Butterfly ID request
Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 5:01 AM
There have been many of these in the area in September, although similar to Monarchs, they don’t appear the same.
cneal
North Carolina

American Painted Lady

American Painted Lady

Hi cneal,
Your butterfly is an American Painted Lady, Vanessa virginiensis. BugGuide has a nice set of images that explain how to differentiate between the American Painted Lady and the Cosmopolitan, the Painted Lady with a wold wide distribution.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Help I don’t know what this is
Mon, Oct 13, 2008 at 8:45 PM
I am trying to find out what this bug is. I discovered it underneath a flat board that was covering a broken basement window, the board fell off the house and when I picked it up this was underneath the board with others like it numbering around 25 – 60 of them, they scattered fast, seems to like dark moist places. It measures from front to back without including leg or antannae, 1 cm long. I am worried this may be some type of bug that is causing hidden damage to my home.
Scott worried in Ohio
Midwest, Columbus, OH

Long Necked Seed Bug

Long Necked Seed Bug

Hi Scott,
The Long Necked Seed Bug, Myodocha serripes, is not damaging your home. According to BugGuide, the Long Necked Seed Bug “overwinters as adult in leaf litter or under bark of trees in woodlands” and is found in “Leaf litter in early spring; fields and artificial lights in summer.” Many True Bugs hibernate overwinter in aggregations, and your individuals found the board to be a fine substitute for the bark of a tree.  While it is not harming the home, it may be harming your strawberries, because BugGuide also indicates it feeds on the “Seeds of strawberry and st. johnswort. Sometimes a pest of strawberries. ” We believe your photo is a new species for our site.

Lime-green ‘V’ spider…
Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 12:10 AM
At the end of a camping trip in Rock Island, TN, we were taking down our tents when I found this little critter. Originally, he was on the tent, but I moved him onto a nearby tree with a leaf so he wouldn’t get squished amongst our packing. I’ve never seen this species before and I was just curious as to what type of spider he/she is.
I also wanted to mention I love your site. Through it, I’ve figured out what baby wheel bugs, house centipedes, and female dobsonflies are!
Much thanks,
Sarah Bowers
between middle and east TN

Arrowshaped Micrathena

Arrowshaped Micrathena

Hi Sarah,
This little beauty is a female Arrowshaped Micrathena, Micrathena sagittata.  It is a harmless orbweaver that is found in wooded areas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug with carapace made of OTHER BUGS!!
Mon, Oct 13, 2008 at 6:03 PM
Dear What’s That Bug Man, my computer just crashed, so if you’re seeing this email for a second time, that’s why. This very tiny (about 1/2 the size of my little fingernail) bug is, from the underneath (not shown in these photos), gray and somewhat louselike. From above, it appears to be wearing a little house made of DEAD, OTHER BUGS. The false carapace is topped with a whitish object–an egg? From the side, I can see its little legs–a lot of them–and pincers, but I can’t tell if the pincers are its own or belong to one of the dead bugs. You helped me once with my Very Special Spotted Bug (an ironclad beetle) and I hope you can help me again! Thank you! p.s. I love the updated website!
Kaila W.
Dripping Springs, TX (west of Austin)

Debris Carrying Green Lacewing Larva

Debris Carrying Green Lacewing Larva

Lacewing Larva

Really? Well all right then! We have lacewing eggs all over the place, even inside. But what the heck is up with it carrying around the little house made of dead bugs? Do you have information about this? It’s quite fascinating. And quite bizarre. I desire explanation on top of identification! But perhaps I can do that for myself, now that I know what bug to research!
Thank you so much for your speedy reply! Your website is one of my constant favorites.
Kaila

Hi Kaila,
We often write a very short response before doing a lengthier answer for posting. This is a Green Lacewing Larva. Some species carry debris like your specimen. According to BugGuide: “It seems that the trash carried by these larvae confers some protection against predatory ladybeetles. ”

Large Green Catapillar
Mon, Oct 13, 2008 at 5:29 PM
Hi, once again, I took this picture of this catapillar in September, and of all the catapillars that I have watched I have never seen one of these before, It is eating a pine tree. It was about 4 inches long and as you can see in the picture it is green and yellow and hairy, and it seems to have little hands that it is holding the pine needle with, while chewing on them, Is this a catapillar or some type of larvae? Is it dangerous? I have grandchildren that love to hold bugs. Thanks for any information.
Lisa Benningfield
Eastern Kentucky, USA

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Hi Lisa,
Your photo of an Imperial Moth Caterpillar is quite beautiful.  The Imperial Moth Caterpillar feeds on a wide range of trees, and it is the only caterpillar we can think of that eats deciduous as well as coniferous trees.  The adult is a large beautiful yellow and maroon moth.

Mormon Cricket Eating A Grasshopper
Mon, Oct 13, 2008 at 4:37 PM
Here’s a photo of a Mormon Cricket eating grasshopper roadkill. It was on a dirt road in the mountains of Southern Idaho. It might work into Bug Carnage…
Also include a side shot of a Mormon Cricket on the same road.
Congrats on the site redesign!
Rush
Mountain Home, Idaho, USA

Mormon Cricket eats Grasshopper Roadkill

Mormon Cricket eats Grasshopper Roadkill

Hi Rush,
Your photos are both positively gorgeous.  Mormon Crickets are omnivorous feeders.  They are credited with destroying crops, but they will also cannibalize one another if there is no other food.  That dead grasshopper was just too appealing to be passed by.  Your profile shot shows the impressive swordlike ovipositor of the female Mormon Cricket.  For clarification, our Unnecessary Carnage section is reserved for the deliberate killing of insects by people for no apparent reason.  Thanks for the compliment on our new site design.

Female Mormon Cricket

Female Mormon Cricket