Subject: Red eyed flies
Location: Toledo District, Belize
September 13, 2014 3:42 pm
Hello again folks,
I took a few photos of new fungi and did not notice the flies until I downloaded the images. These are very small insects.
Thanks in advance.
Signature: Tanya

Vinegar Flies

Vinegar Flies

Dear Tanya,
These sure look like Vinegar Flies in the genus
Drosophila to us.  One member of the genus, Drosophila melanogaster, commonly called a Fruit Fly, is used to teach genetics and you can read more about it on the University of North Carolina web page called The Wonderful Fruit Fly.  Of the family, BugGuide notes they feed upon:  “Decaying fruit and fungi also fresh sap and nectar from flowers.”

Thanks so much, Daniel.  I will read more about these critters on the links you provided.  Your website is terrific; it’s the only one I go to daily and spend lots more time than I intended.
Mediterranean fruit flies are an agricultural pest in this area; it’s not uncommon to spot the little white cardboard triangle traps in fruit trees in the nearby town when there is concern about an outbreak.
Tanya

Hi again Tanya,
Thanks for the compliment.  Mediterranean Fruit Flies are in a different family, which is why we referred to your individuals as Vinegar Flies.  The Vinegar Flies can become a nuisance in the home with overly ripe fruit, but they are not considered an agricultural pest.  They are also associated with bars and taverns that serve sweet, sticky liquors and they are frequently found inside opened bottles with pour spouts.

Thanks, Daniel,  I was reading the UNC site about lab use of fruit flies just now.
The fruit flies we find in swarms in the kitchen from time to time are probably Vinegar flies then.  I never got a close look and certainly never thought to photograph them.  The red eyes were a surprise — very cool.
Thanks again.  I’m turning into a WTB addict.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats that bug! Spider!
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
September 13, 2014 6:22 pm
I found the super cool spider that I have never seen before in Southern Nevada! Could you help me identify it?
Signature: Thanks bunches! Victoria Rebholz

Immature Western Black Widow

Immature Western Black Widow

Hi Victoria,
This is an immature Western Black Widow,
Latrodectus hesperus, and you can compare your image to this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Caution: Anyone bitten by a western black widow spider should receive prompt and proper medical treatment. While the black widow is considered the most venomous spider in North America, death from a black widow spider bite is highly unlikely.  For the most part, the black widow’s bite may be felt only as a pin prick, during which the spider’s fangs inject a minute amount of highly toxic venom under the skin. The severity of the victim’s reaction depends on his or her age and health, and on the area of the body that is bitten. Local swelling and redness at the site may be followed in one to three hours by intense spasmodic pain, which can travel throughout the affected limbs and body, settling in the abdomen and back (intense abdominal cramping, described as similar to appendicitis), and can last 48 hours or longer. Elderly patients or young children run a higher risk of severe reactions, but it is rare for bites to result in death; only sixty-three having been reported in the United States between 1950 and 1959 (Miller, 1992). Other symptoms can include nausea and profuse perspiration. If left untreated, tremors, convulsions and unconsciousness may result. When death does occur, it is due to suffocation.

Subject: Big Spider Bear Lake Idaho
Location: Fish Haven, Idaho
September 13, 2014 9:47 pm
Saw this big spider on our walk today near Bear Lake on the Idaho side. It was sitting (standing?) in the road. It is mid-September, leaves are changing, and has been a wet fall. Is it venomous? Dangerous? Tried to talk my friend into putting her hand down beside it for a size reference but she refused…something about being afraid of spiders. It was bigger than a silver dollar but smaller than the toy poodle walking with us.
Signature: Thanks

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

We believe this is a Trapdoor Spider, but we have not had any luck identifying it on BugGuide.  We hope one of our readers will provide us with something more specific.  Large Trapdoor Spiders might bite if carelessly handled, but they are not considered dangerous to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Pollinator for Orange Coneflower
Location: North Carolina, United States (near Chapel Hill)
September 14, 2014 8:36 am
Hello, I have recently been studying bugs and have been unable to identify the little bugger you see below. The bug itself seems to hang around the orange coneflower (rudbeckia fulgida) quite a bit and always lands on the outer extensions of the head of the flower before heading to the center portion. Thanks!
Signature: Connor McFadden

Possibly Square Headed Wasp

Possibly Square Headed Wasp

Dear Connor,
Your image is not sharp enough to be certain, but we believe this might be a Square Headed Wasp in the subfamily Crabroninae, and it looks similar to this image posted to bugGuide.

Subject: Need Beetle ID
Location: Olympia, WA, USA
September 13, 2014 9:51 pm
I found this beetle on May 12th of this year near Olympia, Washington, USA. It was in a weedy patch in a garden. Surrounding the garden was a deciduous forest of bigleaf maple and red alder and a douglas-fir forest, on separate sides of the open area. The bug was about 30 meters from any set of woods. Never seen a beetle like it. Any ideas?
Signature: JD

Unknown Beetle

Click Beetle

Hi JD,
Upon opening your digital file, our first impression was that you submitted an image of an Ironclad Beetle, but upon browsing through the images on BugGuide, we don’t believe that is correct.  We will try to get some assistance from Eric Eaton, though we don’t believe we will hear back from him until later in the week.  Meanwhile, we are open to suggestions and assistance from our readership.

Update:  Click Beetle,
Thanks to Bugophile who identified this Click Beetle as being in the genus
Danosoma, and for providing a link to BugGuide.

Subject: Head of a crawfish body of a cricket
Location: Norfolk VA
September 13, 2014 6:09 am
My cousin in Norfolk had this thing crawling on his porch what is it lol
Signature: Anonymous

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Anonymous,
We knew immediately upon reading your subject line that you were inquiring about a Mole Cricket, and this is not the first time we have received an identification request comparing a Mole Cricket to a Crayfish.