Ed. Note:  Please do not submit images of similar insects from the internet with identification requests without informing us of the origin of the images.  That wastes our time and the time of our readers.

Subject: A caterpillar that I think is poisonous
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
April 3, 2014 1:28 am
This specific caterpillar has sent me to hospital. I was at school when it had stung me when I had seen it there were no hairs on it. It made my face swell and my left arm doctors say it is not a allergic reaction. Could you please tell me if this caterpillar is poisonous?
Signature: M.Ismail

Stinging Caterpillar

Virginia Ctenucha Caterpillar image from BugGuide

Dear M. Ismail,
Our initial attempts to identify this stinging Moth Caterpillar did not produce any results.  We are posting your image and awaiting input from our readership.  There are many caterpillars that have utricating hairs that can produce a reaction in sensitive humans, and the skin of the face is especially sensitive.

Ed. Note:  Virginia Ctenucha image pilfered from BugGuide!!!
It seems this image was lifted from BugGuide, probably unintentionally, by the M. Ismail in an attempt to identify a different stinging caterpillar in South Africa.  Rather than submitting an original image, we were misled when we were not informed that this image was not taken by the person who wrote the request.  We apologize for any confusion this has caused.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified reed insect
Location: Gifberg, South Africa (S 31.77 E 18.76)
April 1, 2014 2:41 pm
Dear bugman
I found this insect North of the Cederberg, in South Africa. It jumped into the open 4×4 truck window from some tall grasses/reeds we were driving through. It seemed capable of jumping, although its legs seem incapable of this feat. Any idea what it may be? I am from South Africa but never saw something like this before. Length was approx 20mm.
Signature: Francois

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???

Dear Francois,
This has to be one of the most unusual creatures we have ever been asked to identify, and we really don’t know where to begin regarding its classification, except that it is a Hexapod.  We haven’t the time to research this at this moment, so we are posting your photos and we will attempt the identification later today.  Perhaps our readership will take a stab at this while we are away from the office.

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???

Karl Identifies Leafhopper
Hi Daniel and Francois:
Given the submission date Daniel, it crossed my mind that you were perhaps being pranked with this one. However, it turns out to be a Restio Leafhopper (Family Cicadellidae: Subfamily Ulopinae: Tribe Cephalelini). These leafhoppers are native to South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, and the common name derives from the fact that all South African members of the Cephalelini are associated exclusively with the Restionaceae plant family. South Africa has 23 species of Restio Leafhoppers in four genera, 18 of which belong to the genus Cephalelus (so odds are that this is one). All the photos I was able to find showed winged individuals so I expect that this one is a juvenile. If you want to know how such a short-legged beast was able to jump into your truck you could check out this site (stop-action photos and description of Cephalelus in action). Regards. Karl

Eric Eaton Identifies Fulgorid Planthopper
Daniel:
Some kind of fulgoroid.  Will have to get back to you later with a more specific answer as I’ll have to look it up and/or query a colleague.
Eric

Update:  Restio Leafhopper
Ariella wrote today in a comment that this is a Restio Leafhopper,
Cephalelus uncinatus, a species pictured on ISpot.

Update from Chris Dietrich
It’s a nymph of the leafhopper (Cicadellidae) genus Cephalelus, which belongs to a tribe that is disjunct in South Africa and Australia.  They feed only on Restionaceae.
-Chris

 

Subject: No Idea
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
April 1, 2014 6:22 pm
What is this bug?
Signature: Bradley

Gold and Brown Rove Beetle

Gold and Brown Rove Beetle

Dear Bradley,
Your image is blurry, but the contours and coloration of this Gold and Brown Rove Beetle,
Ontholestes cingulatus, are unmistakeable.  Like other Rove Beetles, Gold and Brown Rove Beetles are beneficial predators.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Slow Worms
Winchester, UK
April 1, 2014 7:47 PM
my sister and friends have “slow worms” in winchester.
they are all excited!
i’m not sure how i can send you a photo from FB…?
this photo is from our friend wendy, who is a very accomplished artist and excels in beautiful paintings of flora and fauna.
http://www.herpetofauna.co.uk/slow_worm.htm
c.

Slow Worms

Slow Worms

Dear c.
Thanks for sending us your photo.  We hadn’t heard of Slow Worms before, and the link you provided is of great assistance.  According to the Reptiles and Amphibians of the UK link you provided:  “The Slow-worm is often mistakenly thought to be one of our native snakes. Slow-worms have very few markings other than the vertebral stripe of the female. This is thin and straight and not similar to the indented zigzag stripe of the Adder (
Vipera berus).  The Slow-worm has a noticeably blunter tail than any of the native snakes and the head is quite indistinct from the body. They have very small, highly polished scales, giving a glassy appearance.  On very close examination, it might be seen that the Slow-worm has eyelids, a typical feature of lizards. Another typical feature of lizards displayed by them, is the shedding of the tail when captured. The shed tail falling to the ground and thrashing makes a very effective decoy to predators, whilst the Slow-worm makes for cover.  The Slow-worm is a harmless creature, please remember, whether it is a Snake or Legless Lizard, it is a criminal offence to kill or injure any of the UK’s native reptiles.”  Since the UK Slow Worm, Anguis fragilis, is in a different genus than our local California Legless Lizard, they are not that closely related. 

Subject: Crusty thing on fence
Location: Denver, Colorado
April 1, 2014 8:06 pm
We found thes crusty pupa thing on our fence. We live near Denver, Colorado. Does anyone know what it is.
Signature: Thank you for your help.

Preying Mantis Oothecae

Preying Mantis Oothecae

These are Oothecae or egg cases of Preying Mantids.  Each will release up to several hundred hatchling mantids when they are ready to emerge.

Thank you for the answer-it’s been stumping me for about 6months. I am so glad we found your web site. Keep up the awesome work.
Thanks from Denver.

Subject: beetle
Location: san diego CA
April 1, 2014 8:34 pm
can you identify this guy? very pretty beetle, about 1 in long. iridescent and had a green back under the wings when it flew off. found mar 31 in san diego, ca. curious as i am always looking at bugs in my neighborhood and have never seen this one before. any help much appreciated
Signature: d

Jewel Beetle:  possibly Dicerca hornii

Jewel Beetle: possibly Dicerca hornii

Dear d,
This is a Metallic Borer Beetle or Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae, and we believe it may be
Dicerca hornii based on the photos and range listed on BugGuide.

Jewel Beetle

Jewel Beetle