I have no clue what is it
Sat, Nov 22, 2008 at 10:14 PM
I found it climbing an small concrete wall, close to were I’m building my new home and while I usually have at least an idea of what a bug is, this time I have not clue what so ever,it’s lengt is around an inch long and I found it in the summer, is it a larva of some sort?
Jorge Farias
Jalisco, Mexico

Firefly Larva from Mexico

Netwing Beetle Larva from Mexico

Hola Jorge,
We believe this is a Firefly Larva. Beetle Larvae, and larvae in general, are often quite difficult to exactly identify to the species level. Fireflies are beetles, and the larvae eat snails and slugs. We wish we had Fireflies in Los Angeles, not only because of the night display, but because of the garden snails and slugs that eat our lettuce and other tender plants.

Hi, Daniel:
Wow, you have been very busy posting!  I turn my back for a week and….wham!  LOL!
… Ok, I think that covers it for now.  Oh, wait, that “lampyrid larva” from Mexico is much more than likely the larva of a net-winged beetle, family Lycidae.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Holy bigness!
Sat, Nov 22, 2008 at 3:41 PM
Holy bigness!
This thing FREAKED my husband out today when he found it on our recycle bin. Being “nature girl” I had to run right over and get a close look! It’s very weak, or at least acts like it. I haven’t seen it fly at all but I’m not sure if it’s because it’s colder than usual here or what. I’ve Googled my little fingers away and I’m thinking it might be a queen European Hornet. The thing is, I live in Lehigh Acres, Florida. I haven’t found any sites that mentioned them being in Southwest Florida. The way I look at it is… They fly! – They can go anywhere! Could you please help me identify it? Also, just how much danger am I in when handling it? Could I just move it somewhere else? I’m really not into killing things!
Curious Nature Girl
Lehigh Acres, Florida

Cicada Killer

Cicada Killer

Hi Curious Nature Girl,
This is a Cicada Killer, a large wasp that paralyzed Cicadas to feed to its young.  The curious thing for us is that we generally get our Cicada Killer questions in July and August, and occasionally into September, but late November is very late.  We have a dedicated portion of our site specifically for Cicada Killers and we have featured the Cicada Killer as a Bug of the Month recently.  Now that you know what it is, you should be able to find endless information online.  We have received a single report of a sting from a Cicada Killer.  They are not aggressive, but males will defend their territory and though they buzz people, male Cicada Killers do not possess stingers.

Unidentified weevil in Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest
Sat, Nov 22, 2008 at 1:10 PM
I came across this amazing weevil while exploring the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil on 7th November. It was probably 1.5 to 2 inches long and had the most amazing markings which reminded me of African tribal art. I would love to know what it is and would be grateful if you are able to identify for me – thank you.
Karen
South-east Brazil, Atlantic Rainforest

Unknown Brazilian Weevil

Unknown Brazilian Weevil

Hi Karen,
This is at least the third Weevil image we have received in the past several years, and we have never had much success with identifying the species.  Some countries have excellent websites for the identification of their native insects, but sadly, Brazil is not one of them.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

brown beetle/spider?
Fri, Nov 21, 2008 at 8:54 AM
Hi,
Cleaning out my back storeroom, I came across this insect. I got so scared, I emptied half a tin of insecticide on it before it died. It has six long legs, two large mandibles at front and two very long antennae. It’s black with brown spots/stripes and its body is about 1-1.5 inches in length.
Cheers
shurland
Trinidad, West Indies

Exterminated Tailless Whipscorpion in Trinidad

Exterminated Tailless Whipscorpion in Trinidad

Hi shurland,
Tailless Whipscorpions are fierce looking, but they are totally harmless unless you are a small Arthropod or other creature that becomes prey to this shy nocturnal hunter.  We haven’t posted an image to our Unnecessary Carnage page, so we will be posting your letter and image.

Giant spider in Ecuador
Fri, Nov 21, 2008 at 1:08 PM
Friend that’s visiting found this spider in her sink – then behind her hand towel. it’s about 4-inches across. Is there a potential that this is venomous?
Curious in CA
Ecuador – Quito

Possible Huntsman Spider from Ecuador

Possible Huntsman Spider from Ecuador

Hi Curious,
Our first thought was that this resembled some type of Huntsman Spider. We received a previous photo from Ecuador that Eric Eaton identified as probably a Huntsman Spider, and we also posted images of large spiders from Costa Rica about the same time. Eric Eaton wrote to caution readers about large tropical spiders. Here is what he wrote: ” Ok, the spiders from Ecuador and Costa Rica: They are most likely NOT wolf spiders, but wandering spiders, either in the family Ctenidae or Sparassidae. They tend to be more common, and even larger than, wolf spiders in the tropics. At least one species, Phoneutria fera, is extremely aggressive, with potentially deadly venom. Do not mess with large spiders in Central and South America! The venomous types are very difficult to distinguish from harmless species, and in any event, a bite is going to be really painful. These spiders sometimes stow away in bananas, houseplants, and other exported goods, so they can show up in odd places. Be careful where you put your hands.” We are not certain that this spider is a dangerous species, but we would urge caution. In North America, the Huntsman Spiders, though large and scary, are harmless.

Hi, Daniel:
Wow, you have been very busy posting!  I turn my back for a week and….wham!  LOL!
Also, I need to amend  my commentary on the neotropical “wandering spiders.”  Apparently envenomation symptoms vary considerably, from mild to death.  Big help, eh?  It depends on whether it is a dry bite or not, and how an individual’s immune system responds to envenomation.  Please prompt me to send along an article about them (I need an address, though).
Eric

Long legged spider / insect ???
Fri, Nov 21, 2008 at 5:27 AM
Dear Bugman
This creature is currently basking in the sun on the front of my new house wall. Location is central Scotland. Its legs are very long and almost create a fan shape. Its body is oval with a bit of hight to it and its legs resemble spider esk shape. We have fir trees at the back of the garden and I thought it might have come from there. I would really love to know what it is and if im likely to see more of them in the future.
Mrs Brind
Falkirk

Harvestman

Harvestman

Dear Mrs Brind,
We searched through 19 pages of images of Harvestmen in the order Opiliones in the hope of finding an example of an individual positioned like yours, but we were not successful. Harvestmen are related to spiders, but do not possess venom. They are harmless scavengers that are sometimes called Daddy Long Legs.

Hi Bugman and Mrs. Brind:
This looks like Dicranopalpus ramosus. Although harvestmen are quite harmless in a direct sense (to humans), this is apparently an exotic or ‘invasive’ species in Europe, so there may be some ecological implications. Apparently it originated in North Africa and has been spreading northward for some time, finally reaching Scotland in 2000. Because in is an invasive species there are quite a number of articles and photos on the internet. Wikipedia offers a brief summary at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dicranopalpus_ramosus Regards.
Karl

Hi Karl,
We were unable to open the Wikipedia page you cited, but we did find another website with good images of Dicranopalpus ramosus and we found a posting entitled UK Alien Invasion on the UK Independant website.
Gradual species expansion like this is an often overlooked symptom of Global Warming.