Subject: neon orange bug in Costa Rica with cool patterns
Location: Costa Rica
September 23, 2016 3:06 pm
Hola, My husband and I moved to Costa Rica a year and a half ago. We spend a lot of time photographing animals, wildlife and insects. Here is an interesting neon orange bug we came across with an interesting pattern. Any idea what kind of bug this is? We took this photo near the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica on the Pacific side. Gracias!
Kari P Silcox
www.happycoconutstravelblog.com
Signature: Kari Pinkerton Silcox

Flag Footed Bug

Flag Footed Bug

Dear Kari,
This spectacular insect goes by the very descriptive name Flag Footed Bug,
Anisocelis flavolineata.

Thank you so much for the quick reply!
Kari

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A bug I’ve never seen before.
Location: Nebraska
September 23, 2016 6:49 am
Check this out. What is it?
Signature: Josh Jordan

Earwig

Earwig

Dear Josh,
Congratulations on seeing your first Earwig.

Subject: Don’t even know where to start
Location: Kanagawa Japan
September 21, 2016 7:50 pm
I’m posting for a friend of mine. He’s stationed in Japan, Kanagawa area. Found this on a hill, walking on road. Not even sure if it’s a bug. Tried centipedes but didn’t find anything, tried mantis but that didn’t look right either. Maybe a catapiller of some sort?
Signature: Theresa

Lobster Caterpillar

Lobster Caterpillar

Dear Theresa,
The Lobster Caterpillar,
Stauropus fagi, is such an unusual looking creature it is really understandable that you did not know where to begin researching its identity.  Lepi-PHotos has some nice images of the adult moth.  According to UK Moths:  “The larvae live on the leaves of beech (Fagus), oak (Quercus), and several other trees.”

Thank you!  It’s funny it’s called a lobster caterpillar, I kept trying to figure out if mantis shrimp could be on land, like a bird had dropped it.
Thank you so much!
Theresa McIntosh

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gray flying bug with stinger
Location: Wilmington NC USA
September 21, 2016 5:52 pm
I live in Wilmington North Carolina and saw this bug in mid September at night.
Signature: Sincerely

Longicorn

Lesser Pine Borer

This is a female Lesser Pine Borer, Acanthocinus nodosus, which we identified thanks to an image in “Beetles of Eastern North America” by Arthur V. Evans, and we verified that identification with this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Medium-sized longhorn beetle, gray with distinctive pattern. Long antennae in both genders, but males have a tuft of hair on the fourth segment (see photo above) and significantly longer antennae than the females. Female has pygidium modified into a tube for ovipositing.”  So, what you thought was a stinger is actually the pygidium that is used by the female to lay eggs.

Awesome!! Thanks so much!!  Now I can brag to my fellow firefighters that I knew what that was!!
Thanks again!
Mike

Subject: Trap door?
Location: Oceanside CA
September 21, 2016 9:27 pm
Bug man think I got a trap door. What do you think?
Oceanside after the rain..
Signature: Chainsaw

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Dear Chainsaw,
This is indeed a male California Trapdoor Spider and it appeared right on schedule, though your September rain was rather unseasonal in Southern California.  It will be interesting to see how changes in our weather patterns will affect populations of native species.  Male California Trapdoor Spiders wander in search of mates after the first rains of the season.

Subject: Great Black Wasp
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
September 21, 2016 3:09 pm
Greetings, Daniel et al!
To test whether or not my queries can get through as successful submissions, I’m sending photos I’ve identified as a Great Black Wasp.
These photos were taken in my Rain Garden way back in August of 2013. I was so excited the first time I saw this magnificent creature! I did not know what it was and called it a giant flying ant and tried to do some research. I eventually figured out it was a Great Black Wasp. My first photos were blurry and off center so I kept hoping I would see it again to take more pictures. The milkweed in my garden proved irresistible and the wasp did return allowing me to get these better photos.
I’ve seen the Great Black Wasp each summer since then, though not as frequently. I was gone much of Summer 2015 and this year the humidity has kept me out of the garden more than I like.
These photos are slightly smaller in size than the others I’ve been trying to send through without success. Does this site have a limit to submission size? Maybe that is my issue …
Blessings to all,
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Great Black Wasp

Great Black Wasp

Wow Wanda,
Your images of a Great Black Wasp,
Sphex pensylvanicus, are absolutely gorgeous.  We wonder if your problem was related to huge file size.  The detail on these images is phenomenal, even after we reduced them to a web friendly size.  According to BugGuide:  “Provision nests (in burrow in soft earth) with Katydids or grasshoppers. (Univ. Florida lists: Tettigoniidae in genera Microcentrum and Scudderia.) Usually about three are placed in a nest.”

Great Black Wasp

Great Black Wasp

Hi Daniel,
Thank you! The Great Black Wasp photos I sent went through just fine, so what you received is “my original” in all its glory. The combined total in size for the Great Black Wasp was just under 6 MB. The Long-Horned Bee submission earlier this summer was closer to 7.5 MB. For my future submissions I’ll check file sizes. If need be, I’ll compress them to keep my combined total submission size under 8 MB.
I was hoping you would like the photos of the Great Black Wasp. I thought you would like to add them to your photo archives. I truly was excited to see this creature; when feeding on the milkweed the Great Black is quite a sight to behold, almost mesmerizing! I have some fine photos of the Great Golden Digger Wasp as well which I can send.
Both large wasps really are gentle giants. All of the insects I’ve encountered in my garden have proven to be non-aggressive toward humans, so I have been using that reality as an opportunity to educate the residents here at the apartments. My photos help make the point quite nicely. “Aren’t you afraid of getting stung?” they ask. “Nope,” I reply. “In all my years of gardening I’ve never had an issue with any of the wasps, flies, or bees I find on my plants or in the earth. They do their thing, I do my thing, and we get along just fine.”
Blessings, Daniel!
Wanda J. Kothlow

Great Black Wasp

Great Black Wasp