Subject: Strange bug
Location: Naples, FL
October 25, 2014 2:15 pm
Yesterday I found a bug in the bathroom, a type I have never seen before. Since we occasionally have silver fish, I thought it might be an odd looking one. Then today I saw something move ever so slightly at the rug’s edge [an area rug in the den]. Closer checking and it looked just like the bug I found yesterday. I got a magnifying glass and tried to figure out what it might be. I spent the last 90 minutes searching the web as best I can. No luck. I’m as puzzled now as ever. I will attach a couple of photos, though not the best, but the best I could do.
The bug measures 5/8 inches by 1/4 inch. Color appears to me to be a tan or ivory and the head appears to be a redish color.
Any ideas?
Signature: Charles Sebrell

Case Bearing Moth Larva

Case Bearing Moth Larva

case bearing moth larva

Dear Daniel Marlos,
Bravo!
That was quick.  My thanks.  I have now checked it out with that title.  Must admit, I have never seen one before.
My sincere thanks!
charles sebrell
naples, fl
Life is just simpler if you plow around the stumps.

Dear Charles,
Thanks so much for your kind response to our terse identification of a Case Bearing Moth Larva.  We have decided that your original written request was so nicely worded and your response was so kind that we retroactively determined to go live with a posting.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Karin Weidman liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Huntsman Spider Snared with 777!!!

Huntsman Spider Snared with 777!!!

Caught with Adhesive
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
October 25, 2014 6:27 PM
We have numerous unanswered identification requests in our mailbox, yet we are indulging ourselves by posting this image of a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the genus Olios that was found dead under a poster that was adhered to a board with industrial strength adhesive.
  This is only the second time we have seen one on our grounds in Mount Washington, and the first one took refuge in the fence.

FENCE:  Home to many spiders.

FENCE: Home to many spiders.

Subject: Beautiful Winged ?????
Location: South Florida
October 25, 2014 3:20 pm
Earlier today I discovered, thanks to your website, that the white weevils that have been eating our Blackbead, Bay Cedar and Hollies are non-native beetles from Sri Lanka. So when I was out watering this afternoon and saw this beautiful winged insect that I could not identify I immediately thought of your site.
It is very deep, somewhat iridescent blue with white spots on most of its body including underside and legs. It is bright red back at the end of its abdomen. The wing span appears to be about 1.75″ and it is sitting on my desert rose plant in South Florida, in Broward county.
Signature: OutGardening

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Dear OutGardening,
The Polka Dot Wasp Moth really is a pretty insect.  Its caterpillars feed on oleander.

Thank you very much Daniel! I would never have guessed it is a moth!
Gina

Hi again Gina,
Most people assume that all moths are small, dull colored, nocturnal creatures that eat clothes.  This diurnal Polka Dot Wasp Moth is brightly colored, and the species is also a very effective wasp mimic which provides it some protection against predators.

Hi Daniel,
From its wing shape and the iridescence color it reminded me of a dragonfly although when I first saw just the flash of white spots and red color I was excited thinking I had another atala butterfly. I’ve been hoping that our coonties would attract more atalas but so far have only seen one. But this moth is quite exciting and beautiful to watch in the garden, although I may not leave all her eggs on my little lone desert rose.
I’ve learned since starting our butterfly and native garden a few years ago, that there is such a variety of moths and that they seem to overlap in appearance and characteristics with the butterflies. Many butterflies I’m meeting in the garden appear more like what I used to think of as moths. It’s been an exciting journey into gardening, learning not only about native/invasive plants but the birds, butterflies and now into bugs! Today I was out picking the Sri Lanka weevils off some of our plants that have been so badly eaten by them, after learning from your site what those little white bugs were.
Thanks for providing a great resource and website! And your personal replies!
Gina

Thanks for your followup information Gina.  We did not know what an “atalas” was and upon looking it up on BugGuide, we learned that Eumaeus atala, the Atala Hairstreak, is endangered and it has caterpillars that feed on a native cycad known as a “coontie”.  Thanks so much for the education.  We hope you are able to provide us with an image of an Atala Hairstreak soon.  We are thrilled that you are learning about the interconnectivity of life forms, both plant and animal, in an ecosystem.

MaryBeth Kelly, Ito Fernando, Margie Hudson, Amy Gosch, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Rachel Mouldey liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: flattened out legless pill bug thing
Location: north texas
October 23, 2014 8:28 am
My parents have this device that makes compost from old bits of banana peels and whatnot, and every once in a while it will leak, so we put this metal tub underneath it. Now the tub has these strange bugs that move like caterpillars, or slugs, and have a back similar to a flattened out “pill bug”. We do not want the bugs in our garage, but are not sure what to do with them, because we don’t want to simply kill them.
Signature: nathan

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Dear Nathan,
These are Black Soldier Fly Larvae, and they are commonly found in compost piles where they contribute to the decomposition of organic materials.  They will not negatively affect the compost or your family.  They are benign and they should be left to do the job that they do so well.

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Subject: I found this spider 4 times
Location: Botswana, palapye
October 24, 2014 1:52 pm
I just want to know it’s dangerous or not… It moves very fast.
Signature: Don’t know

Solifugid

Solifugid

This is a Solifugid, and though they are commonly called Camel Spiders or Sun Spiders, and though they are Arachnids, they are not true spiders.  They do not have venom, but a large individual might bite a human, and they have powerful mandibles.  Solifugids are fierce predators, and we would encourage you to allow them to keep your surroundings clear of unwanted insects like Cockroaches.  As it appears the individual in your image has bee sprayed with insecticide, we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Jacob Helton liked this post

Subject: TINY BEE?
Location: Fannie, Ark.
October 24, 2014 5:46 pm
This little bee (when I say little I mean smaller than the head of a pin) appeared in a photograph I took of another insect (Bluet). I literally could not see it until I had cropped the picture. It was on a Sicklepod Senna leaf. I didn’t think bees could get this tiny!
Signature: Bill

Chalcid Wasp

Chalcid Wasp

Dear Bill,
This is not a Bee, but rather a parasitic wasp in the family Chalcididae.  We believe we have identified it as
Conura amoena, and according to BugGuide:  “hosts: hairstreak butterflies (Theclinae).”  Most parasitic wasps prey upon the immature stages of insects, and we are guessing that this Chalcid Wasp was searching for caterpillars, though of the genus BugGuide notes:  “most attack Lepidoptera pupae; a few parasitize Coleoptera (Chrysomelidae, Curculionidae) and Diptera (Syrphidae); some are secondary parasites of Ichneumonidae and Braconidae.”