Is this in Hemiptera?
Thu, Jan 29, 2009 at 2:43 PM
My students and I recently found this bug on a nature walk. I’ve looked everywhere to try and identify it. Please Help….???
Dr. G
Central Flordia

Giant Sweet Potato Bug Nymph

Giant Sweet Potato Bug Nymph

Dear Dr. G,
This is a Hemipteran.  More specifically, it is a Giant Sweet Potato Bug nymph, Spartocera batatas, one of the Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae.  We matched the photo to one on BugGuide, also from Florida.  According to BugGuide, which only has reports from Florida:  “Non-native, found in Surinam and some Caribean islands. First reported in the continental US in Florida in 1995. ”  We are tagging this as an invasive exotic.  It may be an introduced species that entered the country through human intervention, it may have been introduced through hurricane winds, or it may be a result of range expansion due to global warming.  Global warming will most definitely affect both species range expansions, and species range declines.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Fly of Atacama Desert
Thu, Jan 29, 2009 at 4:16 PM
Your letter to the bugman (please provide as much narrative and information as possible)
I found this fly in a garden of the coastal city of Antofagsta, Atacama Desert, Chile. Sitting on a leaf of a palm tree.
The size was 5mm approx.
Very interesting the pattern on the wings and the color.
Thanks for your help.
desert fly
North of Chile, desert, coast

Unknown Fly from Chile

Fruit Fly from Chile

Dear desert fly,
We are uncertain of the exact identiy of your beautiful Chilean desert Fly, but we will post the image in the hopes one of our readers will be able to identify its family or species before we can.

Update:
Thu, Jan 29, 2009 at 9:19 PM
Hi Daniel:
This is a fruit fly (family Tephritidae) in the genus Trupanea. There are about 70 species in the neotropics, including at least four in Chile (T. bullocki, T. nigriseta, T. nymphula and T. simpatrica). Most look quite similar and apparently all the neotropical species feed on Asteraceae hosts(asters, daisies and sunflowers) as larvae. There are also 21 nearctic species according to the Bugguide, most in the USA. The Bugguide site has some good images that look very similar to the Chilean fly. Regards.
Karl
Link: http://bugguide.net/node/view/94894#counts

moth
Mon, Jan 26, 2009 at 6:25 PM
what type of moth is this? I think it may be an underwing, I have seen no photos anywhere of this same moth.
Elaine photo girl
North east MA

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth

Hi Elaine,
This is actually a Tiger Moth in the family Arctiidae, most likely from the genus Grammia. There are many similar looking moths in this genus and we do not feel confident trying to identify your specimen to the species level, but a glance at the images on BugGuide will show you some possibilities.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please can you identify this creature
Mon, Jan 26, 2009 at 12:56 PM
Hi, please could you help us identify this creature which my brother snapped in his little corner of the jungle near Cayenne, French Guyana – it is obviously hanging on a tree in the photo, is well camouflaged and looks pretty scary – he has never seen anything like it before, despite living there for about 5 years. Is it poisonous or dangerous (should he be worried??!)
Frankie
French Guyana

Katydid from French Guyana

Katydid from French Guyana

Hi Frankie,
This is a harmless female Katydid.  What appears to be a dangerous stinger is really an ovipositor.  We thought this might be a Moss Mimic Katydid like one from Costa Rica that  Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki identified for us in the past.  When we wrote to Piotr, here was his response:  “Hi Daniel,  Very hard to say from these photos. It looks more like Acanthodis than Haemodiasma (which does not occur in Fr. Guiana.)  Piotr”

Katydid from French Guyana

Katydid from French Guyana


Beautiful Bug
Sun, Jan 25, 2009 at 10:24 PM
Hi guys,
Found this nymph of a Eucalyptus Tip Wilter (Amorbus alternatus) hard at work on a young Ironbark tree. Stunning to look at but they do a lot of damage, particularly in areas where other trees and predators have been removed for grazing.
aussietrev
Queensland, Australia

Eucalyptus Tip Wilter

Eucalyptus Tip Wilter

Hi Trevor,
Thanks so much for sending us this beautiful photo of an immature Eucalyptus Tip Bug or Eucalyptus Tip Wilter, one of the Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae. We also found a link to an Australian Insect site with more information about this species.

Bug Identification
Sat, Jan 24, 2009 at 2:20 AM
Hi,
I would really appreciate your assistance in identifying this really bizarre looking insect, It has the body very similar to a cricket with a very strange head. On the underside it seems to have 3/4 of a smaller body inside its pincer type arms on its head (as seen in pic one).
The bug flew into my dogs water bowl and couldnt get out, so I found it and still cant beleive how weird looking it is.
BTW… I think you have next month’s bug of the month!
Thankyou,
Nikki, Australia
New South Wales, Australia

Weta

Weta

Hi Nikki,
This is a Weta, one of a family of insects endemic to Australia, New Zealand and South Africa whose closest relatives are the Potato Bugs or Jerusalem Crickets of the American West. There is a photo posted on Wikipedia of a Wellington Tree Weta, Hemideina crassidens, that looks very much like your specimen, but all indications are that the Wellington Tree Weta is only found in New Zealand.

Weta

Weta

Perhaps your specimen is closely related in the same genus, but we are having problems locating information. Many species of Weta are endangered and are protected by law. Perhaps one of our readers will supply us with a link and identification.

Weta

Weta

Nikki, your bug looks like a King Cricket, Australostoma. They live in burrows and come out on wet or humid nights. They are found in coastal New South Wales.
See a photo at
http://www.austmus.gov.au/factSheets/grasshoppers.htm
Grev