Subject: What’s this moth?
Location: Northern Kentucky
July 31, 2016 6:10 pm
Just wondering what this is the kids found it on our property.
Signature: Fun in ky

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear Fun in ky,
Though there are several other large green moths native to North America, including the Pandorus Sphinx and the Pacific Green Sphinx, nothing looks remotely similar to the Luna Moth.  Other continents have relatives of the Luna Moth, including the Indian Moon Moth, but again, there is nothing else in North America that looks anything like this beautiful creature.

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug
Location: Summerset, South Dakota
July 31, 2016 11:25 am
I found this bug in my garage in South Dakota. It is about 6 times bigger than your standard cricket. All I am finding is the camel cricket, but it looks nothing like that.
Signature: Marci

Robust Camel Cricket

Robust Camel Cricket

Dear Marci,
Most images of Camel Crickets we receive are the species that proliferate in damp basements.  Your individual is an outdoor species, the Robust Camel Cricket,
Udeopsylla robusta, which we identified thanks to images on BugGuide.  Though BugGuide does not include any South Dakota sightings, there are North Dakota sightings and sightings from states to your east and south.

Subject: unusual big moth
Location: kerala- India ,asian continent
July 31, 2016 12:23 pm
Hai.. I am from india.. Its south of india.. I saw a large moth in my bedroom .. I was scared.. Wn i saw it clearly i realized its not a common one in india.. So i took some pictures of it.. I searched about it.. Is it Eumorpha pandorus??????… Is it migrated to india???…
Signature: Deepthi

Oleander Hawkmoth

Oleander Hawkmoth

Dear Deepthi,
Eumorpha pandorus, the Pandorus Sphinx, is a North American species, though it is green like your native Oleander Hawkmoth.  The Oleander Hawkmoth has greatly increased its range due to the cultivation of its larval food plant, the oleander shrub.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee?
Location: Mogollon Rim near Payson AZ
July 31, 2016 11:03 am
Good Morning!
I found this colorful insect on a flower in the Tonto National Forest in Eastern Arizona July 30, 2016.
We were hiking along the Mogollon rim at an elevation of 5,000 feet.
Thanks for your help!
Signature: Ann in Arizona

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Ann,
This Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae might be
Macromya crocata based on this BugGuide image, though there are many other members of the family that look quite similar.  Another possibility is that this might be Adejeania vexatrix which according to BugGuide:  “Bristles concentrated in rings adjacent to the joints between abdominal segments. In the strikingly similar Hystricia abrupta, the bristles are scattered across the surface of the abdomen.”

Subject: Beetle ID
Location: Anchorage, AK
July 31, 2016 10:37 am
Although born and raised in Anchorage, this year is the first I’ve come across this beetle. I can not seem to find any Alaskan reference (picture) on the web, so I’m turning it over to you. The sample photo’d was found while working in a flower bed. A couple of more came up while raking out some heavy moss in the yard. (They seemed to be under the moss.) They definitely do not like light and run until they can hide their body under something, or can burrow into loose dirt or a crack. (This one was very hard to photograph.) They are at least 3/4 inch long and possibly closer to an inch. Other than the size, the iridescent horns on the rear edges of thorax is the most distinctive feature.
Signature: Rich Johnson

European Ground Beetle

European Ground Beetle

Dear Rich,
Based on this BugGuide image, we are confident this is a European Ground Beetle,
Carabus nemoralis, a species that was introduced from the Old World.  Its North American range, according to BugGuide is:  “n. US & Canada, absent from Great Plains (BG data) native to Europe, adventive in NA (in the east: NF-MN-ne.VA; in the west: BC-CA to AB-UT; isolated in the Saskatoon area, SK).”  According to the Natural History of Southeast Alaska:  “Introduced species so far (as of 2011) known only from Sitka, where it does not seem to be uncommon” and “First reported from Alaska in Sitka, adults seem to be relatively common around yards/gardens by May and into June, though not later in the summer.”

Thank you so much for the ID; the photo attached to your link is my guy.
Given the climate around south central I’m not too surprised they are this far north of Sitka.
We’ve also just had two of the mildest winters and warmest summers that I can remember.
(And I’m Anchorage born & raised, and over 60.)
I’m sure they are not seen much due to their apparent aversion to daylight, which can be tough to avoid in the summer up here.
All the best, and thank you again.
Rich

Subject: What big spider is this?
Location: Wrightsville
July 31, 2016 4:08 am
I saw this spider this morning on Wrightsville Beach, NC. It’s thorax is about 1.5 to 1.75 inches and the legs extend another 1.5 inches.
A multicolored thorax (brown with white spots) and legs with dark fur on the joints.
Love to tell the kiddos here at the beach house what kinds of spider they found.
Thanks!
Signature: Curious Beach Bum

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Dear Curious Beach Bum,
This Golden Silk Spider,
Nephila clavipes, gets its common name from the color of its incredibly strong silk.  North Carolina is the northernmost point of its range, according to BugGuide, which continues as far south as Argentina.  More information is available on BugGuide where it states:  “Like other spiders, this one will bite in self-defense, especially if you go out of your way to provoke it (in particular, by handling or picking it up). Spiders have venom which enables them to incapacitate their prey. However, the bite of most species is described as much less severe than a bee sting.”