Subject: Termite or ant?
Location: Maryland
June 6, 2014 4:25 pm
Literally out of nowhere (I didn’t see them an hour ago), we have hundreds of these. This is only about 1/3 of them. Just as quickly as they came, they went back under the wood porch. Termite or ant?! :( randomally there are also a few red fire ants mixed in without wings.
Signature: Jenn

Swarming Ants

Swarming Ants

Dear Jenn,
These are swarming Ants, and the winged individuals are alates, unmated reproductive individuals that will fly off, mate and begin new colonies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Caterpillar
Location: North east coast of South Africa
June 9, 2014 4:10 am
We found this guy eating on the tree and then began spinning a cocoon around himself. Amazingly the next morning the cocoon was complete with the hairs from the caterpillar embedded into the surface.
Signature: Brian

Toothed Cream Spot Eggar Caterpillar

Toothed Cream Spot Eggar Caterpillar

Hi Brian,
We believe this is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae, and we did find what appears to be a matching image on iSpot that is identified as a Toothed Cream Spot Eggar,
Catalebeda cuneilinea, but we have not been able to locate any other images online to verify that identification.

Toothed Cream Spot Eggar Caterpillar

Toothed Cream Spot Eggar Caterpillar

Cocoon of a Toothed Cream Spot Eggar

Cocoon of a Toothed Cream Spot Eggar

Subject: Strange bug
Location: SW Ontario Canada
June 7, 2014 11:56 am
We found two of these bugs. We would like to know what they are and if they are destructive or beneficial?
Signature: Gardener

Eyed Elater

Eyed Elater

Dear Gardener,
This is an Eyed Elater, the largest North American Click Beetle.  In our opinion, it is beneficial based on what BugGuide indicates it feeds upon:  “Adults may take some nectar and plant juices.  Larvae are predatory, eating grubs of wood-boring beetles like cerambycids (longhorns).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Not bedbugs!
Location: West Lafayette, Indiana
June 12, 2014 9:06 pm
Hi,
I found at least 10-15 of these little guys crawling around on my sheets tonight within the span of an hour. They’re very very tiny, maybe a 10th of the size of the tip of a match. They’re orange/light brown and don’t seem to fly. While they don’t actually jump, they move quickly for their tiny size and what seems like a little jump. I can only find about one every few minutes that’s actually alive, but there are maybe 10 dead ones throughout my sheets too. Any ideas? My window is open 24/7. Could they be coming from outside? I haven’t had any bites or itchy bumps either. They seem to be harmless but are definitely creepy. Please let me know if you can figure these guys out!
Signature: Sarah K

Springtail

Springtail

Hi Sarah,
While we cannot make out any detail in your image, based on the description you have provided, we are quite certain this is a harmless and benign Springtail.  They like moist conditions.

Subject: ID Bug
Location: Tucson Arizona
June 6, 2014 1:14 pm
This bug was found on a tree at a commercial office complex in Tucson, AZ during the month of June, 2014.
Thank you!
Signature: Matt from Sahuarita Arizona

Giant Mesquite Bug nymph

Giant Mesquite Bug nymph

Hi Matt,
This is an immature Giant Mesquite Bug.

Subject: what type of chrysalis is this
Location: Wimberley, Texas
June 13, 2014 6:56 am
Found in Wimberley Texas
6/12/2014
What is is
was hand clearing some leaves and organic debris.
It’s has movement so i know it’s alive.
would love to return it to a safe place to mature but don’t know if it was actually in the dirt or just under some leaves….
Maybe it would like a dry area of my compost area…
Signature: Emily

Pupa of a Tersa Sphinx

Pupa of a Tersa Sphinx

Hi Emily,
Chrysalis is a term that refers to the pupa of a butterfly, and this is a pupa of a moth, and to the best of our knowledge, there is not moth specific term for a pupa.  We believe this is the pupa of a Tersa Sphinx,
Xylophanes tersa, or a closely related species.  You might try keeping it is some moist, but not wet peat moss if you don’t want to try the compost pile.  You can get additional information on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

I nested it in some leaves.. maybe I’ll put it so that it has earth contact with a blanket of leaves… where I water a plant once in a while..Thanks for the info.
Thank you so much for your service in keeping us connected with Nature