Subject: Dull green (beetle?) with spots
Location: Montreal, QC
July 20, 2014 4:13 pm
Hello, we were intrigued by this bug spotted on our cedar tree. We wondered what it might be. It’s about an inch long, it’s a dull olive green and has four faint black spots.
We think it’s a beetle because of the elytra?
Cheers and thank you!
Signature: Snowpea

Longicorn

Linden Borer

Dear Snowpea,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle or Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  We will attempt to determine a species for you.

Longicorn

Linden Borer

Eric Eaton provides an identification:  Linden Borer
Hi, Daniel:
Sure, this is a “Linden Borer,” Saperda vestita.  Nice beetle!
Eric

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: curious to find out what this is
Location: Western Virginia, Shenandoah National Park
July 19, 2014 6:28 am
Good morning Bugman.
My son and I were staying at a hotel in Virginia (just outside of Shenandoah National Park), in mid-July. He saw this creature on the wall, and this is one we’ve never seen before. It didn’t move, even after the flash from the camera. Thank goodness, because those mandibles look ferocious.
Signature: Bob M.

Female Dobsonfly

Female Dobsonfly

Dear Bob M.,
This is a female Dobsonfly, and your timing is perfect as we just posted an image of a sexually dimorphic male Dobsonfly.  Though his mandibles are much more impressive looking, they are unable to bite human skin, but the smaller and more utilitarian mandibles of the female are capable of delivering a painful bite that might even draw blood, so you should handle her with caution.  You can compare this image of a male and female Dobsonfly side by side and also view the courtship process.

Subject: duson fly ?
Location: blakeslee ,pa
July 19, 2014 2:59 pm
Hi i live in northeastern pa . I found this bug outside of my work on the wall and was wondering what it was? Many people were freaking out over it because of the way it looked and its size. It was about 5 inches long . Never saw one before.
Signature: lordnikon

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

Dear lordnikon,
Though you have the spelling wrong, you are correct that this is a male Dobsonfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I think I found a Cicada!
Location: Toronto, Ontario
July 19, 2014 5:05 pm
I wish I could have taken a better picture, but this not so little guy was hanging out on my second floor window. It’s been raining all day, so it looks like he found himself a nice spot to dry off. Aside from a little green at the base of his wings, he was mostly brown and grey, with the majority of grey found on his underside. He looked like he was wearing armor, with a buffe on his face and a breastplate.
I live in Southern Ontario, in Toronto.
Signature: Angelique

Cicada

Cicada

Hi Angelique,
You are correct that this is an Annual Cicada.  North American Cicada sightings tend to peak in August except in years where the Periodical Cicadas make a 17 year appearance in the late spring.

Subject: insect indentification
Location: Oklahoma
July 19, 2014 9:15 pm
Can you please help identify this insect?
Signature: Abigail

Treehopper

Treehopper

Dear Abigail,
We believe we have correctly identified your Treehopper as
Entylia carinata, based on this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they feed on:  “various herbaceous plants, especially Asteraceae” and “Commonly seen to be attended by ants” which form a symbiotic relationship with plant sucking insects like Aphids and Treehoppers because the Ants feed on the honeydew secreted by many free-living Hemipterans.

Subject: Ash borer?
Location: Cook County, IL
July 20, 2014 8:34 am
Hi bugmen and bugwomen,
I took this photo of an insect sunning itself on the side of my house. I searched your files and online.
the closest I could narrow the ID was to the BANDED ASH BORER beetle, but all the photos I found lacked yellow stripes across the thorax. Otherwise, it seems to be a close match.
is this a banded ash borer, or perhaps a relative?
We have been losing trees in the Chicagoland (IL) area at an alarming pace. (mostly elms and ash), and work crews were in my neighborhood felling diseased trees last week.
My guess is this bug is in the process or relocating to new food source.
Many thanks for all you do.
Signature: Jill A

Neoclytus scutellaris

Neoclytus scutellaris

Dear Jill,
You are quite astute to observe the similarities between your insect and the Banded Ash Borer,
Neoclytus caprea, since they are in the same genus.  According to BugGuide, there are 25 members in the genus Neoclytus in North America, and many look quite similar, probably requiring the actual examination of the specimen by an expert in the family Cerambycidae to determine the actual identity.  Based on the striping pattern on the thorax and head, we believe your individual is Neoclytus scutellaris, based on its similarity to this individual posted to BugGuide.  The species has no common name, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed in sapwood of (dead?) oaks, hickories, also grape.”  It is also worth noting that adults do not feed on wood, and they are most commonly found taking nectar from flowers, sap, fruit and other sweet substances.

Thank you for your response and reassurance! (I’m so glad this bug didn’t go on to feast on my elm tree). We have lots of native berry trees in our yard, and the bug was near our cherry tree when the photo was taken. Your description of it’s feeding habits makes sense.
Thanks, Jill