Do Bats Eat Fireflies? Unveiling the Nocturnal Mystery

Bats are fascinating creatures that come out at night to feed on a variety of insects. Often seen swooping through the sky, these nocturnal mammals rely on their outstanding echolocation skills to catch and eat their prey.

One insect that has left many curious to know if it’s part of bats’ diet is the firefly. These bioluminescent insects light up the night with their enchanting glow, creating a mesmerizing spectacle for onlookers. As bats play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of the ecosystem, understanding their feeding habits and preferences helps us appreciate their significance in the natural world.

Bats and Fireflies

General Characteristics of Bats

  • Bats are the only flying mammals
  • Bats primarily feed on insects, including moths, beetles, and mosquitoes
  • Over 1,100 known species of bats
  • Most bats are nocturnal and use echolocation to locate prey

Bats play a significant role in controlling insect populations. For example, a single little brown bat can eat 4 to 8 grams of insects each night.

General Characteristics of Fireflies

  • Fireflies are bioluminescent beetles
  • They produce light through a chemical reaction in their abdomen
  • Males and females communicate using light signals
  • Approximately 2,000 known species of fireflies

Fireflies are not only fascinating but also useful. They play a crucial role in natural pest control by preying on slugs, snails, and other pests.

Comparison Table: Bats vs. Fireflies

Feature Bats Fireflies
Class Mammal Insect
Primary Diet Insects Snails, slugs, insect larvae
Number of Species Over 1,100 Around 2,000
Unique Abilities Flight, echolocation Bioluminescence, light communication

In conclusion, both bats and fireflies are essential to maintaining balanced ecosystems. While bats are voracious insect predators, fireflies also contribute to natural pest control. Learning more about these fascinating creatures will undoubtedly increase our appreciation for their roles in the environment.

Dietary Interactions

What Bats Typically Eat

Bats have a diverse diet, but most species eat insects found in the night sky. For example, a little brown bat can consume 4 to 8 grams of insects each night. Other bats enjoy:

  • Fruit: Some bats are frugivores, meaning they eat fruits like figs, mangoes, dates, and bananas.
  • Small animals: Certain species of bats eat birds, fish, frogs, lizards, or even other bats.

What Fireflies Typically Eat

As for fireflies, they eat mainly:

  • Insects: Including snails, slugs, aphids, and mosquito larvae.
  • Nectar and pollen: As an occasional part of their diet.

However, interactions between bats and fireflies do occur. Bats are attracted to insects that emit light, such as fireflies. Despite this attraction, bats may not consume fireflies as frequently as other insects, possibly due to a chemical in the fireflies called lucibufagins that can make them unpalatable or poisonous to some predators.

Here is a comparison table detailing the dietary habits of the two species:

Species Primary Diet Secondary Diet
Bats Insects Fruits, small animals
Fireflies Insects Nectar and pollen

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Firefly, NOT Glowworm from Colorado

 

Can you identify this?
Sirs,
I found this in forest litter in foothills of Colorado at about 8000 ft. elevation last fall. I saw several of them glowing green in the dark and was able to find a couple and photograph them. I am attaching several photo’s and from looking at your site it may be a firefly, but I have lived here for 45 years and have never seen these before. I appreciate any information you can provide as to what this is. I can’t believe I found this web site and still have the photo! Thanks!
Bill Trust

Hi Bill,
We wrote to Eric Eaton to see if he knew a species name for your Glowworm. We wrote back saying he would check with another expert. Here is Eric’s query followed by the expert’s thoughts: “Q Dear Art: I did not know there was anything like this in Colorado! Any ideas? A John Wagener Green revised Microphotus in 1959 (Coleopterists Bulletin 13: 80-96). The only species he lists from Colorado is Microphotus pecosensis Fall. Fall described this species in 1912 from specimens collected in June and July in New Mexico. Green also recorded this species from Arizona, California, Texas, Utah, and Chihuahua. His Colorado records include Royal Gorge, Junction Creek, San Luis Valley, and Stollsheimer. He notes that they were all females collected in June and July and that, although their identities are not certain, they are probably pecosensis. The pink females are said to closely resemble the more common CA species, M. angustus LeConte and have 6-segmented antennae, 4-segmented tarsi. The CO specimens all have 3-segmented “

Update:  June 12, 2018
Based on a brand new posting, we realized we never changed the subject line of this posting to correctly identify this as a Firefly and not a true Glowworm.

Letter 2 – Firefly Larvae in Oregon

 

Subject: Unknown Glowworm
Location: Forest near Newport, Oregon
January 26, 2017 11:47 pm
This bug has bothered me for years. As a kid, I discovered these tiny bugs in the topsoil of a forest a few miles out of Newport, Oregon, near a cabin where my family stays occasionally. The bug is remarkable in that the circumstances to discover it were extraordinary.
Me and my brother and some of our friends created a game we called ‘real-life Slenderman’ where we would go out in the woods at night and try to collect notebook pages, like in the video game ‘Slender’, all while being pursued by my brother wearing a mask. Good for some thrills, certainly. The game necessitates spending a good amount of time alone in the woods in pitch darkness. Because of this, we quickly discovered minuscule lights in the soil beneath our feet, impossible to see except in total darkness. We found tiny segmented bugs with two faintly glowing ‘eyespots’ on their backs, which we observed in detail upon collecting some and bringing them into the house. They are less than a quarter inch long, dark brown, and segmented. I don’t remember if it was the front two spots or the back two that glowed, but it was two spots on each one. They were quite mobile when brought into the house, and moved in centipede-like fashion across a plate.
Since then, I have gone to the same spot many times to try and find more ‘glowworms’, but have not been able to find any. I did a thorough internet search on any ‘glowworms’ native to the Pacific Northwest, but found nothing remotely resembling this find. Perhaps it is not known as a ‘glowworm’ since the glowing is extremely faint.
I would love to have this resolved, and if nothing else, the story of how it was discovered is worth appreciating.
Signature: -Rebecca

Firefly Larvae

Dear Rebecca,
We actually believe these are Firefly Larvae from the family Lampyridae and not Glowworms in the family Phengodidae, but we are really reluctant to provide a more specific identification. 
Pterotus obscuripennis is an Oregon species pictured on BugGuide, but it looks very different from your larvae.

Firefly Larva
Firefly Larva

Letter 3 – Mystery Solved: Not Firefly but Checkered Beetle

 

Firefly, I think, in Florida
July 10, 2010
Hello again you helpful people! I believe you’d recently asked for photos of fireflies, and here’s one I took last month (had misfiled it and only just found it). When I was trying to ID it, I couldn’t find one that had all the same features. The antennae clearly have some feathering like pterotus, but all the images I found of those had solid red thoraxes. It looks a lot like lucidota, but the images of those I found have plain antennae and no red spot in the middle of the thorax, and no edge color to the wing cases (is that the right term?). What do you think? [Much thanks for the time and effort you expend on this marvelous website!]
Karen H.
Belleview, FL

Checkered Beetle

Hi Karen,
While it sure does look like a Firefly, we are not totally convinced it might not be something else, like a Soldier Beetle.  We are going to post your image and contact Eric Eaton to see if he has an opinion on the identity of your beetle.

Eric Eaton Responds:
July 12, 2010
You are correct, the insect is *not* a firefly.  It is a “checkered beetle,” Chariessa pilosa, and a firefly MIMIC.  Many beetles (and even other insects) masquerade as fireflies because fireflies are poisonous to many predators if they are eaten.
Eric


Letter 4 – Firefly: Pterotus obscuripennis

 

Subject:  Cool Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Paradise Mountain, Valley Center, California
Date: 04/11/2021
Time: 11:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m thinking this is a male Glow Worm Beetle that is…
Zarhipis integripennis?
How you want your letter signed:  Bomberojohn79

Firefly

Dear Bomberojohn79,
The Western Glowworm males pictured on BugGuide have orange legs.  We actually believe this is a Firefly,
Pterotus obscuripennis, based on this BugGuide image, and according to BugGuide:  “comes to lights in spring/early summer.”

Thank you so much for setting me straight.

Letter 5 – Firefly from Vietnam

 

Subject: Glowing Insect
Location: Vietnam
June 24, 2014 11:15 am
A friend of mine in Vietnam posted a video today. It contains a clip of an weird bug with a glowing bum. The video was taken at Cát Tiên national park (in Vietnam). He and I have both tried researching it with no success. It seems to have beetle like legs up front, but tiny catterpillar like legs on it’s rear end. The video is more helpful than the picture I provided. Could you help us out by identifying this weird insect? Here is a link to the video:
https://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php?v=10152232679183723&set=vb.737983722&type=2&theater&notif_t=comment_mention
Signature: ~Meagan Preston

Firefly
Firefly

Hi Meagan,
This is a Firefly in the family Lampyridae, and we believe it is either a larva or a larviform female.  See this image on BugGuide that shows a similar insect from Texas.

My friend says that looks right except the insect in question was bigger than his thumb. Do they get that big?

We are not certain how large Fireflies grow in tropical countries.  Alas, there is not a good comprehensive identification source for Vietnamese insect identifications that we are aware of that is in English.

He sent me a photograph.

Firefly Larva or Larviform Female Firefly
Firefly Larva or Larviform Female Firefly

Thanks Meagan,
The new image has much more detail.  We stick to our guns on this being a Firefly Larva or adult Larviform (usually female) Firefly.  Again, we are not familar with species from Vietnam, but when time permits, we will attempt to provide you with some additional information.

 

Letter 6 – Just One More Posting Until we reach 20,000 COUNTDOWN: Western Banded Glowworm or Male Firefly in Mount Washington???

 

Male Western Banded Glowworm
Male Western Banded Glowworm or Male Firefly

Male Western Banded Glowworm in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
April 3, 2015 10:00 PM
After a very long and busy day today, we arrived back at the office to find this male Western Banded Glowworm on the windowsill, and rather than to answer any requests that came in today, we decided to wait until morning and post our own first sighting in our yard and to wait until tomorrow to look at new mail.  We are feeling a bit inadequate that the images of a Western Banded Glowworm male we found on BugGuide are so much more detailed than our own.
  In trying to find a link to our own site, we found this other possibility, a male Firefly, Pterotus obscuripennis.

Letter 7 – Firefly from South Africa

 

Subject: Bioluminescense Beetle
Location: Illovo beach, kingsburgh, kzn, south africa
December 7, 2016 2:32 pm
Hi. I found this one flying in home about 23h00pm. Caught it in a jar with sand and some leaves. Hoping its alive tomorrow evening to show my son.
Signature: not private?

Firefly
Firefly

This is a Firefly, a beetle in the family Lampyridae, but unfortunately, we did not find a visual match on iSpot.

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

70 thoughts on “Do Bats Eat Fireflies? Unveiling the Nocturnal Mystery”

  1. We have found the same creature in Manitou Springs at 7000ft. They glow green, and look generally the same. Do you think their is a possibility that they could be moving up into the mountains?

    Reply
  2. We have outside tonight @ about 8000ft in pine junction, co. Never heard of one before tonight. Like a lightning bug that crawls.

    Reply
    • I found one in Pine Co. on June 20th 2015 @ around 9:45pm. Never knew they existed but we got some pics and video—super cool!!!

      Reply
  3. I just found one of these last night (4th of July) as I was on a night hike up Massey Draw in the Ken Caryl valley right next to the Foothills (approx. 7,000 ft. elevation). I saw something glowing in the distance on a rock, I thought it was a firefly but when I approached it and shined my light on it it was a little pink worm with a glowing green end (head or tail in not sure). I took a picture but I couldn’t get my camera to focus on it in the dark, but you can tell it’s the same as the worm above. I asked my dad what it was in the morning and he said he has never heard of glow worms in Colorado and he has lived and hiked here for over 60 years.

    Reply
    • Thanks for letting us know. This is a very old posting. If you find any Glowworms, please take photos and submit them for our archive. Please use a “Colorado Glowworm” as the subject line to ensure you get our attention.

      Reply
  4. I’ve seen this larval-looking female Microphotus pecosensis several times at 6000 ft. in Oak Creek Canyon, south of Flagstaff, AZ. I didn’t know there was a fire fly that didn’t flash while flying. A friend just found one a few nights ago about 7300 ft. on the slope of Mt. Elden on the north side of Flagstaff. As he watched, two adult males came and mated with the female.

    Reply
  5. this is too funny,so I am looking online to find info on glow worms in Colorado and I find this site and see that my friend joel has already left a comment!!!we did see several glow worms near rampart res.I have lived here 20 yrs and never saw them until now

    Reply
  6. For the last couple of nights looking out of our bedroom window…rt there on the ground we saw 3 green glowing lights. Both my husband and son went with flash lights to investigate. They said the bugs were like tiny worms with the heads lit up..,what are they & there in the same spot even to night.

    Reply
  7. We saw one in Buffalo Creek, CO (~6,800 ft) on July 11, 2014.
    I have some good pic.s but don’t know how to post them here.

    Reply
  8. We saw one in Buffalo Creek, CO (~6,800 ft) on July 11, 2014.
    I have some good pic.s but don’t know how to post them here.

    Reply
  9. I was actually digging in our garden last night in Lehi, UT (~4,000 ft?) and found something similar. At first I thought I was hitting rocks with my shovel and causing sparks, but then realized it was actually these glowing grub-like creatures. Tiny, about the size of the tip of a ball-point pen, glowing green. I’ve lived in the intermountain west my whole life and I’ve never seen anything like them. Wish I would’ve taken a photo. If what I saw is the same as the Colorado glowworm, what does it grow up to be? Or is the worm stage it’s mature, adult stage? (bug newby)

    Reply
  10. Found one last night in Orem UT (just 20 miles south of Lehi, see post above), and about 4500 ft elevation. It isn’t as developed as the critter shown in the original post, but the green glowing tip is pretty eerie as you weed in the garden just after dusk! I’ll upload some pictures.

    Reply
  11. We live at 9500′ elevation near Hartsel, CO and noticed a strange glow off our deck while star watching. We got out our flashlight and tracked down the light source, it was a very tiny, (1/4″) long and worm looking. It has been on te same rock for 2 nights now.

    Reply
  12. We saw 2 glow worms while camping in the Rampart range just West of Devils Head. They were glowing flourecent green. Half the body was yellow and the other half pink. I have lived here and explored Colorados mountains for 35 years and have never seen them before.

    Reply
  13. These glowworms are looking peculiar. I am also seeing this type of worm for the first time. People mentioned that they have seen this worm in mountain regions. Only a few people go to mountains and found them. so, it would be a strange one to the people living in the region. The experts might be got the name of this worm.

    Reply
  14. I have seen two of these creatures or something similar here in South Carolina at an elevation of only 292 feet. Never seen these before tonight!

    Reply
  15. I live just out side of Williams AZ at about 6800 ft. For the first time we have this bug. Never have seen it before. We found quite a few of them. The date 6-21-16 time 9:26pm. Red with green glow.

    Reply
  16. I just came upon a bright light while out hiking on a July night outside Saguache in the San Luis Valley–over 9,000 feet. Upon close inspection I discovered a tiny, pink worm with an illuminated tail embedded in the embankment along side the dirt road! I’ve never seen anything like it. Such a dazzling light in the moonless night.

    Reply
  17. I just found one on my flagstone patio! I live in the foothills of Tucson,AZ. All lights off, and looked down to see a tiny green glowing light. Gently picked up with a soft towel -a tiny little pink worm with green glowing head. (Or tail) I brought it inside to investigate further, and with the light on, the creature’s green light went off! I took it back outside (dark) and after a few minutes, the green light was back again! Never seen before. 10:30pm, July 15, 2016. I took photos-will try to upload tomorrow!

    Reply
  18. Saw one on a rock in Wlidcat Canyon near Lake George, Colorado, then found at least 5 more that night further up river, July 16th, 2016. Been hiking and camping CO for 20 years, live close to Pine Junction, never seen them. Very cool!

    Reply
  19. Saw numerous glow worms at Mueller State Park, outside of Divide, Colorado, last summer around July 4th. Each one we found were were situated exactly in the middle of the cement parking curbs in the campground. Don’t know if this could be attributed to some kind of temperature preference for the glow worm…

    Reply
  20. Just saw one of these little guys on a overnight camping trip just north of Payson AZ below the Mogollon Rim / See canyon , They are bright on a dark night , It was in the red rocks at about 6,000 ft. First time I had ever seen. Thank you all for your information , I had never seen one befor then .

    Reply
  21. I saw one of these in the mountains on 6/15/2017 on a rock at first i thought it was reflection from the fire but i grabbed a flash light and had to check it out sure enough a worm. First time ever seening one i found him in the mountains north west of saguache colorado

    Reply
  22. We were standing on our deck last night and saw a single glowing light on a rock in our backyard. When we investigated we found one pink glowworm. We live at 6,475 feet in the foothills of the Wet Mountains near Florence, CO. If we find more we will photograph and post. Have never heard of nor seen any of these in my 42 years of exploring Colorado.

    Reply
  23. Saw one tonight in Tucson, AZ. Got a small video on it. Light just went out after five minutes but the worm continued to crawl. It was dark out. Probably 2400 ft above sea level.

    Reply
  24. At my parents house in Colorado Springs there is a tree in their backyard that has these green glowing lights. we’ve seen them the past couple of years but only in this one type of tree. (no clue what kind) but last night I counted about 15-20 green ones and 1 red one. they seem to appear every year right before it gets cold. Is there any definite answer as to what these are?

    Reply
  25. Our house is at 6600′ near Mountainair, NM. I have seen 3 of these beatles, so they are in central New Mexico. Interestingly one was on our patio in February when it was below freezing!

    Reply
  26. My wife and I saw several of these insects glowing together on a rock in our yard this evening. Lived here for 11 years, and this is the first time we’ve seen them. We live in Woodland Park, CO @ 8,700 feet. Fire fly makes sense – they do seem to be in a larva stage. Although, we’ve never seen any actual mature flies at night at this altitude -we don’t even hear crickets at night (something I miss terribly, since moving from the east coast).

    Reply
  27. Spotted one last night at 8200′ (Sampson Mountain) in Jefferson county, Colorado. First I have seen since moving here 12 years ago. Very bright glow.

    Reply
  28. Saw and have photos of a presumed female in Santa Fe, NM on July 14, 2018. Bright constant glow. Have not seen one before in the 20 years living here.

    Reply
  29. Saw a couple of these exact bugs in Bandelier National Park this past weekend. Rangers said they were “glowworms” but I was skeptical. Glad to have found this site and learn their real name. Not sure why they are called fireflies or glowworms. The green light from their tail end looks just like the fireflies I remember from home back East. But these guys don’t fly. Rather they move more like a caterpillar.

    Reply
  30. Hey, Rebecca! Loved your question!
    Nice to know there are others who have childhood mysteries needing to be solved!
    Isn’t this website THE BEST???
    Roni
    PS I accidentally sent this comment to a previous “inquisitor”. Oops.

    Reply
  31. Hey, Rebecca! Loved your question!
    Nice to know there are others who have childhood mysteries needing to be solved!
    Isn’t this website THE BEST???
    Roni
    PS I accidentally sent this comment to a previous “inquisitor”. Oops.

    Reply
  32. I just found some glow worms/bugs at 9200-9400 feet on Pikes Peak last week. It was like a larve. Kinda squishy when I touched it. It never changed brightness after I touched it. Bigger than a BB but smaller than a pea. Groups of 4-8 in areas of 15ft circumference. on nothing but granite. What the heck are these??? Never seen them in 20 + years on the peak. Please help!

    Reply
  33. Saw them in Lake George at 8500 ft on June 23, 2019. They look like larva. Very little ability to move around. I was thrilled. I missed the Kansas fire flies of my chilhood. Glad to see them in CO, but would love to identify them. No legs or antenna. 1/4 “.

    Reply
  34. We had three appear immediately following a rain shower from under the river rocks that are in our yard. It has been over 3 years I believe since there was one that made an appearance. Hopefully they are multiplying under the river rocks.

    Reply
  35. Observed three in the same spot as last year (Santa Fe/Tseuque, NM) exactly the same time – first two weeks in July. Moving around to a different location each day.

    Reply
  36. I live in evergreen CO at 8600 ft. I have five of the same on my property. They are absolutely amazing and I’ve never seen anything like it CO in all my years. Born and raised in the mountains.

    Reply
  37. I just saw several last night outside of Snowmass Village, at about 9,000 feet. It was on a trail I’ve hiked regularly for years, but I’ve never seen or noticed them before.

    Reply
  38. Adding to my previous reply from yesterday…
    Looking at my pictures, the one I found appears to be a bit lighter in color than the pic above (though they were taken during the day.. I couldn’t get a night pic)

    I also wanted to mention that it did not blink its ‘light’, but was able to control the brightness (or turn it off).
    The actual light organ appeared to be on the bottom of the last segment, although glow from it could be seen from the top in both of the last 2.

    ——
    This is the first time I’ve ever come across any ‘lighted’ bug!

    Reply
  39. Adding to my previous reply from yesterday…
    Looking at my pictures, the one I found appears to be a bit lighter in color than the pic above (though they were taken during the day.. I couldn’t get a night pic)

    I also wanted to mention that it did not blink its ‘light’, but was able to control the brightness (or turn it off).
    The actual light organ appeared to be on the bottom of the last segment, although glow from it could be seen from the top in both of the last 2.

    ——
    This is the first time I’ve ever come across any ‘lighted’ bug!

    Reply
  40. We live at 6200 feet between wetmore and Florence Colorado. There is a glow worm in our yard tonight.
    Years ago, before the 2000s, we saw them a few times up here but that was before was such a drought.
    Thank you for having and maintaining site. It is excellent!

    Reply
  41. We live at 6200 feet between wetmore and Florence Colorado. There is a glow worm in our yard tonight.
    Years ago, before the 2000s, we saw them a few times up here but that was before was such a drought.
    Thank you for having and maintaining site. It is excellent!

    Reply
    • I am also seeing these in my yard (south of Cañon City CO)for the first time in 16 years. There are 3 that glow shortly after sunset and move short distances each day around rock garden, ground cover.

      Reply
  42. We live at 9300 ft elevation near Bishop’s Castle and started seeing the little worm like bugs tonight.
    Curious to whether these are a firefly larvae or an actual type of glow worm.
    Can anyone clarify?

    Reply
  43. We live at 9300 ft elevation near Bishop’s Castle and started seeing the little worm like bugs tonight.
    Curious to whether these are a firefly larvae or an actual type of glow worm.
    Can anyone clarify?

    Reply
  44. Hello! Happy 4th of July to everyone! I live in Poncha Springs, CO- near Salida. As I was waiting for the fireworks show to begin, I found what other people are describing as a small flat pink worm with a brightly lit green “booty”, in a patch of tall grass and wildflowers. I only seen the one, but it is very overgrown in that moist area by the cherry tree. I’ve never seen a bioluminescent creature in Colorado, and I am a born and raised in Colorado gal. I will be looking daily for more!

    Reply
  45. Went for a walk last night and spotted five or six of these creatures at about 7200’ elevation, straight east of Spring City, Utah. They were all hanging out among the dead scrub oak leaves on the ground. Hard to capture the glow on my iPhone, but I do have a pic of the worm and will send it to you.

    Reply
  46. Vegas lights via “Bioluminsescent Beetle”. Tonight at Mt. Charelston, Las Vegas ~ 8:50pm, in my happy place of 76 degree weather during the 118 heatwave, was suddenly confounded by what lay ahead? Making my way down the pitch-dark, tree-lined pathway, I suddenly found my eyes blinking like butterfly flutters. “Do my eyes deceive me? Did I strike gold, wait, Nevada is silver.” I halted my gate to a shattered glass walker. Upon arrival, in catcher’s position I extracted my loupe, pulled down my welder’s helmet and began exploring the mystifying soil. Pushing around the pinhead glow I suddenly jerked, there was movement like a dog squimmering on his back; backward and forward, C-crunching. As the blanketed dirt fell aside and fully exposed the glow, to my facinated and bewildered surprise was a worm the length of sewing needle. Only the tip beamed a glorious flourescent green. What a wonder, what a waunderlust for worms, what-in-the-world? Who-“wood”a-wagered their greenback on green glowworms in Vegas? Next stop Allegheny National Forest, Waitomo-hmmm?

    Reply
  47. I have found bioluminescent caterpillars in the Oregon forests. They had yellow horizontal glowing stripes across their body. I discovered them in 2016. Very exciting! Ella, Portland

    Reply
  48. Saw two of these glowing bugs in our front yard outside Pagosa Springs. I’m a Colorado native and never saw these before. Interesting!

    Reply
  49. We saw one last night & still there tonight, still glowing. Took pictures.. we live at 7500 ft in Morrison, CO, lived here for 54 years & never seen them before. My wife grew up here & she has never seen them either.

    Reply

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