Location: Jacksonville, FL
September 17, 2014 11:39 am
Also, a few feet away from them I found this excellent Eastern lubber.
Absolutely.  The lubber was in the grass next to an open, natural field also at the dog park in Jacksonville, FL.  It didn’t seem to be in any particular hurry to get away and freely let me pick it up– I assume because they are toxic if ingested?
Signature: Mike

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper

Hi Mike,
Thanks for sending in your image of an Eastern Lubber Grasshopper.  According to BugGuide:  “Coloration is aposematic (warning), apparently this species is distasteful to vertebrate predators. When disturbed, it will spread its wings, hiss, and secrete a smelly fluid from its spiracles.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s this bug?
Location: southern california
September 18, 2014 5:24 pm
Found this critter on my front screen door. It’s been in the low 100’s for the past week. This is in Southern California, about 30 miles east of Los Angeles . I put him in a tiny jar overnight and opened the jar when I got home to photograph him; got two shots and he flew away. Is it some kinda moth? At first I was kinda freaked, thought it was a huge tick but then I saw he had only six legs legs so I calmed down….what is this thing!!
Signature: john roush

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear John,
This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, an Asian species that was first reported in Allentown, Pennsylvania in the late 1990s, and which has spread across much of eastern North America.  In recent years, Southern California sightings have become more frequent.  The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is both an agricultural pest and a nuisance to the average person as it frequently enters homes to hibernate as the weather cools.

Subject: Tarantula maybe
Location: San Antonio, TX
September 19, 2014 6:16 am
Can you help me identify this spider I found floating in my pool. When I got it out I was surprised it was alive. It is about 2 inches long and the body is 1/2 inch wide. I did not see it spread out its legs. Is it dangerous?
Signature: Lisa

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Lisa,
This is a Trapdoor Spider, and though it is theoretically not a Tarantula, it is classified with the Tarantulas in the infraorder Mygalomorphae, and according to BugGuide, the Mygalomorphs are:  “Easily distinguished from araneomorphs by two pairs of booklungs; fangs and chelicerae are parallel to the body axis.”
  BugGuide also notes:  “This is a more primitive group of spiders which includes the infamous tarantulas, primarily represented by members of Family Theraphosidae. Other familiar members include the trapdoor spiders and purseweb spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mating muskmares
Location: Jacksonville, FL
September 17, 2014 11:39 am
Hi again! I noticed you haven’t had any muskmares on your site for over a year, so I thought I’d send a pic of this happy couple to you. I found them on a chain link fence last week at a dog park here in Jacksonville, FL. The female sprayed me repeatedly until she realized I wasn’t going to hurt them the spray seemed to come from the thorax under a lot of pressure; I could hear the hissing over the sounds of the breeze and the dogs! It looked like 2 sprays from a mist bottle set on “fine” and travelled about a foot from her. Smelled like rotting wood and vinegar. Also, a few feet away from them I found this excellent Eastern lubber.
Signature: Mike

Mating Muskmares

Mating Muskmares

Dear Mike,
Thanks so much for making our Muskmare postings more current.  Your observations on the “spraying” defense of the individuals you encountered is very valuable, and though you did not experience any harm, we caution our readers against careless handling of Muskmares as the noxious gas they expel is reported to be caustic if it lands in the eyes.  We will post your Lubber image in a distinct posting.  Can you provide any additional information on the Lubber?

I found a very good description of the muskmare defense and it’s effects on the eye on this website that you may want to share with your readers
See Featured Creatures.

Subject: Interesting Kenyan Spider
Location: Kenya
September 17, 2014 10:25 am
What kind of spider is this? We live in Machakos, Kenya. He looks to be half crab.
Signature: Marc Jordan

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

Dear Marc Jordan,
This appears to be an Orbweaver in the genus
Gasteracantha, and North American members of the genus are known as Crablike Spiny Orbweavers.  We located a very similar looking individual from Tanzania on FlickR, but it is only identified to the genus level and another image on FlickR is identified as possibly Gasteracantha versicolor.  According to the images on Encyclopedia of Life, it is a highly variable species.  Thorn Spider appears to be an accepted common name.

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

Subject: Bugs In My Pool
Location: Westminster, California, U.S.
September 17, 2014 6:24 pm
I have found about 50 of these crazy little bugs in my pool over the last two days and have no desire to swim with them. My best guess is that I can be rid of them by keeping the pool algae free, which has been a problem this summer. In the meantime, what is this bug that lives underwater, moves very slowly on land does not survive outside of the water, swims very quickly in trying to escape my net, and has my wife so freaked out she will not swim in the pool until they are gone?
Thank you,
Signature: Gary

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Gary,
This is the aquatic larva of a Dragonfly, commonly called a Naiad, a name shared with other aquatic larvae of flying insects.  We are very curious about your pool, which has algae as well as thriving aquatic insect life.  Do you not use chlorine or other pool chemicals?  Since Dragonfly Naiads are predatory, they need to eat other aquatic creatures, including the larvae of Mosquitoes, hence they are beneficial insects.  Dragonfly Naiads are not aggressive toward humans, and they will not hurt you or your wife.