Subject: Daniel – Help, please?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
August 8, 2014 8:21 pm
Hi,
I was out in the back today and spotted this bug on what my seed packet says is Brown-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia triloba). Can you please help with identification when you have a chance?
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Aphid Wolf is Lacewing Larva

Aphid Wolf is Lacewing Larva

Hi Anna,
This is a highly beneficial Lacewing Larva or Aphid Wolf.  True to their common name, Aphid Wolves will consume large quantities of Aphids, though very young Monarch Caterpillars might also fall victims.
  Many folks have been writing in maligning this beneficial predator by stating they have been bitten by a Lacewing Larva.  Daniel was bitten by a Lacewing Larva once, but other than slight itchiness, there was no ill effect.

Thanks very much!  I’ve taken pictures of Lacewing Larva before, but with the point & shoot camera and the shots weren’t as good as this happens to be.  I didn’t recognize it.
Anna

Nice investment, that new camera.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly, Moth or Something Else?
Location: Iron Station, NC
August 8, 2014 5:26 pm
My husband photographed this pretty creature late afternoon August 8th on our concrete sidewalk. Can you please tell us what this is?
Signature: Ridgerunner

Clymene Moth

Clymene Moth

Hi Ridgerunner,
This pretty Tiger Moth is commonly called a Clymene Moth
When it reveals its lovely orange underwings, the religious illusion many folks see in the wings is no longer apparent.

Subject: found at a Mass Audubon Sanctuary
Location: Natick, MA
August 8, 2014 9:19 am
Wondering what this is. My son sent me the photo, so I don’t know if those are mandibles or legs or something else. And I don’t know how many pairs of wings it had.
Looks like a mantis or mantid fly or something like that.
Thanks.
Signature: glen

Thread-Legged Assassin Bug

Thread-Legged Assassin Bug

Dear Glen,
This appears to be a Thread-Legged Assassin Bug in the subfamily Emesinae, and the species it most closely resembles on BugGuide is
Stenolemoides arizonensis, a species reported from Arizona and Utah.  We suspect your individual is a different species that is perhaps closely related.  Those raptorial front legs are found in numerous species of unrelated insects that capture prey, including Mantids, Mantispids and Water Scorpions as well as the Thread-Legged Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of catipillar?
Location: Burlington county New Jersey
August 7, 2014 11:01 am
I lived in NJ all my life and have never seen this type of caterpillar. Today I found 3 of them in my backyard. The largest one I found floating in my pool. Each one I found was dead. What type are they? Are there any concerns I should have as I have children and a dog running around in the yard. I don’t have any gardens.
Signature: Monica

Four Horned Sphinx

Four Horned Sphinx

Dear Monica,
This is a Four Horned Sphinx or Elm Sphinx,
Ceratomia amyntor, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Sphingidae.  The common name refers to the four horns behind the head of the caterpillar, and it ignores the caudal horn which is a trait shared with most caterpillars in the family.  We are very curious what might have cause the demise of three individuals in such a short period of time.  The Four Horned Sphinx is a harmless species, despite its somewhat fearsome appearance.  Perhaps you have a nearby elm tree that is serving as food for the Elm Sphinx as it is also called.  In addition to elm, according to the Sphingidae of the Amercias site, the caterpillars feed on “birch (Betula), basswood (Tilia), black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) and cherry (Prunus).”  Living Four Horned Sphinx caterpillars are much more attractive than dead ones, and as you can see from this image, the Four Horned Sphinx is very well camouflaged while feeding.

Subject: Moth
Location: Coatesville, Indiana
August 7, 2014 11:31 pm
I found this moth in Coatesville, Indiana. It was the beginning of August, Midday. It had deformed wings, and you can see the size compared to my fingertips. It had a furry body, deformed wings, and it kept laying eggs or pellets on my fingers. the pellets were beige with a black dot in the middle and an almost tar-like substance on the bottom to attach it. I’m really curious what this little guy is called!!!
Signature: Deena B.

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Deena,
This Polyphemus Moth either has atrophied wings, or they have not completely expanded after emergence from the pupa.

Subject: Large moth
Location: South Indianapolis
August 8, 2014 8:54 am
This large (7″ wingspan) moth showed up on our patio and spent a couple days hanging out. I live in an industrial area just outside of downtown Indianapolis. This was the week of August 4, 2014.
He wasn’t afraid of anyone getting close to him, so I was able to get some good photos.
Normally, all you can see are his main wings. Only when he starts to feel threatened does he expose his lower wings (and eyespots).
I’ve looked at hundreds of pictures of moths, but couldn’t find any that matched its unique markings. The closest I could find was a Cecropia.
Signature: Ben Mc

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Ben Mc,
Like the Cecropia Moth, this Polyphemus Moth is one of the Giant Silkmoths in the family Saturniidae.  Many moths in the family were given names that reference mythology, and Polyphemus was a one-eyed cyclops that figures into the Odyssey, the story of the journey of Ulysses, also known as Odysseus.

Daniel-
WOW! Thanks for getting back so quickly. I never realized how many moths there really were. And they’re not just those grey little things that eat your clothes!
Thanks for being such a great resource-
Ben Mc