Subject: Tiny insects
Location: Quebec, Canada
April 12, 2015 8:48 pm
Hi. I have been finding these tiny bugs in our new condo. I find them on baseboards, windowsills and around our electric breaker box. They are very small (1-4 millimeters, I would say), and are easier to spot with a flashlight. I have found about 50 of them over a 4 week period.
Signature: Concerned

Booklouse

Booklouse

Dear Concerned,
You are being concerned unnecessarily because of this Booklouse, probably a member of the genus
Lipocelis based on this BugGuide image.  According to the North Carolina State University Department of Entomology:  “Booklice feed primarily on microscopic fungi and mold. Therefore, they are most often found in damp, dark areas. Such places may include basements, crawlspaces, kitchens, leaky plumbing, unvented storage areas, and around over-watered houseplants. They may also show up in recently built homes where they entered during construction and were enclosed in a wall after siding and sheetrock were installed. … Booklice are often associated with old books or other papers that are stored in damp conditions. These conditions promote the growth of mold or fungi on the pastes and glues of book bindings. They may also be found in food goods stored in humid conditions that support mold development. While their presence can cause great annoyance, they rarely cause significant damage to items.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: An insect that we have not seen on our land in Chilean Patagonia before
Location: La Junta, Aisen, Chile
April 12, 2015 3:34 pm
This insect landed on a volunteers arm while she was working away on our small farm in northern Aisen, Patagonia. We have never seen it before and wonder what it is? In adavance thanks for the work that you do, it has enabled us to better understand our ecosystem.
Signature: Paul Coleman

Stonefly

Stonefly

Dear Paul,
This is a Stonefly in the order Plecoptera, a species generally found near water as the larvae are aquatic nymphs.  According to BugGuide:  “nymphs of most spp. develop in cool, well-oxygenated water and do not tolerate pollution; therefore, their presence is an indicator of good water quality, and their absence in areas where they previously occurred may indicate pollution.”

Sue Dougherty liked this post

Subject: Eggy Weggs
Location: Los Ranchos De Albuquerque, NM
April 12, 2015 6:06 pm
I recently planted a Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick in my back yard. While watering it this evening my wife pointed out these seven white eggs and I was wondering if they will hatch into something that wants to eat my little tree. I am hoping it will turn out to be something carnivorous that would help eat all of the aphids in our yard instead. Please advise, Bugman.
Signature: Ethan Firestone

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Dear Ethan,
It sounds like you love your garden very much, and any gardener knows that a lush garden provides habitat for many native species, including butterflies, birds and many other creatures.  A pesticide free garden provides much more diversity than one in which the caretaker uses chemicals to help control insect populations.  These are the eggs of a Katydid, and though Katydids will eat the leaves of plants, they are actually quite welcome in our own garden.  Katydids are sound producing insects that help contribute to the orchestra of night noises, and though they eat leaves, no permanent damage is done to the plants as they are solitary feeders that you are more likely to hear than to see as they are so well camouflaged.

Leslie Gist, Sue Dougherty, Rickie Louise Hill liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown tussock moth caterpillar
Location: Napa, California
April 12, 2015 10:10 am
Friends who live in Napa California recently photographed this caterpillar on their property.
After going through your caterpillar pages, we concluded it was a tussock moth caterpillar but couldn’t match the color pattern with any of the species shown. The closest seems to be that of the
Western Tussock Moth. What is your identification of this caterpillar?
Signature: Mike Walsh

Probably Western Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Probably Western Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Mike,
There are several species of Tussock Moths in the genus
Orgyia that are found in California, and we believe this is most likely the Caterpillar of the Western Tussock Moth, Orgyia vetusta, but it may be impossible to determine the exact species with an image since all members of the genus have very similar looking caterpillars and there is also much variation within the species.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.

Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch liked this post

Subject: Unidentified Caterpillar
Location: South Africa
April 15, 2015 1:19 am
Hello Bugman,
I found this Caterpillar on my Cape Goose Berry plant. I live in South Africa and we are now in very late Autumn. What type of caterpillar is this? Is it harmful to my plants? Does it turn into an endangered butterfly or moth after metamorphosis? Should I get rid of it or is it harmless?
Many thanks,
Signature: Andrea Joubert

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Andrea,
This is a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar and it will eventually metamorphose into a Death’s Head
Hawkmoth, Acherontia atropos, a species most recognizable because it was used to illustrate the blockbuster movie poster for Silence of the Lambs.  The moth is not endangered.  A single caterpillar on a plant will eat the leaves, which does not permanently damage the plant unless it is very young or otherwise compromised.  A healthy plant will resprout leaves.

Sue Dougherty, Rickie Louise Hill, Amy Gosch, Julieta Stangaferro, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post

Subject: What is my little buddy?
Location: Rock Hill NY
April 14, 2015 5:40 pm
Hello, I just discovered this website and I love it! I’m hoping you can help me figure out what my new little friend is. Yesterday my sister was complaining that a bee was stuck in her window so I went to go free it (I’m pretty sure it was actually a wasp) but I also noticed a tiny green spider in her window too, sitting right on the screen! I watched some kind of fly get caught in a small barely visible web, and little green friend casually walked over and started feeding! My sister has a lethal prejudice against anyone with too many legs so they couldn’t stay there. While my little friend fed, I removed the window screen (with them on it) and put it in my own window. Now they’re safe and enjoying the gnats that hang out around my house plants near by. It’s newly spring here after a long winter. I’ve never seen anyone like this before. I think they have transparent hair on their legs but they’re so small its difficult to see. When I shine a fla shlight there appears to be some gold along the center of the orange stripe. Eight teeny tiny black eyes. Gooey looking fangs. Walks slowly sometimes but mostly stays in one spot. All together probably the size of a dime.
I’m sorry about the image quality, all I have right now is my iphone. If they hang out for a while I’ll try to update with better pictures. Thank you so much :-)
Signature: Jocelyn

Long-Jawed Orbweaver

Long-Jawed Orbweaver

Dear Jocelyn,
This little beauty is a Long-Jawed Orbweaver,
Tetragnatha viridis, and we quickly identified it on BugGuide.  We were totally charmed by your email and we are awarding you the Bug Humanitarian Award for your kindness to this harmless spider.  Out of curiosity, how many legs are too many?

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