Subject: Carlos
Location: Costa Rica
April 29, 2014 6:10 pm
Este insecto no lo había visto antes y lo encontré en un pueblo llamado Zarcero de Costa Rica.
Signature: CarlosAS

Cicada

Cicada

Hola CarlosAS,
Este insecto es una CHICHARRA.  The Cicadas are very vocal insects, and they are considered among the loudest insects in the world.  According to the Book of Insect Records:  “The African cicada,
Brevisana brevis (Homoptera: Cicadidae) produces a calling song with a mean sound pressure level of 106.7 decibels at a distance of 50cm. Two species of North American cicadas, Tibicen walkeri Metcalf and T. resh (Haldman), produce an alarm call with a mean sound pressure level of 105.9 dB(50cm). Brevisana brevis is likely the loudest insect species on record. Cicada songs are species-specific and play a vital role in communication, reproduction, and possibly defense.”  We will attempt to identify your species of Cicada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: tiny bugs on outside walls of house
Location: Phoenix AZ
April 28, 2014 3:22 pm
we just noticed these buggers on our outside walls. they don’t appear to fly; when i touch the wall near one, it falls,. the photo is of a bougainvillea petal floating in our pool, with what (i think?) appears to be a queen! either that, or something wanting to eat them all. please help, so we know what to do, if you can. they are getting inside one window which doesn’t seal properly and a parakeet lives near that window! thank you!!
Signature: suzy

Possibly Immature Dirt Colored Seed Bugs and Syrphid Fly

Possibly Immature False Chinch Bugs and Frit Fly

Dear Suzy,
These immature Heteropterans look remarkably like some still unidentified, possibly Dirt Colored Seed Bugs we posted from Montana in 2012.  The Fly may be a Syrphid Fly, a family that has many species with larvae that feed on Aphids, members of the same insect order as your True Bugs.  We will try to get Eric Eaton’s opinion on this identification.

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
Wow, immatures are really hard.  I suspect something in the “Lygaeoidea” like you do, but….Fly might be a Chloropidae [Ed. Note:  See BugGuide].  This whole image looks like something out of a sweep net sample through a grassland.
Eric

Ed. Note:  May 2, 2014
We posted some images of a very similar Heteropteran nymph that might be a False Chinch Bug,
Nysius raphanus, and the same is likely true for this posting.  According to Colorado State University Extension:  “Mass migrations of false chinch bugs in the vicinity of buildings are primarily associated with very hot, dry weather. This may force the insects to move from drying weed hosts to seek shelter and higher humidity. Migrations indoors may occur through openings and cause nuisance problems. However, false chinch bugs do not bite, do not feed nor damage anything indoors, and will ultimately die out if trapped inside.  Irrigated landscapes adjacent to buildings may further encourage false chinch bug migrations to these areas. Therefore it may be desirable to temporarily discontinue watering in the immediate vicinity of the building when a problem migration is in progress. Providing cool, humid areas at some distance may encourage the insects to move away more rapidly.”  According to BugGuide:  “3 (or more) species are introduced N. caledoniae, huttoni, vinitor” which supports our believe that this might be an invasive exotic species.

Subject: Ontholestes murinus?
Location: Totton, Southampton, Hampshire (UK)
April 29, 2014 6:06 am
Hello! The other day, we had a visitor to the optical practice where I work. I’m 90% sure this is Ontholestes murinus; I was sure it was a rove beetle at the time and although I wasn’t expecting to get such a precise ID, I stumbled upon O. murinus when researching it later. I can’t tell you anything about where it came from, only that there are a couple of green areas around the corner from the practice and that when I chucked it outside, it took off before it even hit the pavement. It was very fast and had large mandibles, and it did raise his tail a few times as a Devil’s Coach Horse would. What do you think? (PS the numbers on the ruler are millimetres, and also I have more photos if required but sorry they’re not better quality). many thanks in advance.
Signature: Becca

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear Becca,
This is definitely a Rove Beetle, and it could well be
Ontholestes murinus, which is pictured on Beetles and Coleopterologists.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stuck-together butt bug
Location: San Marcos, CA
April 28, 2014 12:31 pm
Hi bugman,
I was taking a walk yesterday in San Marcos, CA (just north of San Diego) and found an odd bug. It looked like two bugs stuck together at their bums. Their bums were red (can’t really tell by the photo…sorry). I thought it might have been just two bugs stuck together but a few paces down the road I saw 2 more like this. It looks like one of the bodies is bigger and it moves in the forward direction that the bigger bodied bug would move. Hope this is enough helpful info to figure out what this is. Thanks!!
Signature: Chloe

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Hi Chloe,
Adult Red Shouldered Bugs,
Jadera haematoloma, are frequently found in the mating position.

Rose insect ID?
Location:  San Jose, California
April 28, 2014
Hi Daniel,
Any idea what these are?  Earwig hatchling?
The things are miniscule — on a rose in San Jose California this morning — not sure if the two photos are of same species.
Thanks,
Frank

Thrips

Thrips

Hi Frank
These look like Thrips in the order Thysanoptera to us.  See BugGuide for additional information.

Thrips

Thrips

Thanks — from looking at thrips I agree!!
Just now I got a better photo….
Frank

Thrips

Thrips

Subject: Spiky caterpillar,
Location: central MO, USA
April 28, 2014 7:03 pm
I took a picture of this caterpillar in early September 2006, he was on my tomato plants… I plucked the leaf he was on and put it on a chair so I could try to figure out what he was… never did find out. Here’s the picture, It looks similar to the Mourning Cloak Caterpillar which is on here, but different enough that I think it is a different caterpillar, maybe the spiny elm caterpillar?
Signature: jaelle62

Questionmark Caterpillar

Questionmark Caterpillar

Dear jaelle62,
You actually got quite close with your identification attempt.  We believe this is the caterpillar of a Questionmark,
Polygonia interrogationis, a butterfly in the same tribe as the Mourning Cloak, Nymphalini.  You can compare your image to this image from Bugguide.  Are you growing hops in your garden?  According to BugGuide, the “Caterpillars feed on nettle, false nettle, elms, hackberry, Japanese hops.”