Can House Centipedes Climb Walls? Uncovering the Truth about Their Abilities

House centipedes are fascinating creatures often seen scurrying across floors and walls in search of prey. These arthropods are equipped with long, slender legs, which allow them to move swiftly and efficiently when hunting for food.

In many homes, it’s not uncommon to find house centipedes climbing walls with ease, thanks to their unique body structure. As noted by the Penn State Extension, these creatures feed on a variety of pests such as silverfish, cockroach, and spiders, which often abound near cracks or gaps in walls. While their presence might be alarming to some, house centipedes can actually be beneficial in controlling indoor pest populations.

When considering a house centipede’s wall-climbing abilities, it’s essential to understand that they thrive in humid environments like basements, storage areas, or bathrooms. According to the Clemson University Home & Garden Information Center, house centipedes are often found indoors due to their hairier appearance and preference for high humidity areas. So, don’t be surprised when you spot them climbing up your walls, as they are more than capable of traversing such surfaces.

House Centipedes: A Brief Overview

Centipede Characteristics

House centipedes (Scutigera) are:

  • Yellowish-brown in color
  • Distinctively shaped with up to 15 pairs of extremely long legs
  • One pair of legs per leg-bearing body segment
  • Legs are barbed to help hold prey
  • Three dark stripes running along the top of their bodies1

Habitat and Lifestyle

  • House centipedes prefer damp areas, such as basements, closets, and bathrooms2
  • They are nocturnal creatures, mostly active during the night3
  • House centipedes feed on various small arthropods, like silverfish, firebrats, and cockroaches4

Their presence may indicate a larger pest problem, as they are attracted to locations with an abundance of their preferred prey.

Comparison of Centipede Types:

AspectHouse CentipedeOther Centipedes
LengthUp to 1.5 inchesVaries, some species grow up to 12 inches
Legs15 pairs, long and slenderVaries, usually shorter and thicker
ActivityNocturnalBoth nocturnal and diurnal species exist
HabitatIndoors, damp areasSoil, leaf litter, under rocks, tree trunks, and in houses

Climbing Abilities of House Centipedes

Mechanisms of Wall-Climbing

House centipedes are known for their remarkable climbing abilities, which can be attributed to their long, slender legs. These legs are specially adapted for climbing, as they are barbed to help hold onto surfaces and maintain grip ¹.

Not only do they have 15 pairs of long legs, but each leg is also encircled by dark and white bands, providing additional stability and traction for climbing ².

Climbing Various Surfaces

House centipedes can climb up walls of different materials, such as:

  • Wood
  • Drywall
  • Brick

Their exceptional climbing abilities allow them to scurry along walls and ceilings with ease, regardless of the surface type. This ability enables house centipedes to navigate through diverse indoor environments while hunting for prey or searching for places to hide ³.

Helping or Hindering: House Centipedes and Pest Control

Predators and Prey

House centipedes are yellowish-brown creatures with up to 15 pairs of extremely long legs. They are commonly found in homes, where they feed on:

  • Small arthropods
  • Pest insects

Their diet includes various household pests, such as:

  • Silverfish
  • Ants
  • Bedbugs
  • Cockroaches

Natural Pest Control vs Insect Infestation

House centipedes can offer some form of natural pest control by feeding on other insects. However, a large number of house centipedes might indicate an underlying pest problem. To effectively manage pest issues in your home, consider the following measures:

  • Removing clutter
  • Sealing entry points
  • Proper food storage
  • Maintaining cleanliness
Natural Pest ControlInsect Infestation
Centipedes feed on other pests, reducing their populationA large number of centipedes could indicate a greater pest issue
Eco-friendly solutionMight not solve the root cause of pest problems

In summary, house centipedes might help in controlling pests, but their presence could also signal a need for more thorough pest control measures. A balanced approach should be adopted while addressing such issues in your home.

Footnotes

  1. Missouri Department of Conservation

  2. Penn State Extension

  3. University of Arkansas Arthropod Museum

  4. Horticulture and Home Pest News

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – House Centipede

Striped, Gangly, 30-legged bug!
November 6, 2009
My friend Brandon sent me the photo along with this message: “I was pouring myself a soda next to the kitchen sink, when I turned around and spotted this on the wall. Not what you want to see behind you after you turn the lights on.”
Its body is about 3cm long, and including the legs it’s about 10cm long. I became very curious after seeing the photo, I just had to submit it!
Laura L. W., Roseville, CA
Lake of the Pines, Auburn, CA

House Centipede
House Centipede

Hi Laura,
What Brandon has labeled the Bug of Doom is a harmless, beneficial House Centipede.  This nocturnal predator is not known to bite people, will run away when the lights are snapped on, and will eat cockroaches and other undesirable household intruders if left alone to forage.

Letter 2 – House Centipede

Nothing I’ve Seen Before
May 18, 2010
Hello,
This bug was found scurrying across the floor of my workplace in Columbus, Ohio. I found it yesterday (May 16th) around midnight on a damp, cloudy/rainy day. Our store is next to the interstate, in an industrial part of town.
Shawn
Midwest – Ohio

House Centipede

Hi Shawn,
The House Centipede is a common nocturnal household predator that is found throughout North America as well as in many other parts of the world.  House Centipedes are harmless.

Letter 3 – House Centipede

Unknown Bug
July 19, 2009
Hello,
I found this bug outside my house and can’t figure out what it is. It has a one segment body. Fourteen legs on each side. A false set of antennae on the back side and it looks like it also has pinchers on the front.
Curious Bugman
Upland, California which is at the base of Mt. Baldy of the Inland Empire.

House Centipede
House Centipede

House Centipede

thx – do they bite?  are they poisonous?  thx in advance

You can find tons of info on the House Centipede online, and though all centipedes have venom, the House Centipede is not dangerous to humans and we have not gotten any reports of bites though we get 100s of ID requests per year.

Letter 4 – House Centipede

No clue what this is, found at school computer lab, should i be scared?
February 21, 2010
Hi my friend and I saw this bug at the computer lab at our school crawling up on the wall, we have no clue what it is. It looked black and gray as you can tell it has a lot of legs. Please help! We go to college on a mountain and we swear they have some undiscovered species of insects roaming around.
Sam
Brentwood California

House Centipede

Hi Sam,
The House Centipede is not only harmless, it is actually beneficial since it will eat potentially problematic household intruders.

Letter 5 – House Centipede

What is this bug?
Can you help me. It just crawled from under my couch. I’m in NYC. Thank You.

This is a House Centipede and it is high time we replace the image of a House Centipede on our homepage and your image will do nicely. House Centipedes are harmless, or more accurately beneficial. Chances are this specimen has been feeding on cockroaches, bed bugs and other undesireable roommates in your apartment.

Letter 6 – House Centipede

House Centipede?
Sun, Oct 12, 2008 at 9:33 AM
Is this a house centipede? I have a LOT of these in my house. In the basement, in the bath tub, in the closets, this one was on the stairs. They have very definite little personalities. One I found in the basement, ran away from me, realized he was in the middle of the room with nowhere to go, looked around, turned back towards me and ran to hide in a pile of laundry at my feet. I found another one on my leg while I was sitting watching tv. The one of the picture was on the stairs. They definitely seem to like people! Do they bite?
Inundated
Chicago, IL

House Centipede
House Centipede

Dear Inundated,
Your House Centipede identification is absolutely correct.  We have heard of a very few instances where a person has claimed to have been bitten by a House Centipede, but those reports are rare.  There is no danger if this questionable bite occurs.  House Centipedes would not be so plentiful in your home unless they have a ready food supply.  Roaches and spiders would be considered a food supply.  House Centipedes, though frightening, are actually quite beneficial.

Letter 7 – House Centipede

Scutigera coleoptrata!
Mon, Nov 3, 2008 at 11:29 AM
Hello Bugman.
Somehow I made it 41 arthropod-loving years without EVER seeing one of these beautiful and amazing creatures. This one scurried under my chair in a local bookstore, Petoskey, Michigan. I quite literally clapped my hands with joy and shouted “OH! Gorgeous!” when I caught it. It has big black eyes that looked at me with curiosity like a praying mantis – and purple knees! I swear to god I thought I had discovered an alien life-form. No one in the store had seen one before, either. If you look at a map, isn’t Petoskey awfully far north for this critter? I was able to identify it from your site, so thanks very much! – but I though you’d like another couple photos to add to your collection. Your website is at the top of my Favorites list. By the way, I let this lovely young house centipede loose in my own basement. May it go forth and multiply.
Lynn E
Petoskey, northern Michigan

House Centipede
House Centipede

Hi Lynn,
Wow, Monday seems so long ago, but we have been overcome with obligations since returning back to the offices of What’s That Bug? and we have also been consumed with the elections.  Thanks for your wonderful letter.  We get submissions of House Centipedes from around the world, including parts of Canada, so your sighting is not that unusual, but we are thrilled to find out how much pleasure your sighting brought you and also that your House Centipede and its progeny have found a tolerant new home.

Letter 8 – House Centipede

Hi. This bug I think house cependia?
Fri, Nov 7, 2008 at 6:56 PM

Hi. I just moved to apartment building about a few months. I see these bugs that are flat, have big attenas, look like 18 legs, run fast when I try to spray them, they don’t go away, a big one I think it was the leader went under my cabinet and another one went on my bedroom wall and there are many in my bathroom tub and all over my whole apartment! I spray a lot of perfume and body splash. Is that why they come? even if I don’t spray perfume and body splash they come more! they freak me out! I am sooooo afraid. I get hives and break out bad because of this! I am very nervous and worried all time. What is causing them to come? What do they live off? What do they eat? Are they dangerous? Do they bite? I am sorry but one time I tried to get one and I stump it. I tried to clean up but the body spread out and was very hard to pick up and some parts still there and my fingers sting and I think I got bite. Where do they live? Do they only go to apartments? What other bugs go to apartments because I am new. I just saw these bugs and spiders and spider webs and other bugs I forgot names. And are red ticks bad? What to do? And when I went to my sister’s apartment, when she lived there, I saw she had beetles, cockroaches, and other bugs I don’t know what they are called. She still slept in her bed that had some of this bugs! She didn’t care. There were a lot of bugs there and my apartment. There is a lot of dust, and drafts and very thin walls in my apartment. I am by some old trees and a big old tree comes right by my apartment. I think I am in an old town. They say there are rats in my neighborhood. I saw a rat and mouse too. And a rat and mouse at the Laundromat. So, I heard it was not good to live there and I should move. But I just moved, and want to give it a chance. Am I crazy for this? Plea se help. This is no joke. Thank you.
Soooooo afraid one in Evanston
Evanston, IL

House Centipede
House Centipede

Dear Soooooo afraid,
Since we don’t have psychiatry degrees, we really don’t want to try to diagnose your level of craziness and would prefer to leave that to a specialist. In all actuality, we have art degrees, so theoretically, our insect advice could also be called into question. In recent months, job qualifications have been greatly relaxed, and we do know that Africa is a continent and that Canada, the United States and Mexico are in North America, so we may be qualified to do just about anything.
We are going to confine ourselves to answering your House Centipede questions. Yes, this is a House Centipede. Though they may seem organized, they do not have leaders. They are not attracted to body spray or cologne. They are there because there is a food source. They are predatory and will eat insects and other Arthropods. In the city, they thrive on Cockroaches, so in that sense, they are beneficial. They are not dangerous, but we have gotten a few reports of people being bitten. They are generally found in damp dark places, and they will live indoors and outdoors. Visit our Household Pests section for more creatures frequently found indoors that are not beneficial.

Mon, Nov 17, 2008 at 3:31 PM
Hi. I heard they live off a food supply. But where is the food supply? How to get rid of these bugs? They freak the daylights out of me!!!!!!!! This is no joke. Thanks!

Hello again Sooooooo afraid,
Yes, you have heard correctly. House Centipedes do live off of a food supply. There are probably countless insects and spiders in your new apartment that you are unaware of. Cockroaches like dark places like behind the stove, under the sink, and anywhere that crumbs of food may fall. We do not give extermination advice.

Letter 9 – House Centipede

Most Horrific Thing I’ve Ever Seen
November 18, 2009
Hello!
My roommates and I have been finding these disgusting looking bugs around our house. They are in all rooms and have been found on the floor, walls, and ceililng. Aside from their gross appearance (if it’s not obvious by now, we are a bunch of girls – literally), when they die, all their legs seem to pop off. This makes sense when we smash them, but they’ve also died because we sprayed for them and as they crawl along, slowly dying, the legs seemed to disconnect. Perhaps I should mention they have more legs then I thought possible. They seem to go all around their body. The one in the picture is the biggest we’ve seen so far, it is about two inches in length. The average is 1-1 1/2 inches. Please help!
Horrified in the Heartland
Central Illinois

House Centipede
House Centipede

Dear Horrified,
If you are not seeing any cockroaches, it is probably because these beneficial and harmless House Centipedes are feeding upon them at night.  Should you succeed in eliminating all the House Centipedes, you may find that the Cockroaches and Bedbugs and Silverfish will proliferate.  Our advice is to learn to live in harmony with the House Centipedes and allow them to keep your home pest free.

Thanks Daniel! It would be nice if the “good” bugs would clearly identify themselves and not look so scary. Perhaps I will try and convey that to them next time I see one. Thanks again!

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – House Centipede

Striped, Gangly, 30-legged bug!
November 6, 2009
My friend Brandon sent me the photo along with this message: “I was pouring myself a soda next to the kitchen sink, when I turned around and spotted this on the wall. Not what you want to see behind you after you turn the lights on.”
Its body is about 3cm long, and including the legs it’s about 10cm long. I became very curious after seeing the photo, I just had to submit it!
Laura L. W., Roseville, CA
Lake of the Pines, Auburn, CA

House Centipede
House Centipede

Hi Laura,
What Brandon has labeled the Bug of Doom is a harmless, beneficial House Centipede.  This nocturnal predator is not known to bite people, will run away when the lights are snapped on, and will eat cockroaches and other undesirable household intruders if left alone to forage.

Letter 2 – House Centipede

Nothing I’ve Seen Before
May 18, 2010
Hello,
This bug was found scurrying across the floor of my workplace in Columbus, Ohio. I found it yesterday (May 16th) around midnight on a damp, cloudy/rainy day. Our store is next to the interstate, in an industrial part of town.
Shawn
Midwest – Ohio

House Centipede

Hi Shawn,
The House Centipede is a common nocturnal household predator that is found throughout North America as well as in many other parts of the world.  House Centipedes are harmless.

Letter 3 – House Centipede

Unknown Bug
July 19, 2009
Hello,
I found this bug outside my house and can’t figure out what it is. It has a one segment body. Fourteen legs on each side. A false set of antennae on the back side and it looks like it also has pinchers on the front.
Curious Bugman
Upland, California which is at the base of Mt. Baldy of the Inland Empire.

House Centipede
House Centipede

House Centipede

thx – do they bite?  are they poisonous?  thx in advance

You can find tons of info on the House Centipede online, and though all centipedes have venom, the House Centipede is not dangerous to humans and we have not gotten any reports of bites though we get 100s of ID requests per year.

Letter 4 – House Centipede

No clue what this is, found at school computer lab, should i be scared?
February 21, 2010
Hi my friend and I saw this bug at the computer lab at our school crawling up on the wall, we have no clue what it is. It looked black and gray as you can tell it has a lot of legs. Please help! We go to college on a mountain and we swear they have some undiscovered species of insects roaming around.
Sam
Brentwood California

House Centipede

Hi Sam,
The House Centipede is not only harmless, it is actually beneficial since it will eat potentially problematic household intruders.

Letter 5 – House Centipede

What is this bug?
Can you help me. It just crawled from under my couch. I’m in NYC. Thank You.

This is a House Centipede and it is high time we replace the image of a House Centipede on our homepage and your image will do nicely. House Centipedes are harmless, or more accurately beneficial. Chances are this specimen has been feeding on cockroaches, bed bugs and other undesireable roommates in your apartment.

Letter 6 – House Centipede

House Centipede?
Sun, Oct 12, 2008 at 9:33 AM
Is this a house centipede? I have a LOT of these in my house. In the basement, in the bath tub, in the closets, this one was on the stairs. They have very definite little personalities. One I found in the basement, ran away from me, realized he was in the middle of the room with nowhere to go, looked around, turned back towards me and ran to hide in a pile of laundry at my feet. I found another one on my leg while I was sitting watching tv. The one of the picture was on the stairs. They definitely seem to like people! Do they bite?
Inundated
Chicago, IL

House Centipede
House Centipede

Dear Inundated,
Your House Centipede identification is absolutely correct.  We have heard of a very few instances where a person has claimed to have been bitten by a House Centipede, but those reports are rare.  There is no danger if this questionable bite occurs.  House Centipedes would not be so plentiful in your home unless they have a ready food supply.  Roaches and spiders would be considered a food supply.  House Centipedes, though frightening, are actually quite beneficial.

Letter 7 – House Centipede

Scutigera coleoptrata!
Mon, Nov 3, 2008 at 11:29 AM
Hello Bugman.
Somehow I made it 41 arthropod-loving years without EVER seeing one of these beautiful and amazing creatures. This one scurried under my chair in a local bookstore, Petoskey, Michigan. I quite literally clapped my hands with joy and shouted “OH! Gorgeous!” when I caught it. It has big black eyes that looked at me with curiosity like a praying mantis – and purple knees! I swear to god I thought I had discovered an alien life-form. No one in the store had seen one before, either. If you look at a map, isn’t Petoskey awfully far north for this critter? I was able to identify it from your site, so thanks very much! – but I though you’d like another couple photos to add to your collection. Your website is at the top of my Favorites list. By the way, I let this lovely young house centipede loose in my own basement. May it go forth and multiply.
Lynn E
Petoskey, northern Michigan

House Centipede
House Centipede

Hi Lynn,
Wow, Monday seems so long ago, but we have been overcome with obligations since returning back to the offices of What’s That Bug? and we have also been consumed with the elections.  Thanks for your wonderful letter.  We get submissions of House Centipedes from around the world, including parts of Canada, so your sighting is not that unusual, but we are thrilled to find out how much pleasure your sighting brought you and also that your House Centipede and its progeny have found a tolerant new home.

Letter 8 – House Centipede

Hi. This bug I think house cependia?
Fri, Nov 7, 2008 at 6:56 PM

Hi. I just moved to apartment building about a few months. I see these bugs that are flat, have big attenas, look like 18 legs, run fast when I try to spray them, they don’t go away, a big one I think it was the leader went under my cabinet and another one went on my bedroom wall and there are many in my bathroom tub and all over my whole apartment! I spray a lot of perfume and body splash. Is that why they come? even if I don’t spray perfume and body splash they come more! they freak me out! I am sooooo afraid. I get hives and break out bad because of this! I am very nervous and worried all time. What is causing them to come? What do they live off? What do they eat? Are they dangerous? Do they bite? I am sorry but one time I tried to get one and I stump it. I tried to clean up but the body spread out and was very hard to pick up and some parts still there and my fingers sting and I think I got bite. Where do they live? Do they only go to apartments? What other bugs go to apartments because I am new. I just saw these bugs and spiders and spider webs and other bugs I forgot names. And are red ticks bad? What to do? And when I went to my sister’s apartment, when she lived there, I saw she had beetles, cockroaches, and other bugs I don’t know what they are called. She still slept in her bed that had some of this bugs! She didn’t care. There were a lot of bugs there and my apartment. There is a lot of dust, and drafts and very thin walls in my apartment. I am by some old trees and a big old tree comes right by my apartment. I think I am in an old town. They say there are rats in my neighborhood. I saw a rat and mouse too. And a rat and mouse at the Laundromat. So, I heard it was not good to live there and I should move. But I just moved, and want to give it a chance. Am I crazy for this? Plea se help. This is no joke. Thank you.
Soooooo afraid one in Evanston
Evanston, IL

House Centipede
House Centipede

Dear Soooooo afraid,
Since we don’t have psychiatry degrees, we really don’t want to try to diagnose your level of craziness and would prefer to leave that to a specialist. In all actuality, we have art degrees, so theoretically, our insect advice could also be called into question. In recent months, job qualifications have been greatly relaxed, and we do know that Africa is a continent and that Canada, the United States and Mexico are in North America, so we may be qualified to do just about anything.
We are going to confine ourselves to answering your House Centipede questions. Yes, this is a House Centipede. Though they may seem organized, they do not have leaders. They are not attracted to body spray or cologne. They are there because there is a food source. They are predatory and will eat insects and other Arthropods. In the city, they thrive on Cockroaches, so in that sense, they are beneficial. They are not dangerous, but we have gotten a few reports of people being bitten. They are generally found in damp dark places, and they will live indoors and outdoors. Visit our Household Pests section for more creatures frequently found indoors that are not beneficial.

Mon, Nov 17, 2008 at 3:31 PM
Hi. I heard they live off a food supply. But where is the food supply? How to get rid of these bugs? They freak the daylights out of me!!!!!!!! This is no joke. Thanks!

Hello again Sooooooo afraid,
Yes, you have heard correctly. House Centipedes do live off of a food supply. There are probably countless insects and spiders in your new apartment that you are unaware of. Cockroaches like dark places like behind the stove, under the sink, and anywhere that crumbs of food may fall. We do not give extermination advice.

Letter 9 – House Centipede

Most Horrific Thing I’ve Ever Seen
November 18, 2009
Hello!
My roommates and I have been finding these disgusting looking bugs around our house. They are in all rooms and have been found on the floor, walls, and ceililng. Aside from their gross appearance (if it’s not obvious by now, we are a bunch of girls – literally), when they die, all their legs seem to pop off. This makes sense when we smash them, but they’ve also died because we sprayed for them and as they crawl along, slowly dying, the legs seemed to disconnect. Perhaps I should mention they have more legs then I thought possible. They seem to go all around their body. The one in the picture is the biggest we’ve seen so far, it is about two inches in length. The average is 1-1 1/2 inches. Please help!
Horrified in the Heartland
Central Illinois

House Centipede
House Centipede

Dear Horrified,
If you are not seeing any cockroaches, it is probably because these beneficial and harmless House Centipedes are feeding upon them at night.  Should you succeed in eliminating all the House Centipedes, you may find that the Cockroaches and Bedbugs and Silverfish will proliferate.  Our advice is to learn to live in harmony with the House Centipedes and allow them to keep your home pest free.

Thanks Daniel! It would be nice if the “good” bugs would clearly identify themselves and not look so scary. Perhaps I will try and convey that to them next time I see one. Thanks again!

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts

43 thoughts on “Can House Centipedes Climb Walls? Uncovering the Truth about Their Abilities”

  1. I, too, have lived 44 years without ever seeing this creepy bug! My son and I were so freaked out by this “alien life form”. When he sweeped it out the door, a female mallard was watching and ran over and ate it! We were relieved! Thanks ducky!

    Robin, McHenry, IL

    Reply
  2. You cannot imagine how freaked out I was when I saw my first one in the US. Especially as you don’t know right away where front and end is.
    I guess they are harmless and you can find them where you would expect silverfish or pillbugs.
    If you hold up a bottle neck to them, they creep in, at least that worked for me.

    Reply
  3. I just caught one of these bugs in my apartment! I was surprised to see how huge this was! I was also surprised to see that others have come across this house centipede too and how quickly I was able to identify this bug on your website!

    My question is this: You state that although they have venom, they do not bite humans. What about my pets? I have cats and a small dog. I certainly would not want them to be bit by this bug!

    Can you answer this question?

    Reply
    • Our own cat catches and east House Centipedes that are unlucky enough to cross the feline’s path. We wouldn’t worry about bites to pets.

      Reply
  4. No Disrespect to Bugman, but you absolutely should worry about this bug stinging your pets. I have a 150 lb dog who has been bitten/stung TWICE now by one of these. The first time, we had no idea what happened- just saw a little swelling at the sting site. By the time we got him to the doctor, he had a 107 degree and climbing fever, was listless, had a raging infection and could barely walk.The second time, we knew what it was and put him on antibiotics right away. I don’t think ALL animals will have a reaction, but certainly there are those that are alergic to certain venoms.

    Reply
  5. Well… I’m so happy to hear that it won’t kill me… but I caught two of these already and am simply too creeped out to let them go… can I just let them loose outside or will they come back in?

    Reply
  6. I think I have to break your unbroken string of “no bite reports”. My very first encounter with one of these critters was in the shower- I was in a hurry, and I remember seeing something, but didn’t have my contacts in yet- and it didn’t look like a wasp or a roach or anything else I was afraid of. I wasn’t too worried about it until it bit the crap out of my leg, and I frantically brushed it off- and of course you all know what these things look like up close! I had no idea what it was. My bug man at the time said it was a mature silverfish. The new bug man said it was a firebrat. Neither one had seen the actual bug. We recently had our house sprayed for the first time in years- the spiders were just too too thick for me- and it has caused these creepie crawlies to come out of the woodwork- just this morning one cruised up to my foot and met it’s maker. (Sorry carnage-avoiders!) I haven’t wanted to get too close to one of these after being bitten. I remember it stung pretty badly- not like a wasp or a bee, but pretty annoying and itchy later. I managed to survive without hospitalization, however, unlike the unlucky dog in the post above. I would just be aware- I wonder what in the world caused it to bite me; possibly the water from the shower?

    Reply
  7. Well, I’m not sure one way or another if this bug bites, but my son is 18 months old and over about 3 days time everytime I would lay him down for a nap or to bed, then he would wake up with bite marks on him. They were sensitive to the touch, but he could not tell me what had happened (only being 18 months old!). We searched his room, changed the sheets and never could come up with an explaination. Then my husband happened across this little bug just today and I rushed to the internet to identify it. If no new bite marks then we have our culprit!!!

    Reply
  8. i just caught one just like that do they bite im scared because i have had recent encounters but heard they are venoumous only 4 encounters so far need help on finding out if they bite humans with venom

    Reply
  9. Hi, I’m from NJ and two days ago I found a huge bug like this in the shower. It got out of under the rubber mat I have in the bathtub when I run the water and step inside. I freaked out and sprayed with bug spray and it did not move any more, then I flushed it in the toilet.

    My problem is that happened 4 days ago and still thinking and getting shills when I remember or go in the bathroom, I look everywhere thinking is coming back or I’m going to find another one. I now move the mat every time after I shower and put a cover in the drain. although I don’t know if that is how it got there.

    Can someone tell me how to keep them out of my apt. I also had ant which I have been able to keep out keeping black pepper around all the kitchen. Please do you have any tips for this bugs to stay out of my apt? It happened to me when I was little bug with a lot of legs got in my hand and since that I have phobia to any bug with more than two or lots of legs, like spiders, or any kind of centipedes, specially with long legs.
    Thank You , I’m even afraid to close my eyes when I wash my face in the shower 🙁

    Reply
    • We do not know how to keep House Centipedes, a beneficial species, from entering your home. Start by weather stripping and making sure there are no spaces around windows and doors.

      Reply
  10. I have a 2 week old baby should I get him out of my house. I just found one on my kitchen counter I sprayed it with kaboom and put it in a Baggie. My question is, should I move my child till I take car of this for good. And do these ugly suckers come in more than one? I’m freaking out here

    Reply
  11. Besides being “YUCK” and fast…….I think our cat chases them down overnight…if we don’t find a full body, there are definiately legs around in the morning. My question is, if the cat decides to eat them, will it make them sick??

    Reply
    • With a gun. It’s this thing you hold in your hand, and it has a trigger. When you pull that, it will strike something called the firing pin. This will ignite the powder in the cartridge of the bullet, which will create a small explosion, which is how the energy required to push the bullet out of the barrel is generated. So the bullet flies out and … eh, just kidding.

      Reply
  12. When I was a child I was biten by one of these bugs, I got extremely sick. Maybe when youre older it may not affect you but I believe a child should not be biten by this bug.

    Reply
    • In the unlikely event that a person is bitten by a House Centipede, there will most likely be nothing more than a local reaction to the bite.

      Reply
  13. I feel bad now that I saw one of these coming out of the sink when I was half asleep on a bathroom run. I bleached it to death because our creeped me out so bad…they are very CREEPY in the middle of the night

    Reply
    • Not only will House Centipedes prey upon Cockroaches, they will also prey upon one another, so while populations of Cockroaches tend to just increase, populations of House Centipedes are controlled through cannibalism.

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  14. Just now, one was crawling on me while I was in bed and I freaked out and started rolling around and I raced out of bed. I think that it bit me though in the scuffle. I can’t see it, but the area where I think it bit me, hurts. Am I in any danger? (The little f#$@%r is still alive. It got away, but now without losing about 10 legs.)

    Reply
  15. Wow! Thank you! I’ve been all creeped out after seeing one of these in my house, now I know even tho it looks creepy, it eats the even creepier spiders…I’m set. Thanks for the info.

    Reply
  16. The other day I saw this little night crawler in my garage. I freaked out because it was the first time that I saw this kind of centipede. From then on, I vowed on haunting this little night crawler. So last night, i was able to kill one; right by the laundry machine. Just awhile ago, I saw that it has babies. Then when I opened the door in my garage, I saw another big one. I have been reading that house centipede is beneficial because it preys on spiders, roaches etc. However, it if does prey on spiders, then why is it that I still see alot of small spiders in my garage??? I just dont see this night crawler beneficial at all. But a Pests. It creeps the sh*t out of me everytime I see one. All I can think of is kill.

    Reply
  17. Okay, one thing they’re not is benefice. Those arthropods are extremely toxic, they don’t bite and it’s true, but a word of advice: remember that ANY animal having stripes is dangerous. It is mother nature’s way of saying “Keep away from me”. So I wouldn’t recommend anyone handling one without protective wear. Plus, all arthropods like to “explore”, i.e. crawl into place you’d least expect them to pop out of. Therefore disregarding them isn’t recommended either. If you find a spider or a centipede indoors, chances are those would we wandering animals, and besides killing them, the best way to dispose of them would be to catch them with a glass and let them go outside. At least that’s what I’ve been doing with all of them for quite some time and had no problem with them pestering me in the future.

    Reply
  18. I had a few of these show up in my apartment. Good to know that they aren’t lethal. They sure are fast and freaky looking. Good to know that they eat insects and spiders. There are a lot of bugs in my apartment. I live in Price, UT. I never had seen these in St. George, UT where I moved from.

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  19. Yes. It usually comes in two to breed. Rememberto creep in slow to kill because it moves to damn fast. Use a long stick or if you use a hot shots insect killer, be sure to aim well and dont stop squeezing until you soak the fu*ker.

    Reply
  20. Awsome, seen a couple of these in my new house I bought, freaked me and my girl out, but reading this makes me feel better. I’m not a dirty person, and the last thing we want is nasty bugs in our house. To learn that the weird but awsome house centipedes have our backs is pretty cool. Thank you guys..

    Reply
  21. Worst thing in the world to live in a basement apartment. House centipedes thrive there. Just guess where my wife and I happen to live? Lol. I understand they are beneficial. I just wish they didn’t come on my bed, my couch, my kitchen counter, etc. They can stay on the floor. Plenty for them to eat down there!

    Reply

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