Subject: pink & green horned caterpillar
Location: Colorado
July 29, 2015 3:43 pm
Well hes mostly green and pink on top, his face is scary looking haha. He has a spike or horn on his tail side. He dosnt have anything else. No spots or stripes. I wanna take a pic with him on my face but im scared hes poisonous. Please hurry haha and i probably wont check my email if that applys at all.
Signature: idk

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Dear idk,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, and we believe it is a Waved Sphinx Hornworm,
Ceratomia undulosa, that has turned pink as a sign it is preparing to pupate.  See the image on the Sphingidae of the Americas site, scrolling down.  It is not poisonous, and we eagerly await the image of you posing with this juicy guy.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify Wasps
Location: South Central MN
July 30, 2015 7:54 am
Since 2013 I’ve been caring for a large rain garden on Faribault County, MN. The pollinators have been late to return, but now I have several of them and of large size, too. I took some photos yesterday and include three below, which to my untrained eye look like wasps. They have never gone after me, even when I’ve been working in the garden, preferring instead to to move from blossom to blossom.
Image 1 is pictured on the leaf of an achemilla plant. I rarely see this wasp, so for me this was a lucky shot.
Image 2 was a surprise close-up. It looks very much like Image 3 along the abdomen but the head is different in color and markings. To my eye the antennae also differ.
Image 8196 is the most common in my garden. These vary in size from small to as big as my pinky. Right now they are in the large range, approaching thumb size. They are are hefty in weight; blossoms droop when they land on them. They seem to favor milkweed and ratibida (yellow coneflower).
There are a couple others I see now and again, such as the the Great Black and a red version of same with black tip on base of abdomen.
Then there’s one with long legs that trail in flight, though I’ve not been able to capture a photo. Again, I feel safe enough in my garden; I do my weeding thing and they do their thing on the blossoms. I wear a hat and long sleeves with gloves, which I think helps.
Can you identify them? Are they native or exotic?
Thank you.
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Unknown Wasp

Potter Wasp

Goodness Wanda,
There are at least ten times more words in your request than in most of the phrases we generally receive.  We miss the chatty identification requests from days gone by before everyone was able to connect to the internet with cellular telephones and people began to forget how to write.  Your first Wasp is not something we immediately recognize, though we suspect it is a Potter or Mason Wasp.  It looks very similar to this 
Ancistrocerus adiabatus posted to BugGuide.

Paper Wasp

Paper Wasp

Your second Wasp is a Paper Wasp in the genus Polistes, and a quick glance at BugGuide has us believing it is the Northern Paper Wasp,  Polistes fuscatus.  According to BugGuide:  “Adult P. fuscatus feed mainly on plant nectar. The species is considered insectivorous because it kills caterpillars and other small insects in order to provide food for developing larvae. Foragers collect various prey insects to feed to the larvae. The wasp then malaxates, or softens the food and in doing so absorbs most of the liquid in the food. This solid portion is given to older larvae and the liquid is regurgitated to be fed to younger larvae. (Turillazzi and West-Eberhard, 1996)”

Cicada Killer

Cicada Killer

Your hefty behemoth is a magnificent Cicada Killer, and your indication that there is a significant population of them indicates a ready food supply for the larvae.  Female Cicada Killers sting and paralyze Cicadas to provision an underground nest.  There is one generation per year and where they are found, Cicada Killers make seasonal appearances.  None of your wasps are considered aggressive.  Thanks again for your entertaining submission.  Your rain garden sounds like it has a very healthy ecosystem.

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Subject: Termite or something else?
Location: Northern Iowa
July 30, 2015 6:48 am
I have found many of these bugs inside the house over the past week. We just moved into the house a few weeks ago. We live in northern Iowa in a town where apparently there are no termites… But these bugs look exactly like termites. I have researched online and cannot find any other bug it resembles.
Signature: K.P.

Stonefly

Stonefly

Dear K.P.,
Thanks to this image on BugGuide, we believe we have correctly identified your Stonefly as a member of the genus
Perlesta.  Stoneflies have aquatic nymphs, so we are guessing you live near some body of water.  Like other aquatic insects, Stoneflies frequently are part of a mass emergence of 1000s of individuals, and some species may be attracted to lights, which is why you are currently finding them in the home.  The emergence will not last long and you will probably have them vanish in the near future.  Though this may be a temporary nuisance, Stonefly larvae cannot live in polluted waters, so you can be comforted that your local water supply is clean.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: $15 donated – I going crazeeee
Location: Baltimore Maryland
July 30, 2015 6:32 am
Hi Bugman,
I just contributed $15 to help out your site – hope you can help me beyond ID-ing them maybe treatment destruction of them
I picked these two tiny MONSTERS off my ankle…tried to crush them NOPE
I drowned then so I could photograph them. They were underwater for 4 hours , I photographed them and then they jumped off the paper the cursED undead now in the house to taunt me.
I originally got bit by hordes of these and the itch continues after a month.
In the photos they look like two different species or maybe just in different stages of development.
I think they are no see ums as the bite marks look the same as depicted in photos.
I want to kill them and dont care about toxic as we have no pets and dont walk around barefoot – I just want them dead and anything else that crawls around without hurting plants & grass so I/we dont have to walk around with having to deal with Deet or different Citronella essential oil/vodka potions.
Someone recommended CedarCide as an all natural solution. I’d go broke as I have a large yard and apparently theres knock offs being sold.
Your HELP is greatly appreciated . Thank You
Alex Karas – Baltimore
Signature: Alex Karas

Flea we suppose

Flea we suppose

Dear Alex,
Thank you for your contribution.  We wish your image had more detail.  Our initial suspicion based on your description is that you are being bitten by Fleas.  You did not indicate if the insects came from outdoors or if you encountered them indoors nor did you indicate a size.  Fleas can be very hard to crush and our editorial staff has first hand experience being bitten on the ankles by dozens of hungry Fleas after a feral cat that had taken up residence under a rental unit we were living in had kittens and then got hit by a car and died.  It took months for the Flea population to diminish and we could not walk out onto the back porch without being swarmed.  Here is a good detailed image of a Flea from BugGuide.

Possibly a Flea

Possibly a Flea

Hey Daniel
Thx for the quick response. The two samples I provided  looked totally different. Yes,  nabbed  them outside / back yard.
The bite marks look like no see ums from google images. Itch ….geezs../..itching for the last month
The problem now is – I was sitting on the couch last night INSIDE when one jumped on my ankle… do the ‘bugs ‘ on the sample not look different.? They came off the same ankle attack played dead after a good drowning…is this the new mini series walking dead – fleas OR is that jumping dead ??? Are they different bugs or just different stage of development. I sprayed outside yesterday but that resolve the living room couch visitor.
I’ll see if I can get better images IF I havent eradicated them
The one inside is troubling as I dont know if it has family and eggs and reproduction and and and .
This is getting nasty
I greatly appreciate your opinions. Great website too BTW
Thank you
Alex

Hi again Alex,
The reason we think Fleas is that they are compressed laterally, so you could have a side view and a view from above.  Your entire description supports our suspicion that they are Fleas.  The BugGuide description is:  “body dark, laterally flattened, wingless; hind legs adapted for jumping; mouthparts adapted for piercing skin and sucking blood; row of large bristles often present on head and/or thorax (called genal and pronotal combs).”  BugGuide also notes:  “The Cat Flea commonly infests dogs, and the Dog Flea may infest cats; both species may bite humans.
…  Some fleas can jump 200 times their body length.”  Our personal experience is that the itchy bite lasts a very long time, often several weeks.

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Subject:  Western Tiger Swallowtail
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 31, 2015 9:46 AM
Several years ago we lamented that we were not able to capture any images of the Western Tiger Swallowtails that fly around the garden.  Today we got some early morning images of this individual.  The morning haze cleared and the sun had just begun to shine.  The Swallowtail was warming in the sun on the cypress, and it appears that it had narrowly escaped at least one predator since not only the swallowtail, but fully half of each of the hind wings is missing.

Western Tiger Swallowtail

Western Tiger Swallowtail

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Subject: Long earwig-like thing
Location: Somerset, UK
July 30, 2015 12:44 am
Hello! I was wondering if you could help, no one here seems to know and I can’t find this insect in any ‘common British insects’ books.
I’m in England, I was just about to finish the last gulp of my tea when I saw this thing in the bottom of my mug. It was quite a shock, not least because of its size – it was about 1.5 inches long! The closest thing I can find that it looks like is an earwig, with those big pincers on the back but way bigger and with a much more extended abdomen. Sorry the pictures aren’t great.
Do you know what it is?
Signature: Emma

What's In the Tea Cup???

What’s In the Tea Cup???

Dear Emma,
We empathize with your experience, but we still find it terribly amusing.  The reason this looks like an Earwig is because it is an Earwig.  The beadlike antennae and forceps are plainly evident when zooming in for a close-up.

Earwig

Earwig

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