Subject: Orange grasshopper Florida
Location: 27.3724769,-80.3443463
February 23, 2015 1:23 pm
Hello!
We saw a few dozen of these on the base of a tree by a southeastern river hammock near the natural fall-line about 5 miles inland from the Indian River lagoon. It is not listed on insectidentification.org, and 10-15 mins of web searching yielded nothing that closely resembled what I saw. Sorry for the poor quality image, but I did not have my good cameras with me (we were fishing), so a cellphone cam is the best I could do. The appearance of these grasshoppers is unique enough to be identifiable, even with the poor image.
Thanks for any info you may be able to offer.
Cheers,
Signature: RetroJoe

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper Hatchlings

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper Hatchlings

Dear RetroJoe,
These are recently hatched Eastern Lubber Grasshoppers,
Romalea microptera, a common flightless species in the south with two color variations.

Thanks, Daniel!
I thought that was the most likely possibility, but I had not seen them in such an early phase before.
Thanks again,
Joe

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Subject: Caterpilar with feathers
Location: Hyderabad
February 24, 2015 3:21 am
Hi,
I found this Caterpillar in my garden and was curious to know what is the name of this bug.
Thanks
Signature: Jacinta

Baron Butterfly Caterpillar

Baron Butterfly Caterpillar

Dear Jacinta,
We remember posting a similar image in the past and we located this posting of a Baron Butterfly Caterpillar, Euthalia aconthea, from our archives.

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Subject: Long Fine Webs + Egg clusters on trees. Los Angeles.
Location: Whittier, Los Angeles
February 22, 2015 12:09 pm
Hello,
I live in the Whittier area of Los Angeles. I’ve noticed long fine webs and occasional egg clusters on my deciduous trees branches, and a young bougainvillea. The bougainvillea was eaten down to the stems, not sure if related.
Webs span between branches, and are usually single strand. The webs can become come somewhat more complex in crook of branches or near buds. The small white eggs can be singles, but I have seen long clusters of 1 dozen or so. I never notice any insects present.
My trees are young, between 1-4 years old. Not sure if I should be concerned, or if I should treat. Don’t want to let it get out of hand if its dangerous to my trees. FYI – trees are various fruits, and several Mexican Redbud.
Any insight would be helpful. Thanks.
Signature: Erin

Web with Eggs

Web with Eggs

Hi Erin,
Webs are generally associated with spiders, but your web and eggs are not related to spiders.  Many caterpillars spin silk, but caterpillars do not lay eggs, so we don’t think this is related to a Moth.  We will post your images and continue to research your submission.

Web with Eggs

Web with Eggs

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Subject: Metallic wheeled beetle
Location: Buckinghamshire, England
February 22, 2015 12:06 pm
Hello, I’m a gardener living in the south of England. I saw these beetles living on a rosemary bush. There was about 15-20 of them. I saw the over two seasons on the same rosemary bush but never anywhere else in the garden or in England for that matter.
Any ideas?
Signature: Jackson Rowe

Rosemary Leaf Beetle

Rosemary Leaf Beetle

Dear Jackson,
You have the hands of a gardener.  Your beetle is a Rosemary Leaf Beetle,
Chrysolina americana, which is sometimes called merely a Rosemary Beetle.  Knowing that it feeds on a single plant in your garden, Rosemary, is a good way to search for its identity.  According to UK Safari:  “Despite the scientific name, this beetle is a native of southern Europe.  It was first noticed in the U.K. in the early 1990’s and has since become well established.”  You can locate additional information on the Royal Horticultural Society website where it states:  “The larvae and adults feed on the foliage of rosemary and related plants.  Rosemary beetle is a pest that eats the foliage and flowers of various aromatic plants, such as rosemary, lavender, sage and thyme.  Initially rosemary beetle was found mainly in London gardens, but it is rapidly spreading and is becoming widespread throughout England and Wales, and possibly further north.”

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Subject: Moth laying eggs
Location: Spring Hill, Florida
February 22, 2015 10:53 am
My friend sent me this interesting photo of a beautiful moth laying eggs on her car cover. I have tried Google and the only thing I can find close to it is the Leopard moth.. but I am confused because this moth has red.. and I can not find any moth that looks like this at all?
Signature: Tina

Eyed Tiger Moth laying Eggs

Eyed Tiger Moth laying Eggs

Dear Tina,
Your identification of a Giant Leopard Moth,
Hypercompe scribonia, is correct, and the species is also known as an Eyed Tiger Moth.  The reddish mark on the thorax is an area where the scales have worn away, revealing the exoskeleton.  Here is an image from BugGuide of an individual with a similar bare spot on the thorax.

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Subject: new bug
Location: Bend Oregon
February 21, 2015 11:47 pm
this is a new bug all over my house we were on vacations to Thailand for 2 weeks and the day I got back I notice this bug all over the house, is not in the rooms just in the kitchen and the living room! but in the last two hours I saw 5 of them… please help me
Signature: Marian

Beetle

Cedar Tree Borer

Hi Marian,
We are requesting assistance from Eric Eaton to help identify your beetle.

Hi Eric,
It looks a bit like a checkered beetle, but the person from Bend Oregon who sent the picture has indicated that significant numbers are appearing inside the home, which makes me wonder if it is a wood borer.
Daniel

Eric Eaton provides identification:  Cedar Borer
Daniel:
It is indeed a longhorned woodborer, the Cedar Tree Borer, Semanotus ligneus.  Here’s the Bugguide link:
Yes, they are likely emerging from firewood, but potentially from the structure itself, or cedar furniture.  For reasons still unclear, when a beetle larva is trapped inside milled lumber, it frequently extends the life cycle of the larva by years, sometimes decades.  Then, suddenly, beetles are popping out of whatever the lumber was used to build.
Eric Eaton

Hi Again Marian,
Eric Eaton has identified your Cedar Tree Borer, and Bugguide indicates it feeds on “Juniper, Cedar”
in the larval stage.  Since you found significant numbers in the home, we are speculating that wood that was infested with larvae resulted in a mass eclosion or emergence.  Perhaps there was some firewood in the home, or perhaps you bought a recent piece of cedar or juniper furniture made with infested wood.

Daniel and Eric thank you so much! yes there was so firewood (juniper) inside.
Thank you again !
Marian

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