Subject: What kind of caterpillar is this?
Location: Ames, IA
October 26, 2014 1:53 pm
Hello,
I have found this caterpillar in the grass while taking my dog on a walk. I would like to know what species of caterpillars it is and what it will become. I was hoping this website would help me.
Thanks!
Signature: Emily

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Emily,
Your caterpillar is a Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar,
Hyles lineata.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Catapillar invasion

Location: Pacifica CA
October 26, 2014 2:42 pm
I have been invaded by hundreds of these catapillars around the outside of my house … Can you please give me some info on these critters – thanks !
Signature: Gina

Genista Broom Caterpillar

Sophora Worm

Hi Gina,
Your caterpillar is known as a Sophora Worm, the larval form of the Genista Broom Moth,
Uresiphita reversalis, and you can verify our identification by viewing this matching image on BugGuideAccording to Bugguide:  “‘Sophora Worm’ is reference to the native host genus: Sophora.  ‘Genista Broom Moth’ is an odd common name for a native North American moth as Genista (common name of ‘broom’) is an Old World genus, family Fabaceae.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Larvae feed on Acacia, Baptisia, Genista, Lupinus, Texas Mountain Laurel (Sophora secundiflora) and other pea family shrubs. Also reported on Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) and honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.)” so we are speculating that one of those plants might be growing in your yard.

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Subject: longish wingy forest bug
Location: Mount Rainier National Park, WA, USA
October 26, 2014 10:19 am
Hi, I found this bug in the woods on Mount Rainier near Carbon Glacier in August. What is it? PS love you guys.
Signature: – Haley

Stonefly

Stonefly

Dear Haley,
This is a Stonefly in the order Plecoptera, but we are not certain of the species.  According to BugGuide:  “nymphs occur primarily under stones in cool unpolluted streams; some species occur along rocky shores of cold lakes, in cracks of submerged logs, and debris that accumulates around stones, branches, and water diversion grills.  spring and summer adults may be found resting on stones and logs in the water, or on leaves and trunks of trees and shrubs near water.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: black beauty
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
October 25, 2014 7:49 pm
This black beauty was photographed today, Oct 25 in a ravine in Toronto, Ontario Canada. It was about 1-1/14″ long and moving steadily through a grassy area. We thought it looked like it was full of eggs or something since its abdomen was so huge compared to the head and thorax.
Signature: anne murphy

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Dear Anne,
This distinctive insect is an Oil Beetle, a species of Blister Beetle in the genus
Meloe.  According to BugGuide:  “Males smaller than females, with modified antennae” and several images of the modified antennae are included.  Your close-up image of the Oil Beetle’s head appear to show the modified antennae, so though you suspected this to be a gravid female, we believe it is a male Oil Beetle.

Head of Oil Beetle

Head of Oil Beetle

Thank you so much Daniel!  I am so glad you could identify that insect.  Now I’ll look it up and learn more about it.  So, the female would be even bigger.  Wow!  Hope we come across one some day.  Thanks again.
anne

 

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Subject: Large bug in pond seems to be eating frog spawn
Location: Aisen, Patagonia, Chile
October 26, 2014 11:31 am
A few years ago we made a pond in our garden in Patagonia, Chile. A few weeks ago a frog laid some spawn and three weeks later we wondered what had happened to the developing tadpoles, then looked closely and spotted several long insects slightly below the water, congregated around the spawn, which now contained only one of the tiny tadpoles. The insects seem to be sprouting wings. Are they a type of dragonfly?
Signature: Paul Coleman

Naiad:  Possibly Dragonfly nymph with frog eggs

Naiad: Possibly Dragonfly nymph with frog eggs

Dear Paul,
The insect in your image is an aquatic nymph of a flying insect, known as a Naiad.  It is very likely that the naiad will develop into a Dragonfly.

Dragonfly Naiad, we believe

Dragonfly Naiad, we believe

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Subject: what kind of bug is this?
Location: Boonsboro Maryland
October 25, 2014 6:05 pm
I’m just wondering what kind of bug this is and if you can help that would be wonderful thank you.
Signature: Kyle Kwiatkowski

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Dear Kyle,
Wheel Bugs like your individual attract attention throughout their lives, from young hatchlings, to brightly colored nymphs, to transitionary molts, to mating adults.

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