Need help identifying this bug.
Tue, Nov 11, 2008 at 7:47 PM
Recently these little bugs started showing up in my basement bathroom. (It’s currently 11/11/08.) There are usually several in there at any given time. I have not seen them anywhere else in the house. They may be in other parts of the basement, but the rest is carpeted with a light tan carpet, so the color of these bugs would blend right in if they are elsewhere in the basement.
I’ve tried vacuuming them (and the surrounding area) but within a day or so they’re back. They walk around (rather than fly) and usually don’t do much at all to get out of the way when I go to kill one. They can jump, but apparently only about an inch or so.
They are quite tiny. I shot these pics with a 105mm macro lens plus an extra 52mm extension tube. I placed a ruler in the second shot for size reference. The marks on it are 64ths of an inch.
I would very much like to know what they are, what troubles they might cause, and how to get rid of them. If possible, would prefer to find a way of dealing with the problem without using harsh pesticides.
Thanks in advance for the info.
Chris
Leesburg, Virginia

Booklouse

Booklouse

Hi Chris,
We are pretty certain this is a Booklouse in the order Psocoptera, but we recently misidentified a different insect thinking it was a Booklouse.  We will get a second opinion.  BugGuide indicates:  “Book lice are best known for feeding on the starch in book bindings.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

A beetle that looks like Indian Corn.
Tue, Nov 11, 2008 at 7:37 PM
Hi Bugman,
My son Sam took this picture of a small beetle walking on the railing of our deck in the back yard. We have never seen him before or since. We have not had any luck identifying him–we thought those amazing antennae would make it easier– but we call him the Indian Corn beetle for now because of his unusual texture and coloration. One of our favorite bugs of the summer. Any help would be appreciated.
Sam and Daddy Jim
Suburban backyard, 35 miles west of Chicago

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Reticulated Beetle

Hi Again Sam and Daddy Jim,
We tried skimming quickly through the family Cerambycidae on Bugguide to identify your Longhorned Borer Beetle without much luck. We are late to an important meeting, and cannot continue the research right now. We hope Eric Eaton can assist us on this identification.

Hi, Daniel:
You’re having trouble with the ID because it is not a longhorn beetle:-) Most folks make that mistake, though. This is a “reticulated beetle” in the family Cupedidae, specifically Tenomerga cinereus. Neat find!
Eric

Sun, Nov 16, 2008 at 8:04 PM
Daniel,
Your sense of dedication and good cheer is completely amazing.  As a dad I want to thank you for contributing to the enthusiasm of a real bug-loving kid. It’s been great for me, too!  We’re a couple of damselfly id’s away from getting a small book of Sam’s best pictures from this summer printed and you’ve really helped us with a couple of tough ones.  Thanks for being there!  We’ll be making a little monetary contribution to your website soon.   All the best.
Jimmy

Bug Love Meets Where’s Waldo
Tue, Nov 11, 2008 at 7:49 PM
My son Sam took this picture of what he thought was an assassin bug on a flower. Later when we looked back at it we noticed that it was actually two bugs mating. If you can zoom in it’s really a pretty amazing picture. We are wondering now if they are assassin bugs since they don’t seem much like the others on this site. In any case, it’s one for your Bug Love. Any ideas? Thanks, as always, for your great great site!
Sam and Daddy Jim
Suburban backyard, 35 miles west of Chicago

Mating Ambush Bugs

Mating Ambush Bugs

Hi Sam and Daddy Jim,
Though they are sometimes mistaken for Assassin Bugs, Ambush Bugs are in a different family, Phymatidae.  Your pair are Jagged Ambush Bugs in the genus Phymata, and you can see more images on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

A spider with a pearlescent back decorated with an indented line and 2 spots on each side, and a brown underside decorated with yellow markings.
Mon, Nov 10, 2008 at 4:12 PM
Hiya, I found this spider on our now flowering Floribunda Iceberg. What a beautiful spider with a pearlescent back decorated with very subtle markings (that look like engraving of a line in the middle and 2 spots on each side), and a brown underside decorated with yellow markings. It was sitting in the centre of a round web. My husband doesn’t like spiders, so my first thought was to pick it up and toss it out of the garden… which is why I have photographed it on this dried branch. But I know that spiders can be a good friend to have in the garden too, and so I am in a dilema. What should I do? I attach 3 photos offering the top, underside and side views. I hope these help. As I do not know how they should be measured, the side view photo is against a ruler. I am zero on spiders as you can see… hahaha… thanks very much!
Intrigued
Leederville, Perth, Western Australia

Argiope protensa

Argiope extensa

Dear Intrigued,
When we first read your letter, we read the word Floribunda and somehow thought you were in Florida. We were going to say that this was probably a light Banded Garden Spider, Argiope trifasciata, which is well represented on BugGuide. Sometimes we see very light specimens of this species. Once we realized we had erred and that you were in Australia, we tried to identify your Argiope. Seems the Argiope trifasciata we found on a Brisbane Insect website is a different species entirely and we suspect it is misidentified. We then found the Thumbnails of Australian Spiders website and there are several Argiopes pictured. We believe this may be Argiope extensa.  There are some good images of this species on the Find a Spider Guide of Australia.

Argiope protensa

Argiope extensa

Golden Orb Weaver?
Mon, Nov 10, 2008 at 8:19 PM
I found this spider when I went rafting in Rishikesh, India. Have tried looking for it online but could not find anything specific. Came across your site and I think it is a wonderful way to learn and teach! Keep up the good work. Hoping you can help me with my picture.
Gaurav Pathak
Rishikesh, India

Golden Silk Orbweaver

Golden Silk Orbweaver

Hi Gaurav,
While we are not certain of the species, we can tell you that your spider is a Golden Silk Orbweaver or Golden Silk Spider in the genus Nephila.  This genus of spiders has very strong golden silk and attempts were made in the past to weave it into fabric.

Looks like an Iron Cross Blister Beetle?
Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 11:44 AM
We found this beetle in El Cañon de Guadalupe which is between Tecate & Mexicali in Baja California 11-08-08. We saw alot of these getting together on rocks. We looked thru the archives and found the very similar Iron Cross Blister but the wing case doesn’t look the same nor the color of its head. It’s color is more of a dark rich red not a bright.
Macajr
El Cañon de Guadalupe which is between Tecate & Mexicali in Baja California.

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

Hi Macajr,
We agree that this is some species of Blister Beetle, but we do not recognize it. We can’t even decide what the genus is. We will try to contact Eric Eaton for assistance.

Blister Beetles

Blister Beetles

Hi:
I’m relatively certain this is a species in the genus Tegrodera, just not as ornate as the ones from the southwest U.S.
Eric