horse fly from Patagonia, in Argentina and Chile
Sat, Jan 3, 2009 at 1:09 PM
Hi!
I´m sending a couple of pictures of a real nightmare in the forest of Patagonia during summer´s days. Its scientific name is Scaptia lata and the females are longer than one inch.
Local names are tabano negro or colihuacho
I must confess your site has been addictive to me since I discovered it and sent you my first message asking about a tiger? moth almost one year ago.
Happy New Year and many new bugs for you!
Mirta in San Antonio Oeste, Rio Negro. Argentina
Patagonian forests in Argentina and Chile

Horse Fly from Patagonia

Horse Fly from Patagonia

Hi Mirta,
Thanks for sending us these beautiful images of a gorgeous, but blood thirsty Horse Fly. Thank you also for including both the scientific name and local names. We don’t get many submissions from Argentina or Chile. Thanks also for your kind words regarding our humble site. That is a brave individual handling this female Horse Fly. Male Horse Flies do not bite, but the females will readily bite warm blooded creatures including humans.

Horse Fly from Patagonia

Horse Fly from Patagonia

Hi Daniel!
Thanks for your message
The brave one is me… but I need to tell you that the horse fly was a little dizzy after I punched it with my hand… So I took the picture while giving her time to recover and start flying again. Their bites are really painful, and it is impossible not try  knocking them when you are hiding quietly  to photography an elusive bird and you are pursued by almost 10 of them! Hope you don´t  think it was an unnecesary carnage… :)
I´d wish more websites like yours plenty of southamerican bugs. As you know, it is difficult to find places online  to ID our bugs. I will try to submit more when the pictures or the bug deserve it, if it is OK to you.
Hugs
Mirta

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

tiny black bugs
Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 10:43 PM
These bugs recently appeared in a house that we have been living in for the past 11 months. We have seen them in the washer and dryer room and our bathroom. They are mostly seen crawling on walls. We use a quarterly pest control service and the last time they came they sprayed in the attic. I am calling them to come back for a “call back” but I was hoping to know what they are sooner.
Thanks, bugged out in Texas
Houston, TX

Grain Weevil

Grain Weevil

Dear Bugged Out in Texas,
This is a weevil, possibly a grain weevil.  Is there stored pet food nearby?

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the quick response.  The pest control (Truly Nolen) is here and you “nailed it”!  It is a weevil.  He showed us a book with insects and to be exact it is a rice weevil.  They were infested in a bag of bird seed that we have in a cabinet in our dining room.  The bag contains milo, millet, cracked corn and sunflower seeds.  The corn is what it looks like it was after.  The strange thing is that we have had the plastic bag of seed since the summer and never noticed them until we came back from my grandparents house in Oklahoma.  We brought back a back of nuts and had them in the same cabinet.  Two days later we noticed the bugs.  Not sure if that is it but we can draw a pretty good conclusion that is were they came from.
WE can’t thank you enough for helping identify these pesky things!  I’ve included a link that shows what they look like in our bird seed.
Have a Happy New Year!
John and Melissa Roschal

Grain Weevil

Grain Weevil

Found on the Christmas Tree
Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 10:28 AM
EEK! I went to take down my Christmas tree, which we cut from a tree farm in Florida. Crawling all over my angel at the top of the tree were these bugs, ranging in size from tiny (rice-sized) to one or two about the size of a fine-point Sharpie head. It has six legs, three on each side. One set appears to protrude from nose, like antenna. The next, slightly larger set is a bit further back, and the third set is still on the middle part of the body, but much longer. It is tear-drop shaped, and the butt seems to have a bit of a point to it. It’s dark gray. I thought they were ticks, but it only seems to have 6 legs. They were ALL over the angel, and moved very quickly. I am trying to decide what to do with the tree, my first inclination is to pitch the whole thing but of course it has my most expensive decorations and lights on it.
Beverly J.
Orlando Florida

Conifer Aphid

Conifer Aphid

Hi Beverly,
We wanted to check with Eric Eaton before we misidentified your insect and caused you undue alarm.  According to Eric:  “The insect is a conifer aphid in the genus Cinara.  They tend to be gray or brown rather than green, and they are quite large for aphids, too.  So, no worries.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Um… what’s this bug?
Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 7:04 AM
OK, so I know there are more types insects than any all the other types of creatures put together, and asking you about an insect from ASIA is asking a lot, but I went on a trip through Vietnam and found this little guy on a sign near a beach close to Danang and it’s so weird! I can’t find anything like it. I live in China and see weird bugs all the time, but can usually put them in some sort of category of the bugs I know back home in the states. (okay, so I live in an urban jungle of 20 million people, but I still see crazy insects)
This thing had some sort of CLEAR shell over a more normal looking shell. It was probably 3/4 of an inch long and didn’t budge. I now wished I would have poked it a bit to see how it moved, but I wanted to leave it alone. Probably the nice choice. It looks like a beetle, but I thought it might even be some sort of true bug in a stage of metamorphoses? Heck, I dunno. But I’ve googled all sorts of combinations of transparent, clear, and beetle, and can’t find much more than tricked out Volkswagons.
Help me, Whatsthatbug! You’re my only hope!
ajg
On land by a beach, near Danang Vietnam, in the rainy season.

Spotted Tortoise Beetle

Spotted Tortoise Beetle

Dear ajg,
This is a Spotted Tortoise Beetle, Aspidomorpha miliaris.  There are related species found in North America.

Locust infected with mites?
Thu, Jan 1, 2009 at 8:48 PM
Hi guys,
This locust was very well disguised by colour and textures to fit in with the semi arid landscape and I only spotted it when it jumped out of my way. After processing the shot I noticed the little red attachments. Would they be some type of mite or some other parasite?
aussietrev
Capricornia region, Queensland

Locust with Mites

Locust with Mites

Hi Trevor,
Your Locust is in the suborder Caelifera and probably one of the Short Horned Grasshoppers in the family Acrididae.  We are not certain if the Mites are parasitic, but that is quite likely.  There are some mites that infest insects, but they are not parasitic.  Rather, they use the insect for transportation purposes, a phenomenon known as phoresy.  We are currently experiencing problems with images going live and hope to resolve this very soon.

What’s this?
Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 8:49 AM
Hello,
The colourful little (well not so little) grasshopper in the picture and three of his friends/family have decided to make a plant outside our gate their home. The rest of the family appears to have moved on. We thing it is a Milkweed grasshopper. Please confirm this. Also can you tell us how to remove them without 1) getting hurt/poisoned ourselves and 2) hurting the grasshoppers.
Regards,
Nelspruit, Mpumalanga

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

We first did a google search to substantiate that Mpumalanga is in fact in South Africa because your image matched a photo taken in January 2000 that we received back in February 2006. That specimen was eventually identified as Phymateus leprosus , one of the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers or Gaudy Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae . This species is also called a Bush Locust or sometimes Bushlocust.  The toxicity, if our information is correct, results in ingesting them, not from handling them. You should be able to just catch them and release them to a more suitable location. Your specimen is an immature nymph as adults have fully developed wings.