Polka Dot Patriotic Bug
Wed, Jun 3, 2009 at 4:22 PM
Hi! I saw this patriotic looking bug on a Dessert Rose plant in my backyard in South Florida yesterday (June 2009). I was wondering if you could tell me what it is. I t was a beautiful blue hue with white polka dots and a red tip behind. He was about 2 1/2 inches long and was hanging out on the plant and flowers. Also the tips of its legs and antenee were white. We thought it might be a wasp of some sort or maybe a moth. Thanks
Heather
South Florida

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Hi Heather,
Your patriotic bug is an aptly named Polka Dot Wasp Moth, Syntomeida epilais. The caterpillars feed on the leaves of Oleander. Since we are going away on holiday, we are taking advantage of a feature on our site allowing us to post live at a future date. We are setting your photo to post to the site at noon on Friday.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Black “Fly” ???
Thu, Jun 4, 2009 at 11:46 AM
Hey Dan,
Are you familiar with these ‘flies’ ???
Sorry about the quality of the photo, the foc us is a little off.
Thanks,
Ferd

Ebony Jewelwing

Ebony Jewelwing

Hi Ferd,
This little beauty is a species of Damselfly known as a Ebony Jewelwing, Calopteryx maculata. The white spots at the tips of the wings indicate that this is a female. You can see more photos on Bugguide.

What’s That Bug? will not be answering any questions between June 4 and June 12 while we are out of the office, visiting relatives in Ohio.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Orange and Black Beetles
Tue, Jun 2, 2009 at 9:13 PM
Found these just north of Scissors Crossing in mid-April. I haven’t been able to figure out what they are and was hoping you would have better luck.
David Ellzey
San Felipe Hills, Southern California

Master Blister Beetle

Master Blister Beetle

Hi David,
Had you checked out our website in April, you would have found that the Master Blister Beetle, Lytta magister, was our featured Bug of the Month for April 2009.

Pink, Cream and Yellow Colored Moth in Connecticut
Wed, Jun 3, 2009 at 2:39 AM
Hello,
This beautiful moth was resting on the entrance to my SE Connecticut home in May, 2009. I’m curious what it is and also what kind of other information about it you could give me. It was about the size of a US quarter; possibly a bit larger.
Donna in Marlborough, CT
Marlborough, CT., USA

Rosy Maple Moth

Rosy Maple Moth

Hi Donna,
This little beauty is a Rosy Maple Moth, Dryocampa rubicunda.  One of our readers once described it as a sherbet moth.  It is related to the Giant Silk Worm moths that do not feed as adults.  The Rosy Maple Moth is found in much of eastern North America including Florida.  You can find out more by looking on BugGuide and also by searching our archives for previous postings.

Need ID for Neo tropical Conservation Project
Tue, Jun 2, 2009 at 5:37 PM
Hi Daniel,
Sorry it’s me again. I have this pic of a very colorful bug that looks like a reduviid but the narrow neck usually typical of the family is not present and also the shield on the back is kind of wierd… therefore I was thinking it might be in another family, maybe leaffooted bug (correidae) although those one are not really  colorful most of the time. Any ID?
You may want to check this link on flickr as someone else took a pic of a similar bug at higher elevetion somewhere else in the country (a difference of 500 metres!). On his pic you will also see the profile of the lad which can prove helpful. Here’s the link:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/28347466@N08/3333642517/in/set-72157605982707119/
Absolutely no rush, I know you are busy working on that book, so good luck with it! You are doing a wonderful job teaching people how to admire and respect bugs. Thank you!
Best
Thierry
Ecuador

Leaf Footed Bug

Leaf Footed Bug

Hi again Thierry,
We agree with the family Coreidae (only one r), the Leaf Footed Bugs.  It may be the genus Thasus which contains the Giant Mesquite Bug, Thasus neocalifornicus, which looks quite similar.  You can see images of this species, which ranges in California and Mexico, on BugGuide.  The insect in the photo on the link you provided is incorrectly identified as being in the family Reduvidae, the Assassin Bugs.