Subject: Help a Bugger Out
Location: Tosa Peninsula, Kochi, Shikoku, Japan
May 15, 2014 6:17 am
Hello bugman!
Me and my boyfriend have been travelling in Japan now for 7 months. We came here originally for the birds but the huge variety of strange, colourful and giant insects have been stealing the show a bit.
This guy flew down off a tree, looking closely at its face we decided it was the funniest bug we had seen all trip, so that seems like a good place to start.
I would like to send more if that’s okay?
Signature: Ellie

Acorn Weevil

Acorn Weevil

Hi Ellie,
This is an Acorn Weevil in the genus
Curculio, but our quick research did not determine which species are found in Japan.  You can find information on BugGuide regarding North American species that might be helpful for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful beetle in South Korea
Location: South Korea
May 15, 2014 3:36 am
Dear Bugman,
I saw this beetle the other day near my office on a college campus in South Korea (it’s currently mid-May). I’ve lived here for several years and have never seen an insect that looks anything like this. I asked around and nobody seems to know what it is. Any insights?
Signature: Jon Soderholm

Jewel Bug

Jewel Bug

Hi Jon,
This is not a beetle.  It is a Jewel Bug in the family Scutelleridae, and our first matching images are on the What Went Wrong? blog, but the species is not correctly identified.
  Your individual looks similar to the Poecilocoris lewisi which is pictured on a postage stamp from Japan on the Asahi Net site, however other images of that species look quite different.  At this time, we are unable to provide a species identification for you, but we are confident that it is a Jewel Bug in the family Scutelleridae.

Dear Daniel,
Firstly, Thank you so much for a quick response… you guys are fast… Impressive! May I ask another question?  It seems that this Jewel Bug resides in Japan normally.  Nobody that I’ve talked to here in Korea seems to have seen one… How did it get here? and why…. (Korea and Japan have similar weather patterns)  Or, is it always here, just rarely seen?  As a scientist myself, I’m curious.
Thank you!!
Jon

Dear Daniel,
Based on the info that you gave me, I was able to find images on the web of bugs of the species poecilocoris splendidulus, that look just like what I saw… thanks once again!
Jon

Thanks Jon.  We found an image of a mating pair of Poecilocoris splendidulus from Japan on AnimalsandEarth.

Subject: a bee or a beetle!?
Location: County Down, Northern Ireland
May 15, 2014 5:30 am
Hey bugman! Me and my mum were just digging through some soil in our garden and found this weird looking insect! It’s body is all fuzzy and the colour of a bees but the head area is a yellow coloured shell? And it’s wings are very tiny and at the side of it! Also it’s eyes are like something you’d see in a cartoon of a house fly (really big and buggy). You can also clearly see wee pinchers for it’s mouth! I’ve never seen a bee or anything like this and it’s also weird that it was found in soil.
Signature: Many thanks, Rosalyn

Male Narcissus Bulb Fly

Male Narcissus Bulb Fly

Hi Rosalyn,
This is neither a bee nor a beetle, but you were on the right track when you noticed its eyes resembling those of a house fly.  This is a Fly in the order Diptera, and the fact that you found it underground indicates an underground pupation.  The wings have still not expanded after it emerged from the pupal stage.  The color and furry body are quite distinctive, and our first clue was images of a Narcissus Hoverfly,
Merodon equestris, on UK Safari, however, the images there show very different eyes.  The site indicates:  “look like small bumblebees” and “The ‘Narcissus’ name is given because they lay their eggs on Narcissus plants (daffodils).  When the eggs hatch, the larvae burrow down into the plants to feed on the fleshy bulbs.”  Everything seemed to fit but the shape of the eyes.  The eyes on your individual meet at the front of the head, so we continued searching.  On Bugs and Weeds, we learned that the Large Narcissus Fly:  ” only survives for a short while – between 5 and 24 days, and lays its eggs low down on the leaves of daffodil, narcissus and bluebell plants. On hatching the larvae make their way down into the bulb where they will feed for something like 300 days before re-emerging to pupate in the soil.”  We began to ponder the possibility that like Horse Flies, the Narcissus Hoverfly might exhibit sexual dimorphism, with the spacing between the eyes helping to distinguish the sexes.  That proved to be correct when we finally located an image of a male Narcissus Hoverfly on RI Bugs where it is called a Narcissus Bulb Fly.  Once we realized that the Narcissus Bulb Fly was also found in North America, we searched BugGuide and located another matching image of a male that matches your individual, except for the wings, which we have already indicated have not expanded to their full size in your image.  We are speculating that you have daffodils planted near the site of the sighting.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nightime beetles
Location: Pátzcuaro, Michoacán, México
May 14, 2014 9:47 am
These small brown beetle-like bugs vanish during the day, but are out after dark by the hundreds, merrily chewing the leaf margins on various plants. Their favorites seem to be oregano, honeysuckle, rose, the tender flowers of cana lillies, and avocado. They seem to prefer young leaves. Often they are stacked one atop another as if they are mating. They only appear at our house in late April, early May. We are in Pátzcuaro, Michoacán, México, at an altitude of about 7,200 feet. May is the dry, warmest month of the year (before the cooler rainy season begins), with daytime temperatures in the low 80s. Several locals we asked call them “cumbos” but that doesn’t translate into anything that makes sense.
I’d like to have them identified so I could research their behavior, life cycle and possible control mechanisms. Hand removing them by flashlight is taking about an hour every night and getting tedious.
I took the accompanying photos last night. They very much alive, though perhaps a bit dazed from being unceremoniously interrupted in the middle of their favorite activities — eating and mating.
Thanks for any help you can provide.
Signature: Mark B Emmer

May Beetles

May Beetles

Hi Mark,
These are Scarab Beetles in the family Scarabaeidae, and they are most likely May Beetles in the subfamily Melolonthinae, but we are unable to provide you with anything more specific at this time.  Perhaps a coleopterist, an entomologist who specializes in beetles, will write in and provide us with a genus or species identification.  Meanwhile, you can read more about the subfamily on BugGuide.

May Beetles

May Beetles

Wow!  Thank you.  From the photographs on that page, it appears that Phyllophaga rubiginosa is a dead ringer for what we have.  I’ll look closer at ours with a 10 power loope now that I have something to compare it to.
The links I found say the source is grubs in our lawn.  I will go have a look now that I have some information on their life cycle.
Again, thank you for your help.
Mark Emmer
Pátzcuaro, Michoacán, México

May Beetles

May Beetles

 

Subject: European Hornet, I think
Location: Bucks County, PA (In my car!)
May 13, 2014 7:34 pm
Hi there bug man!
Today I found this huge bug in my car. It couldn’t make it’s way out and people in the parking lot were gathered round with various solutions. Unfortunatly, it finally balled up and died. It looks like it was nesting in the door of my car. I’ve sent pictures and video. Sorry for the comentary but it freaked me out. Never saw one before! Could you tell me if I have identified this bug correctly? Thanks so much!
Signature: Judy “freaked-out” Sawyer

European Hornet

European Hornet

Dear Judy,
We agree that this is a European Hornet,
Vespa crabro, but we do not believe it was attempting to nest in your car.

Subject: Hornet nest
Location: Anniston, AL
May 13, 2014 11:07 am
Found one just getting started under my eaves.
Signature: Rick

Hornet Nest

Hornet Nest

Hi Rick,
Thank you for sending this image of what is most likely a queen Bald Faced Hornet beginning to construct her nest.