Subject: Blister beetle?
Location: Hyderabad, India
August 5, 2015 9:40 pm
I would like to know what type of bug this is.
Signature: Rekha Sekhri

Man Faced Bug

Man Faced Stink Bug

Dear Rekha,
The first clue we had to your Stink Bug’s identity was a posting on Project Noah that identified a similar looking insect as a member of the genus
Catacanthus with the common names Man Face Bug or Red Stink Bug.  Scientific American identifies the Man Faced Stink Bug as Catacanthus incarnatus, includes a nice illustration with red, orange, yellow and cream colored variations within the species, and notes:  “Discovered in 1778 by British entomologist, Dru Drury, the species hails from Southeast Asia and India, where it congregates in dense groups of several hundred on fruit trees and flowering flame trees. Man-Faced Stink Bugs can come in several colours, such as red, yellow, orange and cream, and it’s thought that these mostly bold colours exist to warn predators that the bug is either poisonous or at least tastes horrible. The bizarre face pattern could also function as a defence mechanism, with the pseudo-eyespots drawing attention away from the vulnerable head area.  Also known as shield bugs, Man-Faced Stink Bugs have a thick, hardened extension of the thorax, called a scutellum, that covers and protects the top of its abdomen. It sometimes has two prominent black dots on its scutellum, but always has a pair of big, black spots on its leathery wings.”  India Nature Watch includes an image of a mating pair of yellow Man Faced Stink Bugs.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?!
Location: Groveport, ohio
August 5, 2015 2:16 pm
I found this guy on the screen of one of my 2nd story Windows. When I first saw him in the morning on Aug 5th 2015 in Ohio, he was a normal black/brown combo. Later in the day there was a 2nd bug similar to the first only smaller. It appeared that the larger of the 2 was eating the smaller. While this was going on, the larger bug turned almost a lobster red!
Signature: Jen Kelly

Wheel Bug post metamorphosis

Wheel Bug post metamorphosis

Dear Jen,
We believe you misunderstood what you observed.  We suspect you believe the larger Wheel Bug ate the smaller because the smaller was an empty husk, but rather than predation, we believe you observed the metamorphosis of the larger Wheel Bug and that you mistook the exuvia or shed exoskeleton for the prey.  Immediately after metamorphosis, the adult Wheel Bug is bright red, but as its new exoskeleton hardens, it darkens to a gray color.  Wheel Bugs are the largest North American Assassin Bugs, and they have mouths designed to pierce and suck body fluids from the prey.  Though bites to humans are not common, we have gotten reports and we always caution that careless handling might result in a bite.  Wheel Bugs are not considered dangerous to humans, though there are related Assassin Bugs, the Blood Sucking Conenose Bugs, that are known vectors for the spread of Chagas Disease.

Wheel Bug post Metamorphosis

Wheel Bug post Metamorphosis

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Subject: Odd beatle like desert insect
Location: High Desert
August 5, 2015 2:23 am
Found this one in my house near Joshua Tree National Park.
Signature: VLH

Charlie Brown Blister Beetle

Charlie Brown Blister Beetle

Dear VLH,
Your beetle is
 Pyrota palpalis, a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, and we are not certain what prompted some comic influenced entomologist to bequeath it with an amusing name, but it is commonly called a Charlie Brown Blister Beetle.

Charlie Brown Blister Beetle

Charlie Brown Blister Beetle

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant bug Canada
Location: Canada
August 4, 2015 7:12 pm
I saw this giant bug on my run today. I thought it was a water bug but it almost looks like it has a stinger, what is it?
Signature: Cindy

Cicada

Cicada

Dear Cindy,
This is a Cicada, and you may be familiar with the loud buzzing sounds Cicadas produce, often from the tops of trees in the late summer.

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Subject: ID request
Location: upstate NY
August 4, 2015 7:59 am
Hello my name is Jack and I live in upstate NY. A few days ago my niece found what seems to be a catipillar but I am not sure. My niece and I attempted to find it on the Internet bit we had no such luck. So if you have any idea what type of bug this is my niece and I would gratefully appreciate it. Thank you
Signature: Jack

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Dear Jack,
This Luna Moth Caterpillar can be distinguished from the very similar looking Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar because, according to BugGuide:  “Larva lime-green with pink spots and weak subspiracular stripe on abdomen. Yellow lines cross the larva’s back near the back end of each segment (compare Polyphemus moth caterpillars, which have yellow lines crossing at spiracles). Anal proleg edged in yellow. Sparse hairs.”  The large size and pink coloration indicates that this is probably getting ready to pupate, which it does in a cocoon loosely spun around a fallen leaf.  Because of your northern location, the cocoon will pass the winter and the adult Luna Moth will emerge in the spring.  BugGuide indicates:  “One brood in the north, May-July. Three broods in the south, March-September.”

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So I just got home and I found one  .  Of these Ivory Marked Beetles on my back door outside. I didn’t know what it was, so I got a sandwich bag and put it in and it bit me through the bag.
Kiko

Round Headed Apple Borer in a Plastic Bag!!!

Round Headed Apple Borer in a Plastic Bag!!!

Dear Kiko,
We are attaching two images to your comment for posting purposes, an image of a Round Headed Apple Borer as well as an image of an Ivory Marked Beetle,  both members of the same family, the Longhorned Borer Beetle family Cerambycidae.  If we were put in a plastic bag, we would bite to get out as well.  Longhorned Borer Beetles have to chew their way out of wood, where they have been feeding as larvae often for many years, after they metamorphose into adults.

Ivory Marked Beetle in a Plastic Bag!!!

Ivory Marked Beetle in a Plastic Bag!!!

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