Subject: Possible wasp?
Location: Sydney, Australia
February 7, 2016 11:56 pm
Hi there, I have noticed what looks to be a wasp nesting outside my back door. It does not seem to be aggressive and I don’t mind it being there as long as it doesn’t harm myself or my dogs. However, the strange thing about it is the nest structure and what it is made out of. I Googled wasp nests, I have looked everywhere and types everything but can’t see any nests that look anything like this. Do you know what type of wasp this is? Is it even a wasp? What is the nest made out of? It’s driving me crazy not knowing. If you zoom in on photo 1, you can just see the little wasp’s head inside the hole. I have no desire to remove the nest as I am regularly outside and the wasp doesn’t come near me. But I’m so curious. If you could identify it for me, that would be great. Thanks so much.
Signature: CuriousityCat

Wasp with Nest

Wasp with Nest

Dear CuriosityCat,
Wasps that construct nests generally use mud or chewed wood that creates a paper pulp.  Your images have what appears to be resin oozing from the bricks.  There is not really enough detail for us to be able to identify the Wasp, but perhaps one of our readers who is more familiar with Australian insects will be able to provide an identity.

Wasp with Nest

Wasp with Nest

Update:  Thanks to comments from Cesar Crash and Drhoz, we are pretty confident this is a Resin Mason Wasp, Epsilon chartergiformis, which is documented on FlickR constructing a nest using resin.  It is also documented on Bowerbird where Ken Walker provided the following comment:  “This is a FASCINATING find!!! There are very few aculeate wasps (ie. wasps with stings) that use resin as a building material. There are Australian resin bees but to our knowledge, there are only two Australian wasps that use plant resins to build their brood nest. These wasps are Epsilon chartergiformis (incorrectly listed on AFD, ALA and BowerBird as Pseudepipona chartergiformis) and Epsilon excavatum (incorrectly listed on AFD, ALA and BowerBird as Ubirodynerus excavatus). In 1995, Giordani Soika transferred these wasps to the genus Epsilon. There are 17 described species in this genus and all occur in SE Asia and Australia. OBVIOUSLY, there are no distribution records on ALA for either of the two Australian species.”

Wasp Peering from Nest

Wasp Peering from Nest

Update:  February 23, 2016
Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much, to yourself and your readers for helping me identify the wasp. I feel so happy now that I know what it is. I’ve been watching every day as the nest has been growing bigger, it’s been interesting.
I’ve attached a photo I took of the nest this morning, as it looks now.
Thank you once again for taking the time to get back to me, I really appreciate it.
Kind regards,
Novella Besso

Resin Mason Wasp Nest

Resin Mason Wasp Nest

Dear Novella,
Thanks for your kind words and a progress image of your Resin Mason Wasp Nest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Singapore
February 20, 2016 6:22 pm
We think this is a type of ant. Do you know it’s species?
Found indoors in our home in Singapore. Humid and hot all year around.
Signature: Pippa

Queen Green Tree Ant

Queen Green Tree Ant

Dear Pippa,
This looks to us like a queen Green Tree Ant,
Oecophylla smaragdina.  You can see the stubs where her wings were attached.  Flying Ants are reproduction kings and queens and the queen loses her wings once she has mated.  She will now begin a new colony.  According to Termites and Ants:  “Oecophylla smaragdina nests can be quite extensive covering several trees over a few acres. These nests are made of leaves woven together with ants’ silk secreted by the larvae. Some workers pulled leaves together while other workers each with a larva in its mandibles ‘glue’ the leaves together, with the ant silk secreted by these larvae, to formed a shelter where the brood are housed.”

Thank you!
May I ask, would she have been far from the nest she would be building? Should I be searching around our home to make sure there is not a huge ant colony about to be running through our home?
I read somewhere that sometimes the nests can be built in eaves on roofs etc, not just trees.
We live opposite a Giant part with lots of massive trees.  We released her there.  We do not have any trees overhanging our house but just want to make sure we are not neglecting to search for a pending ant infestation.
She was found in my son’s bedroom just walking across the floor.  My gut is that she was ‘brought in’ with something.  But now I’m wondering, at what point would she have lost her wings.  Could she have accidentally have flown in, and only just have lost her wings since being in our home?
Sorry for so many questions.
Thank you again for your help,

Hi again Pippa,
What we are about to write is based on speculation, and not about any research we have done on the Green Tree Ants.  We suspect this is a newly mated queen that has not yet set up a new colony.  We believe after her nuptial flight, she landed near your home, not an ideal site to construct her nest.  Your believe that she lost her wings either just prior to entering your home or after landing on a window sill is entirely possible.

Subject: Yellow/orange, ladybug-like spider
Location: tangkahan, north sumatra
February 20, 2016 8:58 pm
This spider was found in Tangkahan, North Sumatra, Indonesia, February 2016,, close to sea level.
Signature: matthew brealey

Crab Spider:  Platythomisus octomaculatus

Crab Spider: Platythomisus octomaculatus

Dear Matthew,
This is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, identified by the length of the first two pairs of legs, and the lack of a web.  Crab Spiders do not use a web to snare prey.  We quickly found a gorgeous image on Deviant Art taken by Melvyn Yeo that is identified as an Eight Spotted Crab Spider, 
Platythomisus octomaculatus.  According to Macrophotography in Singapore:  “The Eight-Spotted Crab Spider (Platythomisus octomaculatus) has been an elusive subject to many macro photographers, appearing in the Singapore macro scene a small handful of times per year, despite being possibly the largest of all Crab Spiders (Thomisidae) in Singapore.”  According to So Much Science:  “Platythomisus octomaculatus – a rare crab spider from Borneo about 3 inches long. They sit in flowers and wait for pollinators. These guys have been known to feed on bees in captivity and Borneo has the world’s biggest and longest bees.”  Thanks for submitting this rarity to our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is the bug
Location: Singapore
February 21, 2016 2:59 am
Hi,
Found these bugs developed in my fish food when it is left opened for few weeks. Please help to identify it.
Regards
Signature: TS

Mite

Mite

Dear TS,
This is a Mite in the Superorder Acariformes, but we haven’t the ability to provide anything more specific.

Subject: Long pillbug with segmented thorax in my makeup!
Location: Az
February 21, 2016 1:46 am
I found this bug in my makeup in mid February, (and promptly threw out said makeup by the way). I’ve seen them before, usually when deep cleaning the grime out of the bottom of drawers (you know how hair and dust collects in the corners of bathroom drawers, and food in kitchen drawers?)It was about the size of a pantry bug, less than the size of a peppercorn, and just hanging out in my purple eye shadow, no waste/feces around it, in fact, it was sitting more on the exposed metal part of my makeup than in the powder. It looked fuzzy just along the sides and out was hard to tell if it had six or eight legs, but appeared more centipede like. It didn’t seem to do well in water (I freaked out a little when I saw it and flicked it into my just used sink. But it didn’t go down the drain once wet; I figured it was dead (it wasn’t moving), so I snapped a few pics and would come back to check later, leaving it so I could try and look it up). I came back a few hours later to find that it had crawled away and my search on the Internet turned up nothing. And so I found you, the bugman!
Signature: Grossed out but curious

Carpet Beetle Larva

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Grossed out but curious,
This is a Carpet Beetle Larva, a common household pest.

Subject: Lichen Mimic
Location: Rancha Naturalista, Costa Rica.
February 21, 2016 10:00 am
Hello,
We encountered this lichen mimic hemipteran in Costa Rica 10 days ago. Can you help in identifying it please.
I tried previously to submit, but have now reduced the size of a single file.
Thanks
Hugh
Signature: Hugh Woodland

Lichen Mimic Hemipteran

Lichen Mimic Fulgorid Planthopper

Hi Hugh,
How large was this Hemipteran?  It resembles a Lace Bug in the family Tingidae, but we could not locate any images of similar looking Lichen Mimic Lacebugs from Costa Rica on the internet.  Lace Bugs are quite small.  We would not rule out that it is some species of Planthopper from the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with an identity than we have had.

Hi Daniel,
It was 1.5, maybe 2 cm long. I couldn’t find anything on the net either!
Hugh

That is too big to be a Lace Bug.

Comment from Hugh:  August 11, 1016
With the help of Dr Jim Lewis of the Museo Nacional of Costa Rica and Dr Jan Janzen this has been identified as Sinuala tuberculata in the Fulgoridae.