Subject: Hard Ball
Location: Florida
September 21, 2014 2:25 am
Hello. I just was wondering what are these small,hard, orange balls found on carpet? If they’re insect related
Signature: Raquelle Alexander

Resin, we believe

Resin, we believe

Dear Raquelle,
We do not believe these droplets are insect related.  They appear to be resin droplets to us.  Check if the ceiling beams are oozing resin.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: Foxboro,MA
September 20, 2014 11:34 am
Just wondering what type of bug this little guy is. He has a small round red head, his body is black , flat and he has two long antenna with 4 small greenish legs and two greenish grasshopper like legs . He’s kinda cool . It looks like there is also a little red segment between his head and body and like he has 2 smaller antenna or feelers on top of his head but under the longer antenna. I hope this is enough info to figure it out.
Signature: Hope to hear back, Thank you. Cathy

Handsome Trig

Handsome Trig

Hi Cathy,
This beautiful Red Headed Bush Cricket,
Phyllopalpus pulchellus, is sometimes called a Handsome Trig.  The ovipositor which resembles a stinger indicates that this individual is a female.

Handsome Trig

Handsome Trig

Subject: not a fruit fly
Location: Toledo District, Belize
September 20, 2014 3:29 pm
Hi, folks,
Just sending this along for fun; thought you might get a kick out of it.
My kitchen is open air and we get plenty of critters, but this was a first.
Signature: Tanya

Fiddler Crab

Blue Land Crab

Hi Tanya,
What a pretty little Fiddler Crab, and what a poser.  The Smithsonian has a nice article on Fiddler Crabs.

Hello, Daniel,
Glad you liked the photo.  But it’s not a fiddler crab.  It’s a blue land crab (Cardisoma guanhumi) also known as duppy.  They get very large (“huge” says my Peterson Field Guide).  The one in the picture is a small, young animal.  When the mating season is on, they run in large numbers.  Their claws are capable of puncturing vehicle tires which is a hazard when they cross roads in swampy areas.  They are very tasty and are a much-prized delicacy in Belize.
I’m having lots of fun (and learning plenty) reading through the archives of WTB.  What a terrific job you and your small staff are doing.  Plenty of stars in your crowns.
Regards,
Tanya

Thanks for both the compliment and the correction Tanya.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Creepy Tree Bugs
Location: Abingdon, Virginia
September 20, 2014 2:29 pm
My 7-year-old was climbing a dogwood tree in our front yard when she suddenly started shrieking. She said there were bugs everywhere, and there were stains on her shirt where she had squished several. Once I got her down, I examined the tree and found this pile of little beasties. It is mid-September, and we are in the mountains of Southwest Virginia. She has climbed this tree in all seasons, but we haven’t seen these bugs before. They freaked her out pretty bad. What are they? Also, are they harmful? Thanks!
Signature: Staying Out of Trees for Awhile

Bark Lice

Bark Lice

Dear Staying Out of Trees for Awhile,
We hope we can mitigate any trauma your daughter experienced because of her encounter with these Bark Lice,
Cerastipsocus venosus.  Let her know that Bark Lice, which are sometimes called Tree Cattle, are benign creatures that are not harming the tree, though their presence might be symptomatic of a tree health issue.  Bark Lice feed on lichens and fungus, and sometimes older trees have fungus and lichens present.  The Bark Lice will not bite or otherwise harm humans.  See BugGuide and this University of Florida pdf for additional information on Bark Lice.

A herd of Tree Cattle, AKA Bark Lice

A herd of Tree Cattle, AKA Bark Lice

 

Subject: Madagascan cricket
Location: Ifaty, Madagascar
September 20, 2014 2:07 am
Are you able to id this Madagascan cricket? Seen on a night visit to a small nature reserve at Ifaty on the coast of south west Madagascar.
Signature: Niall Corbet

Unknown Ensiferan

Conehead Katydid

Hi again Niall,
We are contacting Piotr Naskrecki about this Ensiferan as well.

Thanks Daniel, I look forward to his thoughts.
Cheers, Niall

Karl Provides and Identification:  September 23, 2014
Hi Daniel and Niall:
I believe this may be the same species as in the previous post, Colossopus grandidieri, but a sub-adult this time. Hopefully Piotr Naskrecki can confirm, correct or clarify. Regards Karl.

We are always appreciative of your excellent research Karl.

Many thanks Daniel. I would never have guessed that they were the same species! Is the pale coloured one a female and the dark one a male?
Regards, Niall

Subject: Cricket, Madagascar
Location: Ifaty, Madagascar
September 20, 2014 2:53 am
Another cricket from Ifaty in south west Madagascar – any ideas for id?
Signature: Niall Corbet

Ensiferan

Conehead Katydid:  Colossopus grandidieri

Hi Niall,
We believe this Ensiferan or Longhorned Orthopteran is a type of Katydid.  We are contacting Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki regarding both of your submissions.  The red eyes and blue legs are quite distinctive.

Katydid possibly

Conehead Katydid

Karl Provides Identification:  September 23, 2014
Hi Daniel and Niall:
It looks like the Conehead Katydid (Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae), Colossopus grandidieri. The species is wingless but the dark coloration suggests that it is likely and adult. There really isn’t very much information available online for this species; what there is has been posted mostly by German breeders. The common name may be Giant Cricket or Tiger Cricket, both erroneous since it is not a cricket, and it is endemic to Madagascar, perhaps only the southern part of the island. The literature for C. grandidieri is very sparse and there seems to be some confusion or ambiguity between this and a related species, Oncodopus zonatus. Based on what I could find on both species I would go with C. grandidieri. Regards. Karl

Thanks so much Karl.  We are surprised that such a gorgeous Conehead Katydid is not better documented.