what are these bugs?
Hey there
These guys seem to have gathered around one of my windows in the last few days; when I keep the window open, they try to get in and more and more of them show up. They seem to be losing their wings pretty easily. When I close the window, they hang out but not in such numbers. I’m able to make them go away temporarily by putting a stick of incense between the screen and the window (shut), but inevitably, they come back. What are they and how do you get rid of them? I’m in LA (in case that helps figure out what these are). Thank you
Nat

Flying Termite

Flying Termite

Hi Nat
You have Termites. These are flying reproductive king and queen Termites on their nuptial flight. Luckily, they are on the outside trying to get in. If they were on the inside trying to get out, we would say you have a termite infestation problem indoors. Generally, in Southern California, we see swarming termites on warm sunny spring days after a period of rain.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Do you know what kind of caterpillar this is? They were on our blueberry bush!

Datana Caterpillars on Blueberry

Datana Caterpillars on Blueberry

These are caterpillars in the genus Datana.  Datana major, the Azalea Caterpillar is most likely and they appear to be early instars that will get more colorful as they grow and molt.  You can read more about this species on BugGuide, where it is reported that they are sometimes found on blueberry leaves.  The posture and group grazing of this genus are quite unique.

THIS IS NOT ON YOUR PAGE.OPEN IT AND AT LEAST TELL ME THAT I AM A WASTE OF YOUR TIME
I HAVE SENT YOU A MESSAGE ON THIS BEFORE BUT I GEUSS I DID NOT GET YOUR ATTENTION.I WOULNT SEND IT AGAIN BUT I HAVE CHECKED YOUR SITE AND LIKE 20 OTHERS.PLEASE TELL ME WHAT THIS IS.THERE ARE TWO PICTURES OF IT.I LIVE IN KINGSLAND GEORGIA.THAT IS JUST ON THE BORDER OF FLORADA.MABEY BY POSTING THIS OTHER PEOPLE WONT SEND YOU THE SAME PICTURE.

Polka-Dot Wasp Moth

Polka-Dot Wasp Moth

Your insect is a Polka-Dot Wasp Moth, and we have at least 20 images on our site. The problem you probably had is that you never thought to look under moths since the Polka-Dot Wasp Moth is such an effective wasp mimic. On a more personal note, answering the letters of our readership gives us such gratification, it is never a waste of our time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

strange flying creature
Hi,
You have a great website, it’s helped me identify some critters in my area already.
If you have time to check this one out, I’d be grateful. I live in southeast Pennsylvania and this past July I was hiking at a State park and came across two of these in the woods. I’ve never seen them before.  I tried searching your website but I’m not even sure what insect family they’re in. They were about an inch long and the strangest thing I observed was how they flew. They seemed to just float and were almost vertical as they moved slowly thru the air. The one in the photo drifted toward a plant and just sort of hung onto it when I took the picture. Thanks for any help,
Jaime

Phantom Crane Fly

Phantom Crane Fly

Hi Jaime,
What a positively gorgeous image of a Phantom Crane Fly, Bittacomorpha clavipes.  As we are still trying to transition to our new format, we are not posting live, but your image will be on the web as soon as our transition is complete.

Update Not a bee but a Hover Fly
Hello Bugman & Bug Lady!
I know you only have 30 minutes a day to spend on emails, etc, so If you read this, great! If not, it’s okay as well. Anyway, I sent an email with 2 photos. one a White -Lined Sphinx moth..and the other photo, I thought was some sort of bee..Well I discovered that it’s a Hover Fly. I Never would have thought it was a fly, but I checked all the categories I thought it would be in, and came up with nothing, so I got bored and just started looking through other areas of your site, and that’s how I happened across the Hover Fly! I added a few more photos, hope you enjoy them.
One is a worm or some such, another is a moth and the dragonfly, I think is a Widow Skimmer, which you have plenty of photos, I just thought you might like it.
These were all taken in Minnetonka Minnesota. Thanks for all your hard work,
Laura

Common Ringlet

Common Ringlet

Hi Laura,
We are happy that you identified your Hover Fly, but we must confess, that we are not sure we saw the photo. We did open one letter with a gorgeous photo of a Hover Fly, but didn’t have time to post it. Regarding this submission, it is not feasible for us to post images of different insects in the same letter. The image we are quite happy to post is of the Common Ringlet, Coenonympha tullia. The Common Ringlet is a highly variable butterfly, not a moth. You can read more about the Common Ringlet can be found on BugGuide

Thank you so much for your kind reply.   Honestly, I didn’t expect that any of the four photos would be posted, so I’m thrilled.  I really just love your site and wanted to be part of it by sending you and Lisa some pictures that I thought you would enjoy. And thank you for the information and further information regarding
the Common Ringlet.   The very next thing I’m going to do is go to the BugGuide and read all about it!
Thanks again,
Laura in Minnesota.

Strange Variation of HHD
Hi. I ran across your site as my three year old and I are trying to put a name to some of the tiny creatures around our Florida home. I have seen the Hickory Horned Devil Catapillar many times but none of them look like ours. Please tell us if we have a true HHD or something else. Thanks so much. (See attached.)
Have a blessed day!
Jacilyn Wheeler

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Hi Jacilyn,
Your Hickory Horned Devil looks like a normal fifth instar caterpillar. Perhaps those you saw previously were younger caterpillars, but as you did not describe the difference, we are uncertain. At any rate, it is wonderful to have your gorgeous, yet typical, Hickory Horned Devil to add to our archives. As we are currently transitioning our site, the image will not go live until we finish the site migration.