Cecropia Moth Male vs Female: Unveiling Key Differences

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The cecropia moth, known scientifically as Hyalophora cecropia, is a remarkable creature and the largest moth native to North America. These moths are members of the Saturniidae family, well-known for their size and striking appearance.

Male and female cecropia moths exhibit distinct differences, particularly in their antennae. Males have large, feathery antennae, which play a crucial role in detecting female pheromones from up to a mile away. Females, on the other hand, have smaller antennae but a crucial role in reproduction, laying up to 100 eggs after mating.

Some key features of male and female cecropia moths include:

  • Size: Both sexes are large, with a wingspan of up to 6 inches
  • Coloration: Both males and females display similar color patterns, consisting of reddish-brown and creamy-white shades
  • Antennae: Males have larger, feathery antennae, while females have smaller and less bushy antennae
  • Reproduction: Only female moths lay eggs, typically on tree or shrub foliage where the caterpillars will later feed

Cecropia Moth Overview

Species Classification

The Cecropia Moth, scientifically known as Hyalophora cecropia, is a species of moth in the Saturniidae family under the Lepidoptera order. They are considered the largest native moths in North America, with wingspans documented at over 6.2 inches.

Habitat and Distribution

Cecropia Moths can be found throughout the United States, stretching from the east coast to the Rocky Mountains. Their range extends north into the maritime provinces of Canada, including areas like Nova Scotia. In the southern regions, their distribution reaches down to Florida.

Key Features:

  • Largest native moth in North America
  • Belongs to the Saturniidae family of moths
  • Found in the United States, Canada, and some parts of Florida

Comparison of Male and Female Cecropia Moths

Feature Male Female
Size Slightly smaller Larger
Antennae Large and feathery, used for detecting female pheromones Smaller and less notable
Behavior Attracted by female pheromones, can detect them from up to a mile away Female moths produce pheromones to attract males for mating

Example: The large, feathery antennae of male Cecropia Moths help them detect female pheromones from great distances, contributing to their mating success.

Physical Characteristics

Wingspan and Coloration

Cecropia moths are known to be the largest moths in North America. Both male and female moths have a large wingspan, but there is a slight difference in size between them:

Gender Wingspan
Male Slightly larger
Female Slightly smaller

Their wings have a mix of black, brown, and white colors with reddish patches. Both males and females have a characteristic pattern on their wings, including:

  • Tan bands
  • White crescent shapes
  • Eyespots with red-orange rims

Antennae and Abdomen

Male and female Cecropia moths can also be distinguished by their antennae and abdomen. Males have larger, fluffier antennae, which allow them to detect female pheromones up to a mile away.

On the other hand, females have:

  • Smaller, less feathery antennae
  • A prominent white “collar” and white bands on their abdomen

In summary, Cecropia moths exhibit differences in wingspan, coloration, antennae, and abdomen between males and females. These features not only make them visually stunning but also play an essential role in their reproductive behavior.

Life Cycle and Reproduction

Caterpillar to Adult Moth

The life cycle of the cecropia moth begins with the female laying eggs on the leaves of their host plants, which include maple, birch, elm, and ash trees. After about 10 to 14 days, the eggs hatch and the black caterpillars emerge. These caterpillars then feed on the leaves, growing larger and going through five larval instars before reaching cocoon stage.

Some characteristics of cecropia moth caterpillars include:

  • Bright colored exoskeleton with spikes and hairs
  • Feeding on a variety of host plants

As the caterpillars grow, they molt and develop new exoskeletons to accommodate their size. After the final instar, they spin a silken cocoon around themselves to protect during the pupal stage. The caterpillars transform into adult moths inside the cocoon and emerge after a few weeks.

Pheromones and Mating

During mating season, adult cecropia moths use pheromones to locate and attract potential mates. Female moths release pheromones that can be detected by males from up to a mile away. After mating, the female will lay her eggs on host plants to start the life cycle anew.

Male vs female cecropia moths can be distinguished by their antennae, with males having larger, more feathery antennae to help detect the female pheromones. Additionally, females are generally larger than males.

PROS

  • Adult cecropia moths are among the largest and most colorful native moth species in North America.
  • They contribute to ecological balance by serving as pollinators and food sources for other animals.

CONS

  • Adult cecropia moths only have a short lifespan of two weeks or less.
  • Their populations are affected by habitat loss and pesticide use, making conservation efforts important.

Comparison Table

Feature Caterpillar Adult Moth
Size Grows through 5 larval instars Female larger than male
Color Bright exoskeleton with spikes and hairs Colorful, large wings
Diet Feed on leaves of host plants Adults do not eat
Defenses Exoskeleton with hairs and spikes Warning coloration

In conclusion, understanding the life cycle and reproduction habits of the cecropia moth not only helps appreciate these incredible insects but also guides effective conservation strategies.

Diet and Host Plants

Caterpillar Diet

The cecropia moth caterpillars primarily feed on leaves of various host plants such as:

  • Birch tree: A preferred host plant with abundant leaves for caterpillars.
  • Apple: Caterpillars enjoy munching on apple tree leaves.
  • Cherry: Another favorite host plant with plenty of foliage to support caterpillar growth.

As they progress through their five instars, the caterpillars change their appearance and have distinctive dietary preferences. For example, during the first instar, they are mostly black and are very hungry. They consume both sides of leaves in groups as they grow.

Adult Moth Eating Habits

Contrasting their caterpillar stage, adult cecropia moths do not require nutrition in their short lifespan. They don’t have functional mouthparts to eat or drink, and their sole purpose is to mate and reproduce.

Cecropia Moth Males vs Females:

Characteristic Males Females
Size Slightly smaller Larger
Antennae More feathery Less feathery
Purpose Find and mate Lay eggs

In conclusion, the cecropia moth’s diet and host plants vary depending on its life stage. While caterpillars indulge in host plant leaves, adult moths do not consume any nutrition. Each gender has its distinctive role, with males seeking females for reproduction and females laying eggs on suitable host plants.

Natural Threats and Predators

Bolas Spiders

Cecropia moths, being nocturnal creatures, face a variety of natural threats and predators. One such predator is the Bolas spider, known for its unique hunting technique that involves swinging a sticky silk thread to capture prey. On occasion, this spider may target moths, such as the Cecropia.

Migratory Birds

Another threat faced by the Cecropia moth comes from migratory birds. These birds often consume insects for their essential nutrients. Moth species, including the Cecropia, serve as a food source for these birds.

However, it’s important to note that the Cecropia moth is not classified as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The moths not being synonymous with being rare might owe it to the fact that they are not active during daytime, so humans encounter them less often. Mating season, for example, usually takes place after dusk or before dawn, guided by the females releasing pheromones to attract males from up to one mile away.

Despite these natural threats, some human-related factors, such as the presence of porch lights, can also impact the Cecropia moth population. These lights may disorient moths during mating, leading to unsuccessful reproductive attempts. To help protect the Cecropia moth population, organizations like the National Wildlife Federation encourage reducing unnecessary outdoor lighting during moth mating season.

Conservation and Human Interaction

Habitat Loss

Cecropia moths rely heavily on hardwood forests for their habitat. The loss of these habitats due to urbanization and deforestation poses a serious threat to their populations.

  • Hardwood forests provide food and shelter for cecropia moths in their larval stage.
  • Conservation efforts should focus on preserving hardwood forests for these moths and other woodland creatures.

Moth Collecting

Although cecropia moths are not officially listed as endangered, they are among the largest species in North America and can be considered relatively rare. Collecting these moths can have an impact on their population, especially if pupae are taken from the wild.

Approach Pros Cons
Moth Collecting Attracts collectors and nature enthusiasts. Can harm cecropia moth population.
Habitat Conservation Preserves natural habitats of the moths. May not be as popular among collectors.

Cecropia moths exhibit some unique features:

  • Males have larger, feathery antennae for detecting female pheromones.
  • Females have a more robust body for carrying and laying eggs.
  • Each moth has tubercles (raised spots) and crescent-shaped marks called commas on their wings.

By respecting their habitat and curbing collecting practices, we can contribute to the conservation of the cecropia moth and protect their unique characteristics.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Cecropia Caterpillar

 

Cecropia Moth caterpiller?
Location:  On a leaf on the ground
August 15, 2010 6:19 pm
Hey Bugman!
My name is Isabella, I’m ten years old and my dad found this interesting lil’ guy at the golf club. I think its a Cecropia caterpillar. After measuring it, it’s almost three and a half inches long and about half an inch wide. Am I right that it’s a Cecropia? Thanks, bugman
Nicely

Cecropia Caterpillar

Hi Isabella,
You are correct.  This is a Cecropia Moth Caterpillar.

Cecropia Caterpillar

Letter 2 – Bug of the Month: July 2008 – Cecropia Moths

 

Bug Love
Can you tell my what kind of moth this is? Thanks From Lenox Michigan
Donna

Hi Donna,
What a beautiful image of mating Cecropia Moths. It is coming our way at the perfect time to designate it as the Bug of the Month for July 2008. We have received numerous images of Cecropia Moths this year, but none as lovely as yours. Cecropia Moths are Giant Silk Moths and they do not eat as adults. Their sole task is to mate and reproduce.

Letter 3 – Cecropia Caterpillar

 

Caterpillar
My son-in-law and daughter found this caterpillar on their property. They put their daughter’s size four shoe near it to show us us how large this thing is. Do you have any ideas and above all is it poisonous. Thanks,
Wanda

Hi Wanda,
Your Cecropia Moth Caterpillar, despite its fierce size, is totally harmless. It will mature into a large beautiful moth.

Letter 4 – Cecropia Caterpillar

 

Cecropia catapiller
Hi Daniel,
Just thought I would pass on this picture to you, it’s a Cecropia moth caterpillar. I was at Fort Michilimackinac in Northern Michigan in August 2005 and found him crawling up a paper birch near the fort. He was in the neighborhood of 3 inches long, I couldn’t get over how beautifully colored he was.
Steve
Coldwater, MI

Hi Steve,
Thanks for sending in such a wonderful image. It will make it easy for our readers to identify the distinctively marked Cecropia Caterpillar.

Letter 5 – Cecropia Caterpillar

 

cecropia moth caterpillar
Dear Lisa Anne and Daniel,
About a week after my hickory horned devils left my sumac tree, I found three cecropia moth caterpillars on an apple tree sapling. I managed to snap a few pictures of them, as well as that of a large praying mantis; my entomologist friend in town said this was probably a representative of an introduced species. I found the cecropias as cool as the hickory horned devils. I’ve never seen so many bizarre and beautiful caterpillars in my life. Best Regards,
Glenn

Hi Again Glenn,
Thanks for sending in your Cecropia Caterpillar photo. We have gotten many photos of them this year.

Letter 6 – Cecropia Caterpillar

 

Caterpillar
Location: Western PA
September 12, 2011 6:57 am
We found this beautiful bug. Can you tell us what it is?
Signature: Amy Guthridge

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Hi Amy,
This is the caterpillar of a Cecropia Moth, and judging by its size, the season and the silk it is spinning, it may be getting ready to form a cocoon.  Cecropia Moths are the largest North American Silkmoths.

Letter 7 – Cecropia Caterpillar becomes Cecropia Moth

 

Subject: Cecropia?
Location: Elmira, NY
May 28, 2013 8:37 pm
We found this beautiful thing in July 2012. I tried to put it back and it kept going for the ground. So we decided to keep it in a can. It made a cocoon and nothing every happened. Tonight it arrived (10 months later). I would set it free tonight but it’s raining. I hope it will be okay overnight.
Signature: Michelle Buchanan

Cecropia Caterpillar
Cecropia Caterpillar

Hi Michelle,
Your identification of a Cecropia Moth Caterpillar and adult moth is correct.  Congratulations on successfully rearing this beautiful creature from the caterpillar through adult.  We wish there was better resolution in the photo of the adult moth.  It appears that the antennae are not especially plumose or feathery, indicating that this is a female Cecropia Moth.  If she is releasing pheromones, you might be greeted by her attracting all the males in the vicinity.

Cecropia Moth
Cecropia Moth

Daniel, thanks so much for your response. We set it free this morning, and I’ve attached a few pictures I took with my good camera so you. Can enjoy this beautiful creature.

Cecropia Moth
Cecropia Moth

Hi Again Michelle,
Thanks for the additional and higher quality photos.  We still believe she is a female.

Cecropia Moth
Cecropia Moth


 

Letter 8 – Cecropia Caterpillar from Canada

 

Subject: Big green bug
Location: Oro Station Ontario
October 14, 2013 11:28 am
What is this. What does it become ?
Found in central Ontario in a wood pile.
Signature: Lisa

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar
Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Hi Lisa,
This is the caterpillar of a Cecropia Moth.  It was most likely looking for a place to spin a cocoon in preparation for the approaching winter.

Letter 9 – Bug of the Month March 2014: Polyphemus Moth Cocoon

 

Subject: Weird pod I’m hoping will hatch a wonderful creature
Location: Brooklyn, NY
March 1, 2014 2:38 pm
Hi Bugman–
Yesterday my daughter and I found this strange pod under some oak trees in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, NY. It looks like some kind of cocoon–it has an imprint of a leaf on what seems like a hardened foamy surface. We’ve had a lot of storms lately so all kinds of things have been shaken lose from trees. It’s about two inches long.
Also, if it is some kind of cocoon, how should I care for it?
Signature: Carol Vinzant, editor, animaltourism.com

Cecropia Moth Cocoon
Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Dear Carol,
If it is viable, this Giant Silk Moth Cocoon will produce a gorgeous once the weather warms.  Keeping it indoors with warmth due to artificial heat will cause it to eclose early and result in a sterile death without reproduction. Giant Silkmoths only live long enough to mate and lay eggs, and they have atrophied mothparts, so they can’t even eat.  We believe this is either the cocoon of a Luna Moth or of a Polyphemus Moth.

Wow, that’s fantastic! I can’t wait to see what happens.
I didn’t understand from your message if I should keep it indoors or out. Right now it’s in a sheltered area with outdoor temperatures. When do they hatch?
Carol Vinzant

We don’t know what the ambient temperature needs to be before eclosion will occur, but we suspect it will hatch in the spring.

Great, thanks for all your help.
I blogged about the cocoon and your answer here: http://animaltourism.com/news/2014/03/13/what-to-do-with-cocoons-falling-from-late-winter-trees
Carol Vinzant
animaltourism.com

Thanks for the kind website plug Carol.

Update:  June 19, 2014:  Cocoon Hatches into Polyphemus Moth
thanks again for your help on this. it hatched the first week of june! it was a polyphemus. we released it back to the park.
http://animaltourism.com/news/2014/06/19/mystery-cocoon-revealed-giant-polyphemus-moth
Carol Vinzant

Polyphemus Moth
Polyphemus Moth

Letter 10 – Bug of the Month August 2019: Cecropia Caterpillar

 

Subject:  HI, is this tomato worm?
Geographic location of the bug:  SW Michigan
Date: 08/01/2019
Time: 09:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi is this a good ol tomoato worm or? Thanks so much!
How you want your letter signed:  Jules

Cecropia Caterpillar

Dear Jules,
Your submission was perfectly timed to be selected as our Bug of the Month for August 2019.  We suspect your “tomoato worm” is a Tobacco Hornworm, the caterpillar most commonly associated with tomatoes.  This Cecropia Caterpillar is a member of the Giant Silkmoth family Saturniidae.  It most likely left its food plant to search for a suitable site for pupation.  The adult Cecropia Moth is a gorgeous creature.

Yay, thank you! that was a quick response too.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Cecropia Caterpillar

 

Cecropia Moth caterpiller?
Location:  On a leaf on the ground
August 15, 2010 6:19 pm
Hey Bugman!
My name is Isabella, I’m ten years old and my dad found this interesting lil’ guy at the golf club. I think its a Cecropia caterpillar. After measuring it, it’s almost three and a half inches long and about half an inch wide. Am I right that it’s a Cecropia? Thanks, bugman
Nicely

Cecropia Caterpillar

Hi Isabella,
You are correct.  This is a Cecropia Moth Caterpillar.

Cecropia Caterpillar

Letter 2 – Bug of the Month: July 2008 – Cecropia Moths

 

Bug Love
Can you tell my what kind of moth this is? Thanks From Lenox Michigan
Donna

Hi Donna,
What a beautiful image of mating Cecropia Moths. It is coming our way at the perfect time to designate it as the Bug of the Month for July 2008. We have received numerous images of Cecropia Moths this year, but none as lovely as yours. Cecropia Moths are Giant Silk Moths and they do not eat as adults. Their sole task is to mate and reproduce.

Letter 3 – Cecropia Caterpillar

 

Caterpillar
My son-in-law and daughter found this caterpillar on their property. They put their daughter’s size four shoe near it to show us us how large this thing is. Do you have any ideas and above all is it poisonous. Thanks,
Wanda

Hi Wanda,
Your Cecropia Moth Caterpillar, despite its fierce size, is totally harmless. It will mature into a large beautiful moth.

Letter 4 – Cecropia Caterpillar

 

Cecropia catapiller
Hi Daniel,
Just thought I would pass on this picture to you, it’s a Cecropia moth caterpillar. I was at Fort Michilimackinac in Northern Michigan in August 2005 and found him crawling up a paper birch near the fort. He was in the neighborhood of 3 inches long, I couldn’t get over how beautifully colored he was.
Steve
Coldwater, MI

Hi Steve,
Thanks for sending in such a wonderful image. It will make it easy for our readers to identify the distinctively marked Cecropia Caterpillar.

Letter 5 – Cecropia Caterpillar

 

cecropia moth caterpillar
Dear Lisa Anne and Daniel,
About a week after my hickory horned devils left my sumac tree, I found three cecropia moth caterpillars on an apple tree sapling. I managed to snap a few pictures of them, as well as that of a large praying mantis; my entomologist friend in town said this was probably a representative of an introduced species. I found the cecropias as cool as the hickory horned devils. I’ve never seen so many bizarre and beautiful caterpillars in my life. Best Regards,
Glenn

Hi Again Glenn,
Thanks for sending in your Cecropia Caterpillar photo. We have gotten many photos of them this year.

Letter 6 – Cecropia Caterpillar

 

Caterpillar
Location: Western PA
September 12, 2011 6:57 am
We found this beautiful bug. Can you tell us what it is?
Signature: Amy Guthridge

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Hi Amy,
This is the caterpillar of a Cecropia Moth, and judging by its size, the season and the silk it is spinning, it may be getting ready to form a cocoon.  Cecropia Moths are the largest North American Silkmoths.

Letter 7 – Cecropia Caterpillar becomes Cecropia Moth

 

Subject: Cecropia?
Location: Elmira, NY
May 28, 2013 8:37 pm
We found this beautiful thing in July 2012. I tried to put it back and it kept going for the ground. So we decided to keep it in a can. It made a cocoon and nothing every happened. Tonight it arrived (10 months later). I would set it free tonight but it’s raining. I hope it will be okay overnight.
Signature: Michelle Buchanan

Cecropia Caterpillar
Cecropia Caterpillar

Hi Michelle,
Your identification of a Cecropia Moth Caterpillar and adult moth is correct.  Congratulations on successfully rearing this beautiful creature from the caterpillar through adult.  We wish there was better resolution in the photo of the adult moth.  It appears that the antennae are not especially plumose or feathery, indicating that this is a female Cecropia Moth.  If she is releasing pheromones, you might be greeted by her attracting all the males in the vicinity.

Cecropia Moth
Cecropia Moth

Daniel, thanks so much for your response. We set it free this morning, and I’ve attached a few pictures I took with my good camera so you. Can enjoy this beautiful creature.

Cecropia Moth
Cecropia Moth

Hi Again Michelle,
Thanks for the additional and higher quality photos.  We still believe she is a female.

Cecropia Moth
Cecropia Moth


 

Letter 8 – Cecropia Caterpillar from Canada

 

Subject: Big green bug
Location: Oro Station Ontario
October 14, 2013 11:28 am
What is this. What does it become ?
Found in central Ontario in a wood pile.
Signature: Lisa

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar
Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Hi Lisa,
This is the caterpillar of a Cecropia Moth.  It was most likely looking for a place to spin a cocoon in preparation for the approaching winter.

Letter 9 – Bug of the Month March 2014: Polyphemus Moth Cocoon

 

Subject: Weird pod I’m hoping will hatch a wonderful creature
Location: Brooklyn, NY
March 1, 2014 2:38 pm
Hi Bugman–
Yesterday my daughter and I found this strange pod under some oak trees in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, NY. It looks like some kind of cocoon–it has an imprint of a leaf on what seems like a hardened foamy surface. We’ve had a lot of storms lately so all kinds of things have been shaken lose from trees. It’s about two inches long.
Also, if it is some kind of cocoon, how should I care for it?
Signature: Carol Vinzant, editor, animaltourism.com

Cecropia Moth Cocoon
Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Dear Carol,
If it is viable, this Giant Silk Moth Cocoon will produce a gorgeous once the weather warms.  Keeping it indoors with warmth due to artificial heat will cause it to eclose early and result in a sterile death without reproduction. Giant Silkmoths only live long enough to mate and lay eggs, and they have atrophied mothparts, so they can’t even eat.  We believe this is either the cocoon of a Luna Moth or of a Polyphemus Moth.

Wow, that’s fantastic! I can’t wait to see what happens.
I didn’t understand from your message if I should keep it indoors or out. Right now it’s in a sheltered area with outdoor temperatures. When do they hatch?
Carol Vinzant

We don’t know what the ambient temperature needs to be before eclosion will occur, but we suspect it will hatch in the spring.

Great, thanks for all your help.
I blogged about the cocoon and your answer here: http://animaltourism.com/news/2014/03/13/what-to-do-with-cocoons-falling-from-late-winter-trees
Carol Vinzant
animaltourism.com

Thanks for the kind website plug Carol.

Update:  June 19, 2014:  Cocoon Hatches into Polyphemus Moth
thanks again for your help on this. it hatched the first week of june! it was a polyphemus. we released it back to the park.
http://animaltourism.com/news/2014/06/19/mystery-cocoon-revealed-giant-polyphemus-moth
Carol Vinzant

Polyphemus Moth
Polyphemus Moth

Letter 10 – Bug of the Month August 2019: Cecropia Caterpillar

 

Subject:  HI, is this tomato worm?
Geographic location of the bug:  SW Michigan
Date: 08/01/2019
Time: 09:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi is this a good ol tomoato worm or? Thanks so much!
How you want your letter signed:  Jules

Cecropia Caterpillar

Dear Jules,
Your submission was perfectly timed to be selected as our Bug of the Month for August 2019.  We suspect your “tomoato worm” is a Tobacco Hornworm, the caterpillar most commonly associated with tomatoes.  This Cecropia Caterpillar is a member of the Giant Silkmoth family Saturniidae.  It most likely left its food plant to search for a suitable site for pupation.  The adult Cecropia Moth is a gorgeous creature.

Yay, thank you! that was a quick response too.

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts
Tags: Cecropia Moth

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5 Comments. Leave new

  • Hi Carol,

    Outside is perfect– means it’ll hatch when all the wild Polyphemus are hatching. Make sure it’s in a container that gets the benefit of the rain, but won’t let raccoons or what have you get in. I lost a crop of Poly cocoons to raccoons one summer, it was a travesty. Good luck, can’t wait to see updates!

    Reply
  • my friend found this Cecropia catterpillar in our apartment drive way and she has him in a bug catcher home and her dad said that he could be poisoness and also he is a long way from home i just noticed that he was originally from toronto and we found him in windsor ontario if you can get back to us on what we should do that would be great thanks

    Serena & Marissa

    Reply
    • Cecropia Moths, and their caterpillars, are native to your area. Neither Cecropia Moths nor their caterpillars are poisonous.

      Reply
  • my friend found this Cecropia catterpillar in our apartment drive way and she has him in a bug catcher home and her dad said that he could be poisoness and also he is a long way from home i just noticed that he was originally from toronto and we found him in windsor ontario if you can get back to us on what we should do that would be great thanks

    Serena & Marissa

    Reply

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