Subject: What kind of bees are these???
Location: Springfield Pa
July 5, 2015 10:34 am
Can someone please tell me what kind of bees these are? We noticed them last week and sprayed where they seem to be making a nest in the arm of our awning? We thought we got rid of them and now they are back.
When my 4 year old sees them she wont go outside:(
Thanks in advance for your help!!
Signature: Dina

Giant Resin Bee

Giant Resin Bee

Dear Dina,
This sure looks to us like an invasive, exotic Giant Resin Bee,
Megachile sculpturalis, and you can verify our identification by comparing your image to those on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “They are opportunistic and nest in existing wooden cavities, rather than excavating their own. Effectively pollinate kudzu, another invasive species.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragon fly or Crane Fly?
Location: Denton, MD
July 4, 2015 5:17 pm
After a short rainfall, this guy was bouncing around our door. We do have a garden pond and a river 2streets over. Never seen one with black & whitesteipes legs before.
Signature: Leslie

Phantom Crane Fly

Phantom Crane Fly

Dear Leslie,
Your Phantom Crane Fly image is quite nice.  The bold markings cause the Phantom Crane Fly to appear and disappear when flying through dappled light.  Your image is a nice example of Compartmentalized Space.

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Subject: anteater/poop bug
Location: calgary, alberta, canada
July 4, 2015 12:05 am
Where shall I start? Well I’m an avid fisher in alberta and tend to come across alot of creepy crawlers on my trips. Aswell as a fishing enthusiast, I am a bug lover….. like a HUGE bug lover. I talk to bugs, name them, baby talk with them, form friendships. (Except mosquitos, I loathe those blood sneaking, greedy little bastards! !!) Any who, upon one of my visits to chain lakes (alberta canada) I stumbled upon an adorable little creature. At first I thought it was a poop, a small bird poop. That is, until I saw it move. Upon closer inspection I noticed he had an anteater looking snout. I fell in love with this adorable little critter ! I named him Henry (pronounced on-ri) I think he was french canadian. Well I spent a good half hour admiring Henry and his adorable qualities. He crawled about doing his bug thing while I doted on his endearing qualities. I spent a good 10 minutes taking over 30 pictures of my new found friend. I adored him enough to want to take him home, but loved him enough not to keep him, alas he belongs in nature as Jesus/alah/budah intended. I eventually placed my sweet little buglet on a soft blade of grass and bid my farewell. Well, here I am at past midnight sitting on my couch bed admiring my phenomenal studioesque portraits of Henry when I decided to Google what kind of bug Henry is. I tried “bird poop bug” and “ant eater bug” to no avail, until stumbling upon you site. To you I plead, please help me identify Henry. I must know what beautiful creature grazed my life for just a brief moment. Your help is greatly appreciated!.
Signature: yours truly, Miss Panda

Withy Weevil

Withy Weevil

Dear Miss Panda,
We found your inquiry positively entertaining, and far more enjoyable to research than the typical, terse identification requests we typically receive.  We found your Poplar and Willow Borer Weevil,
Cryptorhynchus lapathi, identified on the Ibycter blog where it is called a “bird-turd weevil”, and then we turned to BugGuide for additional information.  BugGuide provides the common names:  “Poplar-and-Willow Curculio, Mottled Willow Borer, Willow Beetle, Withy Weevil” and states:  “Adults and larvae are associated with various species of willow, poplar, alder and birch (Salicaceae, Betulaceae); larvae mine young stems.”

Withy Weevil

Withy Weevil

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Subject: Space alien or slug?
Location: Western pennsylvania
July 4, 2015 2:37 pm
July 4th found crawling under grill cover.
Sewickley , PA suburb of Pittsburgh
Signature: Johnnie dex

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar with Osmeterium

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar with Osmeterium

Dear Johnnie dex,
This is a Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar, and it will eventually become an adult Tiger Swallowtail, a large yellow and black striped butterfly.  Your individual has everted its osmeterium, the forked organ that emits a foul odor, acting as a defense mechanism when the caterpillar feels threatened.

Thank you Daniel,
I had also identified the caterpillar as that of a tiger swallowtail. Although sorta creepy
looking I’m glad I left the caterpillar alone to go its way as eventually a butterfly may result.
Thank you for your quick response.
John

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Subject: What is this bug
Location: Lake Kiowa, TX
July 4, 2015 4:20 pm
Hi Bugman!
My kids & I are visiting north Texas and we came across this extremely large flying bug. I’m including 2 pics, one for scale.
Signature: Curious Traveller

Deceased Cicada Killer

Deceased Cicada Killer

Dear Curious Traveller [sic],
This magnificent Cicada Killer looks quite dead and we can’t help but to wonder what happened during your encounter to take it from being an “extremely large flying bug” to one that will fly no more.  Cicada Killers are not aggressive and we have never received an authenticated account of a person being stung by a Cicada Killer.

Thanks for the response. My youngest daughter was in my parents’ backyard playing frisbee with her cousins when the cicada killer was spotted. She ran in to get me (terrified), and by the time I got out there, one of her cousins had killed it.
Thank you for your help identifying it. We are better informed now!

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Subject: please help me identify this bug
Location: near austin Texas
July 4, 2015 1:36 pm
I found this bug swimming in my pool before i was going to clean it. Whatever is on its back looks interesting and im not sure how to identify it. I saw it swimming for a while then it nestled on the bottom of the pool. When i nudged it with a small stick to see if it was still alive it was not. So i carefully took it out and captured a picture of it. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
Signature: From Troy Godwin

Male Giant Water Bug with Eggs

Male Giant Water Bug with Eggs

Dear Troy,
This is a male Giant Water Bug in the genus
Belostoma.  After mating, the female cements the eggs onto the back of the male who then guards them until they hatch.  This is one of the very few examples from the insect world where the male plays any part in the care of the young.  You can verify our identification by viewing this image from BugGuide.

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