Cockchafer Beetles (Billy Witch Bugs): A Fascinating Guide to These Unique Insects

Cockchafer beetles, also known as Billy Witch Bugs, are fascinating insects found in many parts of Europe and Asia. These beetles belong to the Melolontha genus and are often recognized by their brown, hairy bodies and distinctive fan-like antennae.

These beetles play a significant role in their ecosystems, serving as food for birds and other predators. However, their larvae can cause damage to plant roots, making them a concern for gardeners and farmers. Adult cockchafers primarily feed on leaves from various tree species.

Though considered a nuisance in some circumstances, cockchafer beetles are an essential part of the natural world. Increased awareness and understanding of these insects can help us appreciate their place in our environment and manage their populations when necessary.

What Are Cockchafer Beetles

Scientific Classification

Cockchafer beetles belong to the genus Melolontha within the family Scarabaeidae. There are two main species:

  • Melolontha melolontha (Large Cockchafer)
  • Melolontha hippocastani (Forest Cockchafer)

Common Names

These beetles are also known as:

  • Billy Witch Bugs
  • June Bugs

Physical Characteristics

Cockchafer beetles display several distinct features:

  • Size: 1 to 1.5 inches in length
  • Color: Brown with a glossy body
  • Wings: Two set of wings: front, hard wings called elytra, and a second pair of delicate wings for flight
  • Antennas: Fan-shaped with 6-7 segments

Here’s a comparison table between the Large Cockchafer and Forest Cockchafer:

Feature Large Cockchafer Forest Cockchafer
Size 1.1 – 1.3 inches 0.7 – 1 inch
Antenna Segments 7 (males), 6 (females) 7 (males), 6 (females)
Habitat Grasslands, gardens Forests, woodlands
Larval Development Time 3 years 2 years

Cockchafers can be easily identified by their antennae, size, and habitat preferences. While these bugs may showcase similar characteristics, understanding their subtle differences can make identifying them more accurate.

Life Cycle and Biology

Eggs

Cockchafer beetles, also known as Billy Witch Bugs, begin their life cycle as eggs. Female beetles lay their eggs in the soil, typically during the summer months. These tiny, white eggs may number in the hundreds per female, which can lead to a large population in a small area.

Larvae

Once hatched, the cockchafer grubs emerge as white, C-shaped creatures. They are known as chafer grubs or white grubs and feed on plant roots, which can cause damage to lawns and crops. The larvae go through multiple growth stages, known as instars, over a period of about three years before they pupate.

Larvae features:

  • White, C-shaped
  • Feed on plant roots

Pupae

When it’s time to pupate, the grubs create small earthen cells in the soil where they transform into pupae. This stage in their life cycle lasts for a few weeks, during which the pupae develop into fully formed adult beetles, ready to emerge from the soil.

Pupae characteristics:

  • Earthen cells
  • Lasts a few weeks

Adults

Adult cockchafer beetles can be distinguished by their brown or black bodies and large, fan-like antennae. They are most active during the night and have a relatively short lifespan, sometimes only a few weeks, in which they mate and lay eggs to ensure the continuation of the species.

Adult features:

  • Brown or black body
  • Large, fan-like antennae

Comparing the life stages of a cockchafer beetle:

Stage Characteristics Duration
Eggs White, tiny, laid in soil Summer months
Larvae White, C-shaped, root-feeding 3 years
Pupae Earthen cells, transform A few weeks
Adults Brown or black, large antennae A few weeks

The life cycle of the cockchafer beetle includes all these stages: eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults. It is essential to understand each stage to deal with potential damages to lawns and crops caused by the beetles, particularly during their larval stage.

Feeding Habits

Leaves and Plants

Cockchafer beetles are known for their preference in munching on leaves from various plants. These plants can include:

  • Trees
  • Shrubs
  • Flowers
  • Cereal crops

They often target woodland margins where these plants are found. These beetles can cause significant damage to both wild and cultivated plants. For example, when feeding on cereal crops, they can compromise the crops’ growth and health.

Roots and Soil

In contrast to their adult counterparts, cockchafer beetle larvae feed on plant roots. They commonly target roots from:

  • Trees
  • Shrubs
  • Crops
  • Flowers

By doing so, they can cause significant damage to the plants’ overall health and growth. However, the impact of their feeding habits can vary depending on the plant species and the number of larvae feeding on the roots.

Feeding Habitat Targets Impact on Plants
Leaves and Plants Trees, shrubs, flowers, cereal crops Can damage leaves and compromise plant growth
Roots and Soil Roots of trees, shrubs, crops, flowers Can weaken plants and affect overall health

However, it’s important to consider the following when discussing cockchafer beetles’ feeding habits:

  • Not all species of plants are equally affected
  • The extent of the damage can depend on the number of beetles present

Reproduction and Mating

Mating Rituals

Cockchafer beetles (Billy Witch Bugs) have unique mating rituals. Males locate females using pheromones. During courtship, males stroke their antennae and front legs.

Females vs. Males

Females ensure the survival of their species by laying eggs in suitable environments. Males, on the other hand, have the responsibility of finding suitable mates. Here are some differences between the sexes:

  • Size: Females are usually larger than males.
  • Antennae: Males have longer, feathery antennae, suited for detecting pheromones.
  • Pheromone production: Females produce and release pheromones.

Comparing the mating rituals of cockchafer beetles in different regions:

Region Ritual Pesticide Impact
US Similar to UK, with slight variations Pesticide use affects population
UK Courtship, pheromone communication Pesticide regulations help protect populations
France Comparable to UK rituals Pesticides have notable effect on populations
England Mating behavior consistent with UK Pesticide regulations reduce harmful impact
Suffolk Mating rituals resemble greater UK area Pesticides managed to minimize adverse effects

Cockchafer beetles face challenges due to pesticide use, but protective measures are in place to ensure their survival. Some considerations for these insects in relation to pesticides:

Pros:

  • Controls other harmful pests
  • Protects crops

Cons:

  • Negative impact on beetle populations
  • Disruption of mating rituals

In summary, cockchafer beetles have intriguing mating rituals based on pheromone communication, and there are identifiable differences between the males and females. Pesticide use can disrupt their mating behavior, but regulations in many regions help reduce the negative impacts.

Cockchafers and Agriculture

Agricultural Damage

Cockchafer beetles, also known as Billy Witch Bugs, are considered agricultural pests. They can significantly impact crops and plant growth. Their larvae, referred to as doodlebugs, feed on plant roots and can cause severe damage to grasslands, crops, and forestry.

Examples of damaged crops:

  • Cereal crops
  • Potatoes
  • Vegetables

Pest Control Methods

Due to the increased agricultural intensification, it’s essential to implement effective pest control methods to reduce cockchafer populations.

Biological Control

One method of controlling cockchafers is using biological control agents, such as predatory beetles and fungi that target larvae.

Pros:

  • Environmentally friendly
  • Target-specific

Cons:

  • May take time to have an impact
  • Requires monitoring

Chemical Control

Another method is using chemical insecticides to kill both adult and larval stages of the pest.

Pros:

  • Immediate results
  • Broad-spectrum

Cons:

  • Can harm non-target species
  • Potential for insecticide resistance

Cultural Control

Cultural control methods, like crop rotation and plowing, can help reduce cockchafer populations by disrupting their life cycle.

Pros:

  • Low environmental impact
  • Can also benefit soil health

Cons:

  • Labor-intensive
  • Requires careful planning

Comparison Table:

Method Effectiveness Environmental Impact Time to Impact Labor Intensity
Biological Control Moderate Low Slow Low
Chemical Control High High Fast Low
Cultural Control Moderate Low Moderate High

Environmental Impact and Conservation

Effect on Ecosystems

The common cockchafer, also known as a Billy Witch Bug, plays a crucial role in ecosystems. These beetles help break down decaying matter and recycle nutrients in soils, similarly to other insects like dung beetles. Some key features of cockchafers include:

  • Antennae: Their long, fan-shaped antennae help them navigate and find mates.
  • Flight: They’re capable of flying, making a buzzing sound as they move due to their wings rubbing against their body.
  • Habitat: Cockchafers can be found in hedgerows and other wooded areas.

As decomposers, cockchafers contribute to the overall health of ecosystems. However, their larvae may sometimes cause damage to root crops and plants, leading to negative associations with these insects.

Threats and Extinction

Historically, cockchafer populations experienced a decline due to pesticide use and extermination efforts. Their status as a pest led to widespread attempts at reducing their numbers. However, these efforts also had unintended consequences, including damage to non-target species and ecosystems.

Today, conservation efforts aim to protect and restore habitats like hedgerows, where these beneficial insects can thrive. Some pros and cons related to cockchafer conservation efforts include:

Pros:

  • Protection of important decomposer species
  • Overall ecosystem health preservation

Cons:

  • Potential difficulties in preventing damage to crops

By focusing on environmental impact and conservation, we can better appreciate the role played by cockchafer beetles, such as the Billy Witch Bug, in maintaining the balance of ecosystems and addressing potential threats.

Unique Behaviors and Facts

Attraction to Light

Cockchafer beetles, also known as Billy Witch Bugs, are commonly found in gardens and are known for their attraction to light. They are most active at night and are often seen swarming around street lamps and other sources of light.

Clumsy Flight

These beetles possess wings in addition to their wing cases, allowing them to fly. However, their flight is often described as clumsy, and they sometimes crash into windows or other objects. This is due to their relatively large size and body structure, which can make it difficult for them to maneuver through the air.

Features of Cockchafer Beetles

  • Large, rounded body
  • Length of 1 to 1.5 inches
  • Emerge in late April or May
  • Brown and black coloration

Cultural References

Cockchafer beetles have held fascination and cultural significance in various societies. Known as “may bugs” or “rookworms” in some areas, they are often associated with the arrival of the month of May. In ancient Greece, they were even linked to the mythological figure Tithonus, who was turned into a cockroach.

Here is a comparison table between Cockchafer beetles and Cockroaches:

Feature Cockchafer Beetle Cockroach
Size 1 to 1.5 inches 0.5 to 3 inches
Wings Yes Yes
Flight Clumsy Agile
Common Habitats Gardens, Lawns Infesting Buildings
Attracted to Light Food and Water

Distinct Characteristics

  • Pronounced “eyelashes” or antennae
  • Three pairs of legs
  • Nocturnal behavior

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Cockchafer or Billy Witch from United Kingdom

 

beetle like bug with pincers and orange fan like antenna
Mon, May 25, 2009 at 12:36 PM
I found this insect in my back garden in England UK. I have never seen anything like this before. Its body length was about 1.5 inches long and It had very large wings. Its face looked see through with large black bulging eye and pincers.It looked like it had a face.it had a fury neck and a hard shell body. could you please let me know what insect this is. I would be very grateful.
Tanni Celep UK
Birmingham,England,Uk

Cockchafer
Cockchafer

Hi Tanni,
Your beetle is a type of Scarab known as a Cockchafer, Melolontha melolontha, also known as a May Bug.  According to David A Kendall on the Insect & Other Arthropods website:  “Adult chafers eat the leaves and flowers of many deciduous trees, shrubs and other plants, but rarely cause any serious damage in the UK. ”  According to the UK Safari website:  “Cockchafers tend to swarm around trees and bushes, as they feed on the leaves.  The wing cases of the adult beetles are covered in tiny grey hairs, giving them a dusty appearance.  They’re quite clumsy in flight.  Often colliding into things as they wobble about in the air. Their wings also make a loud buzzing sound.
The cockchafer has a three year life cycle. After mating the female digs down about 20cm into the soil to lay between 10 and 20 eggs.  The eggs hatch after 21 days and the larvae remain in the soil for a further two years feeding on plant roots. … Cockchafers are sometimes called ‘May Bugs’ because of the month they appear.  In Suffolk they’re also known as ‘Billy Witches’. “

Letter 2 – Cockchafer from the UK

 

Subject: What is Simon?
Location: Bingley, West Yorkshire, UK
May 28, 2012 6:15 am
Simon was found flying around a light last night. Presume he came in the open window from the nearby woods. We lost him for a bit but found him this morning in the cats’ water bowl.
Signature: McSpuddles

Cockchafer

Dear McSpuddles,
This is the third request we have received this week from the UK to identify a Cockchafer.  We only posted one other one.  Cockchafers are a species of Scarab Beetle and they are also called May Bugs because of their seasonal appearance.  They are attracted to lights as your letter indicates.

Letter 3 – Cockchafer from the UK

 

Subject: Cedar Beetle
Location: North Wales UK
June 7, 2015 7:31 am
Found this large beetle stranded on its back on my kitchen window sill. On further examination I realised it was much larger than any I had seen before. After searching the internet I found one like it on your site. It appears to be a Cedar Beetle but I am interested to know more about it. Is it native to the UK and if not how has it arrived here ?
Thank you
Signature: Pat Jones

Cockchafer
Cockchafer

Dear Pat,
This is not a Cedar Beetle.  You encountered a native to England Scarab Beetle commonly called a Cockchafer,
Melolontha melolontha, and you can read more about them on the Natural History Museum website where it states:  “the May bug or cockchafer is not a true bug but a relatively large beetle found more commonly in the south of the UK.”

Cockchafer
Cockchafer

Letter 4 – Cockchafer from UK is edible

 

made me late to work today
Brown wings underneath. I’m in Eversly, UK on business I threw it outside after taking a couple of pics. What was it?

We have to confess that posting letters to our site has made us late for work on more than one occasion. Glad to hear it has the same effect on our readership. This is a Cockchafer, also known as a Billy Witch. Read more on Wikipedia.

Edibility Update: (05/12/2008) Cockchafers: Totally Edible
Greetings Daniel,
Hope things are good with you. Cockchafers are one of the few European insects with a history of consumption — both the grubs and the adults. This is from the classic “Why Not Eat Insects?” published in 1885 by Vincent Holt: Literally tooth and nail we ought to battle with this enemy, for in both its stages it is a most dainty morsel for the table. . . . Again I endorse from personal experience. Try them as I have; they are delicious. Cockchafers are not only common, but of a most serviceable size and plumpness, while their grubs are, when full grown, at least two inches in length, and fat in proportion . . . . What a godsend to housekeepers to discover a new entre to vary the monotony of the present round! . . . Here then, mistresses, who thirst to place new and dainty dishes before your guests, what better could you have than ‘Curried Maychafers’ – , if you want a more mysterious title, ‘Larvae Melolonthae a la Grugru?’
Dave
www.slshrimp.com

Letter 5 – Cockchafer from England

 

Subject: Beetle
Location: England
May 27, 2012 4:46 am
Hi Mr Bugman,
I was lying in bed when I heard this clicking on the wall next to it, turned out to be this little guy, I say little he is pretty big, with a pointed bottom and a really hard shell! never seen this sort of beetle in England before, I’m guessing its down to the really hot weather we’ve been having in the last few days.
Signature: Annie

Cockchafer

Hi Annie,
This Cockchafer,
Melolontha melolontha, is also called a May Bug according to The English Country Garden website, because it tends to appears on schedule each year.

Letter 6 – Billy Witch from UK

 

Subject:  beetle identity
Geographic location of the bug:  Cornwall
Date: 06/17/2019
Time: 06:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I came across this large Beetle recently while shopping in St Austell Cornwall, my local town. I would love to identify it, can you help pleae? I did not move or touch it, it was on the pavement
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Peter McCormick

Billy Witch

Dear Peter,
This is a Cockchafer or Billy Witch.

Letter 7 – Billy Witch from England

 

Subject: Big bug
Location: Hertford, Hertfordshire, England
May 17, 2016 3:04 pm
Hi,
I had this very large bug with furry antenna come into my living room last night , I thought at first it was a moth but on inspection its wings were solid and very beetle like . I have never seen one before . Please could you let me know what it is .
Signature: Lisa

Billy Witch
Billy Witch

Dear Lisa,
This Cockchafer or Billy Witch is a European Scarab beetle whose populations were on the decline in the UK, but in recent years, there seems to be a new surge in the population.

Letter 8 – Cockchafer from Wales

 

Subject: What is it
Location: Blaenau Ffestiniog north Wales
May 26, 2017 5:26 am
Hi we found this bug last night … it seemed harmless but looked ever so strange
Signature: Georgina

Cockchafer

Dear Georgina,
This native Scarab Beetle is commonly called a Cockchafer or Billy Witch.  According to UK Safari:  “The cockchafer has a three year life cycle.  After mating the female digs down about 20cm into the soil to lay between 10 and 20 eggs.  The eggs hatch after 21 days and the larvae remain in the soil for a further two years feeding on plant roots.”

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Cockchafer or Billy Witch from United Kingdom

 

beetle like bug with pincers and orange fan like antenna
Mon, May 25, 2009 at 12:36 PM
I found this insect in my back garden in England UK. I have never seen anything like this before. Its body length was about 1.5 inches long and It had very large wings. Its face looked see through with large black bulging eye and pincers.It looked like it had a face.it had a fury neck and a hard shell body. could you please let me know what insect this is. I would be very grateful.
Tanni Celep UK
Birmingham,England,Uk

Cockchafer
Cockchafer

Hi Tanni,
Your beetle is a type of Scarab known as a Cockchafer, Melolontha melolontha, also known as a May Bug.  According to David A Kendall on the Insect & Other Arthropods website:  “Adult chafers eat the leaves and flowers of many deciduous trees, shrubs and other plants, but rarely cause any serious damage in the UK. ”  According to the UK Safari website:  “Cockchafers tend to swarm around trees and bushes, as they feed on the leaves.  The wing cases of the adult beetles are covered in tiny grey hairs, giving them a dusty appearance.  They’re quite clumsy in flight.  Often colliding into things as they wobble about in the air. Their wings also make a loud buzzing sound.
The cockchafer has a three year life cycle. After mating the female digs down about 20cm into the soil to lay between 10 and 20 eggs.  The eggs hatch after 21 days and the larvae remain in the soil for a further two years feeding on plant roots. … Cockchafers are sometimes called ‘May Bugs’ because of the month they appear.  In Suffolk they’re also known as ‘Billy Witches’. “

Letter 2 – Cockchafer from the UK

 

Subject: What is Simon?
Location: Bingley, West Yorkshire, UK
May 28, 2012 6:15 am
Simon was found flying around a light last night. Presume he came in the open window from the nearby woods. We lost him for a bit but found him this morning in the cats’ water bowl.
Signature: McSpuddles

Cockchafer

Dear McSpuddles,
This is the third request we have received this week from the UK to identify a Cockchafer.  We only posted one other one.  Cockchafers are a species of Scarab Beetle and they are also called May Bugs because of their seasonal appearance.  They are attracted to lights as your letter indicates.

Letter 3 – Cockchafer from the UK

 

Subject: Cedar Beetle
Location: North Wales UK
June 7, 2015 7:31 am
Found this large beetle stranded on its back on my kitchen window sill. On further examination I realised it was much larger than any I had seen before. After searching the internet I found one like it on your site. It appears to be a Cedar Beetle but I am interested to know more about it. Is it native to the UK and if not how has it arrived here ?
Thank you
Signature: Pat Jones

Cockchafer
Cockchafer

Dear Pat,
This is not a Cedar Beetle.  You encountered a native to England Scarab Beetle commonly called a Cockchafer,
Melolontha melolontha, and you can read more about them on the Natural History Museum website where it states:  “the May bug or cockchafer is not a true bug but a relatively large beetle found more commonly in the south of the UK.”

Cockchafer
Cockchafer

Letter 4 – Cockchafer from UK is edible

 

made me late to work today
Brown wings underneath. I’m in Eversly, UK on business I threw it outside after taking a couple of pics. What was it?

We have to confess that posting letters to our site has made us late for work on more than one occasion. Glad to hear it has the same effect on our readership. This is a Cockchafer, also known as a Billy Witch. Read more on Wikipedia.

Edibility Update: (05/12/2008) Cockchafers: Totally Edible
Greetings Daniel,
Hope things are good with you. Cockchafers are one of the few European insects with a history of consumption — both the grubs and the adults. This is from the classic “Why Not Eat Insects?” published in 1885 by Vincent Holt: Literally tooth and nail we ought to battle with this enemy, for in both its stages it is a most dainty morsel for the table. . . . Again I endorse from personal experience. Try them as I have; they are delicious. Cockchafers are not only common, but of a most serviceable size and plumpness, while their grubs are, when full grown, at least two inches in length, and fat in proportion . . . . What a godsend to housekeepers to discover a new entre to vary the monotony of the present round! . . . Here then, mistresses, who thirst to place new and dainty dishes before your guests, what better could you have than ‘Curried Maychafers’ – , if you want a more mysterious title, ‘Larvae Melolonthae a la Grugru?’
Dave
www.slshrimp.com

Letter 5 – Cockchafer from England

 

Subject: Beetle
Location: England
May 27, 2012 4:46 am
Hi Mr Bugman,
I was lying in bed when I heard this clicking on the wall next to it, turned out to be this little guy, I say little he is pretty big, with a pointed bottom and a really hard shell! never seen this sort of beetle in England before, I’m guessing its down to the really hot weather we’ve been having in the last few days.
Signature: Annie

Cockchafer

Hi Annie,
This Cockchafer,
Melolontha melolontha, is also called a May Bug according to The English Country Garden website, because it tends to appears on schedule each year.

Letter 6 – Billy Witch from UK

 

Subject:  beetle identity
Geographic location of the bug:  Cornwall
Date: 06/17/2019
Time: 06:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I came across this large Beetle recently while shopping in St Austell Cornwall, my local town. I would love to identify it, can you help pleae? I did not move or touch it, it was on the pavement
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Peter McCormick

Billy Witch

Dear Peter,
This is a Cockchafer or Billy Witch.

Letter 7 – Billy Witch from England

 

Subject: Big bug
Location: Hertford, Hertfordshire, England
May 17, 2016 3:04 pm
Hi,
I had this very large bug with furry antenna come into my living room last night , I thought at first it was a moth but on inspection its wings were solid and very beetle like . I have never seen one before . Please could you let me know what it is .
Signature: Lisa

Billy Witch
Billy Witch

Dear Lisa,
This Cockchafer or Billy Witch is a European Scarab beetle whose populations were on the decline in the UK, but in recent years, there seems to be a new surge in the population.

Letter 8 – Cockchafer from Wales

 

Subject: What is it
Location: Blaenau Ffestiniog north Wales
May 26, 2017 5:26 am
Hi we found this bug last night … it seemed harmless but looked ever so strange
Signature: Georgina

Cockchafer

Dear Georgina,
This native Scarab Beetle is commonly called a Cockchafer or Billy Witch.  According to UK Safari:  “The cockchafer has a three year life cycle.  After mating the female digs down about 20cm into the soil to lay between 10 and 20 eggs.  The eggs hatch after 21 days and the larvae remain in the soil for a further two years feeding on plant roots.”

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts

10 thoughts on “Cockchafer Beetles (Billy Witch Bugs): A Fascinating Guide to These Unique Insects”

    • HELP HELP HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! PLEEEEEEASE HELP

      I TOO have a phobia. I live in Eastbourne and only today two girls saw me running screaming. They thought that I had been attacked or something and could not see the Maybugs that I could see! They had never even heard of them. They walked with me to a bus stop as I had a jacket wrapped around my head. It has been very, very hot and the Maybugs love it! This phobia of Maybugs takes over my life as they come out all year round and I can be “housebound.” I have run into the Road screaming with people thinking I am mad. I cry, sweat and scream and it is SERIOUS. A Locum said it stems from early childhood Trauma and I that I need PTSD Trauma Based Therapy (LONG LONG story but I have had a battle with the Mental Health Services for over two decades.) I suffer with Mixed Personality Disorder and CPTSD. Can someone help???????

      Reply
    • HELP HELP HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! PLEEEEEEASE HELP

      I TOO have a phobia. I live in Eastbourne and only today two girls saw me running screaming. They thought that I had been attacked or something and could not see the Maybugs that I could see! They had never even heard of them. They walked with me to a bus stop as I had a jacket wrapped around my head. It has been very, very hot and the Maybugs love it! This phobia of Maybugs takes over my life as they come out all year round and I can be “housebound.” I have run into the Road screaming with people thinking I am mad. I cry, sweat and scream and it is SERIOUS. A Locum said it stems from early childhood Trauma and I that I need PTSD Trauma Based Therapy (LONG LONG story but I have had a battle with the Mental Health Services for over two decades.) I suffer with Mixed Personality Disorder and CPTSD. Can someone help???????

      Reply
  1. They are called “June bugs” as they appear in June, not may. Also, if one gets stuck in your hair, you’ll have to cut it out because they really get stuck.

    Reply
  2. To kill a Billy Witch you need a roll of newspaper to swat it then stomp on it. or net it and put it outside it doesn’t want to be indoors. and it is totally harmless and only flies around looking for a mate.

    Reply
  3. Well it’s now 24th june. Sitting outside and loads of Billy Witches flying around. A bit annoying but hey ho it’s their world as it is ours. Nature at its best

    Reply

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