Subject: Looks like tree bark with 4 legs?
Location: Jacksonville, FL
November 19, 2014 3:24 pm
Hello,
This bug has been sitting in relatively the same position for two days on the bricks along our window ledge. It’s November in Florida and we just had two cold nights. It looks as if it has only 4 legs. It’s facing down in the photo shown. Curious!
Signature: Brandi

Florida Bark Mantid

Florida Bark Mantid

Dear Brandi,
This is a marvelous image of a Florida Bark Mantid or Grizzled Mantid,
Gonatista grisea, which you can read more about on BugGuide.  Like other insects, which are known as hexapods, it has six legs, and the raptorial forelegs, which are modified for capturing and holding onto prey, are being held close to the head in your image.  While this individual stands out against the light brick wall, it easily blends in unnoticed when lurking on a tree trunk, making it a very effective camouflage artist.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identifying a bug request
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
November 20, 2014 1:08 am
Hi there.
I found these bug eggs that hatched yesterday and would like to know what they are?
Signature: name

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Stink Bug Hatchlings

These appear to be hatchling Stink Bugs in the family Pentatomidae.

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Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Lesvos
November 20, 2014 5:38 am
I found this bug in Lesvos in the Greek islands last April and would appreciate if you could identify it.
Many thanks for your help. I have been asked to do a talk on Lesvos for my local RSPB group and would appreciate your assistance, regards
Signature: William Smiton

Katydid

Bush Cricket

Dear William,
This is a Katydid or Bush Cricket in the family Tettigoniidae, and we quickly identified it on PBase as
Poecilimon mytelensis, a species endemic to Lesvos.  An endemic species is native to a limited area, and islands that are isolated often have endemic species that have taken their own evolutionary path due to a limited gene pool.  The Flora and Fauna of Cyprus site also indicates this species is endemic to Lesvos.  The spikelike ovipositor indicates that your individual is a female.

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Subject: Gorgeous Giant Ichneumon Megarhyssa
Location: Jonesboro, AR, USA
November 19, 2014 6:29 pm
Hello!
I found this lovely lady on my back porch today. We have had freezing temperatures lately and though it reached almost 50 degrees, I think she was pretty frigid. She was pretty easy to scoop up in some Tupperware. After some research I discovered she was harmless and about this time she warmed enough to begin trying to use her ovipositor on my Tupperware. Obviously, she never succeeded, but a couple of times she even tried beginning ‘unzipping’ her abdomen to begin laying eggs. Alas, she couldn’t figure out how to bore into plastic though so eventually gave up. I hope she was able to finish the process outside in spite of the dropping temperatures. I have seen many Ichneumon in our area, but never her particular species. I couldn’t get a good shot of the ruler, but from antenna to ovipositor she was about 5 inches.
Signature: Heather Buckholtz

Stump Stabber in captivity

Stump Stabber in captivity

Dear Heather,
A female Giant Ichneumon or Stump Stabber is an fearsome looking, yet harmless parasitic wasp.  Other than
Megarhyssa atrata, we are reluctant to attempt a species identification on members of the genus.

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Subject: Confirm ID of beetle
Location: Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge, TX
November 19, 2014 11:45 am
Recently my wife and I were at the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge in Texas photographing the waterfowl. This beetle which I am gussing is the Long Jawed Longhorn Beetle landed on our windshield and I took the picture from inside of our car with my iPhone. I didn’t get to see his top view, but this really shows a long jaw. Can you confirm his ID.
You may use the picture any way you like, but please mention my name as the photographer.
Signature: Joseph A. Sinka

Scorpionfly

Scorpionfly

Dear Joseph,
This impressive insect is not a beetle, but rather a Scorpionfly in the order Mecoptera and most likely in the genus
Panorpa.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed mainly on dead/dying insects, rarely on nectar/fruit.”

Hi Daniel,
Thanks, I don’t think I could have ever identified him as a Scorpionfly.  I just looked it up in my field guide and the size of the one I saw was somewhere between 1″ to 1-1/2″ long; much larger than the 3/8″ mentioned in the guide.
I don’t know how common they are, but this is a first for me.
Thanks for your help and I plan to go back again this weekend,
Joe

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Subject: Bug in Dam
Location: Taggerty, North East Victoria, Australia
November 18, 2014 2:26 am
Hi there,
I was taking photos of dragonfly over my parents dam when I noticed this guy staring at me.
This photo was taken in Taggerty, (north east) Victoria, Australia. We’re at the end of spring but it’s been quite a hot spring. Never seen anything like it before and it was about an one maybe one and a half inches long.
Thanks for your time
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Subject: Bug In Dam Update
Location: Taggery, Victoria, Australia
November 19, 2014 2:03 am
I sent a ID request yesterday about a bug i saw laying on a lillypad that i’d never seen before. Well today i went back to take a look and i think it’s shed it’s skin?? Thought it might help to ID it if you get the time.
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Dragonfly Exuvia

Dragonfly Exuvia

After having had a look on line i think this might actually be a dragonfly nymph! i did notice what i think is a red dragonfly, yesterday i only noticed one red one and today there was definitely two bright red ones.

Dear Cait,
You are correct that is a Dragonfly Naiad, and your second image is of the exuvia or cast off exoskeleton.  Dragonfly Naiads are aquatic predator, and when the time for metamorphosis nears, the naiad leaves the water and climbs a vertical surface, like the grasses depicted in your second image, and there it molts for a final time, flying off as an adult Dragonfly.

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