I’m looking to identify what type of spider lives in this foamy mess.
July 16, 2009
I went on a hike the other day and along the trail, I saw this white foamy substance under most of the plant leaves. Parts of the trail looked like it was just covered with it. My father said that he had seen the same spit-like goo on deer grass in another part of the county. We asked a ranger what it was, and she told us that there are spiders lying in each glob. Content with that answer we drove home. When I got home, I suddenly realized that I didn’t ask the type of spider and it drove me crazy! It’s too far to drive back there! Yesterday, I went on a run on the trail near our house which goes along the beach, and the same stuff was there, this time I caught a picture! Is there any chance you know what’s going on with this all? I’m dying of curiosity!
Emily W.
Northern California, Humboldt County, McKinleyville

Spittle from a Spittlebug
Spittle from a Spittlebug

Dear Emily,
The ranger spoke in error.  There is no spider in the center of the spittle.  There is an immature Spittlebug in the center of the spittle.  Spittlebugs are leafhopper-like insects in the family Cercopidae, and according to BugGuide, there are 67 North American species in 9 genera.  BugGuide also indicates:  “After the nymph molts for the final time, the resulting adult insect leaves the mass of “spittle” and moves about actively.  The “spittle” is derived from a fluid voided from the anus and from a mucilaginous substance excreted by epidermal glands.  Spittlebug nymphs wander away from their spittle masses, and either start new ones, or enter those of other nymphs. Aphrophora nymphs hold the record, of one spittle mass over a foot long containing about 100 individuals! (Comment by Andy Hamilton).

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What kind of moth?
July 15, 2009
Hi again Bugman. I captured this moth with my camera this evening (7/15/2009). I believe it is of the giant silkworm variety but I cannot pin down the exact species. Could you tell me its correct name?
Thanks!
Chris Walker, Stroudsburg, PA
Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania

Tulip-Tree Silkmoth we believe

Spicebush Silkmoth

Dear Chris,
Your moth is in the genus Callosamia.  We are undecided as to whether it is the Spicebush Silkmoth, Callosamia promethea, or the Tulip-Tree Silkmoth, Callosamia angulifera.  Both are well represented on BugGuide.  This specimen is a female.  If we were betting the 50/50 odds, we would be inclined to say this is the Tulip-Tree Silkmoth based on one particular posting to BugGuide.   An open winged view would be most helpful.  Perhaps one of our readers with more skills can properly identify this moth to the species level.

Correction
August 10, 2009
Hi,
I’m a lepidopterist and I was flipping through your pages and found on July 17th, the image of a moth. You couldn’t decide between Callosamia Promethia or Angulifera. I would say it is a Promethia because the white marking is not quite as angular as it usually is with Anguliferas. Also, if you need any help with Butterfly or Moth IDs, I’d be happy to assist and give information.
Teddy Kesting-Handly
butterfly_identification@hotmail.com
http://www.freewebs.com/butterfly_identification/

black with checkers and has wings 1.5 inches long
July 16, 2009
Found this bug hanging around the hangar. What is it?
Sorry I don’t want a letter just curious as to the bug is. Thanks
Chesterfield Missouri

Cottonwood Borer

Cottonwood Borer

Dear Sorry,
This beautiful beetle is a Cottonwood Borer.  Most of our reports come from Oklahoma and Texas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Giant Orange Butterfly
July 16, 2009
I found this bug sitting on the ground at my apartment. It is about 2 or 3 inches long. The pictures I took pretty much explain everything else. Thank you!
Katie
Cary, NC

Regal Moth

Regal Moth

Hi Katie,
This is a Regal Moth or Royal Walnut Moth, not a butterfly.  The Regal Moth only lives a few days as an adult and it does not feed.  It mates and dies shortly after.

bombus ternarius
July 16, 2009
Dear Bugman,
I just started seeing these this summer in central Maine. After watching a few, it seems as they live in the ground/pine needles? Always lived in Maine and never have seen one of these.
JR
Fairfield, Maine, USA

Tricolored Bumble Bee

Tricolored Bumble Bee

Dear JR,
Your Tricolored Bumble Bee, does build a nest underground.  The fact that you have never seen them before this year may be that either you just never noticed them, or that the local population is small.  Some insects do not range far and it is possible that the species might be common a quarter mile away, but virtually nonexistent in your immediate area.  Thanks for sending your awesome photo.

Black insect with red stripes
July 16, 2009
Found this bug east of flagstaff in an abandon trading post. It was moving quickly but seemed to be dragging that red striped sack.
Willis
30 miles east of flagstaff arizona

Blister Beetle:  genus Megetra

Blister Beetle: genus Megetra

Hi Willis,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus Megetra.  You can see more images and get information on BugGuide.
We love your photo with its alarming color palette.  The Blister Beetle does have warning colors for a good reason.  It can exude a blistering agent called cantharidin.