Subject: Type and countey of origin if possible
Location: South east asia
May 23, 2014 8:34 am
I found this beauty staying still for quite a long time.. dont want to catch it though.. love to know what species is this beauty from..
Signature: M.tux

Lichen Moth

Lichen Moth

Dear M. tux,
Your inquiry has us confused.  You did not get very specific in your location, and you are requesting the “countey of origin” which implies that you don’t know where the image was taken, yet your text implies you took the image.  At any rate, this is a Lichen Moth in the tribe Lithosiini and we believe we have correctly identified it as 
Cyana horsfieldi thanks to this posting on FlickR.  It is also pictured on the Moths of Borneo and on BioLib.

Thanks.. I took the picture at my country, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. I wanted to know the origin of the bug if possible, I mean from which country. I guess I did not understand the fields of the form actually, my bad. But thanks for identifying that bug for me

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Velvet Mite
Location: Sibley Nature Center, Midland TX
May 26, 2014 11:20 am
I took this photo of a Velvet Mite after the recent rains here. I thought you might like to have it for your database. It’s nicely focused and clearer than the photos you currently have.
Signature: John P. Van Dusen

Velvet Mite

Velvet Mite

Hi John,
Thanks for sending in your very detailed image of a Velvet Mite in the family Trombidiidae.  Your individual might be in the genus
Dinothrombium based on this image from BugGuide.

Subject: green and brown, active bug
Location: Sierra Foothils 2000′ elevation, Weimar, CA
May 25, 2014 4:45 pm
This was flitting about my garden, and landed on me. Could it be a type of assassin bug? Or is it a leaf eater? The first picture shows it may have a long green head part in front like as assassin bug. Its body is about 3/8 inch long.
Signature: Carolyn

Strawberry Bug

Strawberry Bug

Hi Carolyn,
We believe this is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae, and we also believe we have correctly identified it on BugGuide as
Closterotomus norvegicus, commonly called a Potato Bug (already an overused common name thanks to the iconic Potato Bug or Jerusalem Cricket) or Strawberry Bug.  According to BugGuide, the food plants include:  “alfalfa, white clover, and lotus seed crops in New Zealand; a key pest of pistachios in CA; also reported on nettle, poppy, thistle and other Asteraceae.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: metallic blue bug
Location: mandeville louisiana
May 26, 2014 10:16 am
hi i was at an old abondoned metal shack taking pictures and i found this wierd looking bug and my friends and family are arguing about what kind of bug it is.. please help?
Signature: -madalyn bilac

Cuckoo Wasp

Cuckoo Wasp

Hi Madalyn,
This is a Cuckoo Wasp in the family Chrysididae, and you can find a matching image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “The name ‘cuckoo wasp’ refers to the fact that these wasps lay eggs in the nests of unsuspecting hosts” and “Parasitoids feed on the larva of the host and cleptoparasites “steal” the host’s food. The food-stealing behavior of cleptoparasite species resembles that of the cuckoo bird and gave rise to the cuckoo wasp’s name. Hosts of parasitoid species include bees, sphecid wasps, potter wasps, sawflies, silk moths, and the eggs of stick insects. Cleptoparasitic species feed on provisions of sphecid wasp nests, which may include dead spiders, true bugs, aphids, or thrips.” 

Subject: Bug
Location: Keller, Texas
May 26, 2014 5:39 pm
This bug was crawling up our campchairs today. Keller, Texas. I tried to look up what it was… no clue.
Signature: April Driggers

Wheel Bug Nymph

Wheel Bug Nymph

Hi April,
This is an immature Wheel Bug, a predatory Assassin Bug that might bite a human if carelessly handled.

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Lynnwood WA
May 26, 2014 5:35 pm
Bug landed on our window around 0800 may 26. Photo taken from inside through the glass.
Signature: Mary

Cinnabar Moth

Cinnabar Moth

Dear Mary,
Though BugGuide has no images of the underside of the wings, we are certain this is a Cinnabar Moth,
Tyria jacobaeae, a species, according to BugGuide, that was:  “Introduced from Europe as a control for introduced weedy Ragwort, the host plant for its caterpillars, which is toxic to livestock.”