Subject: What the heck is this thing?!
Location: Suriname, South America (Amazon)
March 21, 2014 6:15 am
Hi,
My name is Josh Lassiter and my father Terry sent me a picture of a bug that he saw in Suriname, South America. It is CRAZY and I would love to know what it is. Can you all help?
Signature: Whatever is normal

Fulgorid Planthopper:  Lystra species

Fulgorid Planthopper: Lystra species

Hi Josh,
This is a Fulgorid Planthopper in the genus
LystraPinterest identifies is as a Red Dotted Planthopper, Lystra lanata.    According to PBase, it is also called a Waxy Tailed Planthopper.  Birdspiders.com posits another species possibility, Lystra strigata, also called a Red Dotted Planthopper, and we would entertain the possibility that the two species might actually represent different taxonomic opinions about the same species.  The waxy filaments on the posterior end are a secretion, presumably for protection.

Thank you so much for your quick response! I really appreciate it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant ant bee
Location: Los Angeles
March 20, 2014 5:37 pm
Found it hiding under a wet sack of soil in the garden. Cool outside, but not cold.
Signature: Sirochs

Potato Bug

Potato Bug

Dear Sirochs,
Say hello to the Potato Bug, the most iconic of all Los Angeles insects.  Potato Bugs or Jerusalem Cricket are found throughout the western United States, but they are most commonly encountered in the southwest.

Subject: WTB
Location: Mexico City
March 20, 2014 6:38 pm
This bug apeared recently (beginning of march) in the washbasin of my bathroom, they are very very small (1mm) apear by night, maybe 10 or 15, when I disturb them with my fingers they take tremendous jumps. If I fill the basin with water they drawn during the night. The foto is of a drowned one, very magnified.
I live in Mexico City.
I hope you can help me identify them, in any case thank you!
Signature: Guillermo

Springtail

Springtail

Buenos Dias Guillermo,
The creature in your photo is a Springtail, a hexapod in the class Collembola.  They might be the most populous creatures on the planet and they are basically benign, or actually beneficial as they help organic matter to decompose and break down into humus.  They jump by means of an organ called a furcula.  According to BugGuide:  “Species with a furcula are jumpers; the furcula is normally folded under the abdomen, and the insect jumps by suddenly extending the furcula ventrally and posteriorly.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Springtails indoors should be ignored, as they cause no health threat whatsoever and will quickly die or disperse as the areas they frequent dry out.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: weird arthropod
Location: Windhoek, Namibia
March 19, 2014 2:42 pm
Hi, I found this very fascinating arthropod in my garden ( today at night, Windhoek, Namibia ). It is about 4cm in length and brightly coloured. 3 pairs of legs. About 12 segments with small paranota. It has a very small retractable soft head. It can coil up half way ( not fully like a centipede ) and is rather sluggish. It keeps “cleaning” itself with a special tail gland ( weird ). we have a lot of rain recently and more snails than usual. I found it close to some snails.
Could you please help to id it and what does it prey on ? Does it feed on small snails, maybe dead ones ? Is it a predator or rather a scavenger ? Is it Poisonous ?
Thanks,
Signature: Steve

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

Hi Steve,
Morphologically, your arthropod looks very similar to the larval form of two families of beetles in North America:  Firefly Larvae in the family Lampyridae, with individuals posted on BugGuide, and Net Winged Beetle Larvae in the family, also with individuals posted to BugGuide.  Eric Eaton once told us that if you want to be sure of the difference, place the larva between a snail and a mushroom.  If it goes after the snail, it is a Firefly larva.  If it goes after a mushroom, it is a Net Winged Beetle larva.  Firefly Larvae are predators that feed on Snails and Slugs.  They are not poisonous.

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

Hi Daniel,
A Ph.D. candidate at the University of Arizona is seeking information on White-lined Sphinx Moth larvae, especially large aggregations of them.
I have posted her “Wanted!” poster on the LepSoc Facebook page, and I told her I’d also send them to you (PDF and JPEG formats, attached) to be considered for sharing on What’s That Bug?
Julian P. Donahue
WANTED!

WANTED

WANTED

Hi Julian,
We are unable to post large files to What’s That Bug? so we included a link to the large pdf and a smaller version as a visual.

 

 

Subject: Inch long far hairy yellow flying insect
Location: Walnut creek California
March 19, 2014 11:21 pm
I found this bug dying on my lawn today and am wondering if it is anything to be concerned about with respect to sting allergies? I have not seen it before and it’s size is concerning: an inch long, maybe more, very yellow and very hairy
Signature: Not needed

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

This is a male Valley Carpenter Bee, and we just featured a posting of a sighting in after our own posting with a Mount Washington, Los Angeles sighting.  Male Bees, including Valley Carpenter Bees, are incapable of stinging because the stinger is a modified ovipositor, an organ for laying eggs, and only female bees can lay eggs.  Female Valley Carpenter Bees are black.