Blinded Sphinx Moth: All You Need to Know in a Quick Guide

The blinded sphinx moth, scientifically known as Paonias excaecatus, is a fascinating species of large moths found in North America. Boasting an impressive wingspan and uniquely patterned wings, these moths are a sight to behold in the nocturnal world of insects. Here, we’ll delve into the world of blinded sphinx moths, providing you with important information about their characteristics, habitat, and unique features.

Characterized by its warm, mottled brown forewings and striking pink and brown hindwings, the blinded sphinx moth stands out in its environment. The hindwings display bold black and blue eyespots that give the moth its name, as they can create the illusion of a blind eye. With a forewing length of 28 to 39mm, these splendid creatures are indeed a sight to behold when encountered in their natural habitat.

Blinded sphinx moth caterpillars, also known as hornworms, have a small horn at their rear and strong stubby legs to clamp onto plants. Resembling the shape of a sphinx, hornworms contribute to the intriguing name for these captivating moths. Now that we’re familiar with their basic characteristics, let’s explore their habitat, feeding habits, and the fascinating world of the blinded sphinx moth.

Blinded Sphinx Moth Overview

Physical Characteristics

The Blinded Sphinx Moth (Paonias excaecatus) is a large to very large moth with a forewing length of 28 to 39 millimeters. Its forewings are strongly mottled warm brown with deeply scalloped outer margins. The hindwings have dark pink and brown colors with black and blue eyespots.

Distribution and Habitat

The Blinded Sphinx Moth can be found in the United States and Canada. They inhabit various habitats, including forests, meadows, and gardens.

Life Cycle and Behavior

The life cycle of the Blinded Sphinx Moth consists of several stages:

  • Caterpillar: The caterpillar starts off as green and later turns brown. It has a distinctive horn on its back end, which is a common characteristic of sphingid caterpillars.

  • Pupa: The green to brown pupa stage takes place in a loose cocoon with a silk casing. The pupa stage can take several weeks.

  • Adult moth: Adult Blinded Sphinx Moths are active from late May to July. They are nocturnal and are attracted to lights at night.

The Blinded Sphinx Moth is a member of the family Sphingidae, which includes other well-known moths such as the White-Lined Sphinx Moth and the Thestis Clearwing or Bee Hawk Moth. In comparison to other moths in the family, the Blinded Sphinx Moth stands out due to its unique coloration and pattern on its wings.

Here are some key features of the Blinded Sphinx Moth:

  • Large to very large size
  • Warm brown forewings with scalloped outer margins
  • Dark pink and brown hindwings with black and blue eyespots
  • Distinctive horn on the caterpillar stage
  • Active from late May to July
  • Nocturnal behavior

Physical Features of the Blinded Sphinx Moth

Coloration and Patterns

The Blinded Sphinx Moth exhibits a variety of colors and patterns on its wings and body. Some key features include:

  • Predominant colors: brown, green, pink, blue, and white
  • Forewings with tan patches and wavy lines
  • Hindwings showcasing pink and blue eyespots
  • Brown and white stripes on the body

These patterns allow the moth to blend in with its environment, providing camouflage from predators.

Wingspan

The average wingspan of the Blinded Sphinx Moth ranges from 75 to 110 millimeters (3 to 4.3 inches). This relatively large wingspan allows them to fly efficiently, hover near flowers, and feed on nectar.

Sexual Dimorphism

In the Blinded Sphinx Moth, there are a few noticeable differences between males and females, including:

  • Females having a slightly larger wingspan than males
  • Males showcasing a more vibrant coloration and sharper patterns on their wings
Aspect Male Female
Wingspan Smaller Larger
Coloration Vibrant and sharp Less vibrant and sharp

In addition to these physical differences, the Blinded Sphinx Moth caterpillars exhibit a soft horn and feed on plants like black cherry. They are subject to parasitic wasps, which can affect their development into adult moths.

Life Stages of the Blinded Sphinx Moth

Eggs

  • Laid on host plants
  • Require specific plants for survival

Blinded Sphinx Moth eggs are laid on the underside of the leaves of their host plants. Specific plants such as rose, hawthorn, and basswood are crucial for their survival.

Caterpillars

  • Grayish-green or brown camouflage
  • Blue eyespot near the rear

As caterpillars, these moth larvae exhibit grayish-green or brown camouflage, making them difficult for predators to spot. A distinctive blue eyespot, surrounded by a black dot, is found near the rear.

Pupation

  • Brown cocoons
  • Hidden among dead leaves

When it’s time to pupate, the caterpillars create brown cocoons, often hidden among dead leaves. This provides additional protection from potential predators.

Adult Moths

  • Mottled warm brown color
  • Blue and black eyespot on hind wings

Upon emergence as adult moths, these members of the Family Sphingidae display a mottled warm brown color. Their hind wings feature a blue and black eyespot, a distinctive characteristic.

Reproduction

  • Males and females mate
  • Female lays eggs on host plants

In the reproduction stage, male and female moths mate. Once fertilized, the female lays her eggs on the host plants, ensuring the survival of the next generation.

Life Stages Characteristics
Eggs Laid on host plants, require specific plants
Caterpillars Grayish-green or brown camouflage, blue eyespot near rear
Pupation Brown cocoons, hidden among dead leaves
Adult Moths Mottled warm brown color, blue and black eyespot on hind wings
Reproduction Males and females mate, female lays eggs on host plants

The Blinded Sphinx Moth is an interesting member of the lepidoptera family, playing a unique role in its ecosystem. From eggs to adult moths, all stages of the life cycle help contribute to the ecological balance in areas such as California, Florida, and Texas.

Habitat and Distribution of the Moth

Geographical Range

The blinded sphinx moth (Paonias excaecata) can be found in various parts of North America, including Canada and the United States. Some specific regions where this moth is present are New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and British Columbia.

Host Plants

Blinded sphinx moth caterpillars have a diverse range of host plants for feeding:

  • Willow
  • Birch
  • Poplar
  • Oak
  • Cherry (including Black Cherry)
  • Ninebark
  • Rose

Predators and Threats

Due to their nocturnal nature, these moths face various predators, such as:

  • Bats
  • Birds
  • Large insects

Key Characteristics

The key features of the blinded sphinx moth include:

  • Commonly known as the blind-eyed sphinx
  • Wingspan: up to 3-3.5 inches
  • Males have scalloped wings
  • Caterpillars are blue-green with a yellow stripe
  • Larvae overwinter before pupating in spring

A comparison of Paonias excaecata with a similar moth species:

Feature Blinded Sphinx Moth Similar Moth
Wingspan 3-3.5 inches 2-3 inches
Color pattern Scalloped wing edges Solid wing edges
Caterpillar color Blue-green Green

In summary, the blinded sphinx moth is widely distributed across Canada and the United States, with a diverse range of host plants that its caterpillars consume. These moths face various predators and have distinct features that make them unique among other hawk moths.

Significance and Conservation

Role in the Ecosystem

The blinded sphinx moth (Paonias excaecatus) is a member of the Sphingidae family. As both caterpillars and adult moths, they contribute to their ecosystem in various ways:

  • Caterpillars feed on the leaves of deciduous trees, mainly hawthorn, which helps maintain a balance in plant populations.
  • Adult moths are nocturnal, serving as pollinators for night-blooming plants, such as Texas and Prince Edward Island environments.

Predators & Prey:

  • Moth caterpillars are prey for:
    • Birds
    • Parasitic wasps
  • Moth adults are food for:
    • Birds
    • Larger nocturnal insects

Threats to the Population

Blinded sphinx moth populations face several threats:

  • Habitat loss due to urbanization and deforestation, especially in areas like New Brunswick and British Columbia.
  • Predation by birds and insects, which makes it crucial to maintain a balance in the ecosystem.
  • Chemical pesticides, which can inadvertently harm moth populations while targeting other pests.

Conservation Efforts

Efforts to protect the blinded sphinx moth include:

  • Habitat preservation through protecting deciduous forests and hawthorn trees.
  • Promoting alternatives to chemical pesticides, such as integrated pest management.
  • Raising awareness about the importance of these moths in their ecosystems.
Conservation Effort Advantages Disadvantages
Habitat preservation Safeguards moth habitats and ecosystems Requires continuous protection measures
Alternatives to chemical pesticides Reduces harm to non-target species May be less effective on target pests
Raising awareness Increases public support for conservation efforts Can take time to change perceptions and behaviors

In conclusion, the blinded sphinx moth plays a key role in the ecosystem, and conservation efforts are vital to protect these moths and the habitats they live in.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Blinded Sphinx and Big Poplar Sphinx

 

Earthlink is ROTTEN & Blinded Sphinx Moth/Big Poplar Moth
Hello one more time favorite bug people 🙂
I ran to the "quickie mart" this afternoon and found a Big Poplar Moth! (Lily Lake, Illinois) I had just read about them on your sphinx page and you mentioned to a reader on 7/8/2004 how the Big Poplar Sphinx Moths "are way, way bigger than the Blinded Sphinx Moths" so before letting them go this evening I just HAD to take a photo of them together for comparison. Once they are side by side, novices can easily tell them apart, for shear size difference, wing shape, and patterns on the wings. It was just so awesome to have run into two cool sphinx moths within 24 hours of each other! Thanks again for sharing excitement about the natural world and teaching us all so much! My kids love your site and I’m glad you’re here 🙂
Michelle
P.S. I’m happy I could brighten your day with my earlier note to you, and my pics you have enjoyed. It’s very mutual you know! 🙂 Oh, and I’m glad the Earthlink Blogger guy is working on your David & Goliath issue

Hi Again Michelle,
OK, this photo is awesome. We especially enjoy slightly quirky images that you wouldn’t normally see in credible entomological publications and your photo fits that bill. Thanks for providing such a great comparison.

Letter 2 – Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

 

Sphinx Moth?
I saw this caterpillar on a blueberry bush in a meadow in Shenandoah. I know for sure that it is a sphinx moth caterpillar, but I’m having trouble pinpointing the species. I’ve looked through your website and guidebooks but with no luck. Since it was eating the blueberry leaves, I’m guessing that it might be a Huckleberry Sphinx?
Thank you! Your site has been a wonderful source for identifying all the bugs I come across. Shenandoah National Park, Virginia
Holly

Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar
Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

Hi Holly,
Your caterpillar is a Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar, Paonias excaecata.  Many times this caterpillar is green, but BugGuide has examples of this mottled color variation.  Bill Oehlke’s very comprehensive Sphingidae site does not depict this color variation.  As he is currently compiling comprehensive data on species distribution, we are copying him on this reply.  He may also request permission to post your photo to his site.

Letter 3 – Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Location:  Waynesville, OH
October 6, 2014
Caveats: NONE
Is this a huckleberry or walnut moth?
Kimberly Baker CIG
Park Ranger
Caesar Creek Lake
Louisville District
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar
Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Kimberly,
In our opinion, this is the Caterpillar of a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.

Letter 4 – Blinded Sphinx Eggs hatch

 

Interesting photos
Just thought you might enjoy these pics for your site…and since I use your site to ID many insects I’m not sure about, I wanted to pass them on to you. The Sphinx eggs came about when my wife brought the adult moth home from work for me to photograph. While in the terrarium it laid eggs and they hatched within 6 days, and are growing fast. Every egg but one hatched. The Hummingbird Moth came from a tip by a friend, and once we went looking we had no problem locating it. Your site is excellent and its obvious that alot of hard work and hours are what keep it going.
Tom Rook
Brantford, Ont.
www.stockfullofnature.com

Hi Tom,
We will post your Blinded Sphinx Hatchlings on our eggs page and include a link back to your site. Hopefully some traffic will head your way.

Letter 5 – Blinded Sphinx laying eggs

 

Please Identify
We are located just east of Dallas Texas and found this bug on window today. Can you please tell me what it is? I assume those are eggs it is laying… Thanks!!

This is a female Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecatus, and she is laying eggs.

Letter 6 – Blinded Sphinxes Mating

 

Bug Love picture from Georgia
I snapped a couple of pics of two moths mating yesterday. I really like this one: underneath this one isn’t as dynamic: topside I included links to the flickr photostream too. They look like Cerisy Sphinxes from what I saw on your site. Feel free to use this pictures if you’d like. Thanks for running a great site,
Casey Willis

Hi Casey,
Bill Oehlke’s website doesn’t list Cerisy’s Sphinx in Georgia. These are Blinded Sphinxes, Paonias excaecata. You can also read about the Blinded Sphinx on Bill Oehlke’s website.

Letter 7 – Brown Pandorus Sphinx

 

Subject: Moth
Location: Staten Island N.Y.
September 30, 2013 1:27 pm
Do you know what kind of moth this is?
Signature: Brian

Brown Pandorus Sphinx
Brown Pandorus Sphinx

Hi Brian,
Typically, the Pandorus Sphinx is a lovely green moth that is often described as looking like camouflage.  We haven’t ever seen a brown individual, and we cannot say if your variation is rare.

Letter 8 – Bug of the Month July 2021: Western Poplar Sphinx

 

Subject:  Moth question
Geographic location of the bug:  Orondo Wa
Date: 06/29/2021
Time: 01:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  Can help identify this creature
How you want your letter signed:  Gilbert

Western Poplar Sphinx

Dear Gilbert,
We believe this impressive Moth is a Western Poplar Sphinx,
Pachysphinx occidentalis, which is pictured on BugGuide. According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of cottonwoods, especially Populus freemonti and Populus sargentii, also willow (Salix spp.). Adults do not feed.”  According to Sphingidae of the United States of America:  “This is a large moth, forewings are between 51-71mm in length (2). The large scalloped forewings are light yellow-gray and brown with a white reniform spot. In the similar Pachysphinx modesta, the forewings tend to be a grayer color, and overall darker.”  Butterflies and Moths of North America lists a Spokane, Washington sighting.  Because of the timing of your submission as well as the impressiveness of the Western Poplar Sphinx, we have selected it as the Bug of the Month for July 2021.

Daniel,
Thanks for the quick response. It was a beautiful specimen and I enjoyed watching it for like 20 minutes or so that it was with us. Can you tell if it was male or female how does that even matter.
Thanks again

Hi again Gilbert,
Here is an image of mating Western Poplar Sphinxes.  The female is generally larger with a thicker body.  We believe your individual is a female but we would defer to an expert in the Sphingidae moths.

Letter 9 – Bug of the Month: May 2008 – Striped Morning Sphinx or White Lined Sphinx: adult and caterpillar

 

Question: Help! What is this bug?!
Dear Bugman,
Please help me identify this bug. I have searched all the pages on the internet for moths and cannot locate a picture that looks like this one. Thank you so much!
Julie

Hi Julie,
On our website, the Sphinx Moths, a large family, get their own pages separate from general moths. This is a White Lined Sphinx, Hyles lineata. It is one of the most common U.S. Sphinx Moths, and in desert areas the species go through cyclical population explosions. Because the California rains this season have been spread out rather than concentrated, there is lush native plant growth and we expect to continue to get reports of both the adult Striped Morning Sphinx moths and the caterpillars as well.

White Lined Sphinx Caterpillar
(03/26/2008) caterpillar picture attached
I saw this caterpillar in Anzo-Borrego Desert in southern California last week. Curious if you know what it is. Pictures attached.
paul

Hi Paul,
With the desert wildflowers being so spectacular this year, there is plenty of food for plant eaters like caterpillars. We expect to get numerous queries regarding your species, the White Lined Sphinx or Striped Morning Sphinx, Hyles lineata. The caterpillars of this species are highly variable and become quite numerous at times. They were eaten by Native Americans and still are eaten by some adventuresome modern Americans as well.

Letter 10 – Blinded Sphinx

 

unknown moth
This moth was on the side of my sister’s house about 30 miles north of Bangor , Maine . The pictures were taken on 7 July 2005 . I have tried and several are close but I’m not sure about a match.
Thank you,
John

Hi John,
This is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecatus.

Letter 11 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Eyed Hawk Moth/Blinded Moth?
Hi there.
Found your wonderfully informative site while snooping for answers as to what this creature was. Now I have book-marked it, I love your site! This moth came into our home for a visit. There were a few photos on the internet that seemed to indicate that this was an "Eyed Hawk Moth", the similarities were close……………….until I saw your site. The Eyed Hawk Moth that is on your list, does not seem to match what we have, but I noticed another photo of the "Blinded Moth". It seemed to match fairly close. I did note that you referred to it as a Hawk Moth, as well. What do you think? We live about 100 miles north-east of Vancouver, B.C. Two years ago there was a humming-bird-type of creature in our honeysuckle bush, in the evening. Was too dark to see, but I’m fairly certain that this must be the same moth species as then. Anyway, if you have the time to answer, that’s great, but if not, I certainly understand.
Thanks for this site!
Eve

Hi Eve,
We think you did a great job of internet research and wholly agree with your assessment that this is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecatus. Your letter has caused us to do additional research and now we know we have been using an obsolete scientific name for this species. Here is a great site with more information on your moth.

Letter 12 – Blinded Sphinx

 

What is this thing???
Hello!
I was outside this evening and noticed a rather ominous looking creature on the side of my garage. Can you tell me what it is? Looks like a Stealth fighter, don’t you think??
Thanks!
Kelly Y

Hi Kelly,
Beautiful moth. It is a Blinded Sphinx, Calasymbolus excaecatus. The caterpillar feeds on willow, Hazel and other similar plants. The moth is relatively common in Pennsylvania, and ranges from southern Canada to Florida, and west to the Mississippi River. Sphinx Moths, also called Hawk Moths, are very strong fliers, so your comment about the stealth bomber is on the mark. Thanks again for a beautiful photograph.

Letter 13 – Blinded Sphinx Moths Mating

 

Moths
I found these moths on my house. It scare the hell out of me at first because from a distance it looked like a leaf, but when I got close I saw what it was. Can you tell me what kind they are? We live in Norwalk, Ohio, about 20 minutes from Lake Erie.
Jonathan

Hi Jonathan,
Your moths are mating Blinded Sphinxes, Paonias excaecata.

Letter 14 – Blinded Sphinx

 

are these related?
I sent pictures earlier this year of a pair of mating grapevine beetles and was thrilled to see them on your site. I’ve never seen them before in this area (Shore of Georgian Bay, Ontario), but shortly after that my son sent me an email saying they had one flying around their back porch light. Earlier in the summer I scared up this large moth while hosing down my front porch, and got this picture (aren’t digital cameras great?). Just this morning I went out on my back deck and found this huge caterpillar on my deck. I have been on your site and think that the caterpillar may be an Io moth caterpillar? Is this correct and I was wondering if these two bugs(the moth and the caterpillar) are related? Your site is very informative and educational and the pictures are incredible—digital cameras have made photographers of us all. The person who states she will not visit your site again IS way too sensitive and needs to chill out—and she is definitely the one losing out on a good thing. Keep up the incredible work—it gives those of us who are fascinated with our cameras and taking pictures of wildlife, both large and miniature, an outlet to show off our stuff. Thanks again
Gloria

Hi Gloria,
Nice to hear from you again. We love repeat correspondance. Your caterpillar is an Io Moth, and it is an excellent shot, but we have just prepared another Io Moth Caterpillar for posting today. Your moth is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecatus, and it is a different family that the Io. Thank you also for your kind words regarding our volatile situation.

Letter 15 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Earthlink is ROTTEN & moth you described 7/4/06
Hi guys,
So sorry to hear of how Earthlink is being such jerks! (I have stronger words for Earthlink but was trying to be polite when writing you) Hee Hee Hee) Glad to hear you will be up and running again soon. In the mean time, I noticed a reply you made to someone (see your home page on July 4th this year) about a “Blinded Sphinx Moth” and how their eye spots look blinded because they have no pupil, just the blue iris. I just found one of these lovely moths in my garage last night and would love to send you my pic of what you described to them, showing the lovely pink underwings with the eye spots displayed. (and she’s a live specimen doing what they do when disturbed). You could display it with the other person’s pic if you want to clarify/show what you described to them. And just a note: A good comparison to a “non-blind moth” is on your “Moths – Sphinx” page about 2/3 of the way down (the Cerisy’s Sphinx (05/11/2005) Hawk-eyed Moth) Just drop me a line with a yes or no subject line. I know you’ve gotta be super busy! What bad timing for Earthlink to be such a pain in the butt. Good luck with your provider move, hope it runs smoothly. We’re all missing you guys right now! Take care,
Michelle Nash – Official Nature Nut

Hi Michelle,
Thank you so much for sending such a thoughtful letter along with your beautiful photograph. Quite to our surprise, Dave, the official Earthlink Blogger, has contacted us and is going to try to find out why we are having problems. Seems he is also a fan of the site.

Letter 16 – Blinded Sphinx Moth

 

Blinded Sphinx Moth?
Hi Bugman,
We found this bug right outside our front door. At first my husband thought it was a dried up leaf and almost brushed it off the spray nozzle. Is this a Blinded Sphinx Moth?
Amber
Salem, Oregon

Hi Amber,
You are correct, this is a Blinded Sphinx. The underwings of this species are pink with a blue eyespot surrounded by black. It is called blinded as the eyespot lacks a dark “pupil”.

Letter 17 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Odd torn wing moth…
Of all the moths we see around every year, we haven’t seen anything like this and was wondering could you identify it for us? We live in Northern California near Oregon. We found it inside our house.

Your moth is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecata. You can find more information on this moth on Bill Oehlke’s excellent website.

Letter 18 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Is this a blinded sphinx?
Hello,
This very cool moth showed up on my screen door this morning. He hung around all day, and is still there tonight. After looking at the pictures on your site and others, I’m thinking it is a Blinded Sphinx Moth. Can you confirm? We moved to the woods of New Hampshire a couple of years ago and run into interesting new bugs all the time. When we find something new, my 5 y/o daughter and I always go to whatsthatbug.com to try and figure out what it is. What a great website! Thanks,
Pete in Charlestown, NH

Yes Pete,
This is a Blinded Sphinx. The common name is appropriate since many moths have eyespots on their lower wings to startle predators. The pale blue spots on the Blinded Sphinx do not have pupils, hence it is blinded, resembling eyes with cataracts. One of your photos illustrates this nicely

Letter 19 – Another Blinded Sphinx from Washington

 

Found this moth on the garage door. Don’t know what it is…
Hello.
I found this weird moth on the garage door this morning. Not sure what kind it is but I have never seen anything like it. Looks like the moth has ‘bat wings’ or something. Could you please identify and let me know. Thanks so much. The moth is about 2 to 2.5 inches long with a curled up tail. I haven’t harmed it as I intend to let it go now that I’ve photographed this beauty. Oh, yeah, the bug (and I) are in Pacific, WA (south of Seattle area). Thanks for your help.
Andrew J. Smalley
Pacific, WA

Hi Andrew,
This is the second Blinded Sphinx image we received from Washington today. Minutes earlier we posted the other image, and, don’t tell Pamela, but your image is of a much higher quality. We are certain it will help our readers identify this very distinctive moth.

Letter 20 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Moth
I found this moth on my screen door a couple days ago. I was wondering if you could tell me what kind it is. I searched your site and couldn’t find anything that I was 100% sure was the same thing. I live in Seattle, WA.
Thank you
Pamela

Hi Pamela,
We have posted several photos of the Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecata, in the past. You can also go to Bill Oehlke’s excellent Sphingidae site for more information.

Letter 21 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Moth Photos
My son took the photos of the Cecropia Moth in May from inside our kitchen window late in the evening. It was an amazing sight! I had never seen such a huge moth. In July, I noticed what I thought was a dry leaf on my first floor window screen. When I looked more closely, I realized it was a moth. A day or so later, it appeared again on another window. I called my son to look at it, and he said he had seen it and photographed it at dusk the day before. That is why the color is not true. The mullion behind the moth is actually white. The moth was exactly the color of a wrinkled dry leaf. It looked like it had wrapped its wings around it body. It was another amazing sight! I spent a lot of time researching it without any luck; except to decide it was some kind of a sphinx moth. Today, I tried Googling it again and opened your web site. And, now I have the answer after looking at your great selection of sphinx type moths. If I’m right; it’s a "Blinded Sphinx Moth." We live in the rural area of Hillsborough, NH. I hope your site is still active. It’s excellent! Thank you.
Mary

Hi Mary,
Your are correct. This is a Blinded Sphinx.

Letter 22 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Another Cerisy’s Sphinx Or a Relative?
Hi! This lovely moth has been right outside my front door for two days now. Is it another Cerisy’s Sphinx or a close relative? Thanks!!
Jacqui

Hi Jacqui,
The Cerisy’s Sphinx, Smerinthus cerisyi is also known as the One Eyed Sphinx. Your moth is a Blided Sphinx, Paonias excaecata. It gets its common name because of the lack of a pupil in the eyespots of the underwings. The moths are easy to confuse. We are taking the liberty of adding that you spotted this moth in Georgia, information provided in a previous email.

Letter 23 – Blinded Sphinx

 

A sphinx moth of some sort?
Hi
Found this hanging on a lavender bush in my garden today. We live just south of Vancouver BC near the Washington border. It is similar in size to other sphinx moths I have seen at Adams Lake BC, but a different colour. Can you help? Thanks
Margaret

Hi Margaret,
Your moth is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecata. You can read more on Bill Oehlke’s wonderful website.

Letter 24 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Moth? Approx 2 1/2 inches high
August 3, 2009
Hi! Hope you can help Identify this moth hanging out on the wall outside our door in Biddeford, Maine. Approx 2 1/2 inches high. House is surrounded by woods, a lot of pines. I’ve searched through sphynx moth info, but couldn’t find anything that seemed to match! Thanks!
Suzie in Maine
Biddeford Maine

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Hi Suzie,
Your moth is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecata, and you may read more about the species on Bill Oehlke’s awesome website.  We are currently working on our book chapter tentatively titled Entomology and Etymology and we are quite intrigued with how insects get their common and scientific names.  This is known as the Blinded Sphinx because there are no “pupils” in the “eyespots” on the lower wings which are not visible in your photo.  Many moths have these eyespots.  If a bird or other predator disturbs the resting moth, it will reveal the lower wings with the spots and hopefully startle the predator into thinking the prey is much larger than it really is and that it is possibly about to eat the predator.

Letter 25 – Blinded Sphinx

 

what kind of moth is this?
Location: Connecticut
June 4, 2011 7:10 am
Hi Bugman,
We have had an emergence explosion here and have used your wonderful site to ID several of the moths we’ve found, but we are having trouble IDing this one. Can you help?
Signature: Maureen

Blinded Sphinx

Dear Maureen,
We are happy to hear our website has been so helpful.  This is a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata, and you may verify that by scanning the photos on Bill Oehlke’s wonderful website, Sphingidae of the Americas.  According to the site, “Males of the eye-spotted sphinxes rest with the posterior of the abdomen curved upwards” which indicates your specimen is a male.  The species has the common name Blinded Sphinx because the eyespots on the underwings lack a black center or pupil, giving them the appearance of blind eyes.  Eyespots on lower wings is a trait that has evolved in many Sphinx Moths and Giant Silkmoths and it is believed that the spots startle a predator into thinking the prey is actually a much larger creature that might harm the potential predator.  When a predator, often a bird, begins to peck at a resting moth, they eyespots are suddenly revealed.

Thank you so much for the super quick response.  My 6 year old daughter will be thrilled to know what it is.
Again, thank you!
Regards,
Maureen

Letter 26 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Moth
Location: Eastrn Washington
June 13, 2011 11:56 pm
Hello
Hope you had a good holiday!
Found this moth on my house. Is it a Sphinx moth…found pics of them but not quite like this one. Comparing to the Sphinx the head is a different shape as is the end of the body..flat instead of pointed. Any thoughts??
Signature: Lynda R

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Lynda,
As we feebly attempt to put a dent in all the identification requests we received during our week away from the office, we are trying to post the most beautiful images of the most significant sightings.  You were very astute to determine that this is a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae.  According to BugGuide, there are 124 North American species, and there is a great deal of diversity within the family, however, the general wing shape and body shape is relatively consistent.  This is a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata, and you may read more about the species on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Letter 27 – Blinded Sphinx

 

A silk moth of some sort
July 6,2011
We believe this may be a silk moth of some sort. We live in Prince Edward Island.
I have several more photos of this beauty, if you would like them. With wings extended, it was around 3″+ from wingtip to wingtip. It was released peacefully.

Blinded Sphinx

We can’t help but to be amused that your Blinded Sphinx can be identified on the Sphingidae of Prince Edward Island website.

Thank you for getting back to me.
I am equally amused and dismayed that I did not find that site on my own, hehe. I am usually pretty good at web searching.
Thank you. 🙂 Both my son and myself have greatly enjoyed capturing (and releasing!) bugs and using your site to identify ones that confuse us a bit.

Letter 28 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Pleae help me identify this Moth.
Location: Vancouver, Washing-Pacific Northwest-USA
July 7, 2011 2:09 pm
I was sitting on my back patio when I noticed this creature clinging to my reataining wall. It’s about the size of a credit card if it was square, a tad bit wider. I do wonder if this thing could harm the plants around here. I have never seen anything like it in the 35 years I’ve lived here.
Thank you for your time!
Signature: Mary

Blinded Sphinx

Hi MAry,
This is a Blinded Sphinx and it will not harm your plants.  This is also the second photo of a Blinded Sphinx we posted today, and the earlier posting shows the eyespots on the underwings.

Letter 29 – Blinded Sphinx

 

What’s this moth?
Location: Oakland County, Michigan
July 6, 2011 11:05 am
From Oakland County, Michigan, July 2011. What is this incredible thing? Thanks in advance!
Signature: B. Cranford

Blinded Sphinx

Dear B. Cranford,
It seems Blinded Sphinxes are flying all across the country right now.  This is our fourth posting of the species today.

Letter 30 – Yet Another Blinded Sphinx

 

What is this bug?
Location: Denver, Colorado
July 8, 2011 10:23 pm
I found this moth/butterfly bug on my porch and have no clue what it is. What is it?
Signature: -Caleb

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Caleb,
This is a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecatus, and we have posted numerous photos submitted in the past week from all over North America.  According to BugGuide, the Blinded Sphinx ranges over:  “all of United States and southern Canada.”  It is curious that despite varied local weather conditions, we have received reports from so many different locations this week.

Letter 31 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Mystery Moth
Location: Niagara Falls, Ontario
July 13, 2011 4:36 pm
Hi,
We’re trying to identify this moth – it was about 1.5 to 2 inches wide.
Thanks!
Signature: Rob

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Rob,
We continue to get photos of the Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecatus, and it appears as though this female has laid a green egg on the right side of your photo.  See Sphingidae of the Americas for additional information and photos.

Thanks – that’s it!  I can’t believe we didn’t even notice the egg.
Rob

Letter 32 – Blinded Sphinx

 

saliceti, cerisyi, excaecatus?
Location: Tonasket, WA
July 23, 2011 12:03 pm
Researching this makes me appreciate what bug enthusiasts go thru. Really need to be detail oriented! I ruled out smerinthus saliceti because we seem to be too far north and s. cersyi because no center black eyespot and both of them have straight sides to the central brown patch on their heads instead of hourglass and the shape of the pattern of the forewing near the head is more convoluted. PHEW! So, I’m thinking Blinded Sphinx, Paonias Excaecatus, although??? And on the side view, are those long filaments coming out of the mouth?! Thanks so much.
Signature: Cathy

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Cathy,
We feel your anxiety over getting a proper identification when numerous different species seem to all look so similar.  We agree with your final decision that this is a Blinded Sphinx.  In our opinion, the best place to Identify Sphinx Moths is on Bill Oehlke’s Sphingidae of the Americas website.  You can actually disaggregate the species that have been reported from Washington and that should make future identifications easier.

Letter 33 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: Moth
Location: Salem, Oregon
July 8, 2012 12:53 am
This moth is approx. 2”, I can’t find an ID for it on line, do you know what it is?
Signature: Mouse

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Mouse,
Your moth is one of the Sphinx Moths in the family Sphingidae, and it is a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata.  We verified its identity on the Sphingidae of the Americas website which is where we turn first when we need a Sphinx ID.  It is very easy to browse the site by state or country.  Many Sphinx Moths have false eyespot markings on the lower wings that are revealed when the moth is disturbed.  The markings on this particular species might have reminded someone of sightless eyes, hence the common name Blinded Sphinx.  If you are interested in moths, you should see if there is a National Moth Week event in your area.

Letter 34 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: what’s this moth?
Location: Bothell Wa 98011
July 15, 2012 8:53 pm
Found this guy in my carport this afternoon. Since I haven’t noticed noticed many this large (2-3 inches) here I’m curious as to what it might be.
photo taken 7/15/2012, around 3pm in shaded carport, Bothell
Signature: Lewis

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Lewis,
This lovely moth is a Blinded Sphinx
Paonias excaecata.  The common name is derived from the eyespots on the underwings which are hidden in your photograph.  You can get additional information on the species on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Letter 35 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: Moth ID
Location: Zip 18360, Stroudsburg PA
July 15, 2013 3:28 pm
Found this in my garden today.
What is it?
Signature: Pat

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Pat,
Thank you so much for submitting your photo of a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata.  If it reveals its underwings, they appear as a pair of blind eyes without pupils, hence the common name.  You can read more about the Blinded Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Letter 36 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: Winged insect looks like tree bark
Location: Edom, Texas
July 26, 2014 11:34 am
Found this gorgeous creature outside my house today. Never seen anything like it.
Signature: Trixie in Texas

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Trixie,
This beautiful Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecatus, gets its common name because the eyespots on the underwings, hidden in your image, do not appear to have pupils as there is no dark spot in the center.  You may read more about the Blinded Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Letter 37 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: What kind of moth?
Location: Long Island, New York
June 24, 2015 12:03 pm
Hi! Do you know what this is?
Signature: Andrew

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Andrew,
This beautiful Sphinx Moth,
Paonias excaecata, is known as a Blinded Sphinx because the oculi or eyespots on the underwings appear that they do not have pupils.   See BugGuide for additional information on the Blinded Sphinx.

Letter 38 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: What the heck giant moth??
Location: Washington state northern
June 14, 2015 5:17 pm
Never seen this before I’m in lake Stevens Washington northern area this guy has been hanging out at my front door for several days just chilling his body is fat and fuzzy his wings are an unusual shape bat like any idea? You prob know 🙂
Signature: Stephanie

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Stephanie,
This is the time of year that we get several identification requests for the Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata.

Letter 39 – Blinded Sphinx Moth from Canada

 

Subject: What’s this bug.
Location: Ontario
July 21, 2015 8:59 am
Seen this last night on my door. Taken in London Ontario Canada.
What they heck kinda moth is it.?
Signature: To Keith.?

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Keith,
We have verified the identity of your Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata, thanks to images posted on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

Letter 40 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: Funky Moth
Location: Beacon, NY
July 21, 2016 10:49 pm
I saw this funky looking moth in the Mid Hudson Valley, NY. He was spotted clinging to the side of my car on a warm July night. He was very resistant to move, so we gently relocated him into a plant. Any idea what kind of moth this is?
Signature: Kimberly E.

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Kimberly,
This striking moth is a Blinded Sphinx, a species that ranges across continental North America.

Letter 41 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject:  Moth found this AM
Geographic location of the bug:  Leesburg, Va
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 12:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this guy on my AC unit this AM. Any idea the kind?
How you want your letter signed:  Jason

Blinded Sphinx

Dear Jason,
Your moth is commonly called a Blinded Sphinx because it is in the Sphinx Moth family Sphingidae, the the eyespots on the underwings (not visible in your image) are lacking a dark center spot, and since the eyespot is lacking a pupil, the creature appears blinded.

Letter 42 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject:  Large moth with impressive camouflage
Geographic location of the bug:  CT
Date: 07/14/2019
Time: 08:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! We found this beautiful fellow in our mudroom. He has tree bark or dead leaf like camouflage. What is he/she? Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Jenn

Blinded Sphinx

Dear Jenn,
This impressive moth is commonly called a Blinded Sphinx because the eyespots on its hidden hindwings lack pupils.  You can read more about the Blinded Sphinx on Sphingidae of the Americas.

Letter 43 – Blinded Sphinxes

 

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwestern NH
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 01:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Seen about 7am after a night of steady rain, the moth was attached to an outside house window screen, and about three feet from that one, another sitting on the plastic frame of the garden hose holder. July 23, 2019.
How you want your letter signed:  NH woodland area

Blinded Sphinx with Rain Drops

Your close-up image of the Sphinx Moth with rain drops is gorgeous.  We are happy you also sent more traditional dorsal views as we were able to identify it as Paonias excaecata a Blinded Sphinx, a common name that refers to the markings on the oceli on the underwings.  When the moth is threatened, it reveals the underwings which creates the illusion of a pair of eyes startling a predator into perceiving that it might have awakened a sleeping giant.  Because those markings include a light blue center dot, rather than a black pupil found on the oceli of many other species of “eyed moths”, the Blinded Sphinx appears to have cataracts.  In searching for Sphingidae of the Americas, we encountered a new [to us] site Sphingidae of the United States of America where it states:  “This species seems to only fly in the warmer months in the Northeast, and even in Florida, it doesn’t seem to be recorded from December to March. This species is extremely common at lights, and both sexes are attracted to light. It does not feed as an adult. The adults do have a fairly large size difference, with females being much larger and rounder than males.”  After that internet detour, we returned to Sphingidae of the Americas to get the information “Males demonstrate a strong curve to the abdomen” so we could inform you that both of your moths are males.

Blinded Sphinx

Awesome!
I researched your page and guessed a Blind Sphinx. Thank you for confirming. This encounter, with these two beauties has peaked my interest, and I’ll now be on the look out for others.
Enjoy the rain drop photo. I did take it myself with an iPhone 8 Plus. You may use it if you want on your page.
Happy week,
Nan

Blinded Sphinx

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Blinded Sphinx and Big Poplar Sphinx

 

Earthlink is ROTTEN & Blinded Sphinx Moth/Big Poplar Moth
Hello one more time favorite bug people 🙂
I ran to the "quickie mart" this afternoon and found a Big Poplar Moth! (Lily Lake, Illinois) I had just read about them on your sphinx page and you mentioned to a reader on 7/8/2004 how the Big Poplar Sphinx Moths "are way, way bigger than the Blinded Sphinx Moths" so before letting them go this evening I just HAD to take a photo of them together for comparison. Once they are side by side, novices can easily tell them apart, for shear size difference, wing shape, and patterns on the wings. It was just so awesome to have run into two cool sphinx moths within 24 hours of each other! Thanks again for sharing excitement about the natural world and teaching us all so much! My kids love your site and I’m glad you’re here 🙂
Michelle
P.S. I’m happy I could brighten your day with my earlier note to you, and my pics you have enjoyed. It’s very mutual you know! 🙂 Oh, and I’m glad the Earthlink Blogger guy is working on your David & Goliath issue

Hi Again Michelle,
OK, this photo is awesome. We especially enjoy slightly quirky images that you wouldn’t normally see in credible entomological publications and your photo fits that bill. Thanks for providing such a great comparison.

Letter 2 – Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

 

Sphinx Moth?
I saw this caterpillar on a blueberry bush in a meadow in Shenandoah. I know for sure that it is a sphinx moth caterpillar, but I’m having trouble pinpointing the species. I’ve looked through your website and guidebooks but with no luck. Since it was eating the blueberry leaves, I’m guessing that it might be a Huckleberry Sphinx?
Thank you! Your site has been a wonderful source for identifying all the bugs I come across. Shenandoah National Park, Virginia
Holly

Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar
Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

Hi Holly,
Your caterpillar is a Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar, Paonias excaecata.  Many times this caterpillar is green, but BugGuide has examples of this mottled color variation.  Bill Oehlke’s very comprehensive Sphingidae site does not depict this color variation.  As he is currently compiling comprehensive data on species distribution, we are copying him on this reply.  He may also request permission to post your photo to his site.

Letter 3 – Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Location:  Waynesville, OH
October 6, 2014
Caveats: NONE
Is this a huckleberry or walnut moth?
Kimberly Baker CIG
Park Ranger
Caesar Creek Lake
Louisville District
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar
Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Kimberly,
In our opinion, this is the Caterpillar of a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.

Letter 4 – Blinded Sphinx Eggs hatch

 

Interesting photos
Just thought you might enjoy these pics for your site…and since I use your site to ID many insects I’m not sure about, I wanted to pass them on to you. The Sphinx eggs came about when my wife brought the adult moth home from work for me to photograph. While in the terrarium it laid eggs and they hatched within 6 days, and are growing fast. Every egg but one hatched. The Hummingbird Moth came from a tip by a friend, and once we went looking we had no problem locating it. Your site is excellent and its obvious that alot of hard work and hours are what keep it going.
Tom Rook
Brantford, Ont.
www.stockfullofnature.com

Hi Tom,
We will post your Blinded Sphinx Hatchlings on our eggs page and include a link back to your site. Hopefully some traffic will head your way.

Letter 5 – Blinded Sphinx laying eggs

 

Please Identify
We are located just east of Dallas Texas and found this bug on window today. Can you please tell me what it is? I assume those are eggs it is laying… Thanks!!

This is a female Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecatus, and she is laying eggs.

Letter 6 – Blinded Sphinxes Mating

 

Bug Love picture from Georgia
I snapped a couple of pics of two moths mating yesterday. I really like this one: underneath this one isn’t as dynamic: topside I included links to the flickr photostream too. They look like Cerisy Sphinxes from what I saw on your site. Feel free to use this pictures if you’d like. Thanks for running a great site,
Casey Willis

Hi Casey,
Bill Oehlke’s website doesn’t list Cerisy’s Sphinx in Georgia. These are Blinded Sphinxes, Paonias excaecata. You can also read about the Blinded Sphinx on Bill Oehlke’s website.

Letter 7 – Brown Pandorus Sphinx

 

Subject: Moth
Location: Staten Island N.Y.
September 30, 2013 1:27 pm
Do you know what kind of moth this is?
Signature: Brian

Brown Pandorus Sphinx
Brown Pandorus Sphinx

Hi Brian,
Typically, the Pandorus Sphinx is a lovely green moth that is often described as looking like camouflage.  We haven’t ever seen a brown individual, and we cannot say if your variation is rare.

Letter 8 – Bug of the Month July 2021: Western Poplar Sphinx

 

Subject:  Moth question
Geographic location of the bug:  Orondo Wa
Date: 06/29/2021
Time: 01:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  Can help identify this creature
How you want your letter signed:  Gilbert

Western Poplar Sphinx

Dear Gilbert,
We believe this impressive Moth is a Western Poplar Sphinx,
Pachysphinx occidentalis, which is pictured on BugGuide. According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of cottonwoods, especially Populus freemonti and Populus sargentii, also willow (Salix spp.). Adults do not feed.”  According to Sphingidae of the United States of America:  “This is a large moth, forewings are between 51-71mm in length (2). The large scalloped forewings are light yellow-gray and brown with a white reniform spot. In the similar Pachysphinx modesta, the forewings tend to be a grayer color, and overall darker.”  Butterflies and Moths of North America lists a Spokane, Washington sighting.  Because of the timing of your submission as well as the impressiveness of the Western Poplar Sphinx, we have selected it as the Bug of the Month for July 2021.

Daniel,
Thanks for the quick response. It was a beautiful specimen and I enjoyed watching it for like 20 minutes or so that it was with us. Can you tell if it was male or female how does that even matter.
Thanks again

Hi again Gilbert,
Here is an image of mating Western Poplar Sphinxes.  The female is generally larger with a thicker body.  We believe your individual is a female but we would defer to an expert in the Sphingidae moths.

Letter 9 – Bug of the Month: May 2008 – Striped Morning Sphinx or White Lined Sphinx: adult and caterpillar

 

Question: Help! What is this bug?!
Dear Bugman,
Please help me identify this bug. I have searched all the pages on the internet for moths and cannot locate a picture that looks like this one. Thank you so much!
Julie

Hi Julie,
On our website, the Sphinx Moths, a large family, get their own pages separate from general moths. This is a White Lined Sphinx, Hyles lineata. It is one of the most common U.S. Sphinx Moths, and in desert areas the species go through cyclical population explosions. Because the California rains this season have been spread out rather than concentrated, there is lush native plant growth and we expect to continue to get reports of both the adult Striped Morning Sphinx moths and the caterpillars as well.

White Lined Sphinx Caterpillar
(03/26/2008) caterpillar picture attached
I saw this caterpillar in Anzo-Borrego Desert in southern California last week. Curious if you know what it is. Pictures attached.
paul

Hi Paul,
With the desert wildflowers being so spectacular this year, there is plenty of food for plant eaters like caterpillars. We expect to get numerous queries regarding your species, the White Lined Sphinx or Striped Morning Sphinx, Hyles lineata. The caterpillars of this species are highly variable and become quite numerous at times. They were eaten by Native Americans and still are eaten by some adventuresome modern Americans as well.

Letter 10 – Blinded Sphinx

 

unknown moth
This moth was on the side of my sister’s house about 30 miles north of Bangor , Maine . The pictures were taken on 7 July 2005 . I have tried and several are close but I’m not sure about a match.
Thank you,
John

Hi John,
This is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecatus.

Letter 11 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Eyed Hawk Moth/Blinded Moth?
Hi there.
Found your wonderfully informative site while snooping for answers as to what this creature was. Now I have book-marked it, I love your site! This moth came into our home for a visit. There were a few photos on the internet that seemed to indicate that this was an "Eyed Hawk Moth", the similarities were close……………….until I saw your site. The Eyed Hawk Moth that is on your list, does not seem to match what we have, but I noticed another photo of the "Blinded Moth". It seemed to match fairly close. I did note that you referred to it as a Hawk Moth, as well. What do you think? We live about 100 miles north-east of Vancouver, B.C. Two years ago there was a humming-bird-type of creature in our honeysuckle bush, in the evening. Was too dark to see, but I’m fairly certain that this must be the same moth species as then. Anyway, if you have the time to answer, that’s great, but if not, I certainly understand.
Thanks for this site!
Eve

Hi Eve,
We think you did a great job of internet research and wholly agree with your assessment that this is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecatus. Your letter has caused us to do additional research and now we know we have been using an obsolete scientific name for this species. Here is a great site with more information on your moth.

Letter 12 – Blinded Sphinx

 

What is this thing???
Hello!
I was outside this evening and noticed a rather ominous looking creature on the side of my garage. Can you tell me what it is? Looks like a Stealth fighter, don’t you think??
Thanks!
Kelly Y

Hi Kelly,
Beautiful moth. It is a Blinded Sphinx, Calasymbolus excaecatus. The caterpillar feeds on willow, Hazel and other similar plants. The moth is relatively common in Pennsylvania, and ranges from southern Canada to Florida, and west to the Mississippi River. Sphinx Moths, also called Hawk Moths, are very strong fliers, so your comment about the stealth bomber is on the mark. Thanks again for a beautiful photograph.

Letter 13 – Blinded Sphinx Moths Mating

 

Moths
I found these moths on my house. It scare the hell out of me at first because from a distance it looked like a leaf, but when I got close I saw what it was. Can you tell me what kind they are? We live in Norwalk, Ohio, about 20 minutes from Lake Erie.
Jonathan

Hi Jonathan,
Your moths are mating Blinded Sphinxes, Paonias excaecata.

Letter 14 – Blinded Sphinx

 

are these related?
I sent pictures earlier this year of a pair of mating grapevine beetles and was thrilled to see them on your site. I’ve never seen them before in this area (Shore of Georgian Bay, Ontario), but shortly after that my son sent me an email saying they had one flying around their back porch light. Earlier in the summer I scared up this large moth while hosing down my front porch, and got this picture (aren’t digital cameras great?). Just this morning I went out on my back deck and found this huge caterpillar on my deck. I have been on your site and think that the caterpillar may be an Io moth caterpillar? Is this correct and I was wondering if these two bugs(the moth and the caterpillar) are related? Your site is very informative and educational and the pictures are incredible—digital cameras have made photographers of us all. The person who states she will not visit your site again IS way too sensitive and needs to chill out—and she is definitely the one losing out on a good thing. Keep up the incredible work—it gives those of us who are fascinated with our cameras and taking pictures of wildlife, both large and miniature, an outlet to show off our stuff. Thanks again
Gloria

Hi Gloria,
Nice to hear from you again. We love repeat correspondance. Your caterpillar is an Io Moth, and it is an excellent shot, but we have just prepared another Io Moth Caterpillar for posting today. Your moth is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecatus, and it is a different family that the Io. Thank you also for your kind words regarding our volatile situation.

Letter 15 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Earthlink is ROTTEN & moth you described 7/4/06
Hi guys,
So sorry to hear of how Earthlink is being such jerks! (I have stronger words for Earthlink but was trying to be polite when writing you) Hee Hee Hee) Glad to hear you will be up and running again soon. In the mean time, I noticed a reply you made to someone (see your home page on July 4th this year) about a “Blinded Sphinx Moth” and how their eye spots look blinded because they have no pupil, just the blue iris. I just found one of these lovely moths in my garage last night and would love to send you my pic of what you described to them, showing the lovely pink underwings with the eye spots displayed. (and she’s a live specimen doing what they do when disturbed). You could display it with the other person’s pic if you want to clarify/show what you described to them. And just a note: A good comparison to a “non-blind moth” is on your “Moths – Sphinx” page about 2/3 of the way down (the Cerisy’s Sphinx (05/11/2005) Hawk-eyed Moth) Just drop me a line with a yes or no subject line. I know you’ve gotta be super busy! What bad timing for Earthlink to be such a pain in the butt. Good luck with your provider move, hope it runs smoothly. We’re all missing you guys right now! Take care,
Michelle Nash – Official Nature Nut

Hi Michelle,
Thank you so much for sending such a thoughtful letter along with your beautiful photograph. Quite to our surprise, Dave, the official Earthlink Blogger, has contacted us and is going to try to find out why we are having problems. Seems he is also a fan of the site.

Letter 16 – Blinded Sphinx Moth

 

Blinded Sphinx Moth?
Hi Bugman,
We found this bug right outside our front door. At first my husband thought it was a dried up leaf and almost brushed it off the spray nozzle. Is this a Blinded Sphinx Moth?
Amber
Salem, Oregon

Hi Amber,
You are correct, this is a Blinded Sphinx. The underwings of this species are pink with a blue eyespot surrounded by black. It is called blinded as the eyespot lacks a dark “pupil”.

Letter 17 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Odd torn wing moth…
Of all the moths we see around every year, we haven’t seen anything like this and was wondering could you identify it for us? We live in Northern California near Oregon. We found it inside our house.

Your moth is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecata. You can find more information on this moth on Bill Oehlke’s excellent website.

Letter 18 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Is this a blinded sphinx?
Hello,
This very cool moth showed up on my screen door this morning. He hung around all day, and is still there tonight. After looking at the pictures on your site and others, I’m thinking it is a Blinded Sphinx Moth. Can you confirm? We moved to the woods of New Hampshire a couple of years ago and run into interesting new bugs all the time. When we find something new, my 5 y/o daughter and I always go to whatsthatbug.com to try and figure out what it is. What a great website! Thanks,
Pete in Charlestown, NH

Yes Pete,
This is a Blinded Sphinx. The common name is appropriate since many moths have eyespots on their lower wings to startle predators. The pale blue spots on the Blinded Sphinx do not have pupils, hence it is blinded, resembling eyes with cataracts. One of your photos illustrates this nicely

Letter 19 – Another Blinded Sphinx from Washington

 

Found this moth on the garage door. Don’t know what it is…
Hello.
I found this weird moth on the garage door this morning. Not sure what kind it is but I have never seen anything like it. Looks like the moth has ‘bat wings’ or something. Could you please identify and let me know. Thanks so much. The moth is about 2 to 2.5 inches long with a curled up tail. I haven’t harmed it as I intend to let it go now that I’ve photographed this beauty. Oh, yeah, the bug (and I) are in Pacific, WA (south of Seattle area). Thanks for your help.
Andrew J. Smalley
Pacific, WA

Hi Andrew,
This is the second Blinded Sphinx image we received from Washington today. Minutes earlier we posted the other image, and, don’t tell Pamela, but your image is of a much higher quality. We are certain it will help our readers identify this very distinctive moth.

Letter 20 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Moth
I found this moth on my screen door a couple days ago. I was wondering if you could tell me what kind it is. I searched your site and couldn’t find anything that I was 100% sure was the same thing. I live in Seattle, WA.
Thank you
Pamela

Hi Pamela,
We have posted several photos of the Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecata, in the past. You can also go to Bill Oehlke’s excellent Sphingidae site for more information.

Letter 21 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Moth Photos
My son took the photos of the Cecropia Moth in May from inside our kitchen window late in the evening. It was an amazing sight! I had never seen such a huge moth. In July, I noticed what I thought was a dry leaf on my first floor window screen. When I looked more closely, I realized it was a moth. A day or so later, it appeared again on another window. I called my son to look at it, and he said he had seen it and photographed it at dusk the day before. That is why the color is not true. The mullion behind the moth is actually white. The moth was exactly the color of a wrinkled dry leaf. It looked like it had wrapped its wings around it body. It was another amazing sight! I spent a lot of time researching it without any luck; except to decide it was some kind of a sphinx moth. Today, I tried Googling it again and opened your web site. And, now I have the answer after looking at your great selection of sphinx type moths. If I’m right; it’s a "Blinded Sphinx Moth." We live in the rural area of Hillsborough, NH. I hope your site is still active. It’s excellent! Thank you.
Mary

Hi Mary,
Your are correct. This is a Blinded Sphinx.

Letter 22 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Another Cerisy’s Sphinx Or a Relative?
Hi! This lovely moth has been right outside my front door for two days now. Is it another Cerisy’s Sphinx or a close relative? Thanks!!
Jacqui

Hi Jacqui,
The Cerisy’s Sphinx, Smerinthus cerisyi is also known as the One Eyed Sphinx. Your moth is a Blided Sphinx, Paonias excaecata. It gets its common name because of the lack of a pupil in the eyespots of the underwings. The moths are easy to confuse. We are taking the liberty of adding that you spotted this moth in Georgia, information provided in a previous email.

Letter 23 – Blinded Sphinx

 

A sphinx moth of some sort?
Hi
Found this hanging on a lavender bush in my garden today. We live just south of Vancouver BC near the Washington border. It is similar in size to other sphinx moths I have seen at Adams Lake BC, but a different colour. Can you help? Thanks
Margaret

Hi Margaret,
Your moth is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecata. You can read more on Bill Oehlke’s wonderful website.

Letter 24 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Moth? Approx 2 1/2 inches high
August 3, 2009
Hi! Hope you can help Identify this moth hanging out on the wall outside our door in Biddeford, Maine. Approx 2 1/2 inches high. House is surrounded by woods, a lot of pines. I’ve searched through sphynx moth info, but couldn’t find anything that seemed to match! Thanks!
Suzie in Maine
Biddeford Maine

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Hi Suzie,
Your moth is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecata, and you may read more about the species on Bill Oehlke’s awesome website.  We are currently working on our book chapter tentatively titled Entomology and Etymology and we are quite intrigued with how insects get their common and scientific names.  This is known as the Blinded Sphinx because there are no “pupils” in the “eyespots” on the lower wings which are not visible in your photo.  Many moths have these eyespots.  If a bird or other predator disturbs the resting moth, it will reveal the lower wings with the spots and hopefully startle the predator into thinking the prey is much larger than it really is and that it is possibly about to eat the predator.

Letter 25 – Blinded Sphinx

 

what kind of moth is this?
Location: Connecticut
June 4, 2011 7:10 am
Hi Bugman,
We have had an emergence explosion here and have used your wonderful site to ID several of the moths we’ve found, but we are having trouble IDing this one. Can you help?
Signature: Maureen

Blinded Sphinx

Dear Maureen,
We are happy to hear our website has been so helpful.  This is a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata, and you may verify that by scanning the photos on Bill Oehlke’s wonderful website, Sphingidae of the Americas.  According to the site, “Males of the eye-spotted sphinxes rest with the posterior of the abdomen curved upwards” which indicates your specimen is a male.  The species has the common name Blinded Sphinx because the eyespots on the underwings lack a black center or pupil, giving them the appearance of blind eyes.  Eyespots on lower wings is a trait that has evolved in many Sphinx Moths and Giant Silkmoths and it is believed that the spots startle a predator into thinking the prey is actually a much larger creature that might harm the potential predator.  When a predator, often a bird, begins to peck at a resting moth, they eyespots are suddenly revealed.

Thank you so much for the super quick response.  My 6 year old daughter will be thrilled to know what it is.
Again, thank you!
Regards,
Maureen

Letter 26 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Moth
Location: Eastrn Washington
June 13, 2011 11:56 pm
Hello
Hope you had a good holiday!
Found this moth on my house. Is it a Sphinx moth…found pics of them but not quite like this one. Comparing to the Sphinx the head is a different shape as is the end of the body..flat instead of pointed. Any thoughts??
Signature: Lynda R

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Lynda,
As we feebly attempt to put a dent in all the identification requests we received during our week away from the office, we are trying to post the most beautiful images of the most significant sightings.  You were very astute to determine that this is a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae.  According to BugGuide, there are 124 North American species, and there is a great deal of diversity within the family, however, the general wing shape and body shape is relatively consistent.  This is a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata, and you may read more about the species on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Letter 27 – Blinded Sphinx

 

A silk moth of some sort
July 6,2011
We believe this may be a silk moth of some sort. We live in Prince Edward Island.
I have several more photos of this beauty, if you would like them. With wings extended, it was around 3″+ from wingtip to wingtip. It was released peacefully.

Blinded Sphinx

We can’t help but to be amused that your Blinded Sphinx can be identified on the Sphingidae of Prince Edward Island website.

Thank you for getting back to me.
I am equally amused and dismayed that I did not find that site on my own, hehe. I am usually pretty good at web searching.
Thank you. 🙂 Both my son and myself have greatly enjoyed capturing (and releasing!) bugs and using your site to identify ones that confuse us a bit.

Letter 28 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Pleae help me identify this Moth.
Location: Vancouver, Washing-Pacific Northwest-USA
July 7, 2011 2:09 pm
I was sitting on my back patio when I noticed this creature clinging to my reataining wall. It’s about the size of a credit card if it was square, a tad bit wider. I do wonder if this thing could harm the plants around here. I have never seen anything like it in the 35 years I’ve lived here.
Thank you for your time!
Signature: Mary

Blinded Sphinx

Hi MAry,
This is a Blinded Sphinx and it will not harm your plants.  This is also the second photo of a Blinded Sphinx we posted today, and the earlier posting shows the eyespots on the underwings.

Letter 29 – Blinded Sphinx

 

What’s this moth?
Location: Oakland County, Michigan
July 6, 2011 11:05 am
From Oakland County, Michigan, July 2011. What is this incredible thing? Thanks in advance!
Signature: B. Cranford

Blinded Sphinx

Dear B. Cranford,
It seems Blinded Sphinxes are flying all across the country right now.  This is our fourth posting of the species today.

Letter 30 – Yet Another Blinded Sphinx

 

What is this bug?
Location: Denver, Colorado
July 8, 2011 10:23 pm
I found this moth/butterfly bug on my porch and have no clue what it is. What is it?
Signature: -Caleb

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Caleb,
This is a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecatus, and we have posted numerous photos submitted in the past week from all over North America.  According to BugGuide, the Blinded Sphinx ranges over:  “all of United States and southern Canada.”  It is curious that despite varied local weather conditions, we have received reports from so many different locations this week.

Letter 31 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Mystery Moth
Location: Niagara Falls, Ontario
July 13, 2011 4:36 pm
Hi,
We’re trying to identify this moth – it was about 1.5 to 2 inches wide.
Thanks!
Signature: Rob

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Rob,
We continue to get photos of the Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecatus, and it appears as though this female has laid a green egg on the right side of your photo.  See Sphingidae of the Americas for additional information and photos.

Thanks – that’s it!  I can’t believe we didn’t even notice the egg.
Rob

Letter 32 – Blinded Sphinx

 

saliceti, cerisyi, excaecatus?
Location: Tonasket, WA
July 23, 2011 12:03 pm
Researching this makes me appreciate what bug enthusiasts go thru. Really need to be detail oriented! I ruled out smerinthus saliceti because we seem to be too far north and s. cersyi because no center black eyespot and both of them have straight sides to the central brown patch on their heads instead of hourglass and the shape of the pattern of the forewing near the head is more convoluted. PHEW! So, I’m thinking Blinded Sphinx, Paonias Excaecatus, although??? And on the side view, are those long filaments coming out of the mouth?! Thanks so much.
Signature: Cathy

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Cathy,
We feel your anxiety over getting a proper identification when numerous different species seem to all look so similar.  We agree with your final decision that this is a Blinded Sphinx.  In our opinion, the best place to Identify Sphinx Moths is on Bill Oehlke’s Sphingidae of the Americas website.  You can actually disaggregate the species that have been reported from Washington and that should make future identifications easier.

Letter 33 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: Moth
Location: Salem, Oregon
July 8, 2012 12:53 am
This moth is approx. 2”, I can’t find an ID for it on line, do you know what it is?
Signature: Mouse

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Mouse,
Your moth is one of the Sphinx Moths in the family Sphingidae, and it is a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata.  We verified its identity on the Sphingidae of the Americas website which is where we turn first when we need a Sphinx ID.  It is very easy to browse the site by state or country.  Many Sphinx Moths have false eyespot markings on the lower wings that are revealed when the moth is disturbed.  The markings on this particular species might have reminded someone of sightless eyes, hence the common name Blinded Sphinx.  If you are interested in moths, you should see if there is a National Moth Week event in your area.

Letter 34 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: what’s this moth?
Location: Bothell Wa 98011
July 15, 2012 8:53 pm
Found this guy in my carport this afternoon. Since I haven’t noticed noticed many this large (2-3 inches) here I’m curious as to what it might be.
photo taken 7/15/2012, around 3pm in shaded carport, Bothell
Signature: Lewis

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Lewis,
This lovely moth is a Blinded Sphinx
Paonias excaecata.  The common name is derived from the eyespots on the underwings which are hidden in your photograph.  You can get additional information on the species on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Letter 35 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: Moth ID
Location: Zip 18360, Stroudsburg PA
July 15, 2013 3:28 pm
Found this in my garden today.
What is it?
Signature: Pat

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Pat,
Thank you so much for submitting your photo of a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata.  If it reveals its underwings, they appear as a pair of blind eyes without pupils, hence the common name.  You can read more about the Blinded Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Letter 36 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: Winged insect looks like tree bark
Location: Edom, Texas
July 26, 2014 11:34 am
Found this gorgeous creature outside my house today. Never seen anything like it.
Signature: Trixie in Texas

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Trixie,
This beautiful Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecatus, gets its common name because the eyespots on the underwings, hidden in your image, do not appear to have pupils as there is no dark spot in the center.  You may read more about the Blinded Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Letter 37 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: What kind of moth?
Location: Long Island, New York
June 24, 2015 12:03 pm
Hi! Do you know what this is?
Signature: Andrew

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Andrew,
This beautiful Sphinx Moth,
Paonias excaecata, is known as a Blinded Sphinx because the oculi or eyespots on the underwings appear that they do not have pupils.   See BugGuide for additional information on the Blinded Sphinx.

Letter 38 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: What the heck giant moth??
Location: Washington state northern
June 14, 2015 5:17 pm
Never seen this before I’m in lake Stevens Washington northern area this guy has been hanging out at my front door for several days just chilling his body is fat and fuzzy his wings are an unusual shape bat like any idea? You prob know 🙂
Signature: Stephanie

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Stephanie,
This is the time of year that we get several identification requests for the Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata.

Letter 39 – Blinded Sphinx Moth from Canada

 

Subject: What’s this bug.
Location: Ontario
July 21, 2015 8:59 am
Seen this last night on my door. Taken in London Ontario Canada.
What they heck kinda moth is it.?
Signature: To Keith.?

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Keith,
We have verified the identity of your Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata, thanks to images posted on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

Letter 40 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject: Funky Moth
Location: Beacon, NY
July 21, 2016 10:49 pm
I saw this funky looking moth in the Mid Hudson Valley, NY. He was spotted clinging to the side of my car on a warm July night. He was very resistant to move, so we gently relocated him into a plant. Any idea what kind of moth this is?
Signature: Kimberly E.

Blinded Sphinx
Blinded Sphinx

Dear Kimberly,
This striking moth is a Blinded Sphinx, a species that ranges across continental North America.

Letter 41 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject:  Moth found this AM
Geographic location of the bug:  Leesburg, Va
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 12:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this guy on my AC unit this AM. Any idea the kind?
How you want your letter signed:  Jason

Blinded Sphinx

Dear Jason,
Your moth is commonly called a Blinded Sphinx because it is in the Sphinx Moth family Sphingidae, the the eyespots on the underwings (not visible in your image) are lacking a dark center spot, and since the eyespot is lacking a pupil, the creature appears blinded.

Letter 42 – Blinded Sphinx

 

Subject:  Large moth with impressive camouflage
Geographic location of the bug:  CT
Date: 07/14/2019
Time: 08:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! We found this beautiful fellow in our mudroom. He has tree bark or dead leaf like camouflage. What is he/she? Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Jenn

Blinded Sphinx

Dear Jenn,
This impressive moth is commonly called a Blinded Sphinx because the eyespots on its hidden hindwings lack pupils.  You can read more about the Blinded Sphinx on Sphingidae of the Americas.

Letter 43 – Blinded Sphinxes

 

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwestern NH
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 01:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Seen about 7am after a night of steady rain, the moth was attached to an outside house window screen, and about three feet from that one, another sitting on the plastic frame of the garden hose holder. July 23, 2019.
How you want your letter signed:  NH woodland area

Blinded Sphinx with Rain Drops

Your close-up image of the Sphinx Moth with rain drops is gorgeous.  We are happy you also sent more traditional dorsal views as we were able to identify it as Paonias excaecata a Blinded Sphinx, a common name that refers to the markings on the oceli on the underwings.  When the moth is threatened, it reveals the underwings which creates the illusion of a pair of eyes startling a predator into perceiving that it might have awakened a sleeping giant.  Because those markings include a light blue center dot, rather than a black pupil found on the oceli of many other species of “eyed moths”, the Blinded Sphinx appears to have cataracts.  In searching for Sphingidae of the Americas, we encountered a new [to us] site Sphingidae of the United States of America where it states:  “This species seems to only fly in the warmer months in the Northeast, and even in Florida, it doesn’t seem to be recorded from December to March. This species is extremely common at lights, and both sexes are attracted to light. It does not feed as an adult. The adults do have a fairly large size difference, with females being much larger and rounder than males.”  After that internet detour, we returned to Sphingidae of the Americas to get the information “Males demonstrate a strong curve to the abdomen” so we could inform you that both of your moths are males.

Blinded Sphinx

Awesome!
I researched your page and guessed a Blind Sphinx. Thank you for confirming. This encounter, with these two beauties has peaked my interest, and I’ll now be on the look out for others.
Enjoy the rain drop photo. I did take it myself with an iPhone 8 Plus. You may use it if you want on your page.
Happy week,
Nan

Blinded Sphinx

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

6 thoughts on “Blinded Sphinx Moth: All You Need to Know in a Quick Guide”

  1. Amazing!!! I have just this past year come across this Moth several times, in different sizes, and have been fascinated with it’s extraordinary beauty and form…but never knew what it was! Thank you for naming it for me!!! Blinded Sphinx’s are Awesome!!!

    Reply
  2. I live in Ohio and seen this exact moth on my front door. Is this a moth that has a specific native area?

    Reply
  3. I have a caterpillar that is about 3″ long, smooth, with 11 segments and an orange horn on its tail. It has no false eyes. It has four lateral rows of black spots, with yellow center in the two rows of black spots just below each side of the dorsum. It sorta resembles the white-lined sphinx, but has not lines. Please suggest species I should consider as its identification.

    Reply
  4. We had many of these White-lined Sphinx Moths on the Indian Pink Bush, but not for the last few years here in Escondido, No. San Diego Co.

    Reply

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