Subject: Megasomas for You
Location: Nogales AZ and Live Oak County TX
March 16, 2014 11:33 am
Hello bugman! I’m a fan of Your site. As an avid insect collector I have used Your site as a reference when trying to hunt down species for my personal collection. I felt like it is time for me to contribute as I have utilized You site as a reference. Here are pics of some of the lesser known/seen Megasoma species found in the U.S. Megasoma punctulatus from Nogales, AZ and Megasoma vogti from Live Oak County TX. I hope you enjoy the pics!
Signature: Sincerely, Swampyy82

Elephant Beetle Collection

Elephant Beetle Collection

Dear Swampyy82,
Thank you for the kind compliment.  Do you have a general collection, or do you specialize in Scarab Beetles?  Your photos are greatly appreciated.  According to Bugguide, the Texas Elephant Beetle is found in:  “south Texas and northeastern Mexico” and “Seven species of
Megasoma occur in the southwestern United States and Northern Mexico, only one of which occurs in Texas.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: small brown white carpet bug
Location: Austin, TX
March 11, 2014 7:23 pm
We found lots these bugs on our rug next to kitchen tile. At first we thought it was mouse dropings but eventually we realize they were alive. I have provide two magnified pictures. One picture is the top view and the other is the bottom view. The top view of the bug appears to show wings ont he tail section, how I have not observed these bugs in flight. We live in Austin Texas and the weather was in the 20 deg F a few weeks ago. Please identify and recommend way to control.
Thank you.
Signature: Allen

Varied Carpet Beetle

Varied Carpet Beetle

Hi Allen,
This is a Varied Carpet Beetle, a common and cosmopolitan household pest.
  We get numerous identification requests daily for Varied Carpet Beetles, so we are posting your images in the hope that it will help some folks who are currently being troubled by Varied Carpet Beetles.

Varied Carpet Beetle

Varied Carpet Beetle

Thanks Daniel…
I appreciate your quick feedback.
–Allen

 

Subject: Unidentified Weevil From Malaysia
Location: Malaysia
March 13, 2014 8:20 am
Hi, this is a weird weevil that i found on the dead tree in my backyard. This weevil has a weird eyes. Can you ID it for me?
Signature: Lanzz

Weevil

Weevil

Hi Lanzz,
We found a matching image of your Weevil on Some Wonderful Weevils of Malaysia and on FlickR, but it is not identified.  At this time, we are unable to provide any conclusive identification.

Weevil

Weevil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spotted moth in garden
Location: Baltimore, MD
March 13, 2014 1:13 pm
after planting a garden in Baltimore Maryland (downtown!) We started getting a bunch of strange bugs – is this just a standard moth, or something special? Late summer months. Thanks!
Signature: Jet Setter

Agreeable Tiger Moth

Agreeable Tiger Moth

Hi Jet Setter,
This Tiger Moth is in the genus
Spilosoma, and based on the number of black spots and the location of the sighting, we believe the best match is the Agreeable Tiger Moth, Spilosoma congrua, that we found pictured on BugGuide.  Picturing the abdomen would be helpful in the identification, because BugGuide notes:  “Adult: S. virginica has yellow markings on the abdomen, while S. congrua‘s abdomen is pure white.”

Subject: Flatworm from Peru
Location: Peru; near Iquitos
March 13, 2014 5:52 pm
I know this is not exactly a “bug”. However I d be very glad if u d be able to help me to identify this.. flatworm. Thanks for any suggestion :)
Signature: Jiri Hodecek

Planarium

Planarium

Hi again Jiri,
When we were contemplating the subtitle of Daniel’s Book, The Curious World of Bugs, we settled upon “the mysterious and remarkable lives of things that crawl” because “Bug” is a generic term, despite the fact that True Bugs are in the suborder Heteroptera.  If it crawls, we have room for it on our site.  Flatworms, including Planaria, are in the class Turbellaria, and when we attempted to research this identification for you, we discovered a nearly identical image on Stock Photography that interestingly was also taken at Iquitos, Peru.  Alas, it is not identified further than the class Turbellaria.  Another unidentified individual from the Andes in Peru is pictured on Age PHotostock.

Hello, yeah I guess its quiet impossible to ID it better, thank you! :)
Jirka

Subject: Strange bug.
Location: North East Florida
March 15, 2014 3:43 pm
Saw this strange bug on the hood of my Step Dad’s car. It is about 3 inches long and appears to have only 4 legs. I’ve never seen anything like this before. What on Earth is it?
Signature: Brandon

Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper

Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper

Dear Brandon,
This sure looks like a Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper,
Leptysma marginicollis, to us.  According to BugGuide, it:  “Inhabits wet areas, and is usually found on emergent vegetation such as cattails and sedges.”