Subject: identify bug
Location: plymouth mass
July 17, 2016 10:18 am
Just wondering what type of bug this is
Signature: lara killen

Caterpillar Hunter Carnage

Caterpillar Hunter Carnage

Dear Lara,
This is the larva of a Caterpillar Hunter, one of the Ground Beetles in the genus
Calosoma.  It looks like someone killed it, so we are tagging this posting with Unnecessary Carnage.  Many people kill insects with which they are unfamiliar out of irrational fear.  This is a beneficial species and we hope that should you encounter another in the future, you will let it survive to eat caterpillars.  Caterpillar Hunters are important natural control agents for Gypsy Moths and others.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown damselfly or dragonfly
Location: NE San Diego county
July 17, 2016 2:25 pm
Hi! Saw this beauty hanging out on the sunny side of my house for several hours. When it flew away, it was flying like a damselfly or dragonfly. It is about 2″ long, and at first I thought it might be a female dobsonfly but it didn’t appear to have mandibles or a wide body.
Signature: -LP

Antlion

Antlion

Dear LP,
This is neither a Dragonfly, a Damselfly, nor a Dobsonfly.  It is an Antlion, one of the Neuropterans that are related to Lacewings and Owlflies.

Subject: Strange Bug
Location: Northwestern West Virginia
July 11, 2016 9:11 pm
Hello. I’ve found a strange insect that hangs around my house and all of my plants. I have researched and I can’t seem to figure out what type of bug this is. I am hoping to get some help. I live in West Virginia and I have been seeing this insect since the beginning of spring.
Signature: – Madison

Spotted Apatelodes

Spotted Apatelodes

Dear Madison,
This fascinating moth is a Spotted Apatelodes,
Apatelodes torrefacta, and you can compare your image to this BugGuide image.  Most of the images of the Spotted Apatelodes on our site are taken from below, and your image has a better vantage for appreciating the subtle beauty of this interesting moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swallowtail Butterfly Alaska
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
July 11, 2016 6:10 pm
Here is the ONLY photo of one of the yellow Swallowtail butterflies that I have seen in Alaska. I can’t believe I don’t have more pictures. I will be on the look out for more photos now that I know you are interested.
I think have seen at least 2 different species of yellow swallowtail here in Anchorage. This is one of them, and please correct me if I’m wrong, but it is the Canadian Tiger Swallowtail. (Taken in Anchorage, Alaska May 2010)
Signature: MsRobin

Canadian Tiger Swallowtail

Canadian Tiger Swallowtail

Dear MsRobin,
We are very happy we decided today to look back over the past two weeks to see if we missed anything in the 100s of unanswered emails, and we discovered the request we made from you, unopened in the mailbox.  We agree that this is most likely a Canadian Tiger Swallowtail,
Papilio canadensis.  You may enjoy our own account of trying to get a decent image of the Western Tiger Swallowtails that frequent our office garden.

 

Subject: Some sort of parasite?
Location: Lafayette, NJ
July 12, 2016 12:53 pm
I found a most curious thing today while out hiking – an asian multicolored lady beetle with it’s shell open, wings extended, and what appears to be some sort of growth or parasite on its back. I’ve never seen anything like this before and can’t come up with any explanation. So, hoping you can have a look at these photos and perhaps solve the mystery?
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

What Parasitized the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle???

What Parasitized the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle???

Hi Deborah,
Though we cannot at this time provide you with a conclusive identification of what parasitized this Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle,
Harmonia axyridis, we hope that whatever it is will help reduce the populations of this invasive Lady Beetle that is displacing many native species.  Our best guess is that it is the pupa of a Tachinid Fly or some parasitic Hymenopteran.  According to Featured Creatures:  “All insects have predators, parasites/parasitoids, and/or pathogens. Ladybirds are not exempt. Larvae of Epilachna borealis and E. varivestis are attacked by a native tachinid fly (Aplomyiopsis epilachnae (Aldrich)) which specializes in the genus Epilachna. Larvae of E. varivestis also are attacked by a eulophid wasp (Pediobius foveolatus, see above). This wasp is a parasitoid of other epilachnine ladybirds in India, and was introduced into the USA specifically to control Epilachna varivestis. Another native tachinid fly, Hyalmyodes triangulifer (Loew), is less specialized, attacking larvae not only of Epilachna varivestis, but also of Coleomegilla maculata, several weevils, and a pterophorid moth. Perhaps the best known of the parasitoids of ladybirds is the braconid wasp Perilitus coccinellae (Schrank). It attacks adult ladybirds and to a lesser extent larvae and pupae (Obrycki et al. 1985). It attacks Coccinella septempunctata, Coleomegilla maculata, and several other species. Many other parasitoids and pathogens of ladybirds are not mentioned here for lack of space.”

Thanks, Daniel – I just wasn’t quite sure what I was seeing, although some sort of parasite makes the most sense.
Interestingly, I have been seeing more native lady beetle species this summer in our area – many more than in past summers.  I am very encouraged by this as I know the asian has really hurt our native species.
Debbi

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Connecticut
July 12, 2016 7:20 pm
Found crawling in yard in CT today, July 12, 2016. Can you help identify? I’m thinking some kind of beetle.
Signature: Rich P

Diving Beetle

Predaceous Diving Beetle

Dear Rich,
This is a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the genus Dytiscus, possibly Dytiscus harrissii that is pictured on BugGuide.  Its range, according to BugGuide, is “transcontinental in Canada, also in the northeastern US and Alaska; most common in the east (in the Great Lakes region), rare in the west.”  Of the entire genus, as this might be a different species, BugGuide notes the habitat is “permanent or temporary freshwater ponds and pools …, plus streams and rivers; usually found on or among aquatic plants” and “adults fly from March to November (varies by species).”  Though this is an aquatic predator, they are capable of flying from pond to pond.