Subject: A moth with a face, what is it?
Location: Las Salinas, Rivas Department of Nicaragua
July 24, 2016 12:09 pm
I am an expat in Las Salinas, Nicaragua by the Pacific Coast. I enjoy butterflies and moths. However about three weeks ago I photographed this moth that has a strange face. I cannot find any online resources to help me identity it. Any help would be grateful and appreciated.
Signature: Christy C. R. Kennedy

Scarlet Leafwing

Scarlet Leafwing

Dear Christy,
When attempting an insect identification, narrowing down the search to a family is always helpful.  This is a Brush-Footed Butterfly in the family Nymphalidae, not a moth.  Furthermore, it looked to us like one of the Leafwing Butterflies.  Our first clue was a matching thumbnail we found on Neotropical Butterflies, but alas, the name associated with the thumbnail, Pylene Prepona, was obviously incorrect, so we dragged the thumbnail into photoshop hoping it was named, and we got lucky as it was labeled
Siderone galanthis and that name led us to the Butterflies of Amazonia site and the Scarlet Leafwing.  The site states:  “The tribe Anaeini comprises of 87 neotropical species in the genera Coenophlebia, Anaea, Consul, Memphis, Polygrapha, Siderone, Fountainea and Zaretis. The butterflies are characterised by having a very rapid and strong flight. They have stout bodies, falcate wings, and on the upper surface are generally black, marked with bands of orange, bright red, or lustrous blue according to genus and species. The undersides of all Anaeini are cryptically patterned in mottled brown tones, and bear a very strong resemblance to dead leaves.
Siderone galanthis is distributed from Mexico to southern Brazil, and also occurs in the Caribbean on Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Trinidad.”  Butterflies of America also has some nice images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Suspected Eumorpha in Costa Rica
Location: Carara National Park, Costa Rica
July 23, 2016 12:25 am
Though I’m not positive, I think this caterpillar appears to be in the genus Eumorpha judging by its “tail”. I found it in Carara National Park in Costa Rica, where I saw more species of caterpillar than I could possibly count– it was wonderful.
Signature: Casey

Hornworm:  Eumorpha triangulum

Hornworm: Eumorpha triangulum

Hi Again Casey,
We agree that this is a Hornworm in the genus Eumorpha, and after searching through the Sphingidae of Costa Rica, we believe the images on that site of
Eumorpha triangulum Hornworms look the closest to your individual.

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: Idaho City, Idaho
July 23, 2016 7:42 pm
Found in Idaho City in July, beautiful but never seen one before! Could be because I’m from Ohio…
Signature: Meg shap

Banded Alder Borer

Banded Alder Borer

Dear Meg,
If we had to vote today on what we think the most beautiful North American beetle is, our vote would go to the Banded Alder Borer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Baja Bug
Location: Northern Baja California, Mexico
July 24, 2016 2:44 pm
Hi Daniel,
We encountered this big guy coming out of the mother-in-law’s tongue one night in front of our place in northern Baja Mexico. His body is about 2″ long!
Do you recognize him?
Thanks!
Signature: Dana and Alan

Palo Verde Root Borer

Palo Verde Root Borer

Dear Dana and Alan,
This is a Palo Verde Root Borer.

Thanks, Daniel!
xo
D & A

Dana Duff,
I did not realize that email came from you.  If you want more information on the Palo Verde Root Borer,
Derobrachus hovorei, you can check out the information on BugGuide where it states:  “attracted to lights” which might explain its appearance if there was a porch light lit.

Subject: What is this creature?
Location: Huntsville Alabama, outskirts of city
July 24, 2016 5:46 pm
Hi
I live in Huntsville Alabama and saw these insects on the railing of my deck. Never seen this creature before. Any id assistance would be appreciated! It’s been close to 100 degrees here, has now cooled off for the evening to about 80-85.
Signature: Carolyn Sanders

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Dear Carolyn,
We have a few images in our archive of mating Red Footed Cannibalflies,
Promachus rufipes, a large impressive species of predatory Robber Flies, but nothing comes close to your amazing images.  It looks like you were several inches away.  Though they are not aggressive toward humans, Red Footed Cannibalflies look quite frightening, so we applaud your courage in securing these awesome images.  We are also quite impressed the amorous pair did not fly away when you got close.  Though not aggressive toward humans, Red Footed Cannibalflies are able to take down very large prey, including stinging wasps and bees, on the wing, and we have read on Hilton Pond Center that a large Robber Fly can even prey upon a hummingbird.  We would also caution against trying to handle a living Red Footed Cannibalfly with bare hands as that would most likely result in a painful bite.

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Northern Maine
July 15, 2016 2:45 pm
We have many of these small green bugs around our house and we are wondering what they are?
Signature: Elizabeth Collins

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Dear Elizabeth,
This is a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil,
Polydrusus formosus, a species introduced from Europe.  According to BugGuide, it feeds on “primarily Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis).”