Subject: Moth
Location: Middleville Michigan
July 25, 2014 12:12 pm
Found this beauty while washing the deck furniture this spring. I was so excited I had to get my Husband to take the pictures. I couldn’t hold the camera still.
Signature: Teri

Male Io Moth

Male Io Moth

Dear Teri,
This beautiful Giant Silk Moth is a male Io Moth.  Males of the species can be distinguished from female Io Moths which have brown rather than yellow wings.  They eyespots on the underwings of both sexes are believe to deter predators into thinking the moth is a much larger creature that might decide to eat the predator.

Male Io Moth

Male Io Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Imperial Moth?
Location: Raleigh, NC
July 25, 2014 7:47 am
Hello!
We found this relatively small, maybe an inch long, beauty on the outside of our garage door this morning. Last week we spotted an Imperial Moth in all his glory, wings splayed, on the side of our house but he was much bigger than this little guy. Even though he is much smaller I’m wondering if this is an Imperial as well. Thanks and my five year old and I LOVE this website. Having just moved to the south we are using it to identify all sorts of new bugs (our latest is a Giant Stag Beetle) that cross our paths.
Signature: Sheri

Rosy Maple Moth

Rosy Maple Moth

Dear Sheri,
Thanks so much for the compliment.  The Imperial Moth and this lovely Rosy Maple Moth are in the same family Saturniidae, but they are distinct species.

Subject: Wasp or Hornet?
Location: Truro, MA
July 26, 2014 7:39 am
I live in Truro, MA. This insect sits on the corner of my deck each morning that it is sunny but not when it is cloudy or in the evenings. It is quite large (over an inch), and stays all day making the deck unusable. I can’t get close enough to spray because it immediately flies and appears aggressive. Can you tell me what it is and if it is really aggressive.
Thank you.
Signature: Bill

Cicada Killer

Cicada Killer

Dear Bill,
This is a solitary wasp known as a Cicada Killer, a species that preys upon Cicadas.  This is likely a male, and male wasps are incapable of stinging.  He is likely defending territory against other males in the hope of luring a female into mating and digging a nearby burrow.  Female Cicada Killers are capable of stinging, but they are not aggressive.  We would urge you to abandon your attempts to spray this impressive Cicada Killer.  Normally, we get numerous Cicada Killer identification requests each summer, but this summer your submission is the only one we have received.

Thank you Daniel, for your help.  I will not spray.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: HELP
Location: Oregon
July 26, 2014 10:48 am
We have a caterpillar that is going to turn into a cinnabar moth, we already know what bug it is but it just went into a cocoon (yay!). How long will it be in a cocoon?
Signature: Seriously bugged

Cinnabar Moth Caterpillar

Cinnabar Moth Caterpillar

Dear Seriously bugged,
According to Bug Life:  “Caterpillars are feeding from July – early September and are initially pale yellow but soon develop bright yellow and black stripes to deter predators. … The caterpillars overwinter as pupa in a cocoon under the ground. The adult moths emerge around mid May and are on the wing up until early August, during which time males and females will mate and eggs are laid.”
  If that is accurate, you will not experience eclosion until next spring.

Subject: Mystery Moth.
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
July 26, 2014 10:48 am
Hello! Found this fairly large moth in my mothers backyard, hanging out on the fence, early evening. I have no idea what it is!
Signature: -Auraus

Laurel Sphinx

Laurel Sphinx

Dear Auraus,
This lovely moth is a Laurel Sphinx,
Sphinx kalmiae, and we identified it thanks to the comprehensive database on the Sphingidae of the Americas site where it states:  “In Canada, Sphinx kalmiae is single-brooded with most adults on the wing in June and July. In New Jersey and Connecticut and states of that latitiude, the Laurel Sphinx is double-brooded (late May-June flight and then again in July-August). There are as many as six broods in Louisiana with the first brood appearing in early to mid April.”  We are grateful that you were able to obtain an image that reveals the underwings.

Laurel Sphinx

Laurel Sphinx

Ah hah! Thank you so much for the identification. :) It was actually very happy to sit in my hand and pose for photos. Getting it to leave was the trick. ;)
-Danijela

Subject: Beetle I think?
Location: Thunder Bay, ontario, Canada
July 25, 2014 5:08 pm
Hey there. I live in a little town in the bush in ontario and I’ve never seen one of these around. Happen to know exactly what this one is?
Signature: Vicki

Poplar Borer

Poplar Borer

We certainly do Vicki,
This is a Poplar Borer,
Saperda calcarata.  According to BugGuide:  “This species is of considerable economic importance on account of its serious injury to the trunks and larger branches of poplars. These trees rarely attain any size in New York State before showing the operations of this insect, and in not a few instances very serious injury is inflicted. This applies not only to neglected trees along road sides and in forests but also to magnificent specimens grown for ornamental purposes in parks.  Professor Riley, in his early writings, states that this insect has been universally destructive to cottonwoods and poplars in the western states, and Professor Bruner, in his paper, ‘The Insect Enemies of Ornamental and Shade Trees,’ states that this borer is by far the most destructive enemy of poplars and cottonwoods in the west. He further adds that it is almost impossible to grow these trees of any size in cities and towns of Nebraska away from the friendly care of birds and parasitic insects. (Felt and Joutel, 1904).”  With that stated, it is important to understand that this is a native species, and that it does fill an important place in the web of life associated with poplar trees.