Camel Cricket: All You Need to Know in a Nutshell

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Camel crickets are intriguing insects known for their unique appearance and behavior.

These fascinating creatures get their name from their slightly humped backs and long legs, which give them a spider-like appearance.

Interestingly, unlike other cricket species, camel crickets are wingless and do not produce sounds.

Camel Cricket

These crickets can be found in various habitats, including humid and concealed areas like caves, basements, and cellars.

Generally active at night, camel crickets have a long antenna and large hind legs that allow them to jump strongly.

Camel crickets come in a range of colors, such as tan, reddish-brown, or dark brown.

Camel Cricket Basics

Identification and Appearance

Camel crickets get their name from their slightly humpbacked appearance. Key characteristics include:

  • Long legs, giving them a spider-like appearance
  • No wings as adults
  • Brownish, reddish brown, or dark brown color
  • Large hind legs
  • Long, fragile antennae

Due to their physical features, camel crickets are also referred to as spider crickets. They can grow up to 1 ½ inches in length.

Habitat and Range

Camel crickets typically live in:

  • Humid, concealed areas
  • Caves, basements, and cellars
  • Tall grass and other moist environments

These insects are active mostly at night and can be found worldwide.

Camel crickets often become a problem during extremes in weather conditions, such as excessive rainfall or extended periods of hot, dry weather, driving them to invade homes.

In the United States and Canada, over 100 different kinds of camel crickets can be found.

Camel Cricket

Lifecycle

Camel crickets undergo a simple metamorphosis during their lifecycle. Stages include:

  1. Egg
  2. Nymph (looks like a smaller version of the adult)
  3. Adult

Throughout their life, camel crickets can pose a nuisance as pests due to their tendency to invade homes and outdoor structures.

However, they do not bite or pose any health risks to humans.

Diet and Behavior

Food Sources and Diet

Camel crickets are known for their diverse diet, feeding on a variety of organic materials. Some examples of their food sources include:

  • Fungus
  • Plant materials
  • Animal products

These crickets are also known to eat other insects and even their own kind when food is scarce.

Drowned Camel Cricket

Nocturnal Activity

Camel crickets are primarily nocturnal creatures, meaning they are more active at night.

This is when they venture out to search for food and mates. During the day, camel crickets prefer to stay hidden in dark, damp areas such as:

  • Crawl spaces
  • Basements
  • Caves

Chirping and Sounds

Interestingly, camel crickets do not chirp like many other cricket species.

They lack sound-producing organs, so their nighttime activities remain silent, allowing them to go unnoticed while foraging or searching for mates.

Comparison Table

Aspect Camel Cricket Other Crickets
Diet Diverse (fungus, plant and animal products) Typically plant-based
Activity Time Nocturnal (active at night) Primarily nocturnal
Habitat Dark, damp areas (crawl spaces, basements, caves) Various (grass, soil, indoors)
Chirping/Sounds None (no sound organs) Chirping noises

Camel Crickets as Pests

Damage to Home and Property

Camel crickets are attracted to dark, moist environments like basements, garages, and laundry rooms.

They can potentially cause damage to household items like clothes, curtains, and paperwork by chewing on them.

Furthermore, they may also feed on plants, including houseplants, and organic materials like mulch.

Specifically, camel crickets can damage garments and linens packed in boxes in a garage or basement, especially if the infestation goes unchecked for some time.

Infestation Signs

When dealing with camel crickets, it is essential to spot the signs of a potential infestation. Some clues include:

  • Large numbers of camel crickets inside or near your home
  • Eggs or small cricket nymphs in moist environments
  • Chewed plants or fabrics
  • Presence in basements, laundry rooms, or utility rooms
  • Presence of dark fecal smears on surfaces.
Camel Cricket

Health Risks

Though camel crickets resemble spiders with their long legs and dark brown color, they are harmless and do not bite or transmit diseases.

However, their presence may attract predators like bats to your home, which could bring potential health risks.

To manage a camel cricket infestation, consider the following methods:

  • Reduce moisture in affected areas (e.g., using a dehumidifier or fixing leaks)
  • Seal up cracks and crevices in your home
  • Remove potential hiding spots (e.g., piles of wood or debris)
  • Use appropriate pest control methods (e.g., sticky traps or consult a professional)

Prevention and Control

Home Maintenance Tips

  • Maintain a dry environment by using a dehumidifier, fans, or natural ventilation.
  • Seal gaps and cracks in the foundation to limit entry points.
  • Regularly clean moisture-prone areas like basements and crawl spaces.
  • Remove potential hiding spots such as weeds, tall grass, and wood piles near the home.
  • Fix any water leaks, as dampness attracts camel crickets.
  • Keep ground cover and mulch away from the foundation
  • Avoid stacking firewood against the house
  • Remove clutter under decks that might attract crickets.

Traps and Remedies

  • Place sticky traps in areas where camel crickets are spotted; effective for reducing small populations.
  • Create a simple homemade trap by filling a shallow dish with soapy water and placing it near cricket activity.
  • Additional control methods include sealing gaps and openings, using sticky boards, applying outdoor barrier treatments, and placing insecticidal baits in specific locations.
Camel Cricket

When to Call Professionals

  • Consider professional help if home remedies and maintenance fail to control the population.
  • Consult experts in case camel crickets pose a threat to valuable items or cause damage to plants and fabrics.

Comparison Table: Prevention Methods

Method Pros Cons
Home Maintenance Long-term solution, reduces cricket habitats May require considerable time and effort
Traps and Remedies Quick results, budget-friendly Best for small infestations, ongoing maintenance
Professional Help Expert solutions, comprehensive control Can be expensive, may involve chemicals

Camel Cricket Species and Taxonomy

Family Rhaphid

Camelophoridae crickets belong to the family Rhaphidophoridae. These crickets are known for their:

  • Humpbacked appearance
  • Long legs and antennae
  • Lack of wings in adults

These unique characteristics give them a spider-like appearance while still being part of the order Orthoptera.

Camel crickets are typically brownish in color, and their sizes vary depending on the species.

Subfamilies and Genera

Within the Rhaphidophoridae family, there are multiple subfamilies and genera.

One common genus is Ceuthophilus, which includes several species often found in caves and basements.

Another notable species is the greenhouse camel cricket (Diestrammena asynamora), which is native to Asia but has become increasingly common in the United States.

One common nuisance species of camel crickets is Tachycines asynamorous, also known as the “greenhouse stone cricket”.

Conclusion

In conclusion, camel crickets, characterized by their humpbacked and wingless appearance, are intriguing nocturnal insects.

Found worldwide, they thrive in humid, concealed environments and exhibit a diverse diet.

While they don’t pose direct health risks, their presence can attract other potentially harmful creatures and cause damage to household items.

Effective management strategies include maintaining a dry environment, sealing entry points, using traps, and seeking professional help when necessary.

Understanding their behavior and implementing preventive measures can mitigate the challenges posed by these unique crickets.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about camel crickets. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Camel Cricket

camel/cave cricket photo
Hi there Bugman!
My husband and I are in the process of moving into a new home, which brings the joy of finding all kinds of new bugs! We’ve got Box Elder bugs hoping to move in for the winter, as well as forming aggregations on our mail box, trees, and just hanging out.

We’ve got what I believe are some kind of seed or leaf footed bug also hoping to move in for the winter. If I can find another one, I’ll send a photo in, I’m having trouble identifying the particular kind I’ve got (despite using your site and googling)

Anyway. I’ve always had a fondness for crickets, and really loved looking at the cricket section of WTB. Before we started moving in to our new house, we brought a friend by to see the place, and we found this little lady hanging out in what is about to be our library.

I just thought I’d pass on a photo, in case you felt like sharing it with your other readers! Love the site!
Prairie

Hi Prairie,
Thank you for your wonderful letter and great photo of a Camel Cricket. We get so many letters from people who are horrified when they find Camel Crickets in the basement.

I forgot to mention (probably because I didn’t need any identification help), that we live in Northern Alabama. The first time I saw this type of cricket, I did the same thing most people do, I accidentally mistook it for a spider, jumped, shreiked, and begged for someone to move it away.

I just want to add that it seems Alabama natives love this response out of newcomers. We’re transplants from Washington state, and I’d never seen a cave/camel cricket before. (I’m more familiar with Mormon crickets and house/field crickets)

I’ve seen so many sick smiles out of Alabamians when they see someone who’s meeting a cave cricket for the first time. And I have to admit, it’s starting to rub off on me. Just thought I’d share a little fun after the photo.

Letter 2 – Orthopteran reportedly found in Capri Sun

Subject: Help identify
Location: No clue where it originated possibly the packaging plant? Capri Sun roaring waters berry flavor
October 17, 2015 10:03 am
Just opened a Capri Sun water drink and found this as I poured it out. No clue whatsoever what it is. It has a long mandible, wings, three black appendages off the back and some sort of balls posturals on the belly or the thorax??
Signature: MaryAlice foust

Orthopteran
Orthopteran

Dear MaryAlice,
Goodness, what a surprise you had.  Did you consume the drink?  We believe this is some species of Orthopteran, perhaps a female Tree Cricket.

Letter 3 – AKA: Female Camel Cricket

Female Cave Cricket?
Hello,
I found this giant creature in my damp, dark cellar the other day. Unfortunately I didn’t realize what it was and happened to unload spectracide onto it. I thought it was a mutant. Is it a female cave cricket?
Thanks,
Mark

Correct Mark,
The Cave Cricket is also known as a Camel Cricket and the female has the long ovipositor protruding from the end of her abdomen.

Letter 4 – Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket/Cave Cricket?
I just wanted to shoot over a few pictures of a cave/camel cricket I found in my basement. Thank you for helping me ID this guy. Is it true that he eats spiders, ants, and roaches?
Vince
Philadelphia, PA

Hi Vince,
Camel Crickets are generally thought to be scavengers rather than predators, hence they would eat dead spiders, ants and roaches.

Letter 5 – Camel Cricket

What is this bug? Can You help It jumps?
Fri, Nov 7, 2008 at 8:38 PM
Can you please help me identify this bug. It jumps and first I saw them in my basement but now they seem to be showing up all over my house. They are brownish and they jump pretty high and are quick. Any idea what they are and where do they come from. I appreciate any help you can give me.
Thank you,
Suzanne
long island, new york

Camel Cricket
Camel Cricket

Hi Suzanne,
This is a Camel Cricket or Cave Cricket in the family Rhaphidophoridae.  Unlike other crickets, they do not chirp because they don’t have wings.  Here is what BugGuide has to say about them:  “If these occur in a house the best treatment is to remove them and their breeding habitat – cool moist dark places such as piles of logs or boards in basements.

A clean dry home will not be a welcoming place for these guys. Although they are scary-looking they are basically harmless to humans, except perhaps for minor damage to stored items, and are easily discouraged by eliminating the dark damp habitat they prefer. “

Letter 6 – BUG OF THE MONTH JANUARY 2009 – CAMEL CRICKET

6 legged spider/grasshopper
Thu, Jan 1, 2009 at 8:38 AM
Hi,
I walked into my basement one day and I found this creature on my wall. It looked like a spider had mated with a grasshopper and this odd bug was what came of it. This bug did not seem to be aggressive. It was January first and I live in Fairmont, WV.

The bug had long antennas, 6 legs, the two back ones looked like grasshopper legs and the 4 front one like spider legs. I believe I might have seen this creature before while in TN. What is this mysterious bug inhabiting my basement?
Sarah
fairmont,wv

Camel Cricket
Camel Cricket

Hi Sarah,
Though your photo is blurry and the camera angle is not ideal for identifying your Camel Cricket, it is the time of the month for us to select the Bug of the Month for the New Year. Camel Crickets are also known as Cave Crickets and they are in the family Rhaphidophoridae.

They frequent damp dark places. Basements are a perfect habitat for them. BugGuide indicates: “If these occur in a house the best treatment is to remove them and their breeding habitat – cool moist dark places such as piles of logs or boards in basements.

A clean dry home will not be a welcoming place for these guys. Although they are scary-looking they are basically harmless to humans, except perhaps for minor damage to stored items, and are easily discouraged by eliminating the dark damp habitat they prefer.”

Since your photo is not ideal for identification purposes, we will be including an older photo along with the Bug of the Month for January 2009 posting.

Shrimp-like Bug
Tue, Nov 25, 2008 at 11:59 PM
We have ‘smooshed’ a couple of these at my house recently. I can’t recall ever seeing them before. they can jump grasshoppers, perhaps even better than the grass hoppers we see around here.
The fact that it’s an insect is obvious. What’s less obvious is when shrimp made the transition to land. ;D It’s a rather dejected looking bug don’t you think?
So, whats that bug?
+1 dollar to the site if you can help me out.
KILL IT WITH FIRE!
North Carolina, US

Camel Cricket
Camel Cricket

Dear KILL IT WITH FIRE,
Your insect is a Camel Cricket or Cave Cricket in the family Rhaphidophoridae. They are often found in basements and other dark, damp habitats. According to BugGuide: “Feed on leaf debris. In houses may chew on paper products, occasionally fabric.

Letter 7 – Bug of the Month December 2017: Camel Cricket

Subject:  Spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  LaGrange Park
Date: 12/01/2017
Time: 10:17 AM EDT
Is this a spider? Does it bite? I found it inside my house, in the bedroom.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious

Camel Cricket

Dear Curious,
This is a Camel Cricket, a harmless creature that is often found in dark, damp places like basements.  Though it was our Bug of the Month back in 2009, we felt it was time for that honor again.

Letter 8 – Hebard’s Trig

Subject: What big eyebrows you have, my dear!
Location: Andover, NJ
October 6, 2016 5:56 am
I found this very tiny (1/3-1/2 inch) cricket (I think) resting on the leaf of some goldenrod late yesterday afternoon. What struck me about it was the extreme length of its antennae – easily 5 or more times the length of the body.

I’ve checked my field guides and can’d find anything that looks quite like this, so wondering if maybe its the nymph form of a cricket/katydid?
Photo was taken yesterday afternoon right at the edge of our woods (hickory/oak/maple/hardwoods).
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Hebard's Trig
Hebard’s Trig

Hi Deborah,
After carefully searching BugGuide, we believe we have identified this Ensiferan as a female Hebard’s Trig,
Falcicula hebardi, and according to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “‘…restricted to colonies among the wire-grass of the pine woods…’ (Rehn and Hebard 1905).” 

You should submit your image to BugGuide as well because the bristles on the head and thorax are quite evident in your image, a characteristic that is also evident on this BugGuide image.

Letter 9 – Identifications needed for high school project

Bugs
Location: Alabama
September 10, 2011 3:28 pm
I am trying to complete a highschool taxonomy project and I need help finding the common names of these bugs.
In some pictures there are several bugs, please identify them all. If you see the same species twice, please let me know. I have some more posts with more pics comming up. Thanks.
Signature: Calac64

High School Students wants to know “What’s That Bug?”

bugs post#2
Location: Alabama
September 10, 2011 3:30 pm
I did not mention this in my last post, but my teacher recomende this site find identification.
Signature: Calac64

High School Insect Collection

Dear Calac64,
We believe that when your teacher recommended our website, it was not so that you would send your pictures to have our small staff do your homework for you.  We believe we were recommended as a resource that you could use to self identify the insects in your collection.

Ed. Note:  Calac64 sent a total of 4 emails with a total of 12 images requesting identifications.  There is no indication that Calac64 even attempted any identifications by providing a possible name for one of the insects.  If any of our readers would like to identify the insects in the photos, please feel free to post comments.

Thank you for that notification, I agree with your reasoning, but I did not mean to convey my request as you doing my homework.  My teacher just wanted us to identify the insects after we find them, and I did not think that she would mind me requesting help.

I apologize if I have conveyed my request in that fasion.  If you wish to, you can just not identify the insects, I don’t mind, plus I have already identified most of them.

Thank you for responding and clarifying your requests.  If you would like verification on any of your identifications, we will try our best to assist.

Letter 10 – Mysterious Legless Insect found on Table in Texas is Male Trig

Subject: Found dead on kitchen table
Location: Brazoria county tx
December 6, 2016 3:29 am
Found south of Houston tx in brazoria county in someone’s house already dead. First week of December. Even has hairs on its head. Has wings. It’s really creepy looking. No idea what happened to the legs either. Was found like that on a kitchen table dead. No animals live in the house.
Signature: Curious

Legless Insect
Legless Insect

Dear Curious,
Generally legless insects found in a home have been serving as “cat toys” prior to their death, so we can’t explain why this legless insect was found on the table.  Because of what appears to be an ovipositor, we believe this is most likely a Cricket or other Orthopteran, but the eyes remind us of a Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae. 

We are going to guess that this is a Cricket with all its extremities removed, and we suspect it might have looked like this female Carolina Ground Cricket on BugGuide prior to mutilation. We have contacted Eric Eaton for verification.

Legless Insect
Legless Insect

Eric Eaton provides identification:  Male Trig
Hi, Daniel:
It is an adult male “trig” of some sort, or maybe even a ground cricket.  Here’s where I’d start:
http://bugguide.net/node/view/16187
So, yes, an orthopteran.
Hope you are having a lovely holiday season so far!
Cheers,
Eric

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts
Tags: Camel Crickets

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27 Comments. Leave new

  • Hello, I was wondering if anyone can tell me if this is possible…..Ok, I have an old house with camel/cave crickets in my basement. Recently I had a rather large one make it’s way upstairs to the living quarters. I gave it the controlled “step” down , disabling it so I could catch and kill it. Ok , that all happened as planned. What’s next is totally bizarre! So I throw said carcass in the toilet bowl and go finish watching TV. I come back an hour later and there is this 4 or 5 inch long “worm” very thin with a tiny football shaped head swimming madly in my toilet bowl! So, did this come up somehow from my septic tank { highly unlikely in my opinion since it’s never happen in 35 years of living here} or was it inside that monster Camel cricket??? any help would be appreciated!!!

    Reply
    • Dear Artifact,
      This is a horsehair worm, an internal parasite of some Orthopterans. We have also gotten reports that they may parasitize some spiders.

      Reply
  • Looks like bugs for teenagers to figure out on their own (like you said)!

    Reply
  • I would like to know what this insect is. I have seen them in houses here in Texas. They fly and are creepy

    Reply
  • Thank you. My bug looks similar to this one. No white spot thou and flies. If any of ya’ll have knowledge of that bug. It is about 1 inch in size.

    Reply
  • I just have to add..those are some of the scariest type bugs I have ever seen..and let me tell you from experience..they bite!!

    Reply
  • how do i get rid of these camel crickets? is there a reason we only see them when it starts getting warm? All winter we never seen one, but now that it is getting warm, we are starting to see them come out.

    Reply
  • Heather Buckholtz
    July 31, 2013 1:42 pm

    Good to know the official name of these crickets. I live in Jonesboro, Arkansas and I’ve always heard them called “Jerusalem Crickets.” Oh, and in more humorous circles they are referred to as ‘giant-mutant-jumping-bugs.’ They are quite harmless, but they can definitely be alarming. They aren’t very common around here, except in some parts of the country. They used to be an issue in town, but I haven’t seen them very much in a few years. They are not aggressive, from my experience. They can do very quick damage to paper and fabric goods. I’m not a fan of killing bugs but this is one I do make an exception with, largely because I don’t like being surprised by a big honking bug that can jump at my face. That being said, they are also very unpleasant to kill because of the ‘squishiness.’ Can’t say I’ve ever heard anyone say they’ve been bitten before. Their legs are not to be trifled with. Often times I’ll come across a dried dead one outside or the remnants of one killed indoors…. painful to try to dig their little barbs out of the skin of your foot….

    Reply
  • Here in in Easterrn NC I have captured and released several of these buggers. They have never bitten me, their long antennas were always waving, and those big eyes looked as if I could do more harm.Love me some bugs, espescially the weird ones

    Reply
  • Do camel back cricket s bite or sting? I have seen several of them in my building and my kids run around in there..

    Reply
  • I have camel crickets who are very big, fast, and intimadating. I can’t help but kill them due to the fact that they really frightin my daughters very much and me as well. I don’t understand why their in my apartment. Its not moist or anything like a basement so what’s the deal?

    Reply
  • hannah moore power
    May 30, 2015 4:33 pm

    so that is the official name for them. ill tell my fiancee and his family. we just moved into our own place and have spotted 2 or 3 of them but we dont have a bassement,only a crawl space. and let me tell you, my fiancee john is petrified of them. he grew up with them at his house in their basement type walkdown space.

    Reply
  • I live in New Jersey just started seeing them last year.I always found them in the basement next to my clothes. But also found them in the shed.My wufe cannot stand them I just take care of getting rid of them..

    Reply
  • What is the half inch long point in between the camel crickets back legs looks like a long thorn.

    Reply
  • I just visited Alabama last week and came back to Michigan yesterday. That exact same bug landed on my arm and scared the bejezus out of me, because it was so creepy and I have never seen anything like it in the North part of the country.
    Here’s what I observed:
    -It’s black, and has a sharp pointy mouth like thing
    -It flies, that’s how it landed on my arm and then exited when I blew on it
    -Although it is technically the Spring season, March 20 has passed, in Alabama, everyone I spoke with repeatedly said that it was Winter. So although people were swimming outside in pools and in the Gulf of Mexico, there was very little new flower growth, with the exception of Azaleas. This led me to believe that this is a hardy bug, that lasts in colder temperatures of 50’s, relatively speaking for Alabama. (Cold in Michigan is -20 below zero Fahrenheit.)
    I also have a question for the entomologist and bug buffs, with the pincer type mouth, the obvious wings, and my assumption that this is a newly born, or unearthed bug, is it likely that this is a Flying Ant, of the male gender, that is a native of the Warmer climate, perhaps why I spotted it wanting to take a bite of my arm? Crickets don’t bite. I played with them constantly as a child, and found them to be quite friendly little creatures, along with the male’s wonderfully seductive gift of music! ? ? ? ?

    Reply
    • The insect used to illustrate this posting is a Field Cricket. Without an image, we would not like to speculate on what landed on your arm. Flying Ants have mandibles. Flies have mouths designed to pierce. Perhaps you were visited by a Black Horse Fly.

      Reply
  • I just visited Alabama last week and came back to Michigan yesterday. That exact same bug landed on my arm and scared the bejezus out of me, because it was so creepy and I have never seen anything like it in the North part of the country.
    Here’s what I observed:
    -It’s black, and has a sharp pointy mouth like thing
    -It flies, that’s how it landed on my arm and then exited when I blew on it
    -Although it is technically the Spring season, March 20 has passed, in Alabama, everyone I spoke with repeatedly said that it was Winter. So although people were swimming outside in pools and in the Gulf of Mexico, there was very little new flower growth, with the exception of Azaleas. This led me to believe that this is a hardy bug, that lasts in colder temperatures of 50’s, relatively speaking for Alabama. (Cold in Michigan is -20 below zero Fahrenheit.)
    I also have a question for the entomologist and bug buffs, with the pincer type mouth, the obvious wings, and my assumption that this is a newly born, or unearthed bug, is it likely that this is a Flying Ant, of the male gender, that is a native of the Warmer climate, perhaps why I spotted it wanting to take a bite of my arm? Crickets don’t bite. I played with them constantly as a child, and found them to be quite friendly little creatures, along with the male’s wonderfully seductive gift of music! ? ? ? ?

    Reply
  • Dennis Crawford
    October 4, 2016 7:16 pm

    Wow ! ..I thought I found a mutant cricket lol ..I live in eastern Pennsylvania been here all my life …but never seen this cricket before until recently …I find them in the hoods of underground propane tanks …I’ve been a propane delivery man for 14 years but only recently have seen these crickets in the hoods of a couple underground tanks …perfect environment for them as these hoods are cold damp and dark …I leave them alone but boy do they make a mess inside these hoods …freaky looking bug but seem harmless

    Reply
  • Definitely creepy! I live in Indiana and saw a couple on the laundry room in basement.Very intimidating. Went quickly upstairs to get my tablet to take pix of this pair, not knowing what in the world they were. Funny, I asked Google what was this insect that looked like a spider cricket and yes, it came up right away. The camel cricket, although it has no resemblance to a camel from my eyes, but I certainly did not want to get any closer than I was. By the time I got back to take pix, they were gone! That made me more terrified! Where did they go??? Will I accidentally get closer than I ever want to because I don’t know where they are? Eek! They could be more afraid of me than I am of them. All I can say is, stay away, camel cricket.

    Reply
    • From what we have learned on BugGuide: “Most favor cool damp places – caves, rotten logs, under leaves or rocks. Will not reproduce indoors unless they find continuous dark, moist conditions.” Based on that, we would search near the plumbing, including the water heater, to locate the parts of your cellar that have “continuous dark, moist conditions.” and laundry room (don’t forget under the washing machine) because we suspect they might be breeding.

      Reply
  • Thank you for the post. This is really interesting.

    Reply
  • Well thanks, my girlfriend was real worried about one of these things strangling her cat. No worries then!

    Reply

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