New Mexico Moths
September 15, 2009
Here are pictures of 2 moths that visited us the same night in August, up in the northern New Mexico mountains. I’ve been able to read some about them. Their size is noteable!
J. Ivy
Ute Park, New Mexico

Glover's Silk Moth

Glover's Silk Moth

New Mexico Moths 2
I’m sorry, I doubled-up on one photo and left out the second moth.
J.Ivy
New Mexico mountains

Glover's Silk Moth

Glover's Silk Moth

Hi J,
We are very happy you sent a second email with the other moth.  Several of your photos of the Glover’s Silk Moth, Hyalophora comumbia gloveri, a subspecies of the Columbia Silk Moth, were incorrectly labeled Polyphemus Moth.  Your second moth, though it looks like a Polyphemus Moth, is more likely the much rarer Oculea Moth, Antheraea oculea, which has a limited range in the mountains of Arizona and New Mexico, and possibly Texas.  According to the World’s Largest Saturniidae Site:  “Oculea is best distinguished from polyphemus by the orange ring around each eyespot and extensive blue and black scaling on all wings. Polyphemus has a yellow ring around each eyespot and black scaling is much less pronounced.

Oculea Moth

Oculea Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

chrysalis formation of monarch caterpillar
September 14, 2009
Hi! A few weeks ago, my kids and I collected some monarch eggs and caterpillars from a local park. After weeks of collecting fresh milkweed every day and watching the caterpillars grow, we were rewarded by seeing them turn into beautiful green chrysalids. One morning, we happened to be watching when a caterpillar started to shed its skin to reveal the green chrysalis underneath. I took some photos of the process that I thought you might like to see. It took about four minutes for the caterpillar to become a pupa. So far, five of the butterflies have emerged and been released. We have two more that should emerge in a few days. We are already looking forward to raising monarchs again next summer, and even plan to tag them for the Monarch Watch program.
Thanks for such an awesome website! We are big fans!
The Ganino Family
Madison, CT

Monarch Caterpillar Metamorphosis

Monarch Caterpillar Metamorphosis

Dear Ganino Family,
Thanks for the awesome images showing the transformation of the Monarch Caterpillar to the Chrysalis.  Your first image shows the caterpillar skin splitting and the second image shows the Chrysalis while it still maintains the more elongated shape of the caterpillar.

Monarch Chrysalis Metamorphosis

Monarch Chrysalis Metamorphosis

Bizarre yellow bug with red eyes!
September 14, 2009
We found this little guy/gal (1/4 or 1/8 of an inch long) on some flowers in the yard. I have never seen anything like it before in my life. Does anyone know what the heck this thing is?
Nessa
SW Missouri

Ambush Bug

Ambush Bug

Hi Nessa,
This is a predatory Assassin Bug known as an Ambush Bug.  Not too long ago, Ambush Bugs were classified in their own family, but they have recently been downgraded to the subfamily Phymatinae of the Assassin Bug family Reduviidae.  True to their name, the camouflaged Ambush Bugs will wait on flowers until a pollinating insect arrives to feed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this Bug?
September 14, 2009
Dear Bugman, I have this most unusual bug in my downstairs (under the stairs bathroom). I apologise for the Quality of the pictures but it is so hard to get a picture of this bug as it is so tiny. You can see the scale from the last picture with the tap in it.
They seem almost transparent with a brown twinge and I only ever see one or 2 at a time. Usually on the sink or toilet but I have also seen them on the wall. The bathroom is small, quite cold usually and doesnt get a lot of light.
They move very slowly and seem a but unaware of my presence most of the time. They aren’t causing me any problem, more just curious as to what they are?
Thanks for your Help,
Regards,
Denis.
Dublin, Ireland

SpringtailBarklouse

Hi Denis,
This is a Globular Springtail in the order Symphypleona and the class Collembola.  Springtails are primitive insects that are among the most numerous insects on our planet.  They are often associated with dark damp areas.  When they are very numerous, they can become an annoyance in the shower and other indoor areas, but they are benign.  They are thought to feed on molds, so a population explosion of Springtails may be symptomatic of a greater problem.

Correction by Eric Eaton
September 16, 2009
Daniel:
I think that “globular springtail” of September 14 is actually a wingless barklouse (order Psocoptera).  The two look extremely similar and I even have trouble telling them apart sometimes.  Still, I’d bet on this being a barklouse/booklouse.
Eric

Is this a grasshopper?
September 14, 2009
This bug has been hanging out with me for a while now. First it was on my front porch hanging out on the hibiscus and just the other day it was in my room. I put it outside many times and it always comes back. Now I just let it hang out in my room and it just stays sitting in the same spots.
Malia
Virginia Beach, VA

Greater Meadow Katydid

Greater Meadow Katydid

Hi Malia,
Grasshoppers have much shorter antennae than this Greater Meadow Katydid does.  We believe the species is Orchelimum minor, based on images posted to BugGuide.  The red eyes and green face are quite distinctive.  Your individual is a female as evidenced by her sword-like ovipositor, and she is missing one leg, which may have happened because of a run-in with a predator.

i can has parsley?
September 14, 2009
I was at my Grandmother’s today and I grabbed a quick shot of these guys chowing down.  I believe I’ve correctly identified them via your site (because your description specifically mentions parsley!)
I hope you like this group shot of what I believe are Anise Swallowtail Caterpillars.
iphone photo:
Here’s my flickr entry:
Thanks for maintaining such a great site,
Casey

Black Swallowtail Caterpillars? or Anise Swallowtail Caterpillars???

Black Swallowtail Caterpillars

Hi Casey,
Since you did not provide a location, we are not certain if these are Black Swallowtails or Anise Swallowtails.  The caterpillars look very similar and both will feed on parsley.  If you live in the central to eastern states, these are Black Swallowtails.  If you are west of the Rocky Mountains, they are Anise Swallowtails.

Thanks.
I live in Georgia so they would be Black Swallowtails.
Thanks guys.