    So glad you posted this pic and info! We just saw one here in Nashville spending the ENTIRE evening pursuing our Lantana and Hibiscus. Swore it was a Hummingbird until we noticed the antennae. Took photos and video trying to get a closer look. He was very friendly and not worried about us at all- practically landed on us. Hamming it up for photos too, apparently! What a treat to see one of these! So interesting! None of us has ever seen one before. So amazing how much he resembles a Hummingbird! Thanks for posting the photo of the still wings so we could see more clearly!

    Reply
  • Dear Bugalaska,

    So glad you posted this pic and info! We just saw one here in Nashville spending the ENTIRE evening pursuing our Lantana and Hibiscus. Swore it was a Hummingbird until we noticed the antennae. Took photos and video trying to get a closer look. He was very friendly and not worried about us at all- practically landed on us. Hamming it up for photos too, apparently! What a treat to see one of these! So interesting! None of us has ever seen one before. So amazing how much he resembles a Hummingbird! Thanks for posting the photo of the still wings so we could see more clearly!

    Reply
  • Catherine H. Coffey
    August 2, 2014 6:05 pm

    Thanks so much for the info. These are the most beautiful little moth

    Reply
  • I’ve never seen one until today and found your site as I tried to figure out what it was. It’s August in VA. Pretty fascinating bug!

    Reply
  • I have found this in my home state: New Hampshire more up north though all over the place! Didnt know it was classified just thought it was a mistake between a bumblebee and humming bird. Very interesting and they do not seem so bother anyone!

    Reply
  • found one in Texas it was black and yellow

    Reply
  • Found in my yard in Decatur,Il

    Reply
  • Glenda Edington
    July 6, 2016 11:03 am

    East Tennessee has them in a brown and yellow bee like markings. The family has always thought that they were a variety of Tobacco Hawk Moth.

    Reply
  • Paul Cockrill
    July 27, 2017 10:22 am

    I found this strange moth like thingy on the back of my car today in Wilmot NS..
    It is about two inches long with clear wings and a big head/body..I have pictures but can’t seem to add them here

    Reply
  • Paul Cockrill
    July 27, 2017 10:22 am

    I found this strange moth like thingy on the back of my car today in Wilmot NS..
    It is about two inches long with clear wings and a big head/body..I have pictures but can’t seem to add them here

    Reply
  • Paul Cockrill
    July 27, 2017 10:24 am
    Reply
  • Diel Van Haverbeke
    August 13, 2017 7:57 pm

    I saw one of these yesterday going from flower to flower, my neighbor said it was a hummingbird moth, which I have never heard of. Same look as the clearwig shown above. Tried to get a good picture, but those little wings were moving too fast.

    Reply
  • Debra Joseph
    July 11, 2018 3:24 pm

    Just saw one today for the first time drinking nectar from my Bee Balm plants! Have never seen one before in my life and looked it up and happened upon this site. I live in the North Georgia mountains. So cool to discover something I’ve never seen before!

    Reply
  • Saw one on July 18, 2018.
    I have never seen one before, it was amazing.
    Feeling special that I saw it.

    Reply
  • Saw one on July 18, 2018.
    I have never seen one before, it was amazing.
    Feeling special that I saw it.

    Reply
  • I had just seen this on our weather network and was intrigued. Then couple days later after big rain one was in my driveway by a tire. One wing very wet. So I put it on a paper and took to drier garden area. They are amazing looking.

    Reply

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