Subject: Southern House Spider
Location: Richmond, VA
February 20, 2015 12:59 am
Some time ago, I think last winter (maybe the one before), I wrote to you about a southern house spider I caught behind my couch and was going to release in the spring — you suggested I keep her, as I have tarantula experience, and I did. She’s fat and happy to this day, and she’s grown some.
This winter, I have another friend. She lives above my bed, behind an animal-skin wall hanging. I saw the web and meant to brush it away, off of my stuff (it makes all of the fur stick together and look bad), but then I saw her and realized the space was occupied. For now, and very probably permanently, she can stay, as it’s somewhere she’s safe from us accidentally hurting her, and from us being bitten on accident. I’m probably going to start feeding her periodically, so she will be more likely to stay put, instead of setting up camp somewhere less safe. I noticed her weeks ago, but I don’t see her very often. She very likely could have been living there for months. In this picture, she is out on her web “patio”, hanging out. I notice she does this at night sometimes, but usually she’s hidden all day. It’s interesting how her web is — it looks like a snowflake against the wall, and seems to exist mostly so that she can sit there with out losing footing and falling.
I’ve seen some males in my house. I think there’s a big “family” living with me.
Here’s some good pictures, if you want to put them on your website.
Best regards,
Denise Elliott

Southern House Spider

Southern House Spider

Dear Denise,
Thanks for updating us on the Southern House Spiders with which you are sharing your home .

Dawn Ewing, Debbie Lynn May, Rachel Carpenter, Ann Levitsky, Jacob Helton, Kathy Haines, Vanessa Simone, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Jessica M. Schemm, Sue Dougherty, Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Insect
Location: South Africa, Cape Town
February 20, 2015 1:13 am
Found this interesting insect in my moms garden in Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa.
It looks similar to a grasshopper but have no idea what it is. Have never seen this before. Hope you can help identify it.
Signature: JC Hanekom

Cape Longhorn

Cape Longhorn

Dear JC Hanekom,
This looks to us like a Cape Longhorn,
Ceroplesis capensis, which is pictured on iSpot, but for some reason, your individual is missing its distinctive long antennae.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty liked this post

Subject: University Assignment
Location: Vereeniging, South Africa
February 21, 2015 6:19 am
Hi bugman!
I’m currently doing an assignment which requires me to find and identify insects that I come across and I recently found this beetle type thing. I’ve tried searching for the characteristics online but I haven’t found a picture that matches mine. It looks to be some type of beetle but it doesn’t seem to have any wings. It’s about 2 – 2.5cm long and about 1cm wide at its widest point. I live in South Africa, and it is currently the last month of Summer here. Please help!
Signature: Jess

Beetle

Lily Weevil

Dear Jess,
We agree that this is a Beetle, and many species of beetles, including some members of the Blister Beetle family and the Darkling Beetle family, have fused elytra that prohibit the beetles from flying.  We do not recognize this unusual beetle, and we plan to do additional research, but we have some errands to run this morning and we will return to this search.  Right now, we can say that your beetle reminds us of Desert Spider Beetles in the family Meloidae, but we searched through six pages on iSpot without finding a match.  Additionally, the antennae and legs are quite different.  Meanwhile, can you please provide us with more information on the sighting.  Where was it found?  In the home?  In the desert? On a plant?  Just as we were about to post, we decided to see if it might be a Weevil, and we believe this is a Weevil in the genus
 Brachycerus based on this image and others posted to iSpot.  We are going to go with Lily Weevil, Brachycerus labrusca, and there are several images on iSpot.

Beetle

Lily Weevil

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch, Rachel Carpenter liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Medowie, Australia NSW
February 17, 2015 1:28 pm
I was hoping to have this bug identified. It is in a tree in our yard in Medowie NSW. No-one seems to know what it is. There is a circular spider web right next to the bug & cocoon of eggs.
Signature: Toni Alley

Tussock Moth with Eggs

Tussock Moth with Eggs

Dear Toni,
This is a flightless female Tussock Moth with her eggs, probably
Orgyia australis.

Thank you for letting me know :-)
Toni Alley

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post

Subject: Moth from South Africa
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
February 18, 2015 12:45 pm
Hi there!
I hope you guys can help to identify this magnificent moth.
Spotted in a garden in Cape Town, South Africa in mid Feb.
Lots of granadilla and lavender plants around.
Never seen one even remotely similar – the photo is pretty good though, I hope we can identify it and find out more.
Please let me know what turns up!
Looking forward to your reply and thanks for the help!
Signature: Yours truly, NJV

Echo Owlet Moth

Echo Owlet Moth

Dear NJV,
Your lovely moth with its curled wings reminded us of an Australian Fruit Piercing Moth, so we searched the subfamily Catocalinae on iSpot and we quickly found the Echo Owlet Moth,
Achaea echo, a perfect match for your moth.  The species is also pictured on African Moths.

Superb!!
Thank you so much for the help, I really appreciate it!
Have a fantastic day,
Kind Regards
Norman Visser

Melissa Leigh Cooley, Rachel Carpenter, Jennifer MacAulay, Ana Šorc, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Julieta Stangaferro, Amy Gosch, Kristi E. Lambert, Carmen Thompson, Alfonso Moreno, Chris Cooper, Kathy Haines, Kitty Heidih, Mathew Becker, Cora Lukehart liked this post

Subject: bug shape like a T
Location: Idaho
February 17, 2015 11:36 am
What is it?
Signature: Carrie

Plume Moth

Plume Moth

Hi Carrie,
This is a Plume Moth in the family Pterophoridae.

Sue Dougherty, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post