Subject: Long fangs
Location: Western PA
August 13, 2014 4:49 am
This spider was on my car the length of the spider was about two inch when it was laying flat. I don’t scare easy when getting close to spiders that made webs but he was quick. This guys fangs are very long easy to see without my macro lens on my camera.
First time iv ever see one like this I was unable to if any info on the net with my descriptions. Hope you can help.
The last picture is with a flash to better see the patterns on it’s back.
Signature: Ashley

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Dear Ashley,
This impressive spider is a Long Jawed Orbweaver,
Tetragnatha elongata, and according to BugGuide they:  “Usually construct their webs in the shade above water.”

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caught by our cat
Location: NW Wisconsin
August 12, 2014 2:53 pm
This bug was hiding in the sunroom INSIDE the house, cornered by the cat. The bug was aggressive and actually squeaked when confronted. Very large, two inch range. Sorry, the dead body is gone. But, we have a picture. Looking forward to any guesses. Thanks, Keith
Signature: Keith

Brown Prionid

Brown Prionid

Hi Keith,
This impressive beetle is a Brown Prionid,
Orthosoma brunneum, and while we tend to get a few submissions of Brown Prionids each summer, we have had a significantly greater numer this summer.  The larvae are wood borers and according to BugGuide:  “Breeds in poles, roots(?) in contact with wet ground.”  We suspect this individual was attracted to your house because of lights.

Subject: Bee
Location: Western Kentucky, USA
August 12, 2014 4:33 pm
What kind of bee is this? Western KY. There is a swarm in a tree behind my house.
Signature: Anthony Stoner

Honey Bee

Honey Bee

Dear Anthony,
This is a domestic Honey Bee, and you can call a local bee keeper to remove the swarm from your yard.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting Bug!
Location: Attleboro, MA
August 12, 2014 6:20 pm
I think this guy is neat looking, and I have been scouring online bug guides and can’t find anything that really comes close! But then I have never really studied bugs that closely . . .
He was on my back door in Attleboro, MA mid-afternoon in August.
Thanks!
Signature: EmilyRose

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Dear EmilyRose,
He is a she.  This is a female Two Spotted Tree Cricket,
Neoxabea bipunctata, and according to BugGuide:  “Adult females have two large dark spots on their ‘back’.  Adult males do not have the large dark spots on their ‘back’.”

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Thank you so much!  I think it is kind of beautiful.  Sorry to be a repeat for you!  I appreciate your time!
~Emily

Hi again Emily,
We have no problem with repeats as multiple images of the same species help provide a more comprehensive picture of what the insect looks like.  Also, it helps to have a more comprehensive range represented on our site.  Additionally, we like to indicate years when particular species are more numerous.  Your images are quite beautiful.

Oh I’m glad! I don’t see any others with her little fishtail end so that’s neat :-)
Thanks again!
~Emily

Subject: Big fly?
Location: corinth, tx
August 12, 2014 6:23 pm
I was . walking the dog and solve this bug eating a cicada.it looked like it was about one and a half to 2 inches long. I have never seen one and I wanted to know what it was.
Signature: Larry L.

Robber Fly eats Cicada

Robber Fly eats Cicada

Dear Larry,
This is some species of Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, and it is not a species we immediately recognize, so we are going to have to research its identity.  It is indeed eating a Cicada.  Robber Flies are highly specialized predators that are very adept at taking large prey on the wing.  Texas and Arizona both have unusual, not commonly seen Robber Flies that are not found elsewhere in the U.S., though the ranges of those species frequently extend into Mexico.  We believe that based on this image from BugGuide, it may be
Microstylum morosum.  According to Beetles in the Bush, this is “North America’s largest robber fly” and “Until recently, Microstylum morosum was considered a Texas-endemic.  However, Beckemeyer and Carlton (2000) documented this species to be much more broadly distributed in the southern Great Plains (from Texas up into Oklahoma and Kansas and west into New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado), and Warriner (2004) recorded it shortly afterwards in Arkansas.”  We wrote to Eric Eaton to see if he agrees with our identification.

Eric Eaton concurs
I would agree.  Seems to be a pretty distinctive species.
Eric

Subject: Caterpillars on a red-twig dogwood
Location: Chester County, PA
August 12, 2014 10:17 am
While working with a client in their garden yesterday, I noted these caterpillars on a Cornus sericea (red twig dogwood) shrub. I have not seen these before, and would like to know what they are. Fortunately, the clients were just as curious, and willing to “live and let live”, especially as there was very little foliage damage. This is in southeastern Pennsylvania, photo taken August 11, 2014.
Thank you!
Signature: The Gardening Coach

Dogwood Sawflies

Dogwood Sawflies

Dear Gardening Coach,
Though they are easily mistaken for caterpillars, these are actually the larvae of Dogwood Sawflies,
Macremphytus tarsatus, and they are members of the order Hymenoptera that includes wasps, bees and ants.  According to BugGuide:  ” Young larvae are covered with a powdery white waxy coating. Mature larvae are yellow beneath with black spots or cross-stripes above.”