Common House Spider: Essential Facts & Tips

folder_openArachnida, Araneae
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Common house spiders are often found sharing our living spaces, providing benefits like pest control by feeding on smaller insects. These small arachnids are generally harmless to humans and can be identified by their yellowish-brown color, with body lengths of about 5-6 millimeters for females and 3.8-4.7 millimeters for males according to Penn State Extension. Their distinctive abdomen may feature gray chevrons and possibly a triangular black spot on top.

As a natural part of the ecosystem, house spiders play their role in keeping other pests in check. Although they may seem intimidating to some, knowing more about their habits and characteristics can help us appreciate their presence and understand how they contribute to a balanced environment. While they might be a nuisance for some homeowners, understanding and identifying common house spiders is key to ensuring that we can coexist peacefully in our shared spaces.

Identifying Common House Spiders

Physical Characteristics

The Common House Spider is a small creature, usually measuring around 5 to 6 millimeters for females, and 3.8 to 4.7 millimeters for males. These spiders are often found in various shades of brown, yellowish, tan, and gray, with distinct markings on their abdomens. Some examples of markings may include:

  • Gray chevrons
  • Streaks on the side
  • V-shapes behind the abdomen
  • Occasionally a triangular black spot or whitish patch on the abdomen

Their legs typically have dark rings at the end of each segment, and come in yellow-brown colors.

Behavior

Common House Spiders are known for their web-spinning habits, building cobwebs in undisturbed locations. These spider webs show a tangle-like appearance and serve as the spider’s primary method for catching prey. They feed on insects and other spiders and are generally harmless to humans.

Habitat

The Common House Spider can be found both indoors and outdoors, in habitats like:

  • Homes (secluded areas like basements and crawl spaces)
  • Gardens
  • Sheds
  • Garages

They are often seen entering houses during the fall season, looking for shelter from the cold. To minimize their presence indoors, it is recommended to seal any cracks around doors and windows, and reduce the availability of food by controlling other insects in the house.

Here is a comparison table of some common spider types found in homes:

Spider Type Body Shape Color Habitat
Common House Spider Round, higher abdomen Brown, yellowish, tan, gray Indoors, gardens, sheds
Hobo Spider Elongated abdomen Brown, gray, tan Ground level, outdoors
American House Spider Round abdomen Grayish to brownish Indoors, undisturbed areas
Daddy Longlegs Small body, long legs Light brown or gray Indoors, outdoors, high places
Sac Spider Elongated abdomen Light tan to pale yellow Indoors, under objects
Cellar Spiders Small body, long legs Pale yellow to light brown Indoors, damp locations
Funnel Weavers Elongated abdomen Brown with dark markings Outdoors, ground level

Types of House Spiders

Black Widow Spiders

  • Small to medium-sized, round black body
  • Marked with a red hourglass on abdomen
  • Infamous for venomous bite, which can be harmful to humans
  • Prefer dark, undisturbed spaces like woodpiles and garages

Black widow spiders are easily recognized by their shiny black body and distinct red hourglass marking on the abdomen. While their venomous bites can cause pain and discomfort, they are rarely aggressive towards humans unless threatened.

Brown Recluse Spiders

  • Brown or grayish-brown body with violin-shaped marking
  • Venomous bites can lead to tissue damage
  • Favors dark, secluded areas such as basements, closets, or attics
  • Non-aggressive nature, but bites when disturbed or threatened

Brown recluse spiders have a violin-shaped marking on their back and deliver venomous bites that can cause tissue damage. They prefer dark and secluded spaces in homes and are typically not aggressive unless threatened.

Jumping Spiders

  • Small, compact, and hairy body
  • Excel at jumping and hunting prey
  • Not venomous or harmful to humans
  • Largely found in gardens, but may venture inside

Jumping spiders are characterized by their small, hairy bodies and extraordinary jumping abilities. These harmless spiders are typically found outside in gardens and are not venomous to humans.

Cellar Spiders

  • Also known as Daddy Longlegs
  • Long, slender legs and small body
  • Harmless to humans with low venom level
  • Commonly found in basements and cellars

Cellar spiders, or daddy longlegs, are easily identified by their long, slender legs and small body. They are harmless to humans and prefer to inhabit basements and cellars.

Wolf Spiders

  • Brown, large, and hairy body
  • Fast runners and active hunters
  • Non-aggressive, yet may bite if threatened
  • Frequently found in gardens, but can be found indoors

Wolf spiders are large and hairy with a brown body. They are fast runners and skilled hunters. While not aggressive, they may bite if threatened. They are often found outdoors in gardens but can also be found inside homes.

Yellow Sac Spiders

  • Pale yellow or beige color, small-to-medium size
  • Nighttime hunters that bite when trapped or disturbed
  • Bites can be painful, but not dangerous
  • Indoor and outdoor dwellers

Yellow sac spiders are small-to-medium-sized spiders with a pale yellow or beige body. Their bites are painful but not generally dangerous. These nighttime hunters can be found both indoors and outdoors.

Comparison Table

Spider Type Size Venomous Aggressiveness Preferred Habitat
Black Widow Small-medium Yes Low Dark, undisturbed spaces
Brown Recluse Medium Yes Low Dark, secluded areas
Jumping Spider Small No N/A Gardens
Cellar Spider Small No N/A Basements, cellars
Wolf Spider Large No Low Gardens, indoors
Yellow Sac Spider Small-medium No Low Indoor and outdoor

Common House Spider Bites

Symptoms and Effects

Common house spiders, such as the American house spider, are usually not venomous to humans. However, some household spiders like the brown recluse or the hobo spider can be dangerous. Symptoms of venomous spider bites can include:

  • Itching or rash
  • Pain radiating from the site of the bite
  • Muscle pain or cramping
  • Reddish to purplish color or blister
  • Increased sweating
  • Nausea

In case of a venomous bite, panic and arachnophobia can worsen the situation.

Treatment and Prevention

For non-venomous spider bites, such as from a common house spider, treatment involves:

  1. Cleaning the bite with soap and water
  2. Applying a cold compress
  3. Taking over-the-counter pain relievers if necessary

For venomous spider bites, like from a brown recluse or hobo spider, seeking immediate medical attention is crucial.

Comparison table of common, brown recluse, and hobo spiders:

Common House Spider Brown Recluse Spider Hobo Spider
Size Small (5-6mm female) Small (6-20mm) Medium (12-16mm)
Venomous to humans No Yes Yes
Coloration Yellowish-brown Light to dark brown Tawny brown
Additional features Gray chevron patterns on abdomen Dark violin-shaped mark on back Zigzag and fibonacci-patterned webs

To prevent spider infestations and bites, consider the following:

  • Regularly clean and vacuum your home to discourage spiders from settling
  • Remove webs and egg sacs whenever you find them
  • Seal cracks and gaps in walls, windows, and doors
  • Use insect repellents around the home’s perimeter

Keep in mind that most spiders, including common house spiders, are shy and will avoid humans. They can even help control other household pests, such as flies and mosquitoes.

House Spider Control and Management

Natural Predators

Some natural predators of common house spiders include:

  • Mosquitoes: They feed on spider egg sacs and help control house spider populations.
  • Daddy longlegs: Also known as cellar spiders, they prey on house spiders.
  • Cavagrners: Carnivorous insects which feed on common house spiders and keep their numbers in check.

Home Prevention Tips

To prevent house spider infestations, consider the following:

  • Cleanliness: Maintain a clean environment, especially in attics, basements, and storage areas where spiders are likely to hide.
  • Sealing: Seal cracks and crevices in walls to eliminate entry points.
  • Firewood: Store firewood away from the house to avoid attracting spiders.
  • Declutter: Reduce clutter in storage areas and sheds, as spiders like to hide in these spaces.

Some examples of how to manage infestations are:

  1. Capture and remove small numbers of spiders.
  2. Employ glue traps or insecticides in strategic locations.

Pros and Cons of using traps and insecticides:

Method Pros Cons
Glue Traps Non-toxic, easy to use, cost-effective May be unappealing, need frequent replacement
Insecticides Effective in killing spiders May be harmful to humans, pets, and the environment

Professional Pest Control

In cases of severe spider infestations, it’s best to consult professional pest control services. They have the expertise and equipment to effectively eliminate house spiders and other pests. Be mindful of the potential costs and chemicals used by pest control professionals, as some methods may have unintended consequences for other beneficial species, such as barn spiders and funnel weaver spiders.

Benefits of Common House Spiders

The common house spider plays a crucial role in controlling insect populations. One of the main benefits of common house spiders is that they act as natural pest control. They help keep the population of insects and other small pests in check, reducing the need for harsh chemical insecticides.

  • Scavengers: These spiders are efficient scavengers, preying on various household pests that can be harmful or bothersome. For example, they feed on flies, mosquitoes, and even cockroaches.

  • Non-aggressive: Generally speaking, common house spiders are not aggressive creatures. They choose to retreat or hide rather than bite when encountering humans.

Here are some key features and characteristics of common house spiders:

  • Legs: Their legs are usually yellow, with darker rings at the end of each segment. This gives them a distinct appearance, making them easy to identify1.

  • Beneficial: As mentioned before, having these spiders in your home is actually beneficial, as they control other pests.

Now, let’s have a look at some pros and cons of common house spiders:

Pros

  • Natural pest controllers
  • Non-aggressive towards humans
  • Reduce the need for chemical insecticides

Cons

  • Can trigger phobias for some individuals
  • Produce cobwebs in corners and other areas

In summary, the common house spider is a beneficial presence in our homes. They act as natural pest controllers, keeping the population of insects and other pests in check. While they might scare some people, their advantages outweigh the negatives.

Footnotes

  1. Common House Spider – Penn State Extension

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Red House Spider with Spiderlings

 

Spider Mama and Babies
Location:  Plant City, FL
September 5, 2010 12:36 pm
Hi Bugman,
I took this photo a few days ago. Today is September 4, 2010. I noticed this spider mom and all her little babies and was just wondering what kind of spider she is. Sizewise she is about 5 or 6 millimeters. I photographed her in a crevice on my carport spraycrete wall.
Signature:  Sincerely, Shannon (taking Turf and Ornamental Entomology at UF)

Red House Spider with Spiderlings

Hi Shannon,
We started our identification on the assumption that this was a Cobweb Spider in the family Theridiidae, the group that includes the Widows, but we were not certain if we would have any luck identifying your species.  Then we stumbled upon the Red House Spider,
Nesticodes rufipes, on BugGuide.  There are two deal sealers in our mind, the first being that BugGuide only reports this species from Florida, and the second being some images of a female Red House Spider with her brood of Spiderlings.

Thank you so much. I looked at the photos on BugGuide you mentioned and saw the egg sack as well which she also has out there. So I believe you are correct in your identification.  Hopefully I can submit some more photos in the future. I am getting a degree in Environmental Horticulture with UF and just finished an Entomology course and am now taking the Turf and Ornamental Entomology. I find insects fascinating mostly because I love plants and they interact so much. Thanks again,
Shannon Mitchell

Letter 2 – Common House Spider

 

Subject: Spider in my home
Location: Uk
July 27, 2015 3:28 am
Hi there,
I have this spider in my home. I have not seen one like it before and I don’t know if it’s dangerous or not please help.
Signature: Michael

Common House Spider
Common House Spider

Dear Michael,
We believe this is a House Spider in the genus
Tegenaria, and according to the British Arachnological Society site:  “There are five species of ‘House Spider’ – the big hairy ones that come out at night and occasionally end up in the bath. These large, long-legged, brown spiders produce a sheet web that leads to a tubular retreat. … Tegenaria species very rarely bite and if they do it is painless. What gives them a bad reputation is their size, speed and nocturnal habits. Females can live for several years, but males, who live for a few weeks with the female, die after mating and are sometimes consumed by the female. Like all spiders living in houses they can withstand the very dry conditions and survive for months without sustenance”  The image on The Guardian site is much better for seeing the resemblance to your image.

Letter 3 – Common House Spider feasts on Skink

 

Orb Weaver with Skink Pt2
July 24, 2009
I sent two images earlier today and got one more of the same unknown orb weaver with her skink. By now he’s collapsing on himself from her nonstop feast. As my son said, “Cool. Spiders are like vampires!”
Resa in Atlanta
Atlanta, GA

Common House Spider eats Gecko
Common House Spider eats Skink

Uknown Spider Feasting on Lizard
July 24, 2009
Saw this unknown spider had caught a baby skink it its web last night. I tried to get a decent night shot as the spider was biting the skink’s tail. The poor little lizard was twisitng fruitlessly. This morning the spider had turned the now dead skink and was working on it’s face. My kids enjoyed seeing the circle of life in action. I hope you enjoy the shots as well.
Resa in Atlanta
Atlanta, GA

Common House Spider eats Gecko
Common House Spider eats Skink

Hi Resa,
We are thrilled to be able to post your awesome documentation, though we have a certain fondness for lizards.  We do really hate those television commercials with the animated gecko though.   Your spider is not an Orbweaver, but rather a Cobweb Spider.  We believe it is the highly variable Common House Spider, Parasteatoda tepidariorum, based on images posted to BugGuide.  Spiders are able to incapacitate much larger prey when the prey becomes entangled in the web.  We have photos in our archive of a Golden Orb Weaver feeding on a Hummingbird and we have linked to an image of a Golden Silk Spider eating a Finch.

Common House Spider eats Gecko
Common House Spider eats Skink

Letter 4 – possibly male Giant House Spider

 

spider
Mon, Dec 29, 2008 at 6:24 PM
I send this photo in during a very busy time for you, so I am not surprised
that it received no attention.  Now that it is the middle of the winter,  you
might have less e-mail, so I thought I would try again.   I am still very
curious whether I have correctly identified the  (very scary to me) spider.
I took the photo in early September, in Vancouver, BC, Canada.
The black dots are spaced 1in apart, so the critter is about 2 inches.
Brief research has led me to believe it’s a Giant House Spider,
as described on this website:
http://hubpages.com/hub/The-Glade
You will be glad to know that despite of frightening me nearly to death when
it suddenly appeared on a floor next to me, it has been left alone.  We never
saw it again; I am guessing our small apartment is not a very spider-friendly
place, having no dark undisturbed corners to build a spider web.
What do you think?
Joanna

Giant House Spider
Giant House Spider

Hi Joanna,
We  believe this might be a male Giant House Spider, Tegenaria duellica, based on some images posted to BugGuide.  We are sorry you had to wait so long for a reply, but summer is a very busy time for us.

Letter 5 – Common House Spider with Spiderlings

 

Subject: Parasteatoda Tepidariorum Spiderlings
Location: Upper Texas Coast
July 4, 2017 11:38 pm
The American house spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) that lives in my bedroom recently produced this crop of tiny spiderlings.
Signature: Lachlan

Common House Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Lachlan,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a Common House Spider and her spiderlings.

Letter 6 – Southern House Spider cohabitates with humans!!!

 

Subject: Southern House Spider
Location: Richmond, VA
February 20, 2015 12:59 am
Some time ago, I think last winter (maybe the one before), I wrote to you about a southern house spider I caught behind my couch and was going to release in the spring — you suggested I keep her, as I have tarantula experience, and I did. She’s fat and happy to this day, and she’s grown some.
This winter, I have another friend. She lives above my bed, behind an animal-skin wall hanging. I saw the web and meant to brush it away, off of my stuff (it makes all of the fur stick together and look bad), but then I saw her and realized the space was occupied. For now, and very probably permanently, she can stay, as it’s somewhere she’s safe from us accidentally hurting her, and from us being bitten on accident. I’m probably going to start feeding her periodically, so she will be more likely to stay put, instead of setting up camp somewhere less safe. I noticed her weeks ago, but I don’t see her very often. She very likely could have been living there for months. In this picture, she is out on her web “patio”, hanging out. I notice she does this at night sometimes, but usually she’s hidden all day. It’s interesting how her web is — it looks like a snowflake against the wall, and seems to exist mostly so that she can sit there with out losing footing and falling.
I’ve seen some males in my house. I think there’s a big “family” living with me.
Here’s some good pictures, if you want to put them on your website.
Best regards,
Denise Elliott

Southern House Spider
Southern House Spider

Dear Denise,
Thanks for updating us on the Southern House Spiders with which you are sharing your home .

Letter 7 – Southern House Spider with Spiderlings

 

Trapdoor Spider with Young?
January 31, 2010
Tearing down a shed in South Goergia I found her with hatchlings. I laid a quarter down next to her for scale. She looked a lot more impressive with he legs stetched out, but still a cool speciman.
Wild Man
South Georgia

Southern House Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Wild Man,
This looks to us like a Southern House Spider, Kukulcania hibernalis, one of the Crevice Weaver Spiders.  According to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds ‘messy’ webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.
Your photo nicely illustrates the maternal care many spiders exhibit toward their spiderlings.

Letter 8 – Female Southern House Spider

 

Subject:  Spider named Aragog
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern California
Date: 01/07/2018
Time: 01:27 PM EDT
I can’t find a thing on this lovely ‘lady’. My son purchased an old Airstream Trailer, drove it home (apx 30 miles) and saw her trying to climb up one of the tires the next morning. We have no clue as to ‘where ‘ she actually came from. We live in the mountains where it gets very cold and my concern for her was if she was from ‘down the hill’ it was far too cold for her up here. She is now set up in a quite comfy critter keeper. I have 2 Tarantula Females that I have owned for 20+ years now. What’s another spider to care for! Can you please tell me what she is? We have freaked out about a ‘Recluse’ but she has built a ‘Widow’ type web into her little tree branch in her keeper. She does not appear aggressive or fast moving whatsoever. I’m actually stumped. She’s larger than a quarter.  Spread out I’d say half dollar coin sized. She’s big! We are now calling her Aragog. Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Keeper of T’s

Female Southern  House Spider

Dear Keeper of T’s,
We are posting your Spider images prior to identification.  It appears that the eyes on this individual are not very well developed, indicating is most likely spends its time in low light situations and also that it does not depend upon eyesight to hunt.  We will do additional research and then get back to you.  Perhaps one of our readers will have an idea how to classify your Spider.

Female Southern House Spider

Update:  Female Southern House Spider
Thanks to Cesar Crash who wrote in that this is a female Southern House Spider, a species pictured on BugGuide.

Goodness Gracious Thank You! Now I shall provide a bit more Branchery for webbing! hehe
ŞĦĄŔŐŊ

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Red House Spider with Spiderlings

 

Spider Mama and Babies
Location:  Plant City, FL
September 5, 2010 12:36 pm
Hi Bugman,
I took this photo a few days ago. Today is September 4, 2010. I noticed this spider mom and all her little babies and was just wondering what kind of spider she is. Sizewise she is about 5 or 6 millimeters. I photographed her in a crevice on my carport spraycrete wall.
Signature:  Sincerely, Shannon (taking Turf and Ornamental Entomology at UF)

Red House Spider with Spiderlings

Hi Shannon,
We started our identification on the assumption that this was a Cobweb Spider in the family Theridiidae, the group that includes the Widows, but we were not certain if we would have any luck identifying your species.  Then we stumbled upon the Red House Spider,
Nesticodes rufipes, on BugGuide.  There are two deal sealers in our mind, the first being that BugGuide only reports this species from Florida, and the second being some images of a female Red House Spider with her brood of Spiderlings.

Thank you so much. I looked at the photos on BugGuide you mentioned and saw the egg sack as well which she also has out there. So I believe you are correct in your identification.  Hopefully I can submit some more photos in the future. I am getting a degree in Environmental Horticulture with UF and just finished an Entomology course and am now taking the Turf and Ornamental Entomology. I find insects fascinating mostly because I love plants and they interact so much. Thanks again,
Shannon Mitchell

Letter 2 – Common House Spider

 

Subject: Spider in my home
Location: Uk
July 27, 2015 3:28 am
Hi there,
I have this spider in my home. I have not seen one like it before and I don’t know if it’s dangerous or not please help.
Signature: Michael

Common House Spider
Common House Spider

Dear Michael,
We believe this is a House Spider in the genus
Tegenaria, and according to the British Arachnological Society site:  “There are five species of ‘House Spider’ – the big hairy ones that come out at night and occasionally end up in the bath. These large, long-legged, brown spiders produce a sheet web that leads to a tubular retreat. … Tegenaria species very rarely bite and if they do it is painless. What gives them a bad reputation is their size, speed and nocturnal habits. Females can live for several years, but males, who live for a few weeks with the female, die after mating and are sometimes consumed by the female. Like all spiders living in houses they can withstand the very dry conditions and survive for months without sustenance”  The image on The Guardian site is much better for seeing the resemblance to your image.

Letter 3 – Common House Spider feasts on Skink

 

Orb Weaver with Skink Pt2
July 24, 2009
I sent two images earlier today and got one more of the same unknown orb weaver with her skink. By now he’s collapsing on himself from her nonstop feast. As my son said, “Cool. Spiders are like vampires!”
Resa in Atlanta
Atlanta, GA

Common House Spider eats Gecko
Common House Spider eats Skink

Uknown Spider Feasting on Lizard
July 24, 2009
Saw this unknown spider had caught a baby skink it its web last night. I tried to get a decent night shot as the spider was biting the skink’s tail. The poor little lizard was twisitng fruitlessly. This morning the spider had turned the now dead skink and was working on it’s face. My kids enjoyed seeing the circle of life in action. I hope you enjoy the shots as well.
Resa in Atlanta
Atlanta, GA

Common House Spider eats Gecko
Common House Spider eats Skink

Hi Resa,
We are thrilled to be able to post your awesome documentation, though we have a certain fondness for lizards.  We do really hate those television commercials with the animated gecko though.   Your spider is not an Orbweaver, but rather a Cobweb Spider.  We believe it is the highly variable Common House Spider, Parasteatoda tepidariorum, based on images posted to BugGuide.  Spiders are able to incapacitate much larger prey when the prey becomes entangled in the web.  We have photos in our archive of a Golden Orb Weaver feeding on a Hummingbird and we have linked to an image of a Golden Silk Spider eating a Finch.

Common House Spider eats Gecko
Common House Spider eats Skink

Letter 4 – possibly male Giant House Spider

 

spider
Mon, Dec 29, 2008 at 6:24 PM
I send this photo in during a very busy time for you, so I am not surprised
that it received no attention.  Now that it is the middle of the winter,  you
might have less e-mail, so I thought I would try again.   I am still very
curious whether I have correctly identified the  (very scary to me) spider.
I took the photo in early September, in Vancouver, BC, Canada.
The black dots are spaced 1in apart, so the critter is about 2 inches.
Brief research has led me to believe it’s a Giant House Spider,
as described on this website:
http://hubpages.com/hub/The-Glade
You will be glad to know that despite of frightening me nearly to death when
it suddenly appeared on a floor next to me, it has been left alone.  We never
saw it again; I am guessing our small apartment is not a very spider-friendly
place, having no dark undisturbed corners to build a spider web.
What do you think?
Joanna

Giant House Spider
Giant House Spider

Hi Joanna,
We  believe this might be a male Giant House Spider, Tegenaria duellica, based on some images posted to BugGuide.  We are sorry you had to wait so long for a reply, but summer is a very busy time for us.

Letter 5 – Common House Spider with Spiderlings

 

Subject: Parasteatoda Tepidariorum Spiderlings
Location: Upper Texas Coast
July 4, 2017 11:38 pm
The American house spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) that lives in my bedroom recently produced this crop of tiny spiderlings.
Signature: Lachlan

Common House Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Lachlan,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a Common House Spider and her spiderlings.

Letter 6 – Southern House Spider cohabitates with humans!!!

 

Subject: Southern House Spider
Location: Richmond, VA
February 20, 2015 12:59 am
Some time ago, I think last winter (maybe the one before), I wrote to you about a southern house spider I caught behind my couch and was going to release in the spring — you suggested I keep her, as I have tarantula experience, and I did. She’s fat and happy to this day, and she’s grown some.
This winter, I have another friend. She lives above my bed, behind an animal-skin wall hanging. I saw the web and meant to brush it away, off of my stuff (it makes all of the fur stick together and look bad), but then I saw her and realized the space was occupied. For now, and very probably permanently, she can stay, as it’s somewhere she’s safe from us accidentally hurting her, and from us being bitten on accident. I’m probably going to start feeding her periodically, so she will be more likely to stay put, instead of setting up camp somewhere less safe. I noticed her weeks ago, but I don’t see her very often. She very likely could have been living there for months. In this picture, she is out on her web “patio”, hanging out. I notice she does this at night sometimes, but usually she’s hidden all day. It’s interesting how her web is — it looks like a snowflake against the wall, and seems to exist mostly so that she can sit there with out losing footing and falling.
I’ve seen some males in my house. I think there’s a big “family” living with me.
Here’s some good pictures, if you want to put them on your website.
Best regards,
Denise Elliott

Southern House Spider
Southern House Spider

Dear Denise,
Thanks for updating us on the Southern House Spiders with which you are sharing your home .

Letter 7 – Southern House Spider with Spiderlings

 

Trapdoor Spider with Young?
January 31, 2010
Tearing down a shed in South Goergia I found her with hatchlings. I laid a quarter down next to her for scale. She looked a lot more impressive with he legs stetched out, but still a cool speciman.
Wild Man
South Georgia

Southern House Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Wild Man,
This looks to us like a Southern House Spider, Kukulcania hibernalis, one of the Crevice Weaver Spiders.  According to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds ‘messy’ webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.
Your photo nicely illustrates the maternal care many spiders exhibit toward their spiderlings.

Letter 8 – Female Southern House Spider

 

Subject:  Spider named Aragog
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern California
Date: 01/07/2018
Time: 01:27 PM EDT
I can’t find a thing on this lovely ‘lady’. My son purchased an old Airstream Trailer, drove it home (apx 30 miles) and saw her trying to climb up one of the tires the next morning. We have no clue as to ‘where ‘ she actually came from. We live in the mountains where it gets very cold and my concern for her was if she was from ‘down the hill’ it was far too cold for her up here. She is now set up in a quite comfy critter keeper. I have 2 Tarantula Females that I have owned for 20+ years now. What’s another spider to care for! Can you please tell me what she is? We have freaked out about a ‘Recluse’ but she has built a ‘Widow’ type web into her little tree branch in her keeper. She does not appear aggressive or fast moving whatsoever. I’m actually stumped. She’s larger than a quarter.  Spread out I’d say half dollar coin sized. She’s big! We are now calling her Aragog. Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Keeper of T’s

Female Southern  House Spider

Dear Keeper of T’s,
We are posting your Spider images prior to identification.  It appears that the eyes on this individual are not very well developed, indicating is most likely spends its time in low light situations and also that it does not depend upon eyesight to hunt.  We will do additional research and then get back to you.  Perhaps one of our readers will have an idea how to classify your Spider.

Female Southern House Spider

Update:  Female Southern House Spider
Thanks to Cesar Crash who wrote in that this is a female Southern House Spider, a species pictured on BugGuide.

Goodness Gracious Thank You! Now I shall provide a bit more Branchery for webbing! hehe
ŞĦĄŔŐŊ

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

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  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

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Tags: Common House Spider

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