Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Fort MIll, SC
July 21, 2014 1:12 pm
Just took a photo of this dude. Can you identify it for me. The only picture I found of it on the net also did not identify it. Thanks. Keep buggin’
Signature: Dr.Weetabix

Treehopper

Treehopper

Dear Dr. Weetabix,
Three days ago, we posted an image of this Treehopper which we identified as
Entylia carinata.  The two images are so similar that at first we thought this was a duplicate submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mason Wasp?
Location: Western Pennsylvania
July 21, 2014 12:02 am
I found this on a walk through the woods today and after thorough investigation, I couldn’t quite find a match to any other wasp. The blue tinted wings and black/white body pattern lead me to believe it’s a mason wasp(?), although I don’t know enough about bees/wasps/hornets to confirm. It’s hard to tell in the picture, but the legs and antennae were both bright yellow, which I have yet to see on a Google search of any other. Help me identify? Thanks!
Signature: c.g.

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

Dear c.g.,
This is an Elm Sawfly,
Cimbex americana, and though Sawflies are classified in the same order, Hymenoptera, as Wasps, they are not true wasps and they do not sting.  The larvae of the Elm Sawfly are frequently mistaken for Caterpillars.

Subject: Black and White Herringbone Caterpillar
Location: Western Massachusetts
July 21, 2014 8:12 am
Bugman,
We found this guy in our native butterfly garden and after researching with fields guides, we still can’t seem to figure him out. We found it around aster and nettles and various native plant species. It likes to coil up like it is pictured.
Thanks so much!
Signature: Project Native

Unidentified Caterpillar

Unidentified Caterpillar

Dear Project Native,
We have delayed posting your images while we unsuccessfully attempted to identify your Caterpillar.
  Our best guess is that this might be an Owlet Caterpillar closely related to the Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars in the genus Cucullia, which feed on asters, but none of the examples posted to BugGuide look exactly like your individual.  According to BugGuide, the larvae are:  “usually smooth (hairless) and very colorful, with mixed patterns of spots, stripes, and/or patches of mostly yellow, red, green, blue, and black – the range of variation between species is too complex to describe in general terms.”  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had.

Unidentified Caterpillar

Unidentified Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black bug
Location: Gunnison, Colorado
July 21, 2014 5:08 pm
I found this bug in my home. I thought it was a bee at first but then with a closer look it seemed to be an oversized fly. I looked up horseflies but the bug I found had widest eyes. What is it?
Signature: Audrey

Bot Fly

Bot Fly

Dear Audrey,
There is enough detail in your images for us to determine that this is a Bot Fly in the genus
Cuterebra, the Rodent Bot Flies, but we haven’t the necessary skills, and we suspect there is not enough image detail for even an expert to determine a species identification.  You can compare your image to this individual from BugGuide that also is identified only to the genus level.  According to BugGuide:  “Females typically deposit eggs in the burrows and “runs” of rodent or rabbit hosts. A warm body passing by the eggs causes them to hatch almost instantly and the larvae glom onto the host. The larvae are subcutaneous (under the skin) parasites of the host. Their presence is easily detected as a tumor-like bulge, often in the throat or neck or flanks of the host. The larvae breathe by everting the anal spiracles out a hole (so they are oriented head-down inside the host). They feed on the flesh of the host, but only rarely does the host die as a result.”

Subject: What is this?
Location: Maryland
July 21, 2014 9:33 pm
I saw your presentation a few years ago and a friend posted a picture on Facebook today wondering “what’s that bug” and no one seemed to know so I figured I’d ask.
Signature: Mr. Burk

American Dagger Moth Caterpillar

American Dagger Moth Caterpillar

Dear Mr. Burk,
This very distinctive caterpillar is an American Dagger Moth Caterpillar,
Acronicta americana, and according to BugGuide, its habitat is:  “Woodlands and forests, especially mesic to swampy bottomlands” and “The caterpillar’s hairs can cause skin irritation.”  Just our of curiosity, which presentation did you see?  We are guessing it was the Getty lecture

Subject: Confused Californian
Location: Stream in Northern Sierra Nevada Mountains
July 21, 2014 10:17 pm
Hello!
I found this guy on a dry rock in a small stream in the far northern Sierra Nevada mountain range. One of my friends said it looked like a “cross between a bee and a long horned beetle.” then he quipped that was not possible. I was surprised as he is hard to stump!
Signature: S. Dykstra

Lion Beetle

Lion Beetle

Dear S. Dykstra,
When we first received some excellent images of a Lion Beetle,
Ulochaetes leoninus, in 2009, we were quite confused and amazed ourselves.  BugGuide now has many more images of this unusual Cerambycid, but there is still no information posted on the Info page.  According to the Introduction to California Beetles by Arthur V. Evans & James N. Hogue:  “The Lion Beetle … looks and behaves just like a bumblebee, even attempting to sting with its ovipositor.  When disturbed, the Lion Beetle raises its abdomen forward over its back while flapping its wings, reinforcing its bee-like appearance.”