Subject: Leaf Beelte
Location: El Paso, Texas
August 3, 2014 7:51 pm
I found this beetle, resting on a leaf of grass after a light rain. I believe it belongs to the genus Calligrapha, but I have not been able to find any species with the same markings.
Signature: R. Avila

Leaf Beetle:  Calligrapha species

Ambrosia Leaf Beetle

Dear R. Avila,
At frist we agreed that this is a Leaf Beetle in the genus
Calligrapha, but like you, we are uncertain of the species.  Many species in the genus look quite similar and there is also considerable individual variation within the species.  We did a bit more research and we are relatively confident that this is an Ambrosia Leaf Beetle, Zygogramma tortuosa, and you can compare your images to those posted on BugGuide.

Ambrosia Leaf Beetle

Ambrosia Leaf Beetle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Male Lady Bird Spider
Location: Valais, Switzerland
August 4, 2014 5:17 am
We discovered these male Lady Bird Spiders today in Cotterg, Valais, Switzerland. We looked them up online and were led to your website where we found out they are a rare and endangered spider. We saw THREE of them today, and wanted to share our photos with this wonderful site for others to enjoy this beautiful spider.
Signature: Swiss Sarah

Male Ladybird Spider

Male Ladybird Spider

Dear Swiss Sarah,
Thanks for sending your documentation of male Ladybird Spiders in Switzerland.  We guess it is mating season there as the brightly colored male Ladybird Spiders are out searching for the drastically different looking, sexually dimorphic female Ladybird Spiders that rarely leave their burrows.

Subject: Leaf Bug
Location: Phrao, Chiang Mai, Thailand
August 3, 2014 7:29 pm
Hi bugman
I’ve tried to look this one up but always found bugs that were far too small to be this one and looked too different. From what I remember when I took this photo was when I tried to get it down to have a closer look it took flight and flapped more like a bird then buzzing bug. Kind of freaked me out. Maybe I was seeing things but if you can confirm what this is it would be great. Thanks for the hard work.
Signature: PsychPeter

Katydid

Katydid

Dear PsychPeter,
This is some species of Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae, and most species of Katydids from all over the world are excellent leaf mimics.  We will try to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide a genus or species for this individual
that looks very similar to a Sylvan Katydid, Cratioma sp., Piotr identified for us in the past.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big beetle
Location: Denver City, TX
August 3, 2014 6:23 pm
Hi I thought this was some longhorn beetle but I can’t find one colored like this! It was found outside my home in Denver City, TX.
Signature: JoLynn

Longicorn

Longicorn is Stenaspis solitaria

Dear JoLynn,
You are correct that this is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, but we do not recognize the species.  We will post your image and hopefully get some input from our readers.  We will also contact Eric Eaton to see if he recognizes this lovely red bycid.

Cool!! Thank you!!! Can’t wait to hear what exactly it is!! We have lives here 4 years (in 38 acres) and have never seen one!
JoLynn

Longicorns are often very host specific.  Can you provide the names of the most common trees on your property?

Eric Eaton provides an identification
Daniel:
This is an unusual color form of Stenaspis solitaria.  Most specimens are completely black!  Texas has some populations that look like the one in the image here.
Eric

Ed. Note:
According to BugGuide:  “They love to fly around on hot days. Not common in so. TX but somewhat common in the Big Bend area and extremely common in so. AZ (Dan Heffern, pers. comm.)”

Subject: Stabby the Bug
Location: San Francisco, CA
August 3, 2014 5:57 pm
My wife felt something biting her in bed and caught this guy red- proboscis-ed. We live in San Francisco, California (west Side, nearish the ocean). The bug is about 3-4mm and has a long proboscis which is why I named it “Stabby rather than “Bitey”. I can tell that it is not a bed bug and my best guess is a true bug maybe related to a minute pirate bug. These are known to stab people when their usual preferred prey is not around…but the head shape and the coloration look wrong to me. Thanks in advance!
I apologize in advance if this is a repeat but I realized I never actually verified the last one went through (which may not be something the site does, so sorry for that, too)
Signature: Hernan

Bug Eyed Bug

Bug Eyed Bug

Dear Hernan,
We find your letter terribly entertaining.  The first thought in our mind when we looked at the images was “my what big eyes you have”, and sure enough, our research on BugGuide revealed that this is a Big Eyed Bug in the genus
Geocoris.  According to BugGuide the habitat is  “On ground between clumps of weeds and sparse grass, especially in sandy places, in woods and near streams” and they are “generalist predators of small arthropods.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Big-eyed bugs are among the most abundant and important predaceous insects in many crops in the US.”  Based on that information, it seems highly possible that the individual that bit your wife came in from the outdoors.  As far as the bite is concerned, we are attempting to research other information on bites to humans, and we are relatively certain your wife was not mistaken for a small arthropod.  Additional information is available on Featured Creatures and the Cornell University Biological Control site.  It is sad, but it seems that whenever we write about the possibility of a beneficial insect biting or stinging a person, paranoid individuals attribute horrible reactions to the situation, much like the recent spate of comments we have received regarding the bites from Lacewings.  We like to maintain an open dialog and an interactive site, and we refrain from editing comments, but quite frankly, the internet has become the refuge of paranoid kooks who are trying to protect themselves, their children and their pets from every perceived threat in the world.  Thanks again for your wonderful submission with its excellent images.  It isn’t hard to imagine “Stabby” jabbing that impressive proboscis into tender flesh, but we maintain that is a rarity, and countless millions of encounters between people and Big Eyed Bugs go unnoticed.

Big Eyed Bug

Big Eyed Bug showing proboscis

Big Eyed Bug

Big Eyed Bug us a tiny insect.

Subject: odd beetle with white collar
Location: Lapeer, MI
August 3, 2014 5:29 pm
Can you tell me what type of beetle this is? It is about the size of a dime. I found it in my kitchen sink and it could have come in with some fresh cut flowers I brought last night. It reminded me of the hermit flower beetle, except for the white “collar”. Is it safe to release back in to my garden? Thanks for any information you can give me!
Signature: Pat

American Carrion Beetle

American Carrion Beetle

Dear Pat,
This is an American Carrion Beetle,
Necrophila americana, and according to BugGuide:  “Adults consume fly larvae (maggots) at carrion, as well as some carrion.”  Perhaps there is a dead animal nearby, though they also feed on fungus including mushrooms.

Thanks for responding so quickly!  I had not seen a beetle like that around my property before and was curious.  I set it free and it immediately disappeared under some vegetation.  All kinds of “new to me insects” around my yard this year!
Pat