Subject: Long legged spider
Location: Plainview, Long Island, NY
August 28, 2015 4:20 pm
I originally thought this spider was a daddy long legs variety but then thought otherwise based on the stance and body shape. I found it on my son’s swingset at 7PM on August 28. We are in Plainview, Long Island, NY. I assume it is nocturnal since it was not yet active even with my hand only a couple of inches over it. I saw no sign of a web. It appears to be missing one leg, presumably from a lost fight.
Signature: psinkiws

Harvestman

Harvestman

Dear psinkiws,
Daddy-Long-Legs and Harvestman are both common names for Arachnids in the order Opiliones, like your individual.

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Subject: Six-legged spider?
Location: Norfolk County, Ontario
August 29, 2015 9:18 am
Is this a spider that has lost two of its legs? Or some kind of insect? Seen on a morning glory vine in summer in Norfolk County, Ontario.
Signature: Tim

Harvestman

Harvestman

Dear Tim,
Your Arachnid is a Harvestman or Daddy-Long-Legs in the order Opiliones, and it is missing several legs.  Like Spiders, Opiliones have four pairs of legs, but they do not have poison glands, so they are harmless.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Carrie Bell liked this post

Subject: what insec
Location: standerton, south africa
August 29, 2015 9:17 am
I have never seen this insect before, living in the same town for 30 years….
Signature: solene

PIcture Winged Fly

PIcture Winged Fly

Hi Solene,
This reminded us of a Fruit Fly in the family Tephritidae, so we searched iSpot for South African species, and though we did not find an exact match, we did find several images that looked very similar, including this iSpot posting, though it is only identified to the family level.  The common name for the family in South Africa is Picture Winged Fly, but that same name is used on iSpot for the family Ulidiidae as well.  We are confident that in South Africa, Picture Winged Fly is an appropriate name for your individual, though we cannot say for certain to which family it belongs.

Ann Levitsky, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty, Regis Swope, Tynisha Koenigsaecker liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this?
Location: Putnam, CT 06260
August 26, 2015 1:20 pm
We found 2 of these caterpillars today (August 26,2015) in Putnam, CT while we were trimming bushes. The crew is very curious what they are as none of us had ever seen anything like it before. Each one was about 5 inches long and they were eating a vine-like weed growing inside a forsythia bush. We found them between 11:00 AM and 1:00PM.
Everyone also wanted to know if they were poisonous. It looks like there are barbs or stingers on the body, guessing for protection?
Thank you do your help! Hope to hear back from you.
Signature:  Steve Gallant and The Crew at Eclipse Landscaping

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Dear Steve and Crew,
Your impressive caterpillars are Cecropia Moth Caterpillars, and the fleshy protuberances are not barbs or stingers.  Cecropia Moth Caterpillars pose no threat to humans.  Your large individuals have probably attained maximum growth and they will soon spin a cocoon and molt into a pupa that will overwinter, with the adult Cecropia Moth emerging next spring.  We are very curious what vine they were feeding upon, because according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of various trees and shrubs including alder, apple, ash, beech, birch, box-elder, cherry, dogwood, elm, gooseberry, maple, plum, poplar, white oak, willow. may also feed on lilac and tamarack.”

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

 

Sabrina Lute, Rebecca Young, Nita Mayes, Ann Levitsky, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Brooklynn Claire, Katie Pasulka Casas, Aundrea Murillo-Faynik, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Melanie Conover, Mike Maxwell, Sue Dougherty, Jessica M. Schemm, Garden Geek, LLC, Claire Kooyman liked this post

Subject: Swallowtail?
Location: Milpa Alta, Mexico
August 28, 2015 1:26 pm
About 4 inches long
Picture taken Aug 14, 2015
Signature: Leo Perez

Hornworm from Mexico

Hornworm from Mexico

Hi Leo,
This is not a Swallowtail caterpillar.  It is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, but we have still not been able to identify it to the species level.

Sue Dougherty liked this post

Subject: Green Lynx Spiders Everywhere!
Location: Palm Beach County, Florida
August 28, 2015 10:43 am
Hello What’s That Bug!
I was exploring Pine Glades Natural Area in northern Palm Beach County, Florida and came across lots of bug and spider life on the grasses and Spanish needles growing along the nature trail. I was able to sweet-talk a beautiful adult green lynx spider into letting me get close with my camera to snap a few pictures. I also came across very tiny spiders sitting on the Spanish needle flowers just waiting to pounce on any small bug that walked by. I believe these tiny spiders are baby green lynx spiders. I included a picture – please let me know if I am correct. It never ceases to amaze me that so much life can be found on one plant! Love your web site – I find myself visiting it frequently to help me identify insects I find while working outdoors in Palm Beach County’s natural areas.
Signature: Ann Mathews

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Ann,
We have numerous Green Lynx Spiders in our own garden right now in Los Angeles.  We find them on basil flowers, daisies and sunflowers where they await to ambush flying insects.  Your second spider is a species of Crab Spider in the family Tomisidae, probably
Misumenops bellulus, based on this BugGuide image, also from Florida.

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Thank you so much for the quick response. I will add the crab spider species to the Pine Glades Natural Area animal listing. We tend to overlook the smaller critters at our natural areas – so it is great when I can photograph and identify bugs and spiders not yet in our database. Keep up the wonderful work – What’s That Bug is a fantastic resource!
Ann Mathews
Palm Beach County
Department of Environmental Resources Management