Do Longhorned Beetles Fly?

folder_openColeoptera, Insecta
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Longhorn beetles, especially the Asian ones, are an invasive pest and can create severe economic damage to trees. But can these beetles fly as well? Let’s find out.

The long-horned beetle is a destructive pest that can cause severe damage to trees. That said, you might be curious if these beetles can fly. 

Unfortunately, the answer to this is yes. These beetles can move from one tree to another by flying around. 

Although Asian long-horned beetles aren’t native to North America, they have grown in numbers and spread, becoming a major nuisance.

Do Longhorned Beetles Fly?

What Are Longhorned Beetles?

The term ‘longhorned beetle’ doesn’t refer to any specific pest in particular but an entire family of 35,000 beetle species. 

They earn the name from their extremely long antennae, which often grow longer than their bodies. 

One of the most common species of longhorned beetle is the Asian Longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis), which is black with white spots. 

Native to China and Korea, this pest has spread across to other continents too. Although often mistaken to be a Japanese beetle, it is not a part of Japan’s native fauna.

What Damage Do They Do?

The adult females use their ovipositors to lay eggs under the bark of wood. It’s mostly the larvae that cause damage to stems, trunks, and roots. 

Known as round-headed borers in the larval stage, they are capable of damaging both living trees and untreated lumber by boring into the wood.

The damage varies from one species to another, but some are particularly destructive. Certain species, like the old-house borer, are also major indoor pests. 

These larvae live for two to three years inside the tree, making tunnels that leave the tree a hollow shell of itself.

The Asian Longhorned beetle is capable of laying up to 90 eggs during its lifetime.

Do Longhorned Beetles Fly?

Can They Fly?

Yes, this invasive pest is a winged beetle and is capable of flying. On average, they can fly up to 1.4 miles from the tree where they originally emerged. 

The stronger ones among them can cover longer distances, especially the older and well-fed adults. 

During laboratory tests in controlled environments, some were able to fly as far as 8.5 miles.

Because of its ability to fly and its destructive capacity, this bug often requires setting up large quarantine areas to prevent longhorned beetle outbreaks. 

How To Control Their Spread?

Eliminating longhorned beetles can be a challenge, as pesticides aren’t very effective against them. 

In the event of a longhorned beetle outbreak, the best you can do is try to control its spread. 

Usually, quarantine areas with buffer zones are set up to control the spread. This requires the removal of infested trees after a thorough survey. 

During the quarantine period, no host trees or wood should be moved out from the area, including nursery stock.

Besides this, it’s also possible to use the natural enemies of the pest against them to control their population. 

Ontsira mellipes, a parasitoid wasp species, is particularly effective against these pests. 

The wasp is already used often to control the spread of Asian Longhorned Beetles in forests.

Do Longhorned Beetles Fly?

Frequently Asked Questions

Do longhorned beetles bite?

If you come across a longhorned beetle in your home, there’s no reason to fear it. 
Although these pests can be quite a nuisance, they are incapable of stinging, biting, or harming you in any other way. 
Besides, the adult beetles do not attack furniture either; only the larvae of certain species do.

Are longhorn beetles harmful?

Although the extent of damage depends on the species, long-horned beetles can wreak havoc on trees. 
Their larvae bore tunnels and galleries in the stems and the roots, weakening the trees and eventually killing them. 
These beetles can be devastating enough to disrupt forest and woodland ecosystems. The adults feed on leaves, young bark, and twigs.

What do longhorn beetles do?

The adult females chew depressions into tree bark and lay their eggs inside them. Upon hatching, the larvae feed on plant tissue, boring deep and vast tunnels in the wood. 
Besides the damage this causes to the tree’s structure, it also inhibits the tree’s ability to absorb and transfer nutrients properly.

How long do longhorn beetles live?

Like many insect species, female longhorn beetles live longer than males. Each female beetle of this species lives for approximately 66 days after hatching. A male longhorn beetle, on the other hand, has a lifespan of 50 days.

Wrap Up

Longhorned beetles can attack a diverse variety of trees. Potential host species include mountain ashes, birches, willows, poplars, maples, etc. 

Due to the nature of the infestation, it is possible that these bugs can cause a lot of economic harm to the wood industry.

Hence, the appearance of these beetles near woods or gardens can be quite concerning. I hope you found this article enjoyable, and thank you for reading it.

Reader Emails

Given that some longhorned beetles can be very destructive to trees, it is no surprise that our readers wanted to understand how far some of them could spread and whether they could fly or not.

Regardless, we have an excellent collection of photographs of longhorned beetles from all over the world. Do go through the letters and pics below.

Letter 1 – Unknown Longhorn Borer identified as Cedar Tree Borer – Beetles in their Beds!!!!!

 

Beetle we can’t identify
Dear Bugman:
We recently purchased a new construction home in Granby CO. This beetle has now shown up in one of the bedrooms (mainly in the bed – not too happy sharing with them!) There is a sump pump in the foundation in that room. Can you identify this lovely creature for me? Picture is attached. Thank you! If you need further information – please contact me.
Sincerely,
Kathie Jones

Hi Kathie,
We tried to match the species of the Longhorn Borer Beetle, family Cerambycidae, on BugGuide with no luck. You did not indicate if this was an isolated specimen of if many were found. If it is a new home, it is entirely possible that some of the wood had beetle grubs that matured and chewed their way out. Adults do not bore into wood, only grubs. It is also possible that this specimen was attracted indoors by the lights. At any rate, we will check with Eric Eaton to see if he can narrow down the exact identification. Eric wrote back with this information: “Daniel: I have no idea what this is. Please contact Doug Yanega at UC Riverside. He should be able to recognize it. Please have him CC me his response, I’m really curious now myself! Oh, wait. I just thought of a possibility: Semanotus ligneus, or something else in that genus. Eric”

Update: (02/06/2007) Unknown Longhorn Borer
Dear What’s That Bug,
It appears that the unknown longhorn beetle in kathie’s new home in CO. is the Cedar Tree Borer-Semanotus l. ligneus. Good looking bycid. Keep up the good work Brian
U.S. Department of Agriculture (Aphis)

Update: (02/06/2007)
Beetle we can’t identify
Thank you for checking into this specimen for me. This beetle has mainly been in the one bedroom. Within 1 day there were 15 counted in the bed and around on the floor. We did locate one about 15 feet into another bedroom. However, I believe this is an isolated area that they are coming in to (possibly the sump pump?). I look forward to hearing what you find out for the exact kind this is. I also contacted our furniture company as we recently had some white cedar bedroom furniture bought for that room. However, I was informed that the cedar is a natural bug repellant and nothing should have been in that wood. Thank you again for your’s and Eric’s help with our unwanted guests. Sincerely,
Kathie Jones

Hi again Kathie,
Based on the information we have recieved since posting your photo, you have Cedar Tree Borers. Since you have just purchased Cedar furniture for your bedroom, and you find the beetles in the bed, we are guessing that the grubs were in fact dormant in the wood and have recently emerged. While cedar is a natural insect repellant, it does not repel the Cedar Tree Borer.

Another Case of Cedar Tree Borers
Kathie’s beetle
Dear Bugman,
This is my first visit to your website to identify a bug, and the second picture I see is the picture Kathie Jones sent you on 2-5-07. That is the bug I was looking to identify, how weird is that! We have seen a good dozen of these bugs in our bedroom -in the vicinity of our bed. We set up a new bed and mattress exactly one month ago and the bugs started appearing a a week or two later, I don’t recall seeing one of those ever before. The bed is a handcrafted log bed from a guy who makes them in northern Wisconsin, we live in southern Wisconsin, my husband picked up the bed himself and transported it to our house in his pick-up truck, we set it up the next day. Maybe this will help you identify it. We sure would like to know what they are and what we can do about them. Thanks,
Ann Thompson

Update: (02/07/2007)
Dear What’s that bug, Has the owners of their new cedar furniture looked for frass or what they would consider saw dust caused by the beetle activities. This should help them locate the exit holes and what part of their new bedroom set has the beetles. Sometimes you can hear them chewing. I would ask the makers of the furniture if the wood has been heat treated. I would bet not. If the have any specimens in good shape I would gladly put them into my insect collection. I have seen exotic longhorns emerging from all kinds of items ranging from imported pine cones to wooden bussiness card holders. Hope this information helps the folks out
Brian
U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Chet and Katie
The use of an exterminator may be a bit much but they may tell you otherwise. These beetles 1st came to the cedar probably a tree that was stressed or dying when it laid its eggs. Then the larvae entered the tree feeding and creating feeding galleries inside the tree. At that point it was cut and made into its present form (bedroom furniture). Normally the larvae are in the tree for a season and then emerge as adults during the warmer months. When you brought the furniture into your warm house you triggered the beetle to emerge. The section or sections has to be pretty infested to have the numbers you have mentioned. The sump pump you mentioned is not an issue. These are wood borers not aquatic species but it good to see that you were looking at all the possibilities. After all the beetle emerge they will die in time. As adult beetles there main mission is to emerge and carry on the blood line by mating and laying eggs thus completing the lifecycle. No food to eat and no new host trees to lay eggs they will die out and they will not re-infest the furniture or other house hold items. They are totally harmless even though they have good size mouth parts but don’t really bite. They may make sounds when held (pretty cool). The only concern I would have is the damage that was done to the wood. If it is a leg holding up the bed or other important structure mishaps may happen. Look for saw dust or emergence hole. If the furniture is from a good company you should get a replacement or refund (take pics of the beetle and damage). At this point pesticides will not do much to solve this. The wood would have to be saturated with it (Not good for you son) and their sad home relocation story is almost over. The beetle will die out. If the furniture was from overseas we at the USDA would be very concerned due to exotic wood borering pest damage our forests and natural ecosystems like the emerald ash borer and the Asian Longhorned beetle. Yours is native though and a good looking bug at that and don’t regulate these. Any other questions feel free to ask
Brian Sullivan

Hi Brian, I have several very much alive species of those Cedar Tree Borers in a small plastic ziplock bag right now. If you want them I will send them to you, let me know what to do. We have found some exit holes in the bed and we contacted the guy who made the bed and he is going to make us a new bed ASAP. Said this has never happened to him until now, he is also replacing one other bed from the same batch of wood. I’ll be waiting for your reply regarding sending you the critters. Thanks,
Ann Thompson

Dear Ann I am glad that you found the exit holes and that the furniture maker is going to replace the bed. Its not uncommon for batches of untreated wood to contain insects. I would not want to sleep on a bed that might break due to insect damage. A great thanks goes out to What’s That Bug? for all of their hard work and dedication. This is a happy ending to your story and was due to What’s That Bugs efforts. Besides posting identification and great photos they are providing many other great services to the public. Thanks
USDA APHIS PPQ
Brian Sullivan

Letter 2 – Unknown South African Longhorned Borer Beetle

 

2nd contribution
Dear Bugman,
I stumbled across your website last week and I love it! Well done for creating such a website – I spent most of my weekend going through your archives. I am so happy to see that there are many other bug lovers out there! I am going to send you a collection of bug photos that I have taken over the years – I love bugs, but I don’t know enough about them to identify them so here are some bugs for you from South Africa to identify J. I’ll send them to you separately: 2. Beetle Some kind of a colourful beetle we found – also quite big, approx 6cm long Cheers,
Steph

Hi Steph,
First we must say that we are warmed by your enthusiasm. Second, we are impressed that you actually thought to send each of your requests as a separate email, which makes our posting much easier. Trying to keep What’s That Bug? even marginally organized is a daunting task, especially since the staff is organizationally challenged. You should see our office. Also, finding the time it takes for us to post even one letter with all the “real” obligations we have is not easy. With that said, we can only broadly identify your beetle. This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we are not sure of the genus or species. Larvae of the Cerambycids, or Bycids for short, are wood boring grubs. Researching insects from many parts of the world, including South Africa, is not always easy, and there is a noticeable dearth of identification websites for many locations. Our request is that after about a week, any letters that we did not post, please resend them with any helpful information, and please don’t send them all at once.

Letter 3 – Unknown Long-Horned Borer Beetle from Thailand

 

Weird Bug from Thailand
Hi,
I was hoping that you could help me identify this bug please from when I was living in Jomtien, Thailand. It chased me (or so it seemed) whilst I was outside put my washing to dry. After hiding in an out building for 10 minutes I ran back to the main house to tell me husband. When I went back outside it seemed to have been waiting for me and flew at me again. It finaly settled on a tree and my husband took this picture. Thank you for any information you can give. Love the site.
Stephanie (UK)

Cerambycid from Thailand
Cerambycid from Thailand

Hi Stephanie,
This surely is a spectacular looking Long-Horned Borer Beetle in the genus Cerambycidae. We are not certain of the species, and since we have several days of catch-up to do with posting since our new site migration, we haven’t the time to research this further. We feel fully confident that one of our loyal readers will be able to provide a proper identification, and then use the new comment option on our site to post an identification. To further assist in the identification, a larger file can be downloaded by clicking on the image.

Update: 23 September 2008
Daniel:
Finally went to see the new site….
The big, long-legged yellow longhorn with the black stripes from Thailand is Gerania bosci, apparently at least an uncommon species in collections.  Great image, given the fear factor:-)
Eric Eaton

Letter 4 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Aruba: Oxymerus aculeatus

 

Spots and Stripes…I’m Stumped!
June 5, 2009
Hello there!
First I just want to say I’m so glad I found this site…so informative, thanks for your efforts! I’d like to ask your help in identifying this guy I saw on vacation in Aruba last week. He was hanging around the balcony all day, weather there was low 80s and dry. The pattern reminds me of a potato beetle but the body doesn’t seem quite right…maybe some type of borer? (Sorry if these are dumb guesses, these is soooo not my field, I’m only working with what I could piece together in the last couple hours from google and pouring through your site until my eyes went blurry 🙂 )
Thanks in advance and I hope you are enjoying your vacation!
Najah W.
Aruba

Unknown Cerambycid
Oxymerus aculeatus

Hi Najah,
As you indicated, we were away when you wrote in June, and we never really caught up on unanswered mail.  We are trying to post a few old letters today, and we find your request most interesting.  First, both Leaf Beetles and Longhorned Borer Beetles are in the same superfamily Chrysomeloidea, so your confusion is actually supported by scientific taxonomy.  Your beetle does have the markings of a Colorado Potato Beetle, and the antennae of a Longhorned Borer Beetle.  We believe it is a Longhorned Borer in the family Cerambycidae, though we are uncertain of the species.  Perhaps one of our readers can assist in a proper identification.

Identification courtesy of Karl
This looks like Oxymerus aculeatus (Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae: Trachyderini). The Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services has posted a “Pest Alert” for this species (available online), fearing that it may have become established in South Florida. I believe this is it, but I haven’t checked to see if there are related and similar looking species. Regards. K

Letter 5 – Mystery: Unknown Longhorned Borer Beetle is Hybodera tuberculata

 

Could you please try to ID these beetles? Thanks!
April 19, 2010
These were two of many of their kind that were scurrying all over my windshield today (April 19); some were mating. Each was maybe about an inch long. I was parked directly under a mature cherry tree. The yellow on the windshield is, I believe maple pollen. Thanks for any help in IDing them – I searched this site and a few others but didn’t manage to come across it. Love your site, I refer to it all the time and it has stopped me from being quite so much of a bug-fearer!
Karen in Seattle
Mercer Island, WA

Unknown Longhorned Borer Beetles

Hi Karen,
These are Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae, but we are late for work and haven’t the time to identify the species at the moment.  Perhaps one of our readers will have some free time and post a comment.

Karl provides an answer
April 26, 2010
Hi Daniel and Karen:
It looks like Hybodera tuberculata (Cerambycinae: Hyboderini). The genus only has two species, both native to the Pacific coast. H. tuberculata looks closer than H. debilis. I couldn’t find much information foe either, but apparently H. tuberculata ranges further north (to British Columbia) and H. debilis ranges further south (to California). Regards.
Karl

Letter 6 – Longhorned Borer Beetles

 

bug/beetle on a Harrisia simpsonii
June 4, 2010
Can you tell me what this bug is and if it could be the pollinator of this Prickly Apple Cactus? I brought 3 plants home. 1st night one bug, 2nd bloom 2nd night one bug noticed, 3rd night-different plant 3 bugs.
Susan Forrest
Key largo, FL

Longhorned Borer Beetles

Hi Susan,
The photo with three beetles appears to have two different species, though all are Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae.  The individuals with the ivory spots are in the genus Eburia, possibly Eburia distincta, a beetle that is posted to BugGuide with strictly Florida sightings.  Cypress is a host tree for the wood boring larvae.  The genus Eburia is represented on BugGuide by nine different, but very similar looking species.

Letter 7 – Longhorned Borer Beetle: Neoclytus scutellaris

 

Beetle on Oak Debris
June 20, 2010
Hi. I found a bunch of these guys skittering around on the stump and debris of an oak tree my parents had cut down in their yard. At first I thought they were some sort of crickets; they were moving rather quickly and it was hard to get a good look let alone a picture. But I finally succeeded. I’m not so practiced at IDs for beetles, but I think I am correct that they are one of the wood borer beetles: neoclytus scutellaris (no common name that I could find). I was unsurprised, though, when I read that they like dead and dying oaks; they’d found this one less than 24hrs after it had been cut down. I’m hoping to have some pictures soon from the cocoons I rescued from the cut down branches.
Karen H.
Belleview, FL

Neoclytus scutellaris

Hi Karen,
We agree with your identification of Neoclytus scutellaris, a Longhorned Borer Beetle whose larvae, according to BugGuide:  “feed in sapwood of (dead?) oaks, hickories, also grape.

Letter 8 – Ornate Checkered Beetle and Mating Flower Longhorns

 

2 beetles seen in Montana
Location:  NW Montana, Glacier NP
September 13, 2010 6:32 pm
Greetings Bugman!
You have a wonderful site! My grandson and I found it a year or so ago.
I am trying to identify 2 kinds of beetles (there is a 3rd in the photo, but tiny)that I photographed on some white spirea at Glacier NP last month.
Can you help me identify them? I searched the site, but probably not the right search word combos.
You may use the photos with attribution if you like.
Gretchen F.
backyardnotes.wordpress.com
Seattle, WA
P.S. I have a link to your site on my blog
Signature:  backyardnotes

Ornate Checkered Beetle and Mating Flower Longhorns

Hi Gretchen,
Thanks for the complimentary letter.  We believe the black and yellow beetle is an Ornate Checkered Beetle,
Trichodes ornatus, based on BugGuide images, but since its head is buried in the inflorescence, positive identification may not be possible.  The mating pair appear to be some species of Flower Longhorn in the subfamily Lepturinae, possibly Xestoleptura crassipes, also pictured on BugGuide.

Many thanks, Daniel! I just have that ‘need to know’ gene and when I post photos on my blog I like to have an identification.
And, thanks for the link to BugGuide! I will add that to my links list.
Gretchen Flickinger

Letter 9 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Brazil

 

unknow bug
Location: brazil
January 16, 2011 8:56 pm
hi bugman,
can you tell me whats that very strange bug? i snatched him acciedently today.
thanks
Signature: antonio f. prado

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Antonio,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we do not recognize the species, however we have seen similar antennae in photographs of some members of the family.  Perhaps we will have some luck researching the species which we can add to the posting or perhaps we will get some assistance from our readership.

Ed Note: January 18, 2011
Thanks to a comment from lttlechkn, we have found some internet documentation that this is
Compsocerus violaceus.  The accidental snatching that resulted in this crushed beetle is quite unfortunate.  It may be quite rare or difficult to collect because the God of Insects website prices it at $45.

Letter 10 – Mating Longhorn Beetles in New Zealand

 

Black ants – Orange ringed abdomen & feelers
Location: New Zealand
January 23, 2011 12:42 am
Hello there Bugman. These two (obviously male & female) are the unidentified bugs. Found 400m from New Brighton beach, Christchurch, NZ on a tree.
Signature: Skunkwerx

Mating Beetles

Dear Skunkwerx,
These are Beetles, not Ants, and judging by the antennae, they are Longhorn Beetles in the family Cerambycidae.  We did locate a similar looking species identified as
Obrida fascialis, the One Banded Longicorn Beetle, on the Brisbane Insect website, but a web search of images with that scientific name brought up lots of images of  fingernails and other human body parts and photographs of Nicole Kidman and Beyonce, leading us to believe something is terribly amiss with that identification.  We hope our readers will have time to unravel this mystery while we are at work.

Update:  November 11, 2012
We just approved a comment identifying the genus
Zorion for this pair, and we found a matching photo on FlickRiver to support that comment.

Letter 11 – Unknown Longhorned Borer Beetle

 

sickly bug appears out of nowhere
Location: inland San Diego county, California
July 7, 2011 12:58 am
Two nights in a row i run across the same type of bug, which i have never seen before. Both bugs seem sick and dying and appear out of nowhere. About an inch long and seemingly wingless with long sturdy segmented antennae. Makes a quiet buzzing sound when provoked. No hairs on the legs that i can see. Underside of abdomen is banded. We’ve had hot humid weather both days they appeared. But I’ve never come across one before.
Signature: sara

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Hi sara,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, though we cannot provide you with a species name at this time.

Letter 12 – Longhorned Borer Beetle: Possibly Neoclytus mucronatus

 

Ant…Cricket…Beetle… Ant…Cricket…Beetle..Brickant?
Location: Missouri, St. Louis
August 28, 2011 10:55 am
Saw these guys all over a felled mimosa branch. They moved like fast ants, have legs like crickets and bodies appearing to be something like beetle. I looked and the only things I could find resembling them at all were clown beetles – but none really had the same markings or body. Please help this poor creature out of its identity crises!
PS: sorry the photos are a little blurry. I don’t have the best camera for close ups of a critter this size – approx. 1/2”L.
Signature: Confused Critter

Longhorned Borer Beetle: Neoclytus mucronatus

Dear Confused Critter,
This beetle is one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae.  The larvae are wood borers and most are relatively species specific with regard to the host plant.  We believe your beetle is in the somewhat populous genus
Neoclytus, and based on photos posted to BugGuide, Neoclytus mucronatus seems like a very good match.  BugGuide also notes that it is:  “Fairly common and quite variable in size”

 

Letter 13 – Longhorned Borer Beetle: Synaphaeta guexi

 

Subject: strange beetle?
Location: Portland Or.
May 26, 2012 12:24 am
I took this photo today in Selwood Or. near Portland close to the Willamette River. When I got home and looked it looked like it was sunning it’s self after moulting…
Signature: Jamie

Synphaeta guexi

Hi Jamie,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae and we believe it is
Synphaeta guexi, sometimes called the Spotted Tree Borer according to this BugGuide posting.  It does appear from your photo that the beetle might have just metamorphosed and that the pupal exuvia is to the left of the beetle.  If that is the case, we are very curious to get the opinion of an expert.  We thought that the metamorphosis occurred in the pupal chamber within the wood and that the adult then chewed its way to the surface.  The larvae of Longhorned Borer Beetles are found in wood and they are often very specific about the trees that they bore into.  Do you happen to know what kind of log this was?  Also, do you have a dorsal view that might help confirm the identification.  This comment is also posted on BugGuide:  “this is indeed an uncommon beetle that seems to consistently evade experienced insect enthusiasts: ALL of its images we have on BG to date have been posted by first-time contributors!”  We will try to get an opinion from Eric Eaton.

Unfortunately that is the only image I captured. I meant to mention that it was almost 2 inches long which is why I noticed it. It was on a very old bit of railing on a footbridge so if it was a specific kind of wood I have no idea. I would like to think I could go back the next day but I am sure it is gone now. If there is any more info I can provide I would be happy to do that.

Thanks for the update Jamie.  If it was found on a bridge, then that tends to discount that the pupal exuvia is the object to the left of the beetle.  That might just be some random tree debris.  Our belief that the metamorphosis occurs beneath the surface and that the adult chews its way to the surface can persist unchallenged.

Eric Eaton confirms identification.
Yes, it is.  The beetle may have been struggling to free itself from the pupa as it also worked its way out of the log.
Eric

Letter 14 – Mating Milkweed Longhorns and Japanese Beetle

 

A few insects
Location:  Southern Illinois
June 20, 2012  8:05 AM
A few more questions for What’s That Bug.  Two weeks ago while walking I got to see these first two insects in the same patch of sweet peas.  A little help in the ID would be nice.  The other insect is feeding on Poison Hemlock.  The RedBug pic would be R rated I think.
Thank you, JimmyDean

Mating Milkweed Longhorns and Japanese Beetle

Dear JimmyDean,
Please use our standard form each time you submit a new request.  We realize it is easier to just respond to a previous request, but by not using our forms, important fields might be overlooked, like location.  We needed to hunt down your previous posting on our site to ascertain your location as Southern Illinois, provided of course these images were not taken on a road trip.  We are posting your photo of mating Milkweed Longhorns, also called Red Milkweed Beetles or Milkweed Borers.  A Japanese Beetle, an invasive exotic species that has naturalized in the eastern states, is also in the photo.  The plants are not sweet peas but milkweed, and there is a diverse community of insects and other creatures that flourishes around milkweed.  The other milkweed photo is of mating Large Milkweed Bugs and the insect on the poison hemlock is a Soldier Beetle.

I apologize for not using the form.  I was running hard this morning (or was it yesterday?) and forgot.  I will make sure that I go to the form next time. Thanks for the assistance.  Jim

Letter 15 – Milkweed Longhorn Beetle and Unexpected Cycnia Caterpillar

 

Subject: Red Beetle with Black Spots
Location: Johnson County Kansas
July 9, 2012 7:57 pm
I found the attached in Johnson County Kansas. The beetle was sitting on milkweed and although there was evidence of damage adjacent to the beetle I did not observe it feeding. The brown caterpillar in the attached photo was one of several that were indeed feeding on Milkweeds in my pasture.
Signature: Mike

Milkweed Longhorn Beetle

Hi Mike,
Normally we like to confine the number of insects in a single posting to one unless they are the same family, but we are making an exception in your case because we have a Milkweed Meadow tag because so many different insects comprise the intricate ecosystem that depends upon milkweed.  Your beetle is a Milkweed Longhorn in the genus
Tetraopes.  If they are disturbed, they create a squeaking sound by Stridulation.  The sound is produced by rubbing body parts together.  The caterpillar was a bit more of a challenge.  We quickly located this Gaia Garden:  The Milkweed Insect Tribe webpage with a photograph identified as the orange-margined dogbane moth, Cycnia tenera.  We always double check identifications if possible, and that name on BugGuide was a different insect.  As luck would have it, additional searching led us to another member of the same genus, Cycnia inopinatus, the Unexpected Cycnia Caterpillar, also on BugGuide.  Many insects that feed on milkweed sport orange or red and black coloration to warn predators that the insects are either poisonous or distasteful due to the toxins in the milkweed.

Unexpected Cycnia Caterpillar

Daniel, thank you very much for the information. FYI I have about 2 acres of Milkweed (many varieties)  in my pasture that is home to a wide variety of insects. This year for the first time I have yet to find any Monarch Butterfly caterpillars in them. Again, thanks for helping out a true neophyte with some good information. _Mike Lewis_

We are very disturbed to learn that two acres of milkweed did not produce any Monarch Caterpillars despite having been a habitat for them in the past.  We wonder if this is a local drop in population or if this is more global.  That is sad news. Perhaps if you happen to see any in the future, you can take some photos and send them to us with the subject line Monarch Caterpillars.

I will be happy to sned you any new photos I get of Monarch Caterpillars. I am not an entomologist nor a botanist but from my layman’s perspective it is most likely a combination of factors that has reduced the population of large Butterflies on my small farm.
A severe drought has increased the local farmers desire to produce additional forage for their livestock. Fields and field edges that used to produce large amounts of nectar producing plants like Ironweed and Red Clover have been treated with herbicide to make way for livestock friendly plants like orchard grass.
The flowering trees in my yard like apple and dogwood produced almost zero flowers this year. I typically plant a patch of approximately 200 square feet of Dill for the Black Swallowtails. I got almost no germination of my dill seeds this year. Even the bee hives I keep on my place have reduced their honey production this year by at least 40% over past years.
Hopefully this is not a complete catastrophe and in time some of my gossamer winged friends will return.

Thank you for that very thorough analysis Mike.

 

Letter 16 – Longhorned Borer Beetle: Neoclytus scutellaris

 

Subject: Brown/black beetle with yellow/gold markings
Location: Pennsylvania
August 29, 2012 12:00 am
Hello,
Took this picture in mid August in Pennsylvania near the Delaware River. (Beach Lake) I was struck by how the markings were so precisely ”drawn.” To my eye they appeared gold, though in the picture they seem more yellow.
I’ve spent a good bit of time looking at images online and while it seems similar to a number of long horned borer beetles, the segmentation of its body seems different, and I’ve not seen one marked with this pattern.
I’m sorry there is nothing in the pic that serves to reference its size, but I believe the body was approximately 1.5 inches long.
I would love to know what it might be. Many thanks.
Signature: Laura

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Laura,
This Longhorned Borer Beetle (congratulations on getting the family correct) does not have a common name.  In our opinion, it is
Neoclytus scutellaris, based on photos posted to BugGuide which states:  “Larvae feed in sapwood of (dead?) oaks, hickories, also grape.”

Letter 17 – Mating Four Eyed Milkweed Longhorns and Dogbane Leaf Beetle

 

Subject: Dogbane Leaf Beetle & Bug Love
Location: Sterling, Virginia
June 10, 2013 3:37 pm
Hello!
Two pics I took on 6/9/13 in Claude Moore Park in Sterling, Virginia. They had a large milkweed patch in their butterfly garden, which was attracting a lot more bugs than just the butterflies! So the first is what I believe is a Dogbane Leaf Beetle, and the second is bug love from what I believe is 4-eyed milkweed beetles. (They were about 2 feet above a tiny but voracious praying mantis, so dangerous bug love at that!) Enjoy!
Sincerely,
-M Harmon
Signature: M Harmon

Mating Milkweed Longhorns
Mating Four Eyed Milkweed Longhorns

Dear M Harmon,
Do you appear on television?  We have a tag on our site called Milkweed Meadow because we believe it is one of the most important native ecosystems wherever it is found.  We also strongly feel that only native milkweed should be grown.  Your eastern species are very different from our southern California ecosystems including Indian Milkweed,
Aesclapias eriocarpa.  Your mating beetles are Milkweed Longhorns, in the genus Tetraopes, which we suspect has something to do the number four and seeing.  According to Bugguide:  “Greek tetra ‘four’ + ops ‘eye’ (in this genus, each compound eye is separated in two).”  We had not heard the common name Four Eyed Milkweed Beetle until you wrote in.

Dogbane Leaf Beetle
Dogbane Leaf Beetle

Your Dogbane Leaf Beetle is a wonderful addition to the diversity at your MIlkweed Meadow.  We just returned from a holiday at the Ohio/Pennsylvania border and the milkweed is just beginning to show buds.   Your submission is the first we posted upon our return.  We wish you had sent the Preying Mantis photo as well, and we suspect it might not be native.

Hello again,
No, I’m not on TV, but thank you for the compliment!  I just located seeds at an online catalog for native species, so we’ll be planting Asclepias syriaca as soon as they arrive.  I got the common name “Four Eyed Milkweed Beetle” from this website:
http://www.easttennesseewildflowers.com/gallery/index.php/Beetles_Bugs
And I’ve attached the praying mantis picture as well, enjoy!  (We also saw either a Pearly or Beautiful Wood Nymph, but we didn’t get pics of that one unfortunately.)
Thanks again, and thanks for all the hard work you do for bug ID, it’s very much appreciated.
M Harmon

Preying Mantis
Preying Mantis

Thanks so much for sending the Preying Mantis photo.  Someone with considerably more experience than we have would have to do the species identification.

M. Harmon responds
June 25, 2013
Hello,
“We suspected Mark Harmon of CSI would not be writing to us.”
I am soooo tempted……allegedly (yeah, that and $1 gets you a bad cup of coffee) we’re very distantly related, it would be sooo fun to tease you by having him call you!  😉
“Thanks so much for sending the Preying Mantis photo.  Someone with considerably more experience than we have would have to do the species identification.”
No worries, I’m glad you liked the pics, and thanks again for the work you do!
Sincerely,
-M Harmon

We are happy you have a sense of humor.

 

Letter 18 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Thailand: Xystrocera festiva

 

Subject: unknown
Location: Thailand, Bangkok
December 9, 2013 9:44 am
Can you help to work out what this is? It was approx 10cm long…. found in December. Is it harmful?
Signature: Gosia

Longhorned Borer Beetle
Longhorned Borer Beetle

Hi Gosia,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we do not recognize the species.  Some species in the family represent significant agricultural pests.  The larvae are wood borers and most are very specific about which trees and shrubs they feed upon.  The beetles have strong mandibles and some might give a very painful nip if carelessly handled, but they are not venomous, and other than a bit of discomfort or possibly a bit of bleeding, they are not considered harmful to humans.

Erwin supplies an identification
Subject: Gosia’s cerambycid beetle from Thailand
December 10, 2013 9:34 am
Hi,
This is definitely a male of Xystrocera festiva Thompson, 1861 (the female having antennae not longer and mostly a little shorter than the body). This species is distributed from India to Indonesia (Java, Sumatra). It is indeed an acricultural pest, the larvae bore tunnels into several different plants like cacao tree or coffee plant.  Here you may read something about the life circle of this species:
http://www.cerambycoidea.com/titles/endangfarikhah2010.pdf
In Thailand anf Malaysia I saw this beetle rather often.
The only feature that does not fit is the length given by Gosia (“10 cm”), the normal body length is not more than 45 mm. Or maybe Gosia has measured the length including the antennae (if stretched forward).
Erwin
Signature: Erwin Beyer

Thank you for providing an identification Erwin.  Your recent contributions and corrections to our site are greatly appreciated.  We at What’s That Bug? are thankful for the network of helpful and knowledgeable folks that comprise our readership.

Brilliant! J thanks a lot!
May be I slightly overestimated size but it looked HUGE J
Gosia

Letter 19 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Norway: Rhagium mordax

 

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Norway
May 18, 2014 5:08 am
Can’t recognize this bug.
Is it some kind of beetle?
Signature: Vetle VF

Longhorned Borer Beetle
Longhorned Borer Beetle

Hi Vetle,
This is definitely a beetle, and we believe it is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae.  A dorsal view is ideal for identification purposes.

Update:  Rhagium mordax
Thanks to a comment from Mardikavana, we have learned that this Longhorn is Rhagium mordax and there are some nice images on Nature Spot.

Wow, thank you for the information 🙂 I saw that there are many types of
longhorned beetles in Norway, nicely spotted!
many thanks Vetle.

Letter 20 – Small Longhorn Borer Beetle

 

Subject: spotted longhorned beetle
Location: Raleigh, NC
July 3, 2014 12:36 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found this very small beetle (less than 1/2 inch body length) on May 15th.
I think I had identified it via Google six weeks ago, but I have forgotten what
I’d found and can no longer seem to relocate it on the web.
It seems like it was a “dotted longhorned beetle” or some variation.
Any ideas?
Thanks
Signature: aubrey

Longicorn:  Hyperplatys aspersa
Longicorn: Hyperplatys aspersa

Hi Aubrey,
We actually quickly and quite fortuitously identified it in about ten seconds on BugGuide as
Hyperplatys aspersa.

Thank you so much, Daniel.
I was trying to describe it in my little blog for our grandchildren.
If interested, it is at www.frombluebirdstoturtles.blogspot.com
Have a great holiday.
aubrey

Letter 21 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Nepal

 

Subject: Nepali beetle
Location: Kathmandu valley
September 21, 2014 12:02 am
This beetle (?) was the largest I saw in Nepal. It’s about 4 inches long and had scary-looking mandibles. Taken in July.
Signature: Bug curious

Longhorned Borer Beetle
Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Bug Curious,
This is some species of Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we will attempt to determine the species for you.  Beetles in this family have very powerful mandibles and large individuals might draw blood should they chomp down on a finger.

Longhorned Borer Beetle
Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Daniel,
thanks for the ID on this and the tiger moth. If it helps, here is a link to my a post on my blog with a short film of the beetle.
http://miakt.wordpress.com/2014/09/20/lives-of-the-monster-insects/
I posted some random photos of large insects and other creatures I saw while teaching English in a monastery outside Kathmandu. I managed to identify a couple by googling, but some I couldn’t, so thanks for your help! I will update the blog with your information.
Mia

Letter 22 – Longhorned Borer Beetles emerge indoors

 

Subject: Wasp?
Location: Minnesota
January 17, 2016 7:09 am
My brother found this in his house in Minnesota (US) in January. There were about a dozen in the windows. It has yellow striped wing covers. I am sorry about them being slightly crushed.
Signature: Peter

Longhorned Borer Beetle, genus Neoclytus
Longhorned Borer Beetle, genus Neoclytus

Dear Peter,
Despite their appearance, these are not wasps.  Many harmless insects including some Moths, Hover Flies and some Longhorned Borer Beetles mimic stinging wasps for protection.  Your Longhorned Borer Beetles are in the genus
Neoclytus, and they might be Red Headed Ash Borers.  We suspect your brother brought some firewood into the house and the warm, indoor temperatures caused the adult beetles to emerge early.  They will not damage the home.  You can read more about the genus Neoclytus on BugGuide.

 

Letter 23 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Nepal: Imantocera penicillata

 

Subject: What is this insect?
Location: Nepal
October 5, 2016 2:21 pm
I came across this excellent creature in Nepal, I would love to know what it is.
Thanks so much,
Signature: Sarah

Longhorned Borer Beetle
Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Sarah,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and it is not pictured on the Cerambycidae of the World site for Nepal.  The tufted antennae are quite distinctive and we will attempt to continue searching for its identity at a later date.

Update:  Thanks to Cesar Crash and Boris Bueche, we now know that this is Imantocera penicillata.

Karl provides an agreeable identification.
Hi Daniel and Sarah:
It is a wonderful beetle and it looks like Imantocera penicillata (Cerambycdae: Lamiinae). You can check out a very good paper on this species by Bhattacharjee et al. (2014). Regards. Karl

Daniel this absolutely awesome, thank you so much for coming back to me and solving the mystery!
Super chuffed on the  post.
Thanks again,
Sarah

Letter 24 – Longicorn from Hawaii: Albizia Long-Horned Beetle (Coptops aedificator)

 

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Mililani, oahu, hawaii
June 22, 2017 9:34 pm
Aloha from Hawaii. I live in mililani on oahu and found this really neat guy on my trash can. He is about half an inch long and really strong. I had a really hard time removing him from the trash can and transferring him to a tree. I have lived here 25 years and never seen this insect before. Please can you identify him. I thought he might be a longihorn type of beetle.
Much mahalo!
Signature: Jenz

Longicorn

Dear Jenz,
Like so many creatures found in Hawaii in the 21st Century, this Longicorn is probably an introduced species.  We believe we have correctly identified it as
Coptops aedificator thanks to Cerambycoidea which lists the range as “Arabia, Africa, S. Helena, S. Thomé, Cabo Verde, Madagascar, Comores, Seychelles, Mauritius, Ceylon, India, Andaman. Introduced in China (Taiwan) and Hawaii.”  It is also pictured on Forestry Images where it is identified as the Albizia Long-Horned Beetle, and iSpot.

Longicorn

Mahalo for taking time out of your day to identify him.  We also have Madagascar stick bugs here.  We live on the rim of a nature reserve and find many different insects here. There may be more pics in the future. Aloha jenz

Letter 25 – Longjawed Longhorn Beetle

 

Subject:  Beetle with long banded horns
Geographic location of the bug:  Texas
Date: 10/17/2017
Time: 06:25 PM EDT
A friend just posted this from Texas and wondered what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Steve

oooh – I just saw the page for the Long-Jawed Longhorn Beetle – I think that’s what it is.
Steve

Longjawed Longhorn Beetle

Dear Steve,
You are correct.  This is a Long-Jawed Longhorn Beetle,
Trachyderes mandibularis, and according to BugGuide:  “Hosts: Citrus, Parkinsonia, Salix, Celtis (Hovore et al. 1987).”

Letter 26 – Longhorned Borer Beetle: Obrium maculatum

 

Subject:  Porchlight
Geographic location of the bug:  Fredericksburg Va
Date: 07/19/2018
Time: 01:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this tiny bug late summer last year beneath the porch light at night.  It was smaller than my little finger nail. i wondered if it was an immature ….something.  It was high on the door and this was the only vantage point I could get without pulling out a ladder…
How you want your letter signed:  swarner

Longhorned Borer Beetle: Obrium maculatum

Hi again swarner,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and with the assistance of Arthur V. Evans book Beetles of Eastern North America, we identified it as
Obrium maculatum which we verified with this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Attracted to UV lights; common.”  According to Arthur V. Evans in his book, larval hosts include oak, pecan, hawthorn, river birch, black cherry and hackberry.

Letter 27 – Unknown Longhorned Borer Beetle

 

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Granada Hills (Los Angeles) CA
Date: 10/03/2018
Time: 02:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Would like to know what this bug is and should I worry?
How you want your letter signed:  Helaine

Unknown Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Helaine,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and it looks like the same species Daniel frequently sees at the porch light, but he has not yet identified the species.  Now that your request has arrived, Daniel will spend more time researching its identity.  Based on this BugGuide image, it might be
Paranoplium gracile.  The images of the species on Cerambycidae Catalog appear very different, and look much smaller than the species Daniel has seen.  The species Daniel has seen looks more like Haplidus testaceus which is also pictured on BugGuide.  It is also pictured on Cerambycidae Catalog.

Letter 28 – Longjawed Longhorn Beetle

 

Subject:  Bright and Lonely in FL
Geographic location of the bug:  St. Petersburg, FL
Date: 05/21/2019
Time: 06:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello from sunny Florida! It’s springtime here and I found this bright and lonely guy  (or gal) hanging out by itself for literally hours on the aluminum railing of my porch. It didn’t seem to mind me walking by and taking a picture of it. I wonder if it’s sick/dying because it is in an odd place not reacting to much at all. It walks up and down but I haven’t seen it fly yet. I’m not sure exactly what species this is, although it appears to be some sort of beetle. Of note, there is a small spider that created a web in the corner of my porch ceiling. I’m not sure if maybe the spider is after this unusual looking beetle or if the beetle is after it and that’s maybe why it’s creeping so slowly! Help with identification and info on if I should be worried about anything like harm to my house, plants or the poor lonely beetle itself, would be greatly appreciated! 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks so much! ~Alicia

Longjawed Longhorn Beetle

Dear Alicia,
This magnificent beetle is a Longjawed Longhorn Beetle,
Dendrobias mandibularis, and the smaller mandibles indicate this is a female.  The males have very impressive mandibles.  According to BugGuide:  “Hosts: Citrus, Parkinsonia, Salix, Celtis.

Letter 1 – Unknown Longhorn Borer identified as Cedar Tree Borer – Beetles in their Beds!!!!!

 

Beetle we can’t identify
Dear Bugman:
We recently purchased a new construction home in Granby CO. This beetle has now shown up in one of the bedrooms (mainly in the bed – not too happy sharing with them!) There is a sump pump in the foundation in that room. Can you identify this lovely creature for me? Picture is attached. Thank you! If you need further information – please contact me.
Sincerely,
Kathie Jones

Hi Kathie,
We tried to match the species of the Longhorn Borer Beetle, family Cerambycidae, on BugGuide with no luck. You did not indicate if this was an isolated specimen of if many were found. If it is a new home, it is entirely possible that some of the wood had beetle grubs that matured and chewed their way out. Adults do not bore into wood, only grubs. It is also possible that this specimen was attracted indoors by the lights. At any rate, we will check with Eric Eaton to see if he can narrow down the exact identification. Eric wrote back with this information: “Daniel: I have no idea what this is. Please contact Doug Yanega at UC Riverside. He should be able to recognize it. Please have him CC me his response, I’m really curious now myself! Oh, wait. I just thought of a possibility: Semanotus ligneus, or something else in that genus. Eric”

Update: (02/06/2007) Unknown Longhorn Borer
Dear What’s That Bug,
It appears that the unknown longhorn beetle in kathie’s new home in CO. is the Cedar Tree Borer-Semanotus l. ligneus. Good looking bycid. Keep up the good work Brian
U.S. Department of Agriculture (Aphis)

Update: (02/06/2007)
Beetle we can’t identify
Thank you for checking into this specimen for me. This beetle has mainly been in the one bedroom. Within 1 day there were 15 counted in the bed and around on the floor. We did locate one about 15 feet into another bedroom. However, I believe this is an isolated area that they are coming in to (possibly the sump pump?). I look forward to hearing what you find out for the exact kind this is. I also contacted our furniture company as we recently had some white cedar bedroom furniture bought for that room. However, I was informed that the cedar is a natural bug repellant and nothing should have been in that wood. Thank you again for your’s and Eric’s help with our unwanted guests. Sincerely,
Kathie Jones

Hi again Kathie,
Based on the information we have recieved since posting your photo, you have Cedar Tree Borers. Since you have just purchased Cedar furniture for your bedroom, and you find the beetles in the bed, we are guessing that the grubs were in fact dormant in the wood and have recently emerged. While cedar is a natural insect repellant, it does not repel the Cedar Tree Borer.

Another Case of Cedar Tree Borers
Kathie’s beetle
Dear Bugman,
This is my first visit to your website to identify a bug, and the second picture I see is the picture Kathie Jones sent you on 2-5-07. That is the bug I was looking to identify, how weird is that! We have seen a good dozen of these bugs in our bedroom -in the vicinity of our bed. We set up a new bed and mattress exactly one month ago and the bugs started appearing a a week or two later, I don’t recall seeing one of those ever before. The bed is a handcrafted log bed from a guy who makes them in northern Wisconsin, we live in southern Wisconsin, my husband picked up the bed himself and transported it to our house in his pick-up truck, we set it up the next day. Maybe this will help you identify it. We sure would like to know what they are and what we can do about them. Thanks,
Ann Thompson

Update: (02/07/2007)
Dear What’s that bug, Has the owners of their new cedar furniture looked for frass or what they would consider saw dust caused by the beetle activities. This should help them locate the exit holes and what part of their new bedroom set has the beetles. Sometimes you can hear them chewing. I would ask the makers of the furniture if the wood has been heat treated. I would bet not. If the have any specimens in good shape I would gladly put them into my insect collection. I have seen exotic longhorns emerging from all kinds of items ranging from imported pine cones to wooden bussiness card holders. Hope this information helps the folks out
Brian
U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Chet and Katie
The use of an exterminator may be a bit much but they may tell you otherwise. These beetles 1st came to the cedar probably a tree that was stressed or dying when it laid its eggs. Then the larvae entered the tree feeding and creating feeding galleries inside the tree. At that point it was cut and made into its present form (bedroom furniture). Normally the larvae are in the tree for a season and then emerge as adults during the warmer months. When you brought the furniture into your warm house you triggered the beetle to emerge. The section or sections has to be pretty infested to have the numbers you have mentioned. The sump pump you mentioned is not an issue. These are wood borers not aquatic species but it good to see that you were looking at all the possibilities. After all the beetle emerge they will die in time. As adult beetles there main mission is to emerge and carry on the blood line by mating and laying eggs thus completing the lifecycle. No food to eat and no new host trees to lay eggs they will die out and they will not re-infest the furniture or other house hold items. They are totally harmless even though they have good size mouth parts but don’t really bite. They may make sounds when held (pretty cool). The only concern I would have is the damage that was done to the wood. If it is a leg holding up the bed or other important structure mishaps may happen. Look for saw dust or emergence hole. If the furniture is from a good company you should get a replacement or refund (take pics of the beetle and damage). At this point pesticides will not do much to solve this. The wood would have to be saturated with it (Not good for you son) and their sad home relocation story is almost over. The beetle will die out. If the furniture was from overseas we at the USDA would be very concerned due to exotic wood borering pest damage our forests and natural ecosystems like the emerald ash borer and the Asian Longhorned beetle. Yours is native though and a good looking bug at that and don’t regulate these. Any other questions feel free to ask
Brian Sullivan

Hi Brian, I have several very much alive species of those Cedar Tree Borers in a small plastic ziplock bag right now. If you want them I will send them to you, let me know what to do. We have found some exit holes in the bed and we contacted the guy who made the bed and he is going to make us a new bed ASAP. Said this has never happened to him until now, he is also replacing one other bed from the same batch of wood. I’ll be waiting for your reply regarding sending you the critters. Thanks,
Ann Thompson

Dear Ann I am glad that you found the exit holes and that the furniture maker is going to replace the bed. Its not uncommon for batches of untreated wood to contain insects. I would not want to sleep on a bed that might break due to insect damage. A great thanks goes out to What’s That Bug? for all of their hard work and dedication. This is a happy ending to your story and was due to What’s That Bugs efforts. Besides posting identification and great photos they are providing many other great services to the public. Thanks
USDA APHIS PPQ
Brian Sullivan

Letter 2 – Unknown South African Longhorned Borer Beetle

 

2nd contribution
Dear Bugman,
I stumbled across your website last week and I love it! Well done for creating such a website – I spent most of my weekend going through your archives. I am so happy to see that there are many other bug lovers out there! I am going to send you a collection of bug photos that I have taken over the years – I love bugs, but I don’t know enough about them to identify them so here are some bugs for you from South Africa to identify J. I’ll send them to you separately: 2. Beetle Some kind of a colourful beetle we found – also quite big, approx 6cm long Cheers,
Steph

Hi Steph,
First we must say that we are warmed by your enthusiasm. Second, we are impressed that you actually thought to send each of your requests as a separate email, which makes our posting much easier. Trying to keep What’s That Bug? even marginally organized is a daunting task, especially since the staff is organizationally challenged. You should see our office. Also, finding the time it takes for us to post even one letter with all the “real” obligations we have is not easy. With that said, we can only broadly identify your beetle. This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we are not sure of the genus or species. Larvae of the Cerambycids, or Bycids for short, are wood boring grubs. Researching insects from many parts of the world, including South Africa, is not always easy, and there is a noticeable dearth of identification websites for many locations. Our request is that after about a week, any letters that we did not post, please resend them with any helpful information, and please don’t send them all at once.

Letter 3 – Unknown Long-Horned Borer Beetle from Thailand

 

Weird Bug from Thailand
Hi,
I was hoping that you could help me identify this bug please from when I was living in Jomtien, Thailand. It chased me (or so it seemed) whilst I was outside put my washing to dry. After hiding in an out building for 10 minutes I ran back to the main house to tell me husband. When I went back outside it seemed to have been waiting for me and flew at me again. It finaly settled on a tree and my husband took this picture. Thank you for any information you can give. Love the site.
Stephanie (UK)

Cerambycid from Thailand
Cerambycid from Thailand

Hi Stephanie,
This surely is a spectacular looking Long-Horned Borer Beetle in the genus Cerambycidae. We are not certain of the species, and since we have several days of catch-up to do with posting since our new site migration, we haven’t the time to research this further. We feel fully confident that one of our loyal readers will be able to provide a proper identification, and then use the new comment option on our site to post an identification. To further assist in the identification, a larger file can be downloaded by clicking on the image.

Update: 23 September 2008
Daniel:
Finally went to see the new site….
The big, long-legged yellow longhorn with the black stripes from Thailand is Gerania bosci, apparently at least an uncommon species in collections.  Great image, given the fear factor:-)
Eric Eaton

Letter 4 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Aruba: Oxymerus aculeatus

 

Spots and Stripes…I’m Stumped!
June 5, 2009
Hello there!
First I just want to say I’m so glad I found this site…so informative, thanks for your efforts! I’d like to ask your help in identifying this guy I saw on vacation in Aruba last week. He was hanging around the balcony all day, weather there was low 80s and dry. The pattern reminds me of a potato beetle but the body doesn’t seem quite right…maybe some type of borer? (Sorry if these are dumb guesses, these is soooo not my field, I’m only working with what I could piece together in the last couple hours from google and pouring through your site until my eyes went blurry 🙂 )
Thanks in advance and I hope you are enjoying your vacation!
Najah W.
Aruba

Unknown Cerambycid
Oxymerus aculeatus

Hi Najah,
As you indicated, we were away when you wrote in June, and we never really caught up on unanswered mail.  We are trying to post a few old letters today, and we find your request most interesting.  First, both Leaf Beetles and Longhorned Borer Beetles are in the same superfamily Chrysomeloidea, so your confusion is actually supported by scientific taxonomy.  Your beetle does have the markings of a Colorado Potato Beetle, and the antennae of a Longhorned Borer Beetle.  We believe it is a Longhorned Borer in the family Cerambycidae, though we are uncertain of the species.  Perhaps one of our readers can assist in a proper identification.

Identification courtesy of Karl
This looks like Oxymerus aculeatus (Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae: Trachyderini). The Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services has posted a “Pest Alert” for this species (available online), fearing that it may have become established in South Florida. I believe this is it, but I haven’t checked to see if there are related and similar looking species. Regards. K

Letter 5 – Mystery: Unknown Longhorned Borer Beetle is Hybodera tuberculata

 

Could you please try to ID these beetles? Thanks!
April 19, 2010
These were two of many of their kind that were scurrying all over my windshield today (April 19); some were mating. Each was maybe about an inch long. I was parked directly under a mature cherry tree. The yellow on the windshield is, I believe maple pollen. Thanks for any help in IDing them – I searched this site and a few others but didn’t manage to come across it. Love your site, I refer to it all the time and it has stopped me from being quite so much of a bug-fearer!
Karen in Seattle
Mercer Island, WA

Unknown Longhorned Borer Beetles

Hi Karen,
These are Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae, but we are late for work and haven’t the time to identify the species at the moment.  Perhaps one of our readers will have some free time and post a comment.

Karl provides an answer
April 26, 2010
Hi Daniel and Karen:
It looks like Hybodera tuberculata (Cerambycinae: Hyboderini). The genus only has two species, both native to the Pacific coast. H. tuberculata looks closer than H. debilis. I couldn’t find much information foe either, but apparently H. tuberculata ranges further north (to British Columbia) and H. debilis ranges further south (to California). Regards.
Karl

Letter 6 – Longhorned Borer Beetles

 

bug/beetle on a Harrisia simpsonii
June 4, 2010
Can you tell me what this bug is and if it could be the pollinator of this Prickly Apple Cactus? I brought 3 plants home. 1st night one bug, 2nd bloom 2nd night one bug noticed, 3rd night-different plant 3 bugs.
Susan Forrest
Key largo, FL

Longhorned Borer Beetles

Hi Susan,
The photo with three beetles appears to have two different species, though all are Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae.  The individuals with the ivory spots are in the genus Eburia, possibly Eburia distincta, a beetle that is posted to BugGuide with strictly Florida sightings.  Cypress is a host tree for the wood boring larvae.  The genus Eburia is represented on BugGuide by nine different, but very similar looking species.

Letter 7 – Longhorned Borer Beetle: Neoclytus scutellaris

 

Beetle on Oak Debris
June 20, 2010
Hi. I found a bunch of these guys skittering around on the stump and debris of an oak tree my parents had cut down in their yard. At first I thought they were some sort of crickets; they were moving rather quickly and it was hard to get a good look let alone a picture. But I finally succeeded. I’m not so practiced at IDs for beetles, but I think I am correct that they are one of the wood borer beetles: neoclytus scutellaris (no common name that I could find). I was unsurprised, though, when I read that they like dead and dying oaks; they’d found this one less than 24hrs after it had been cut down. I’m hoping to have some pictures soon from the cocoons I rescued from the cut down branches.
Karen H.
Belleview, FL

Neoclytus scutellaris

Hi Karen,
We agree with your identification of Neoclytus scutellaris, a Longhorned Borer Beetle whose larvae, according to BugGuide:  “feed in sapwood of (dead?) oaks, hickories, also grape.

Letter 8 – Ornate Checkered Beetle and Mating Flower Longhorns

 

2 beetles seen in Montana
Location:  NW Montana, Glacier NP
September 13, 2010 6:32 pm
Greetings Bugman!
You have a wonderful site! My grandson and I found it a year or so ago.
I am trying to identify 2 kinds of beetles (there is a 3rd in the photo, but tiny)that I photographed on some white spirea at Glacier NP last month.
Can you help me identify them? I searched the site, but probably not the right search word combos.
You may use the photos with attribution if you like.
Gretchen F.
backyardnotes.wordpress.com
Seattle, WA
P.S. I have a link to your site on my blog
Signature:  backyardnotes

Ornate Checkered Beetle and Mating Flower Longhorns

Hi Gretchen,
Thanks for the complimentary letter.  We believe the black and yellow beetle is an Ornate Checkered Beetle,
Trichodes ornatus, based on BugGuide images, but since its head is buried in the inflorescence, positive identification may not be possible.  The mating pair appear to be some species of Flower Longhorn in the subfamily Lepturinae, possibly Xestoleptura crassipes, also pictured on BugGuide.

Many thanks, Daniel! I just have that ‘need to know’ gene and when I post photos on my blog I like to have an identification.
And, thanks for the link to BugGuide! I will add that to my links list.
Gretchen Flickinger

Letter 9 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Brazil

 

unknow bug
Location: brazil
January 16, 2011 8:56 pm
hi bugman,
can you tell me whats that very strange bug? i snatched him acciedently today.
thanks
Signature: antonio f. prado

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Antonio,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we do not recognize the species, however we have seen similar antennae in photographs of some members of the family.  Perhaps we will have some luck researching the species which we can add to the posting or perhaps we will get some assistance from our readership.

Ed Note: January 18, 2011
Thanks to a comment from lttlechkn, we have found some internet documentation that this is
Compsocerus violaceus.  The accidental snatching that resulted in this crushed beetle is quite unfortunate.  It may be quite rare or difficult to collect because the God of Insects website prices it at $45.

Letter 10 – Mating Longhorn Beetles in New Zealand

 

Black ants – Orange ringed abdomen & feelers
Location: New Zealand
January 23, 2011 12:42 am
Hello there Bugman. These two (obviously male & female) are the unidentified bugs. Found 400m from New Brighton beach, Christchurch, NZ on a tree.
Signature: Skunkwerx

Mating Beetles

Dear Skunkwerx,
These are Beetles, not Ants, and judging by the antennae, they are Longhorn Beetles in the family Cerambycidae.  We did locate a similar looking species identified as
Obrida fascialis, the One Banded Longicorn Beetle, on the Brisbane Insect website, but a web search of images with that scientific name brought up lots of images of  fingernails and other human body parts and photographs of Nicole Kidman and Beyonce, leading us to believe something is terribly amiss with that identification.  We hope our readers will have time to unravel this mystery while we are at work.

Update:  November 11, 2012
We just approved a comment identifying the genus
Zorion for this pair, and we found a matching photo on FlickRiver to support that comment.

Letter 11 – Unknown Longhorned Borer Beetle

 

sickly bug appears out of nowhere
Location: inland San Diego county, California
July 7, 2011 12:58 am
Two nights in a row i run across the same type of bug, which i have never seen before. Both bugs seem sick and dying and appear out of nowhere. About an inch long and seemingly wingless with long sturdy segmented antennae. Makes a quiet buzzing sound when provoked. No hairs on the legs that i can see. Underside of abdomen is banded. We’ve had hot humid weather both days they appeared. But I’ve never come across one before.
Signature: sara

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Hi sara,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, though we cannot provide you with a species name at this time.

Letter 12 – Longhorned Borer Beetle: Possibly Neoclytus mucronatus

 

Ant…Cricket…Beetle… Ant…Cricket…Beetle..Brickant?
Location: Missouri, St. Louis
August 28, 2011 10:55 am
Saw these guys all over a felled mimosa branch. They moved like fast ants, have legs like crickets and bodies appearing to be something like beetle. I looked and the only things I could find resembling them at all were clown beetles – but none really had the same markings or body. Please help this poor creature out of its identity crises!
PS: sorry the photos are a little blurry. I don’t have the best camera for close ups of a critter this size – approx. 1/2”L.
Signature: Confused Critter

Longhorned Borer Beetle: Neoclytus mucronatus

Dear Confused Critter,
This beetle is one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae.  The larvae are wood borers and most are relatively species specific with regard to the host plant.  We believe your beetle is in the somewhat populous genus
Neoclytus, and based on photos posted to BugGuide, Neoclytus mucronatus seems like a very good match.  BugGuide also notes that it is:  “Fairly common and quite variable in size”

 

Letter 13 – Longhorned Borer Beetle: Synaphaeta guexi

 

Subject: strange beetle?
Location: Portland Or.
May 26, 2012 12:24 am
I took this photo today in Selwood Or. near Portland close to the Willamette River. When I got home and looked it looked like it was sunning it’s self after moulting…
Signature: Jamie

Synphaeta guexi

Hi Jamie,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae and we believe it is
Synphaeta guexi, sometimes called the Spotted Tree Borer according to this BugGuide posting.  It does appear from your photo that the beetle might have just metamorphosed and that the pupal exuvia is to the left of the beetle.  If that is the case, we are very curious to get the opinion of an expert.  We thought that the metamorphosis occurred in the pupal chamber within the wood and that the adult then chewed its way to the surface.  The larvae of Longhorned Borer Beetles are found in wood and they are often very specific about the trees that they bore into.  Do you happen to know what kind of log this was?  Also, do you have a dorsal view that might help confirm the identification.  This comment is also posted on BugGuide:  “this is indeed an uncommon beetle that seems to consistently evade experienced insect enthusiasts: ALL of its images we have on BG to date have been posted by first-time contributors!”  We will try to get an opinion from Eric Eaton.

Unfortunately that is the only image I captured. I meant to mention that it was almost 2 inches long which is why I noticed it. It was on a very old bit of railing on a footbridge so if it was a specific kind of wood I have no idea. I would like to think I could go back the next day but I am sure it is gone now. If there is any more info I can provide I would be happy to do that.

Thanks for the update Jamie.  If it was found on a bridge, then that tends to discount that the pupal exuvia is the object to the left of the beetle.  That might just be some random tree debris.  Our belief that the metamorphosis occurs beneath the surface and that the adult chews its way to the surface can persist unchallenged.

Eric Eaton confirms identification.
Yes, it is.  The beetle may have been struggling to free itself from the pupa as it also worked its way out of the log.
Eric

Letter 14 – Mating Milkweed Longhorns and Japanese Beetle

 

A few insects
Location:  Southern Illinois
June 20, 2012  8:05 AM
A few more questions for What’s That Bug.  Two weeks ago while walking I got to see these first two insects in the same patch of sweet peas.  A little help in the ID would be nice.  The other insect is feeding on Poison Hemlock.  The RedBug pic would be R rated I think.
Thank you, JimmyDean

Mating Milkweed Longhorns and Japanese Beetle

Dear JimmyDean,
Please use our standard form each time you submit a new request.  We realize it is easier to just respond to a previous request, but by not using our forms, important fields might be overlooked, like location.  We needed to hunt down your previous posting on our site to ascertain your location as Southern Illinois, provided of course these images were not taken on a road trip.  We are posting your photo of mating Milkweed Longhorns, also called Red Milkweed Beetles or Milkweed Borers.  A Japanese Beetle, an invasive exotic species that has naturalized in the eastern states, is also in the photo.  The plants are not sweet peas but milkweed, and there is a diverse community of insects and other creatures that flourishes around milkweed.  The other milkweed photo is of mating Large Milkweed Bugs and the insect on the poison hemlock is a Soldier Beetle.

I apologize for not using the form.  I was running hard this morning (or was it yesterday?) and forgot.  I will make sure that I go to the form next time. Thanks for the assistance.  Jim

Letter 15 – Milkweed Longhorn Beetle and Unexpected Cycnia Caterpillar

 

Subject: Red Beetle with Black Spots
Location: Johnson County Kansas
July 9, 2012 7:57 pm
I found the attached in Johnson County Kansas. The beetle was sitting on milkweed and although there was evidence of damage adjacent to the beetle I did not observe it feeding. The brown caterpillar in the attached photo was one of several that were indeed feeding on Milkweeds in my pasture.
Signature: Mike

Milkweed Longhorn Beetle

Hi Mike,
Normally we like to confine the number of insects in a single posting to one unless they are the same family, but we are making an exception in your case because we have a Milkweed Meadow tag because so many different insects comprise the intricate ecosystem that depends upon milkweed.  Your beetle is a Milkweed Longhorn in the genus
Tetraopes.  If they are disturbed, they create a squeaking sound by Stridulation.  The sound is produced by rubbing body parts together.  The caterpillar was a bit more of a challenge.  We quickly located this Gaia Garden:  The Milkweed Insect Tribe webpage with a photograph identified as the orange-margined dogbane moth, Cycnia tenera.  We always double check identifications if possible, and that name on BugGuide was a different insect.  As luck would have it, additional searching led us to another member of the same genus, Cycnia inopinatus, the Unexpected Cycnia Caterpillar, also on BugGuide.  Many insects that feed on milkweed sport orange or red and black coloration to warn predators that the insects are either poisonous or distasteful due to the toxins in the milkweed.

Unexpected Cycnia Caterpillar

Daniel, thank you very much for the information. FYI I have about 2 acres of Milkweed (many varieties)  in my pasture that is home to a wide variety of insects. This year for the first time I have yet to find any Monarch Butterfly caterpillars in them. Again, thanks for helping out a true neophyte with some good information. _Mike Lewis_

We are very disturbed to learn that two acres of milkweed did not produce any Monarch Caterpillars despite having been a habitat for them in the past.  We wonder if this is a local drop in population or if this is more global.  That is sad news. Perhaps if you happen to see any in the future, you can take some photos and send them to us with the subject line Monarch Caterpillars.

I will be happy to sned you any new photos I get of Monarch Caterpillars. I am not an entomologist nor a botanist but from my layman’s perspective it is most likely a combination of factors that has reduced the population of large Butterflies on my small farm.
A severe drought has increased the local farmers desire to produce additional forage for their livestock. Fields and field edges that used to produce large amounts of nectar producing plants like Ironweed and Red Clover have been treated with herbicide to make way for livestock friendly plants like orchard grass.
The flowering trees in my yard like apple and dogwood produced almost zero flowers this year. I typically plant a patch of approximately 200 square feet of Dill for the Black Swallowtails. I got almost no germination of my dill seeds this year. Even the bee hives I keep on my place have reduced their honey production this year by at least 40% over past years.
Hopefully this is not a complete catastrophe and in time some of my gossamer winged friends will return.

Thank you for that very thorough analysis Mike.

 

Letter 16 – Longhorned Borer Beetle: Neoclytus scutellaris

 

Subject: Brown/black beetle with yellow/gold markings
Location: Pennsylvania
August 29, 2012 12:00 am
Hello,
Took this picture in mid August in Pennsylvania near the Delaware River. (Beach Lake) I was struck by how the markings were so precisely ”drawn.” To my eye they appeared gold, though in the picture they seem more yellow.
I’ve spent a good bit of time looking at images online and while it seems similar to a number of long horned borer beetles, the segmentation of its body seems different, and I’ve not seen one marked with this pattern.
I’m sorry there is nothing in the pic that serves to reference its size, but I believe the body was approximately 1.5 inches long.
I would love to know what it might be. Many thanks.
Signature: Laura

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Laura,
This Longhorned Borer Beetle (congratulations on getting the family correct) does not have a common name.  In our opinion, it is
Neoclytus scutellaris, based on photos posted to BugGuide which states:  “Larvae feed in sapwood of (dead?) oaks, hickories, also grape.”

Letter 17 – Mating Four Eyed Milkweed Longhorns and Dogbane Leaf Beetle

 

Subject: Dogbane Leaf Beetle & Bug Love
Location: Sterling, Virginia
June 10, 2013 3:37 pm
Hello!
Two pics I took on 6/9/13 in Claude Moore Park in Sterling, Virginia. They had a large milkweed patch in their butterfly garden, which was attracting a lot more bugs than just the butterflies! So the first is what I believe is a Dogbane Leaf Beetle, and the second is bug love from what I believe is 4-eyed milkweed beetles. (They were about 2 feet above a tiny but voracious praying mantis, so dangerous bug love at that!) Enjoy!
Sincerely,
-M Harmon
Signature: M Harmon

Mating Milkweed Longhorns
Mating Four Eyed Milkweed Longhorns

Dear M Harmon,
Do you appear on television?  We have a tag on our site called Milkweed Meadow because we believe it is one of the most important native ecosystems wherever it is found.  We also strongly feel that only native milkweed should be grown.  Your eastern species are very different from our southern California ecosystems including Indian Milkweed,
Aesclapias eriocarpa.  Your mating beetles are Milkweed Longhorns, in the genus Tetraopes, which we suspect has something to do the number four and seeing.  According to Bugguide:  “Greek tetra ‘four’ + ops ‘eye’ (in this genus, each compound eye is separated in two).”  We had not heard the common name Four Eyed Milkweed Beetle until you wrote in.

Dogbane Leaf Beetle
Dogbane Leaf Beetle

Your Dogbane Leaf Beetle is a wonderful addition to the diversity at your MIlkweed Meadow.  We just returned from a holiday at the Ohio/Pennsylvania border and the milkweed is just beginning to show buds.   Your submission is the first we posted upon our return.  We wish you had sent the Preying Mantis photo as well, and we suspect it might not be native.

Hello again,
No, I’m not on TV, but thank you for the compliment!  I just located seeds at an online catalog for native species, so we’ll be planting Asclepias syriaca as soon as they arrive.  I got the common name “Four Eyed Milkweed Beetle” from this website:
http://www.easttennesseewildflowers.com/gallery/index.php/Beetles_Bugs
And I’ve attached the praying mantis picture as well, enjoy!  (We also saw either a Pearly or Beautiful Wood Nymph, but we didn’t get pics of that one unfortunately.)
Thanks again, and thanks for all the hard work you do for bug ID, it’s very much appreciated.
M Harmon

Preying Mantis
Preying Mantis

Thanks so much for sending the Preying Mantis photo.  Someone with considerably more experience than we have would have to do the species identification.

M. Harmon responds
June 25, 2013
Hello,
“We suspected Mark Harmon of CSI would not be writing to us.”
I am soooo tempted……allegedly (yeah, that and $1 gets you a bad cup of coffee) we’re very distantly related, it would be sooo fun to tease you by having him call you!  😉
“Thanks so much for sending the Preying Mantis photo.  Someone with considerably more experience than we have would have to do the species identification.”
No worries, I’m glad you liked the pics, and thanks again for the work you do!
Sincerely,
-M Harmon

We are happy you have a sense of humor.

 

Letter 18 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Thailand: Xystrocera festiva

 

Subject: unknown
Location: Thailand, Bangkok
December 9, 2013 9:44 am
Can you help to work out what this is? It was approx 10cm long…. found in December. Is it harmful?
Signature: Gosia

Longhorned Borer Beetle
Longhorned Borer Beetle

Hi Gosia,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we do not recognize the species.  Some species in the family represent significant agricultural pests.  The larvae are wood borers and most are very specific about which trees and shrubs they feed upon.  The beetles have strong mandibles and some might give a very painful nip if carelessly handled, but they are not venomous, and other than a bit of discomfort or possibly a bit of bleeding, they are not considered harmful to humans.

Erwin supplies an identification
Subject: Gosia’s cerambycid beetle from Thailand
December 10, 2013 9:34 am
Hi,
This is definitely a male of Xystrocera festiva Thompson, 1861 (the female having antennae not longer and mostly a little shorter than the body). This species is distributed from India to Indonesia (Java, Sumatra). It is indeed an acricultural pest, the larvae bore tunnels into several different plants like cacao tree or coffee plant.  Here you may read something about the life circle of this species:
http://www.cerambycoidea.com/titles/endangfarikhah2010.pdf
In Thailand anf Malaysia I saw this beetle rather often.
The only feature that does not fit is the length given by Gosia (“10 cm”), the normal body length is not more than 45 mm. Or maybe Gosia has measured the length including the antennae (if stretched forward).
Erwin
Signature: Erwin Beyer

Thank you for providing an identification Erwin.  Your recent contributions and corrections to our site are greatly appreciated.  We at What’s That Bug? are thankful for the network of helpful and knowledgeable folks that comprise our readership.

Brilliant! J thanks a lot!
May be I slightly overestimated size but it looked HUGE J
Gosia

Letter 19 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Norway: Rhagium mordax

 

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Norway
May 18, 2014 5:08 am
Can’t recognize this bug.
Is it some kind of beetle?
Signature: Vetle VF

Longhorned Borer Beetle
Longhorned Borer Beetle

Hi Vetle,
This is definitely a beetle, and we believe it is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae.  A dorsal view is ideal for identification purposes.

Update:  Rhagium mordax
Thanks to a comment from Mardikavana, we have learned that this Longhorn is Rhagium mordax and there are some nice images on Nature Spot.

Wow, thank you for the information 🙂 I saw that there are many types of
longhorned beetles in Norway, nicely spotted!
many thanks Vetle.

Letter 20 – Small Longhorn Borer Beetle

 

Subject: spotted longhorned beetle
Location: Raleigh, NC
July 3, 2014 12:36 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found this very small beetle (less than 1/2 inch body length) on May 15th.
I think I had identified it via Google six weeks ago, but I have forgotten what
I’d found and can no longer seem to relocate it on the web.
It seems like it was a “dotted longhorned beetle” or some variation.
Any ideas?
Thanks
Signature: aubrey

Longicorn:  Hyperplatys aspersa
Longicorn: Hyperplatys aspersa

Hi Aubrey,
We actually quickly and quite fortuitously identified it in about ten seconds on BugGuide as
Hyperplatys aspersa.

Thank you so much, Daniel.
I was trying to describe it in my little blog for our grandchildren.
If interested, it is at www.frombluebirdstoturtles.blogspot.com
Have a great holiday.
aubrey

Letter 21 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Nepal

 

Subject: Nepali beetle
Location: Kathmandu valley
September 21, 2014 12:02 am
This beetle (?) was the largest I saw in Nepal. It’s about 4 inches long and had scary-looking mandibles. Taken in July.
Signature: Bug curious

Longhorned Borer Beetle
Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Bug Curious,
This is some species of Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we will attempt to determine the species for you.  Beetles in this family have very powerful mandibles and large individuals might draw blood should they chomp down on a finger.

Longhorned Borer Beetle
Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Daniel,
thanks for the ID on this and the tiger moth. If it helps, here is a link to my a post on my blog with a short film of the beetle.
http://miakt.wordpress.com/2014/09/20/lives-of-the-monster-insects/
I posted some random photos of large insects and other creatures I saw while teaching English in a monastery outside Kathmandu. I managed to identify a couple by googling, but some I couldn’t, so thanks for your help! I will update the blog with your information.
Mia

Letter 22 – Longhorned Borer Beetles emerge indoors

 

Subject: Wasp?
Location: Minnesota
January 17, 2016 7:09 am
My brother found this in his house in Minnesota (US) in January. There were about a dozen in the windows. It has yellow striped wing covers. I am sorry about them being slightly crushed.
Signature: Peter

Longhorned Borer Beetle, genus Neoclytus
Longhorned Borer Beetle, genus Neoclytus

Dear Peter,
Despite their appearance, these are not wasps.  Many harmless insects including some Moths, Hover Flies and some Longhorned Borer Beetles mimic stinging wasps for protection.  Your Longhorned Borer Beetles are in the genus
Neoclytus, and they might be Red Headed Ash Borers.  We suspect your brother brought some firewood into the house and the warm, indoor temperatures caused the adult beetles to emerge early.  They will not damage the home.  You can read more about the genus Neoclytus on BugGuide.

 

Letter 23 – Longhorned Borer Beetle from Nepal: Imantocera penicillata

 

Subject: What is this insect?
Location: Nepal
October 5, 2016 2:21 pm
I came across this excellent creature in Nepal, I would love to know what it is.
Thanks so much,
Signature: Sarah

Longhorned Borer Beetle
Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Sarah,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and it is not pictured on the Cerambycidae of the World site for Nepal.  The tufted antennae are quite distinctive and we will attempt to continue searching for its identity at a later date.

Update:  Thanks to Cesar Crash and Boris Bueche, we now know that this is Imantocera penicillata.

Karl provides an agreeable identification.
Hi Daniel and Sarah:
It is a wonderful beetle and it looks like Imantocera penicillata (Cerambycdae: Lamiinae). You can check out a very good paper on this species by Bhattacharjee et al. (2014). Regards. Karl

Daniel this absolutely awesome, thank you so much for coming back to me and solving the mystery!
Super chuffed on the  post.
Thanks again,
Sarah

Letter 24 – Longicorn from Hawaii: Albizia Long-Horned Beetle (Coptops aedificator)

 

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Mililani, oahu, hawaii
June 22, 2017 9:34 pm
Aloha from Hawaii. I live in mililani on oahu and found this really neat guy on my trash can. He is about half an inch long and really strong. I had a really hard time removing him from the trash can and transferring him to a tree. I have lived here 25 years and never seen this insect before. Please can you identify him. I thought he might be a longihorn type of beetle.
Much mahalo!
Signature: Jenz

Longicorn

Dear Jenz,
Like so many creatures found in Hawaii in the 21st Century, this Longicorn is probably an introduced species.  We believe we have correctly identified it as
Coptops aedificator thanks to Cerambycoidea which lists the range as “Arabia, Africa, S. Helena, S. Thomé, Cabo Verde, Madagascar, Comores, Seychelles, Mauritius, Ceylon, India, Andaman. Introduced in China (Taiwan) and Hawaii.”  It is also pictured on Forestry Images where it is identified as the Albizia Long-Horned Beetle, and iSpot.

Longicorn

Mahalo for taking time out of your day to identify him.  We also have Madagascar stick bugs here.  We live on the rim of a nature reserve and find many different insects here. There may be more pics in the future. Aloha jenz

Letter 25 – Longjawed Longhorn Beetle

 

Subject:  Beetle with long banded horns
Geographic location of the bug:  Texas
Date: 10/17/2017
Time: 06:25 PM EDT
A friend just posted this from Texas and wondered what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Steve

oooh – I just saw the page for the Long-Jawed Longhorn Beetle – I think that’s what it is.
Steve

Longjawed Longhorn Beetle

Dear Steve,
You are correct.  This is a Long-Jawed Longhorn Beetle,
Trachyderes mandibularis, and according to BugGuide:  “Hosts: Citrus, Parkinsonia, Salix, Celtis (Hovore et al. 1987).”

Letter 26 – Longhorned Borer Beetle: Obrium maculatum

 

Subject:  Porchlight
Geographic location of the bug:  Fredericksburg Va
Date: 07/19/2018
Time: 01:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this tiny bug late summer last year beneath the porch light at night.  It was smaller than my little finger nail. i wondered if it was an immature ….something.  It was high on the door and this was the only vantage point I could get without pulling out a ladder…
How you want your letter signed:  swarner

Longhorned Borer Beetle: Obrium maculatum

Hi again swarner,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and with the assistance of Arthur V. Evans book Beetles of Eastern North America, we identified it as
Obrium maculatum which we verified with this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Attracted to UV lights; common.”  According to Arthur V. Evans in his book, larval hosts include oak, pecan, hawthorn, river birch, black cherry and hackberry.

Letter 27 – Unknown Longhorned Borer Beetle

 

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Granada Hills (Los Angeles) CA
Date: 10/03/2018
Time: 02:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Would like to know what this bug is and should I worry?
How you want your letter signed:  Helaine

Unknown Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Helaine,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and it looks like the same species Daniel frequently sees at the porch light, but he has not yet identified the species.  Now that your request has arrived, Daniel will spend more time researching its identity.  Based on this BugGuide image, it might be
Paranoplium gracile.  The images of the species on Cerambycidae Catalog appear very different, and look much smaller than the species Daniel has seen.  The species Daniel has seen looks more like Haplidus testaceus which is also pictured on BugGuide.  It is also pictured on Cerambycidae Catalog.

Letter 28 – Longjawed Longhorn Beetle

 

Subject:  Bright and Lonely in FL
Geographic location of the bug:  St. Petersburg, FL
Date: 05/21/2019
Time: 06:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello from sunny Florida! It’s springtime here and I found this bright and lonely guy  (or gal) hanging out by itself for literally hours on the aluminum railing of my porch. It didn’t seem to mind me walking by and taking a picture of it. I wonder if it’s sick/dying because it is in an odd place not reacting to much at all. It walks up and down but I haven’t seen it fly yet. I’m not sure exactly what species this is, although it appears to be some sort of beetle. Of note, there is a small spider that created a web in the corner of my porch ceiling. I’m not sure if maybe the spider is after this unusual looking beetle or if the beetle is after it and that’s maybe why it’s creeping so slowly! Help with identification and info on if I should be worried about anything like harm to my house, plants or the poor lonely beetle itself, would be greatly appreciated! 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks so much! ~Alicia

Longjawed Longhorn Beetle

Dear Alicia,
This magnificent beetle is a Longjawed Longhorn Beetle,
Dendrobias mandibularis, and the smaller mandibles indicate this is a female.  The males have very impressive mandibles.  According to BugGuide:  “Hosts: Citrus, Parkinsonia, Salix, Celtis.

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

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Tags: Longhorn Beetles

Related Posts

27 Comments. Leave new

  • HI! I was looking online for info of cedar pests and ran across this website. I’m curious of what part of the tree the Cedar tree borer feeds in and also pupates in? I know that some beetles burrow further into wood to pupate. Since the beetles are emerging from cedar furniture I would think all the sap wood has been removed- with only the heartwood remaining. If this is indeed the case then I guess the answer is that the beetles are in the heartwood…but are they only pupating in the heartwood? …as I would think they would or (wood) only feed in the sap wood. Any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated. Thanks! Cheers! Sarah

    Reply
  • This looks like Oxymerus aculeatus (Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae: Trachyderini). The Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services has posted a “Pest Alert” for this species (available online), fearing that it may have become established in South Florida. I believe this is it, but I haven’t checked to see if there are related and similar looking species. Regards. K

    Reply
  • We recently moved to another home in the same area, and now we have an infestation of these Ceder Borer Beetles, and wanted to know how to get rid of them! We’ve never had this problem before. In fact, it took me quite a time to figure out what these little bugs were. One actually bit/pinched me! Is there a way to kill them out side on the wood pile?

    Reply
  • Mr. Goodwraith
    April 22, 2010 1:14 am

    Given the shape and color scheme, I’m guessing some kind of flower longhorn (Lepturinae); possibly Leptura obliterata (although the coloration seems off)? See http://bugguide.net/node/view/165929/bgimage and http://bugguide.net/node/view/315077/bgimage.

    Reply
  • brian sullivan
    April 22, 2010 11:49 am

    This is not a Lepturini for sure. The body is too robust. Note the enlarged femur and the squared humeri. Would luv to see an ID on this one it has me puzzled.

    Reply
  • Muskoteekein – in Cree we call them a Bear Beetle or a Spruce Bug – in our part of the world they bite! Great photo!

    Reply
  • They are Eburia stigma and the single beetle is Anelaphus inermis.

    Reply
  • Believe this to be Compsocerus violaceus based on this image http://www.cerambycoidea.com/foto.asp?Id=1501. Hope this helps.

    Reply
  • These are common flower longhorns of the genus Zorion

    Reply
  • Ando Vaan (aka Mardikavana)
    May 18, 2014 10:42 am

    Rhagium mordax

    Reply
  • Frederick Nunley
    June 22, 2015 6:55 am

    Found the same beetle in my garden on the swamp milkweed mating the other day. Got some good photos with my iPhone camera posted to Instagram .. I came hunting to find out what the beetles name was as I haven’t seen this really red one before. I caught them matting then one took wing and flew away! No Monarch butterflies seen here in Washington, DC yet this summer as of June 21st 2015. Hoping they will appear soon. We are trying to keep our various asclepius growing in our flower gardens.

    Reply
  • My brother and I made an end table out of a wood stump and these guys are starting to appear and holes are popping up in the stump. Is there any way to get rid of them? Do they live in the stump or are the coming into the house and burrowing in it?

    Reply
    • You can try getting rid of the stump to get rid of the Borer Beetles. They are emerging from the stump in which they were living as larvae or pupae when you brought the stump indoors, and now that they have matured, they are appearing.

      Reply
  • It may be a Gerania bosci.

    Reply
  • It must be Imantocera penicillata.

    Reply
  • Arrived at same conclusion (n genus level, at least):
    http://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=97395&subview=grid&taxon_id=50265

    Reply
    • Thanks for this and your other comments Boris. We will have to do plenty of posting corrections thanks to your diligence.

      Reply
  • kathy.shivel@gmail.com
    October 27, 2017 4:38 pm

    Are young Albizia longhorn beetles green, instead of brown?

    Reply
  • A beetle got into my bedroom that I don’t recognize. It was large with long antenae and a very tiny head. The color was dark green and black. I lived in Baton Rouge, LA. I can attach a photo to an email if I get a response from your staff.

    Reply
  • I can say that the specimens on BugGuide can easily be told apart by the eyes.

    Reply
  • My Grandson has just found a pair of these at his school in Hastings

    Reply

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