Subject: Big black bug in my basement and it jumps
Location: Northeast Pennsylvania
September 23, 2016 6:10 pm
Hi bug man,
I have these big black bugs in my basement. I think they are crickets but I don’t hear them. Can you tell me what they are. I am attaching a picture.
Thank you.
Signature: Vito

Field Cricket

Field Cricket

Dear Vito,
This is indeed a female Field Cricket in the genus
Gryllus, and her sex is evident because of the long ovipositor at the tip of her abdomen.  She is silent because only the male Field Crickets chirp.

Daniel,
Thank you so much. She is a beautiful bug. Didn’t know that the females didn’t chirp.
Thanks again

Many years ago, when Daniel first moved to a small cottage in the Glassell Park neighborhood of Los Angeles, he had a male Field Cricket living in the drain of the sink in the bathroom.  It chirped for months.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: paper wasp and goldenrod
Location: Troy, VA
September 23, 2016 12:28 pm
Hi Daniel,
I thought you might like this for your goldenroad meadow. I believe the wasp is some kind of paper wasp. The goldenrod by my house is mostly attracting wasps. I haven’t seen much else on it so far
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Paper Wasp

Paper Wasp

Dear Grace,
Thanks for contributing to our Goldenrod Meadow tag.  We agree that this is a Paper Wasp in the genus
Polistes, possibly Polistes annularis which is pictured on BugGuide.

Subject: neon orange bug in Costa Rica with cool patterns
Location: Costa Rica
September 23, 2016 3:06 pm
Hola, My husband and I moved to Costa Rica a year and a half ago. We spend a lot of time photographing animals, wildlife and insects. Here is an interesting neon orange bug we came across with an interesting pattern. Any idea what kind of bug this is? We took this photo near the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica on the Pacific side. Gracias!
Kari P Silcox
www.happycoconutstravelblog.com
Signature: Kari Pinkerton Silcox

Flag Footed Bug

Flag Footed Bug

Dear Kari,
This spectacular insect goes by the very descriptive name Flag Footed Bug,
Anisocelis flavolineata.

Thank you so much for the quick reply!
Kari

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A bug I’ve never seen before.
Location: Nebraska
September 23, 2016 6:49 am
Check this out. What is it?
Signature: Josh Jordan

Earwig

Earwig

Dear Josh,
Congratulations on seeing your first Earwig.

Subject: Don’t even know where to start
Location: Kanagawa Japan
September 21, 2016 7:50 pm
I’m posting for a friend of mine. He’s stationed in Japan, Kanagawa area. Found this on a hill, walking on road. Not even sure if it’s a bug. Tried centipedes but didn’t find anything, tried mantis but that didn’t look right either. Maybe a catapiller of some sort?
Signature: Theresa

Lobster Caterpillar

Lobster Caterpillar

Dear Theresa,
The Lobster Caterpillar,
Stauropus fagi, is such an unusual looking creature it is really understandable that you did not know where to begin researching its identity.  Lepi-PHotos has some nice images of the adult moth.  According to UK Moths:  “The larvae live on the leaves of beech (Fagus), oak (Quercus), and several other trees.”

Thank you!  It’s funny it’s called a lobster caterpillar, I kept trying to figure out if mantis shrimp could be on land, like a bird had dropped it.
Thank you so much!
Theresa McIntosh

Subject: Gray flying bug with stinger
Location: Wilmington NC USA
September 21, 2016 5:52 pm
I live in Wilmington North Carolina and saw this bug in mid September at night.
Signature: Sincerely

Longicorn

Lesser Pine Borer

This is a female Lesser Pine Borer, Acanthocinus nodosus, which we identified thanks to an image in “Beetles of Eastern North America” by Arthur V. Evans, and we verified that identification with this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Medium-sized longhorn beetle, gray with distinctive pattern. Long antennae in both genders, but males have a tuft of hair on the fourth segment (see photo above) and significantly longer antennae than the females. Female has pygidium modified into a tube for ovipositing.”  So, what you thought was a stinger is actually the pygidium that is used by the female to lay eggs.

Awesome!! Thanks so much!!  Now I can brag to my fellow firefighters that I knew what that was!!
Thanks again!
Mike