Subject: Wolf Spider
Location: Ohio, United States
April 30, 2015 1:16 am
I came across this beauty today that I believe to be an H. lenta. She was carrying an egg sack with her. I’m very curious to see the spiderlings and the mother’s care, so I set up a large escape proof terrarium to watch her in for a bit. Confirmation on her species would be well appreciated.
Signature: SillyToadGirl (Lexi)

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Lexi,
The manner with which the female Wolf Spider transports her egg sac is quite characteristic, dragging it about from her spinnerets, so your family identification is definitely correct.  According to BugGuide,
Hogna lenta is found in Ohio, so the species is a possibility, but we cannot be certain.  Perhaps one of our readers can confirm the species identity for you.

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Subject: Help with ugly spider id
Location: Modesto, California
April 28, 2015 3:14 pm
I was wondering if you could help us identify the spider we found outside our door today?
Signature: Michelle

Grass Spider

Grass Spider

Hi Michelle,
We believe, because of the large, prominent spinnerets at the tip of the abdomen, that your individual is a Funnel Web Spider in the family Agelenidae, and a Grass Spider in the genus
Agelenopsis, and you can compare your individual to this image from BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “They also have two prominent hind spinnerets. A spinneret is a spider’s silk spinning organ. They are usually on the underside of a spider’s abdomen, to the rear. On many spiders, the spinnerets cannot be seen easily without flipping the spider over; however, with Agelenopsis, the spinnerets are readily seen without having to flip the spider over. Agelenopsis spp. also have somewhat indistinct bands on their legs.” 

Subject: What is this weird bug
Location: Saudi Arabia
April 29, 2015 8:55 pm
I found this guy being attacked by ants and I wondered what in the world is this !? It has big eyes,wings,grasshopper like legs , claw like hands !? Help
Signature: normal

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear normal,
Because of their large size and unusual appearance, Mole Crickets generally create an impression on folks who see them for the first time, and we do get reports of Mole Crickets from around the globe.  Mole Crickets are subterranean, and though they are quite common, they are only encountered when they come to the surface.

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Subject: Inchworm Mayhem
Location: Mumbai, India
April 29, 2015 7:34 am
Dear Bugman,
These inchworms have wreaked havoc in my tiny balcony garden, fairly shredding my spider-plants to bits. Could you help id? I understand from your site that inchworms are geometrid moths caterpillars. It’s full summer now in India, and the photos are today’s (April 29). Another couple of days and it would’ve been ‘May’hem quite literally and figuratively 😀
Regards,
Signature: Ankush

Inchworms

Inchworms

Dear Ankush,
Is your Spider Plant a Chlorophytum species like that posted on Wikipedia?  Knowing the food plant is often a big help with identifying caterpillars and other plant feeding insects.  We attempted a search with the genus name of the Spider Plant and the family name Geometridae, but to no avail.  You image is stunning and clearly shows the looping action the Inchworm uses to move about, a result of having fewer sets of prolegs than the typical caterpillar.

Subject: moth
Location: suffolk u.k
April 29, 2015 11:19 am
Hi there
last summer i noticed on the fly screen of the door the biggest mother of a moth i had ever seen. i quickly got my camera and took some photo’s of it. it was really quite beautiful but i have no clue what sort of moth it is. in live in suffolk in the U.K
any feedback gratefully received
Signature: juliet x

Poplar Hawkmoth

Poplar Hawkmoth

Dear Juliet,
This wondrous creature is a Poplar Hawkmoth,
Laothoe populi, and according to UK Moths, it is:  “Probably the commonest of our hawk-moths, it has a strange attitude when at rest, with the hindwings held forward of the forewings, and the abdomen curved upwards at the rear. If disturbed it can flash the hindwings, which have a contrasting rufous patch, normally hidden.”

Poplar Hawkmoth

Poplar Hawkmoth

Thanks so much for that information. very much appreciated.
it was so lovely.
regards
juliet bumstead

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Subject: Los Angeles: black tiny fly likes water w short clear wings
Location: Los Angeles, CA
April 28, 2015 10:33 pm
Hi,
Thank you so much for all of your service throughout the years. I often make donations & spread the word!
This latest bug is stumping me: We live in east Los Angeles near Pasadena & the SGV (inland)- tonight I noticed approx 20-30 fruit-fly-esque bugs dead or dying in the bathroom sink. They seemed to be coming in through a tiny opening in the bathroom window, so my husband went to the roof to check it out. He said there are thousands on our roof!! He’s spraying now but we can’t find anything similar-looking enough online.
They seem to obviously be attracted to water but do not look like drain bugs.
PLEASE HELP!
(We’re so worried they’re termites but they don’t have long wings)
Signature: Gratefully, Meg

Argentine Ant Alate

Argentine Ant Alate

Dear Meg,
The person who can solve your infestation problem will probably win a Nobel Peace Prize as the solution will improve the quality of life for Californians, the people of Japan and the inhabitants of the Mediterranean, as those are the three places where super-colonies of Argentine Ants,
 Linepithema humile, are making millions of people’s lives miserable, especially in hot summer months when 1000s of Argentine Ants invade homes in search of food and water.  Your images are of winged reproductive queen and king Argentine Ants, known as alates, on their nuptial flight and according to BugGuide:  “Winged queens mate once with a winged male, after which they can continuously produce fertile eggs for as long as 10 years- until death. Unlike most ants, several productive queens of this species can share the same colony, with one or more leaving with some of the workers to form a new colony when it gets crowded (this is known as ‘budding’).”  Here are some good images on BugGuide for comparison.

Argentine Ant Alates

Argentine Ant Alates

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