Subject: large beetle
Location: west end of St Thomas, USVI
November 29, 2016 5:26 pm
Hi, Bugman.
I live in the US Virgin Islands. After coming home today, I noticed a large (about 9 cm long) brownish-black beetle hiding in a notch in the outside of our balcony railing. I was hoping I could get a better photo if it came out from its hiding spot after dark, but it hasn’t moved yet. I tried identifying it going on the assumption that it’s a stag beetle, but I’ve been going in circles trying to pinpoint the species. Can you help me?
Signature: Stumped on St Thomas

Stump Borer

Stump Borer

Dear Stumped on St Thomas,
This is NOT a Stag Beetle.  It is a Prionid or Stump Borer in the tribe Mallodonini.  I greatly resembles the Hardwood Stump Borer,
Mallodon dasystomus, a North American species that is known to range as far south as Columbia.  It might be the same species as this Prionid from Puerto Rico.  The site Insectoid has a checklist of species from the Caribbean.  According to the Worldwide Cerambycidae Photo Gallery, Hovorodon bituberculatum  is found on St Thomas.  The mandibles on your individual indicate it is a male.  We would advise that you steer clear of those mandibles as they look like they might do some damage.

Hi, Daniel.
Thank you for all the information. He’s still in his spot on our railing, and looking more and more like the male Hovorodon bituberculatum. I agree that his mandibles look strong and sharp and I will definitely stay out of their way.
~Mae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug found
Location: Adelaide
November 29, 2016 1:06 am
Hi there I was just wondering if you would be able to tell me what sort of bug this is, as I’ve never seen one before and quite curious. Thanks heaps
Signature: Laken ilott

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Laken,
This is a Mole Cricket, a common subterranean dweller found in many parts of the world.

Subject: Earwig no forceps
Location: Logan Canyon, Utah
November 29, 2016 12:49 am
I found an unfamiliar bug that resembles an earwig. Although it looked similar, it was missing the forceps located near the rear of the insect. I extracted the DNA to see if I could use sequencing data to figure out what the insect was. My results came back as an isopod which made no sense (a pillbug). I am still trying to figure out what this bug is or the order it might belong in. If you have any advice I would appreciate it.
Signature: Linsee Park

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear Linsee,
This is a Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae which is very well represented on BugGuide, but alas, there is not enough detail in your image to determine an exact species identification.  We are quite curious about the DNA testing you conducted.  Was it part of a educational program?  We fondly remember our own Fruit Fly data from a high school genetics class experiment that was so very wrong.  If your results were part of a student experiment, the error makes much more sense than if funds were expended through a for profit company.

Thank You! That helps me out a ton and gives me another place to keep researching. We conducted the DNA test for my Genetics lab course. I am currently an undergraduate at Utah State University. We used the Roche High Pure DNA Extraction kit and we amplified the 648bp region in mitochondrial cytochrome-c oxidase subunit 1 gene using the Promega PCR with GoTaq amplification kit. I was wondering if region of mitochondrial DNA that we amplifed are to conserved between different orders of insects. Could that be a possibility?
Thanks Again!
Linsee Park

Hi again Linsee,
Thanks for the DNA clarification.  Alas, our editorial staff does not have the necessary science background to answer your questions regarding shared DNA among the lower beasts.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Glowing objects in tree
Location: Long Island
November 29, 2016 7:10 am
This is a similar siting to this post:
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2015/04/20/glowworms-or-christmas-tree-lights/
It is not a hoax, not Christmas lights, and not any other artificial lights. This happened just after sunset on a chilly evening. The site is on long island. The glowing was steady and not flashing. It was pitch black, and I had to use a 30 sec exposure. For the most part the glowing was green, but some reds came out in the long exposure. My tree had the most activity but you can see some in the neighbors tree as well. The tree was a linden tree. What is this?
Signature: GD

Laser Lights

Laser Lights

This looks like a Laser Lights holiday display to us.

I agree, yet I couldn’t find the source. I will check again tonight.
Thanks,
Glenn Dahl

Subject: Mystery caterpillar
Location: Dubai UAE
November 27, 2016 10:57 pm
Hello,
Students found this caterpillar in Dubai UAE. We are having a difficult time identifying it. Do you recognize it?
Signature: Nichole and grade 3

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Nichole and grade 3,
This appears to be a Lappet Moth Caterpillar from the family Lasiocampidae.  We will attempt to locate potential species in the UAE.

Subject: Big? Larvae?
Location: Philadelphia
November 27, 2016 6:27 pm
Hello
I used to see a random one or two of these in my bathroom and recently have been finding them in the kitchen working thier way to dropped dry catfood
Signature: LK

Carpet Beetle Larva

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear LK,
This is a Carpet Beetle larva, a common household pest that will eat many organic materials in the home, including shed pet hair and natural fibers in carpets like wool.