Subject: Weird beetle?
Location: North Brisbane, Australia
November 25, 2016 3:38 am
Hi. I found this weird beetle thing on my bedroom floor today and freaked out thinking it was a cockroach. But I noticed the mandibles and now I’m confused. It’s about 4cm long.
Signature: Ellie

Longicorn:  Toxeutes macleayi

Longicorn: Toxeutes macleayi

Dear Ellie,
The mandibles on this Longicorn are quite impressive.  We are pretty confident we have correctly identified it as
Toxeutes macleayi thanks to images on Atlas of Living Australia and Prioninae of the World.

Longicorn:  Toxeutes macleayi

Longicorn: Toxeutes macleayi

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect in Australian Wet Tropics
Location: Cairns, Queensland, Australia
November 24, 2016 6:16 pm
Hi folks,
Please see the pix (on one MSWord doc of 2 pages; I tried sending JPGs but they won’t go through). The insect is huge. The body is about 2 inches long. It was photographed at night in tropical rainforest.
Enjoy your Thanksgiving and thank you.
Signature: Jim (Hackett)

Spiny Rainforest Katydid

Spiny Rainforest Katydid

Dear Jim,
This is a Katydid and we identified it as a Spiny Rainforest Katydid,
Phricta aberrans, thanks to Oz Animals where it states:  “The Spiny Rainforest Katydid is a very unusual subtropical rainforest katydid from eastern Queensland and northern New South Wales. The body and legs have numerous thorny spines and antennae are very long. The insect is greenish above with different shades of green and brownish colours providing excellent camouflage; the underside is pale.”  There is a nice image posted to ipernity.  The ovipositor on your individual indicates she is a female.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much. It is is fact more likely to be the closely related Phricta spinosa, which ranges in rainforest from Cooktown to Innisfail. Cairns is in the middle of this range.
Jim.

Subject: Moth??
Location: Southern California
November 24, 2016 2:39 pm
My father showed me a picture of this insect. We think it is a moth but have been unable to determine what insect is this. We live in Southern California and the picture was taken in September on the border of Los Angeles and San Bernardino county. We see lots of interesting and familiar insects around here but we have never seen this one before or since.
Thank you!
Signature: Tracy O

Erythrina Borer

Erythrina Borer

Dear Tracy,
This distinctive moth is an Erythrina Borer,
Terastia meticulosalis, and according to BugGuide, it is a:  “Tropical species that ranges north to the US from Florida to California.”

Thank you so much for getting back to us so quickly. We are going to look further into this moth now that we have a name. We appreciate your help!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My Moroccan Insect Pix
Location: Morocco
November 24, 2016 10:09 am
Dear Daniel Marlos:
Just happened upon your site and decided to let you know about my own minor efforts in entomology. I spend a good deal of my time (retired) in Morocco and one thing I do is take photos of all sorts of subjects, including plenty of ‘bug’ pictures – especially bees and butterflies. Many are as yet to be uploaded since I’m trying to learn the basics about taxonomy but, alas, it’s slow going!
Perhaps you could take a few minutes and look at some of the galleries. If you, or another entomologist, might see scientific value in helping with identification, that would certainly reinforce me efforts. I just did a Google image search for ‘Bees of Morocco’ and see that the majority of images that come up are my own.
The website is: darbalmira.com You’ll see the table of contents on the left side with the various insects photos as submenus. As I said, I have lots more photos but have been holding back since I think it’s important to put a name on living creature – not just ‘bee’ or ‘bug’.
Thanks for any help or suggestions you might offer.
Jearld Moldenhauer
Signature: Jearld Moldenhauer

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Gearld,
Your images are beautiful, especially that of the only one we can identify to the family without research.  It is the green-eyed Bee Fly from the family Bombyliidae.  Today is American (USA) Thanksgiving and our staff is cooking, so we will attempt a species identification at a later time, as well as trying to identify your Hymenopterans.  In the future, please only submit one insect per submission.  It makes it easier to classify.  The only exception would be insects in the same family or those that have a symbiotic or predator/prey relationship.  You should know that our editorial staff is composed of artists, not entomologists, so we cannot commit to identifying your unknown critters, but if you send them to us, one individual per submission, we will be happy to research to the best of our ability. 

Subject: New Bug
Location: Penang, Malaysia
November 24, 2016 6:07 am
Hey Bugman,
Thanks for all your help! Here’s another bug I’ve found but can’t identify. The jungles of Malaysia have so many different types of bugs!
Thanks!
Signature: Jon

Immature Assassin Bug

Immature Assassin Bug

Dear Jon,
This is an immature True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, and we feel very confident it is a predatory Assassin Bug nymph because of its resemblance to this North American species.

Subject: Insect larva?
Location: Port Orchard, WA
November 23, 2016 10:06 pm
I found this critter on a wood fence in my garden on the west side of Puget Sound in western Washington state. I shot the attached picture during August. I tried to chase the i.d. down on the internet, but don’t have enough bug knowledge to find it. I’d love to hear your best guess. Thanks.
Signature: Jim McCausland

Underwing Caterpillar

Underwing Caterpillar

Dear Jim,
This is the Caterpillar of an Underwing Moth in the genus Catocala.  While we cannot be certain of the species, your individual does resemble this Ilia Underwing Caterpillar posted to BugGuide, and according to BugGuide, the species is found in Washington.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of oak” so we are curious if there is an oak tree near where the sighting occurred.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for the i.d. Neither I nor my immediate neighbors have oak trees in the garden, but there is a native oak a few blocks away, plus some ornamental oaks the same distance. Maybe there are closer oaks in backyards that I can’t see from the street. But moths do fly, and I imagine a few blocks isn’t too far.
Thanks again.
Jim

Thanks Jim,
Other species of Underwings feed on other plants.  According to BugGuide, the Charming Underwing feeds on apple and hawthorn, and it is reported from Alberta, Canada.  Again, we are confident with the genus, not the species.