Oleander Hawk Moth (?) on Maui
Fri, Dec 5, 2008 at 2:44 PM
I’ve tentatively identified this moth (see attached image) as an Oleander Hawk Moth (Daphnis nerii). Does that seem correct? Pertinent info: Photo shot on a palm tree trunk near Pukalani, Maui (Hawai’i); altitude > 3,000 feet. Wingspan is about 10 cm. Any info you can provide is appreciated. Mahalo nui loa!
PS. GREAT website!!!
Malama aina!
Maui Mike
Pukalani, Maui, Hawai’i

Oleander Hawk Moth

Oleander Hawk Moth

Hi Maui Mike,
Your identification of an Oleander Hawk Moth is absolutely correct.  We haven’t posted a photo of this species in a very long time and we are happy to add your image to our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Big Big Beetle from Chile?
Fri, Dec 5, 2008 at 11:56 AM
My grandfather caught and mounted this bug for me when I was a baby. But his intricate calligraphy has faded off the little identification sticker. Can someone enlighten me, what is the name of this insect? It is framed with the title “Coleopteros Chilenos” and is about 5 inches in size.
Carol A.
Chile

Beetle Collection from Chile

Beetle Collection from Chile:  Conognatha fisheri, Acanthinodera cummingi and Tauroceraste patagonicus.

Hi Carol,
We can tell you that this is a Prionid Beetle in the subfamily Prioninae, but we are going to have to rely on the assistance of an expert in taxonomy to provide you with a species name.  You are very lucky to have inherited such a nice collection from your grandfather.

Update:  May 24, 2014
Thanks to a comment from Dolan Pinto, we have added the species names to the three beetles visible in the image above, including the Prionid,
Acanthinodera cummingi.

long antennaed in apalachicola fl
Fri, Dec 5, 2008 at 8:47 AM
Good morning/afternoon, and thank you in advance,
What an amusing and informative site!
This August, we were walking the marsh trail at the NOAA interpretive center in Apalachicola Fl , and noticed this creature on the boardwalk rail…you can note the nailhead for scale. None of us are great photographers, so we got very close, and this little animal waved its antennae, turned around, walked back and forth a bit, giving us a few poses, then abruptly flew off, scaring the daylights out of the person whose nose was inches away. Do you know what this is? Thanks!!!
Lara
gulf coast Florida

Cottonwood Borer

Cottonwood Borer

Apalachicola cottonwood borer!
Fri, Dec 5, 2008 at 9:36 AM
Hello again!
If I had scrolled ALL the way down, I would’ve seen the strikingly similar bug that you identified as a Cottonwood Borer. At least now I think that’s what it is, after also cross-referencing other images with name! Hope you enjoy the pictures, at least…(sent earlier today) …this is a popular bug!
Thanks so much!
Lara
gulf coast FL

Cottonwood Borer

Cottonwood Borer

Hi Lara,
We are happy to see that you correctly identified your Cottonwood Borer with our website.  Your photos are a lovely addition to our archive, especially since this is the first Cottonwood Borer Beetle we have that was not sighted in Oklahoma or Texas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Snail Parasite Fly
Fri, Dec 5, 2008 at 12:31 AM
Hi guys, me again,
Got this Snail Parasite Fly. Calliphoridae Amenia imperialis, in my backyard and thought you might like her. The larvae parasite snails amongst leaf litter. The male has eyes that are much closer together but apart from that they are very similar. Quite a beautiful critter really I think
aussietrev
Queensland, Australia

Amenia imperialis

Amenia imperialis

Hi Trevor,
We wish we had a Snail Parasite Fly in Los Angeles.  Thanks for keeping our Australian postings freshly stocked.  Oz Animals has some nice images.

Weird beetle or ant I have never seen before
Thu, Dec 4, 2008 at 1:31 PM
We were vacationing in the mountains of North Carolina and found this beetle looking thing. It was very fast and we found it on 2 different occasions during the same trip. Both were around 11:00 am or so. If you can’t help identify that is ok, I was just really curious what it might have been is all.
Thanks!!
Jamie of Michigan
Franklin, North Carolina

Cow Killer

Cow Killer

Hi Jamie,
Your discovery is known as a Cow Killer because of its painful sting.  Cow Killers, Dasymutilla occidentalis, are a species of Velvet Ant and Velvet Ants are actually flightless female wasps.

I have been searching for it´s name
Wed, Dec 3, 2008 at 2:38 PM
Greetings from Panama!
Dr Alan Jaslow took this picture in the 70s in our Farm in Panama and I need to put a tag with the name on but I am not certain about the name. I got mimet iga ingisa but the ink is fading and is not readible.
Thanks for you help!!!!
Aliss Hartmann
Santa Clara Chiriqui Panama

Katydid

Katydid

Hi Arliss,
All we can say for sure is that it is a Katydid. The archival photo that you are trying to classify is quite beautiful. We have recently gotten some help with Katydid identification from Piotr Naskrecki and we will contact him to see if he is able to assist.

Hi Daniel,
I looked at the picture and the accompanying text. The faded label Aliss
mentions spelled “Mimetica incisa.” I believe, however, that the picture
shows a different species, Mimetica crenulata.
Cheers,
Piotr