A black and white striped insect with rust colored legs.
May 31, 2009
I found this insect crawling on me while gardening. It seems inoffensive; despite me picking it up several times, it never tried to bite. The body was about 7mm long; with legs fully extended, it was about 1cm long. It has wings, but seems reluctant to use them; it never tried to escape by flight, only by crawling. I apologize for the poor photograph; my camera needs a macro lens to take better shots this close, and I have not yet purchased on. This was in late May of 2009, 70 degree temperatures, in central Maryland.
CommanderBalok
Central Maryland (suburb of Baltimore)

False Potato Beetle

False Potato Beetle

Dear Commander Balok,
This is a False Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa juncta.  According to BugGuide, it can be distinguised from its close relative, the notorious plant pest the Colorado Potato Beetle, in the following manner:  “Similar to Colorado Potato Beetle (1), but elytral punctures are regular instead of irregular. Also, a brown stripe at the center of each elytron (wing cover) and on the inner edge of each elytron (where they meet down the middle) distinguish this species.”
BugGuide has this to say about the similar looking Colorado Potato Beetle:  “Before the introduction of the potato in the US this beetle was confined to Colorado and neighboring states feeding on some native species of Solanum (night shade), now it has spread to most potato growing areas.  It has been transported to Europe where it has become a serious pest.”
Of the False Potato Beetle, BugGuide indicates:  “According to the University of Florida, the False Potato Beetle ‘is found primarily on the common noxious weed, horse-nettle, Solanum carolinense. It also feeds on other solanaceous plants, such as species of ground cherry or husk tomato, Physalis spp., and common nightshade, Solanum dulcamara.'”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Monday, July 13, 2009
The Carnage
Last night, before going to bed, we released the week old hatchlings into the nursery aquarium with the two week older siblings.  Though there was a difference in size, we thought all would be fine.  About an hour after turning on the light this morning, we realized we had made an horrific judgment error.  One of the larger fish in the tank had a younger sibling in its mouth.  Most of the younger fish were floating dead or dying.  We don’t know if they were picked to death, or if they were partially chewed and disgorged, but we suspect since a fish will attempt to eat most anything that will not eat it, there was just too much of a size discrepancy for the two generations to coexist, at least until the youngest had gotten more experienced.  Sadly, we have lost nearly the entire generation.  We managed to rescue two little guys and they are once more quarantined.  The largest of the second generation seems to be coexisting right now with the larger siblings

Bug Identity
May 30, 2009
Hello bugman,
We found this brown bug on our balcony in Hong Kong. We’re curious to know its origins, living habits and what it eats. Can you help?
Email Signature
Hong Kong, China

Unknown Stink Bug

Lychee Stink Bug

Dear Email Signature,
This is some species of Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae.  We will try to get you an exact species name, or perhaps one of our readers will have the time to research this Stink Bug’s taxonomy.

Update:  April 3, 2014
Thanks to a comment from a new visitor to our site, Rob, we are confident that this is a Lychee Stink Bug, Tessaratoma papillosa, which is pictured on the Light Creations website.  We have numerous images of immature specimens of Lychee Stink Bugs on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What type of insect are these?
May 29, 2009
What type of insect are these?
I was trimming bushes and noticed what appeared to be a small nest (for lack of a better word) on the side of a service berry tree. A couple days later the bugs hatched and were grouped around the nest. I’ve not been able to identify these. What are they?
George in Central Ohio
Central Ohio

Wheel Bug Hatchlings

Wheel Bug Hatchlings

Hi George,
These are newly hatched Wheel Bugs, a species of Assassin Bug.  Most Assassin Bugs, including Wheel Bugs, are beneficial predators.

What bug is this?
May 28, 2009
Had a few people look at this, yet nobody could identify it properly. The common consensus is that it looks like some kind of wasp. But I’m unable to locate anything like it with numerous google searches. I’m hoping you can enlighten me.
Thank you!
Marcus J
Northern Utah, USA

Red Headed Ash Borer

Red Headed Ash Borer

Hi Marcus,
This is a Red Headed Ash Borer, Neoclytus acuminatus.  It is commonly believed that is mimics wasps for protection.  Read more about the Red Headed Ash Borer on BugGuide.

Green Shell Bug
May 27, 2009,
The Green shell bug has very small brown legs and an almost nonexistent face. I found it near our front door by the dog kennel. We are in Northwestern Virginia. If the bug is on it’s back it can’t make it’s self upright again and it doesn’t appear to have wings. It measured as 1 1/2 cm long, it’s legs are sticky.
What bug is this, my girls ages 8 and 6years would love to know.
Nancy
Northwestern Virginia

Dog Tick

Dog Tick

Dear Nancy,
First, we apologize for the six week delay.  Our fast new computer is allowing us to answer so much more than before.  We are going to try to select one letter a day from our oldest archived requests in an attempt to provide a service to our readership.  Now the bad news.  This is a Dog Tick.  It looks to be engorged with blood.  Ticks can carry diseases.