Subject: brown beetle?
Location: currently in IL, but not where it came from
July 27, 2014 10:40 am
We just returned from a two week trip that took us through Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, West Virginia, and Kentucky. It was hot and humid, with a few big storms that rolled through. When we got home, this bug was in our van. It is about two inches in length, not including the antennae, which add another inch (if pulled straight). It flies and seems attracted to light. Wondering what it is. We live in central IL and aren’t comfortable with just letting it go, without knowing if it’ll cause harm.
If we can’t let it go back into the wild, then we need to know what it is so we can care for it. Thank you!
Signature: Heather

Brown Prionid

Brown Prionid

Dear Heather,
We have received more than the usual number of Brown Prionid,
Orthosoma brunneum, identification requests from eastern North America this summer.  According to BugGuide, Illinois is well within the sighting range of the species, which is native.  Local populations may vary from place to place within the range.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dead Multicolored Centipede found in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 26, 2014
Yesterday, we wa
lked out onto the patio and saw the Argentine Ants surrounding something on the concrete.  We were surprised to see a small, two inch long, Multicolored Centipede in the genus Scolopendra.  Though Hogue writes about them, we have never in our 34 years in Los Angeles seen one.   Since our garden is kind of wild, we hope more may be lurking under stones and logs.

Dead Multicolored Centipede

Dead Multicolored Centipede

Subject: Bugs in bedding and carpet
Location: Lexington KY
July 27, 2014 9:52 am
Hello, I live in Kentucky and have recently noticed these bugs throughout my house mainly in my bedding and carpet. Can you help identify? We live in a newer home, about 6 years old and have hardwood throughout except for bedrooms and several area rugs. Are these bed bugs?
Signature: Emily

Black Carpet Beetle, perhaps

Black Carpet Beetle, perhaps

Dear Emily,
These are beetles, NOT Bed Bugs.  There is not enough detail to give a conclusive identification, but they may be Black Carpet Beetles,
Attagenus brunneus, which you may view on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this an assassin bug?
Location: Big Bend of Texas, Chihuahuan Desert
July 27, 2014 6:08 am
Thanks for all you folks do! I’m hoping you can help me identify what bug has been invading my house for the past couple weeks. We live in the Chihuahuan Desert, on the southwest edge of Texas. We have lots of interesting bugs, including the kissing bug called the conenose which can carry the parasite T. cruzi (causes Chagas disease).
The small bug that has been “blooming” lately resembles the conenose, but the body shape isn’t quite right and the sides are solid red, instead of striped. I’m hoping you will be able to identify this bug — and I’m also hoping it isn’t an assassin bug! We have been sweeping them up and tossing them outside daily, but it feels like bailing out the ocean!
Signature: Sara

Red Shouldered Bug

Red Shouldered Bug

Hi Sara,
The Red Shouldered Bug,
Jadera haematoloma, is a Scentless Plant Bug in the family Rhopalidae, not an Assassin Bug, so you do not have to worry about bites.  Though they are benign, they do have the habit of entering homes, sometimes in great numbers.  According to BugGuide, they are also called Goldenrain Tree Bugs, and perhaps you have a tree in your garden that is attracting them.  BugGuide states:  “Adults and larvae tend to feed in groups, and favor developing seeds and fruits of their favored hosts, but will also suck sap from foliage, flowers, buds, or oozing stems. They feed on a variety of plants primarily in and related to the family Sapindaceae. Favorites include Balloonvine (Cardiospermum species) and Goldenrain Tree (Koelreuteria sp.), both in Sapindaceae, and they regularly use Soapberry (Sapindus sp.; Sapindaceae) and Maple/Boxelder (Acer sp.; Aceraceae). Additionally, reported on a variety of other plants, especially feeding on fruit, including Chinaberry (Melia azedarach; Meliaceae), Fig (Ficus spp.; Moraceae), Althaea (Malvaceae), Plum, Cherry, & Peach (Prunus sp.; Rosaceae), Apple (Malus sp.; Rosaceae), Grape (Vitis sp.; Vitaceae), Ash (Fraxinus sp.; Oleaceae), etc. Adults sometimes gather around human food leftovers and other smashed insects to feed as well.”

Subject: beetle or weevil??
Location: england
July 27, 2014 9:02 am
Found this in north east england yesterday, in woodland near a river, never seen one before.
Do you know what it is??
Signature: mark

Aphid Wolf

Aphid Wolf

Dear Mark,
Weevils are a family of Beetles, and this is neither a Beetle nor a Weevil.  It is a larval Lacewing, sometimes called an Aphid Wolf.

Subject: Large dark reddish bee with two white stripes on abdomen
Location: Queens, NY
July 27, 2014 8:59 am
I saw this guy enjoying the flowers at a Home Depot in Queens, NY. It was difficult for me to get this shot as it was extremely fast moving. I almost thought it was a small hummingbird out of the corner of my eye, When I looked closer I noticed it was an insect. I can’t find anything that looks like it on Google.
I uploaded a video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkYvP9FqovQ
Signature: Jon

Nessus Sphinx

Nessus Sphinx

Dear Jon,
Even though your image is not critically sharp, there are enough features for us to determine that this Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae is a Nessus Sphinx,
Amphion floridensis.  Diurnal members of the family, which also include the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth and the Whitelined Spinx (which is actually more crepuscular than diurnal) are frequently mistaken for hummingbirds.  More information on the Nessus Sphinx is available on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

That’s exciting. It’s funny I’ve lived on the east coast all my life and I’ve never seen one. :)
That’s definitely it. Thanks!

In order to observe Diurnal Sphinx Moths, you would need to be near proper habitat, including flowering plants that produce nectar.