Subject: Beetle identification
Location: East central Alabama
May 2, 2016 8:01 am
This beetle caught my eye she was so bright! I live in Alabama I just moved here and live within many pine trees. I am afraid it is a bad beetle for my trees so I would love to get an identification so I know whether to worry about them or not.
Thank you in advance. I’m in no hurry.
Signature: Jodie Edwards

Male Rainbow Scarab

Male Rainbow Scarab

Dear Jodie,
This beautiful Dung Beetle is a male Rainbow Scarab.  Males of the species have a single horn, while female Rainbow Scarabs have no horn, though both have lovely metallic coloration.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Cincinnati Ohio
May 1, 2016 9:25 am
May 1st in Cincinnati Ohio
Flying, lots of them, near a newly built deck. Landing on skin which caused a bit of irritation.
Looks like a very small stink bug.
Help!
Signature: NoMoBugs

Tarnished Plant Bug

Tarnished Plant Bug

Dear NoMoBugs,
We located a matching image on FlickR that is identified as Lygus lineolaris and when we researched that name on BugGuide, we learned it is the Tarnished Plant Bug.  Earlier today we posted a very similar image from California that we believe is a Western Tarnished Plant Bug.

Subject: Please identify this insect for me
Location: Attica, Greece
May 2, 2016 12:07 pm
Hello, I saw this very interesting creature flying above me, than managed to catch it on cam. Do you know what it is? I’d really appreciate it.
Signature: George

Spoonwing Lacewing

Spoonwing Lacewing

Dear George,
This delicately beautiful insect is a Spoonwing Lacewing or Threadwing Lacewing in the genus
Nemoptera.

Thank you so much for your quick response, you are awesome!
George

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yikes big moth or what?
Location: Lake Stevens, WA
May 2, 2016 11:53 am
Identify please is this a sphinx or moth or freak of nature ? 😜
Lake Stevens wa lived in WA my entire life this is creepy cool.
Signature: Stephanie

Sphinx Moth: Smerinthus ophthalmica

Sphinx Moth: Smerinthus ophthalmica

Dear Stephanie,
This is indeed a Sphinx Moth, albeit one with no common name.  We identified it as
Smerinthus ophthalmica on Sphingidae of the Americas, and verified that ID on BugGuide.  This species was quite recently determined to be distinct from the One Eyed Sphinx, and we would not completely rule out that as the correct identification.

Wowwwww
Totally cool they are bigger over here too 2 nd summer I’ve seen them at my house they came outta nowhere I have a wetland behind so it’s very cool.

The nearby wetlands makes perfect sense because according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on Salicaceae including willows (Salix spp.), cottonwoods (Populus spp.), and quaking aspen (P. tremuloides)” and willow grows in wet areas.

Haaaa haaaa I have willow in my yard and there’s cotton woods in wetland that’s funny.
They are really magnificent HUGE. I did a double take when I saw him I thought was fake :)
But they seem harmless could they be damaging to my trees then?
I am just blown away by him. I’ve seen some weirdo bugs these last couple years and being I’m 42 and lived in same county forever and never seen them it’s a little shocking to see things that look like prehistoric critters

The caterpillars eat the leaves and we seriously doubt there would be so many caterpillars as to defoliate your trees.  In our opinion, they are doing no damage to the trees.

Cool ty
If never spray anyway I’m not a creepy crawler fan but it’s harmful to the vast wildlife I have. I just leave them be in peace. Don’t worry I won’t kill it :)
I only kill spiders if they enter my turf and is bigger than a me haaaa Haaa
Wetland I get some monsters I do spray outside to deter them but once in awhile I get a sneaker I’m aware they are in my home but if I don’t have to I won’t kill it I will scoop him up and back out.
I wouldn’t kill the moth he’s pretty cool and I think it’s a rare treat I got to actually see him chilling out in the sun

 

Subject: Leaf Beetle?
Location: Trinity County, Ca. 1,500′ elev.
May 1, 2016 5:30 pm
We have an infestation of hundreds of beetles that are on our ash tree and lilac bush underneath it. They are very active in the late afternoon in the high 80’s and the ash tree is being defoliated. They are also working out on the lilac bush and it is becoming sickly looking. Looking at pictures they seem to resemble a leaf beetle but I’m no bug person. Can you help?
Signature: Larry Winter

Plant Bug: Possibly Orthops scutellatus

Plant Bug: Possibly Western Tarnished Plant Bug

Dear Larry,
These are definitely NOT Beetles.  We believe they are Plant Bugs in the family Miridae.  It resembles
Orthops scutellatus based on this and other BugGuide images, but that species feeds on carrots and other Umbelliferae according to BugGuide.  Perhaps an even better match is the Western Tarnished Plant Bug, Lygus hesperus, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it is “Widespread in the western North America in agricultural and relatively low elevation regions extending from southern BC to northern Mexico.”

Plant Bugs we believe

Plant Bugs we believe

It seems to be the Western Tarnished Plant Bug, Lygus hesperus.
Thanks so much for your help.  They seemed to like my ash tree, and lilac and are leaving my strawberries alone for now.
Larry Winter
Hyampom, Ca

Subject: Is this a kissing bug?
Location: North Central Alabama
May 1, 2016 12:56 pm
We found this bug in our home in Alabama and are concerned that it might be a kissing bug. We would appreciate any information on what bug this is and if it is a kissing bug, what do we do to insure we don’t have any more in our home?
Signature: Alabama Fan

Kissing Bug

Bee Assassin

Dear Alabama Fan,
We have gotten numerous identification requests over the past year since there has been increased news coverage on Kissing Bugs and most have proven to be other species.  In your case, though your image lacks critical clarity, it appears that this really is an Eastern Blood-Sucking Conenose Bug or Kissing Bug,
Triatoma sanguisuga.   Tropical members of the genus are most likely to spread Chagas Disease, but BugGuide does note:  “Sometimes bites humans, and the bite may be severe, causing an allergic reaction.”  Insects can enter homes through open windows and doors, gaps in the frames of windows and doors, and cracks in the foundation.  You should do a thorough inspection to determine the likeliest places an insect might gain entry and seal those points.

Thank you very much for the prompt response. My husband killed it and thankfully no one has any bites of any kind.  We will definitely be checking for any entry points and seal them.
I truly appreciate your help.

Update:  After a comment from Cesar  Crash and then Alabama Fan agreeing with Cesar, we are making a correction to the identification of the insect we now believe to be a Bee Assassin.