Giant Robberfly Foodchain Picture
Wed, Nov 5, 2008 at 11:07 PM
HI Guys,
Just had an encounter with the biggest robberfly I’ve ever seen. To give you a sense of scale the perch it has chosen is as thick as a mans index finger. It seemed to have some orange colouration under the wings but I couldn’t get close. This was taken with a telephoto lens in a very shady spot so please excuse picture quality.
Aussietrev
Queensland, Australia

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

Hi Trevor,
As always, thank you for another awesome submission to our site. If you identify the species of Robber Fly, please let us know.

ID for that Giant Robberfly
Hi Guys,
That giant robberfly is exactly that apparently, thanks to Eric Fisher at diptera.info for the ID,  the Giant Yellow Robberfly Blepharotes coriarius
Here are two links that show some more detail of the guy, nearly 2 inches long!
http://www.thebegavalley.org.au/1622.html
http://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane_robbers/LargeRobberFly.htm
regards
aussietrev

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

bee or butterfly? (neuroptera or lepidoptera?)
Thu, Nov 6, 2008 at 4:53 AM
we photographed this fairy like bug in a forest near Izmir Turkey. it is not a strong flyer. only seen on spring time. head and legs look like a bee, but it has beautiful wings like a butterfly. is it a known specie?
Thank you..
aegean sea coast, west anatolia, izmir, turkey

Ribbon Winged Lacewing

Ribbon Winged Lacewing

Dear Reader,
This is a Ribbon Winged Lacewing in the family Nemopteridae and the order of Neuropterans.  We have no idea what the species is and a cursory search did not show any matching images online.  Ribbon Winged Lacewings are also commonly called Thread Winged Lacewings, Spoon Winged Lacewings, or Thread Winged Antlions.  Your photos are quite lovely and they have jumped the queue of letters that arrived November 5.

Ribbon Winged Lacewing

Ribbon Winged Lacewing

Black and White Horizontal Striped Caterpillar
Tue, Nov 4, 2008 at 7:34 PM
My daughter and I found this caterpillar that we cannot find a match for anywhere on-line. I sifted through many of your pics of caterpillars and typed in search information for: black and white horizontal striped caterpillar. Nothing came up. The closest identification we could come up with was catalpa caterpillar but ours does not have a tail thing that sticks up like the photos of catalpas and it seems catalpas are more greenish than white. And there are no catalpa trees in the vicinity that it was found. It was found this month: November on an old gravel logging road that’s wooded on both sides, mostly pine, gum and oak trees.
Laurie and Lindsey
SW Arkansas (Arklatex)

Turbulent Phosphila Caterpillar

Turbulent Phosphila Caterpillar

Hi Laurie and Lindsey,
Sorry to have taken so long to reply since we recognized your caterpillar as something we had identified in the past, but between work obligations and the slowness of our 5 year old computer, it has taken us longer than usual to identify an image we wanted to post. We found two examples of your caterpillar in our archives dating from September 2005. Back then it also took us days to properly identify the Turbulent Phosphila, Phosphila turbulenta, which ranges in the Eastern U.S. and Canada and feeds on Greenbriar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wheel Bug!
Tue, Nov 4, 2008 at 3:50 PM
I found this enormous bug on my screen door today, captured it, photographed it, and released it. Then I can to whatsthatbug.com as usual to find out what it was. Turns out its on the top of the main page as Bug of the Month! The person who submitted it, lives just minutes away too! Quite the cooincidence.
Anyways, I took some fantastic photographs of it…and figured since it is bug of the month, you may be able to use them. I also captured a small video of him cruising around on my desk which can be seen here: http://www.goochball.com/ images/bug.wmv
Thanks.
Dan Bowen
Pittsburgh, PA

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Hi Dan,
Your head on view of a Wheel Bug is a nice addition to our archive.

Green lynx spider eats bumble bee
Tue, Nov 4, 2008 at 7:35 AM
Hi Bugman. Maybe this is the true reason for the bee shortage. We saw this food chain demonstration while hiking Moss Park in Orlando, Fl. on Nov.1st. The sun was setting and so we also saw gorgeous orb weavers busy spinning their webs. None of my past submissions have been posted so since this is your favorite spider, I hope my photo will make it to your website. By the way, I impressed my husband when I blurted out “oh, that’s a green lynx spider”! (just a little identifcation I picked up from my visits to your site). Thanks for the great website.
Elizabeth from Orlando
Orlando, Fl.

Green Lynx Spider eats Bumble Bee

Green Lynx Spider eats Bumble Bee

Hi Elizabeth,
What a marvelous photo of our favorite spider, the Green Lynx Spider, Peucetia viridans.

Spider Identification
Mon, Nov 3, 2008 at 12:14 PM
I found this spider in my yard after running into his/her intricately made web that ran across the entry to my front door. What on earth is it? Thanks! Love the site by the way! :)
Lauren F.
Cotati, CA

Cross Spider

Cross Spider

Hi Lauren,
Your spider is a harmless Cross Spider, Araneus diadematus, a species introduced from Europe and found in both the eastern and western U.S.  You can find many images and more information on BugGuide.  A bit of trivia for you concerns Anita and Arabella, the names of the first two spiders sent into space.  In 1973, Anita and Arabella, female Cross Spiders, were sent into space aboard Skylab 3 as an experiment to observe how gravity affected web spinning.  Both Anita and Arabella died of dehydration during the mission, but their bodies are preserved at the Smithsonian Institution for posterity.  You man visit About.com to read more about Spiders in Space.

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