Subject: Pleocoma blaisdelli -males
Location: Don Pedro Reservoir , Tuolomne County, California, US
November 5, 2015 10:53 am
I headed down to 49 and Don Pedro Reservoir 11/3/2015 ( during our first heavy soaker rains ) and set out a couple of my home made Plexiglas vein Black lite bucket traps just off a dirt road and waited . 56 degrees Rain. Finally the lord sent down more rain and at 5:00 am to 6:10 am a very nice series of males newly hatched , very sharp horned , and scratch free ! Very Shiny black elytra covers and golden brown Fur ! I believe these ” Rain Beetles ” to be males of ” Pleocoma blaisdelli Linsley 1938 ” , due to locality association , number of antennae segments, and Physical Description . The males lengths were exactly ( on metal calipers ) 20 mm to 28 mm long. 7 lamillie segments . I did not find or locate any females or their burrows .
… Gene St. Denis , Sierra Nevada Research , South Lake Tahoe , California
Signature: Gene St. Denis

Rain Beetles

Rain Beetles

Dear Gene,
We are positively thrilled to post your images of this Rain Beetle emergence.  From your information, it sounds like you went out on a Rain Beetle safari, and that you were quite successful.  The life history of Rain Beetles in the genus Pleocoma is quite fascinating, and we often marvel at the intricate complexity of the lives of certain insects, and we can’t help but to wonder how the immobility of the female Rain Beetle, who lives deep underground, enables the species to survive, but that also leads to the diversity in the genus and the location specificity of the different species.

Rain Beetles

Rain Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is it?
Location: Perth, Western Australia
November 1, 2015 9:17 pm
Hi! :)
My Son found this bug and I thought it had the cutest face! my first thought was a tick but on googling images of ticks I don’t think it is. can you please help identify it?
Signature: Belinda

Weevil

Weevil

Dear Belinda,
This is a Weevil, a member of the largest family of animals on earth.  You can find some examples of Australian Weevils on the Brisbane Insect website.

Subject: What bit me??!
Location: Illinois
November 4, 2015 10:41 pm
Hi! So me and my boyfriend just moved into a new apartment. The first night we slept there I woke up with horrible red itchy bumps on me. An hour or so after I woke up I couldn’t stop itchy them cause they itched so bad. The next day they became painful swollen and blistered and also still itched. I have about 10 on one foot and a couple on the other foot. Plus a couple here and there on my arm, leg, back, and one on my chest. The most of them are on my feet though. It’s been about 3 days now and they are still very itchy and blistered and it looks like some kind of clear liquid is coming out of them. Please help me figure out what these bites are so I know what I’m dealing with. I’d really appreciate any feedback!
Signature: Thank you!! – Lauren

What's Biting???

What’s Biting???

Dear Lauren,
Our best guess is that you are being bitten by Fleas.  If the previous tenant had pets and there is no longer a mammalian host for the bloodthirsty critters, they will bite humans and the itchy bites can last for weeks.  We do not believe these are Bed Bug bites.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Slow peanut-shaped insect
Location: Georgia, USA
November 4, 2015 11:52 am
Hey Bugman,
I am curious to know what kind of bug this is. I have researched online and cannot find anything similar looking. It is early fall in Athens Georgia, we are in a wooded residential area. It is about the size of a half dollar including leg span, maybe a little smaller. But definitely larger than a quarter. There is a ridge on its upper back between its top two legs.
Thanks for your time!
Signature: -Intrigued in GA

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Dear Intrigued in GA,
This Wheel Bug is the largest North American Assassin Bug, a family of predators.  The slow movement is characteristic of the hunting style of the Wheel Bug, but they are beneficial predators.  Many species of Assassin Bugs will readily bite humans if carelessly handled, but we cannot recall a single report in more than 15 years of a Wheel Bug biting a human, even though Wheel Bug identifications are among the Top 10 identification requests to our site.  We believe the cog-like ridge you cited prevents Wheel Bugs from being easily swallowed by other, larger predators like birds.

Subject: New apartment, new pantry protein?
Location: Orem, Utah
November 4, 2015 10:25 pm
We just moved to a new apartment and I decided I wanted to clean all the cabinets myself before putting anything in them. Imagine my surprise to find several of these crawling around the edges of my cabinets before I put anything in! I haven’t seen them eating anything, but I’ve found them on all my cabinets and the extra free standing pantry on the far side of the kitchen, so I think they’re after my food. I’ve only seen them in the evening and it has recently gotten cold, so perhaps they’re more recent invaders. I’ve combed through several pages of your site and others and can’t figure out what it is. I’d like to know so I’m not as paranoid with my 10 month old sticking everything in his mouth. I took the pictures on a sheet of lined paper with this bug in a Ziploc, so sorry if it isn’t really clear. They’re trangular in shape with a colorful band separating the black/brown head and tail. I’ve mostly seen a yellow/tan like this specimen, but I did see an orange band once as well. Thank you so much for running a great website where I hope to find answers!
Signature: Ashley B.

German Cockroach Nymph

German Cockroach Nymph

Dear Ashley,
This is an immature Cockroach and we are relatively certain your nymph is that of a German Cockroach based on images found on BugGuide and FlickR.  Of the 1000s of species of Cockroaches in the world, only a few species are considered household pests and the German Cockroach is probably the most pernicious.  According to BugGuide:  “Infests human dwellings and workplaces” and “Omnivorous, eats just about anything edible”.  BugGuide also states:  “Like most cockroaches, the German Cockroach is nocturnal. It is a major pest of residential and commercial structures.  Some people can develop severe allergies to cockroach parts, feces, and oils. “

Oh my goodness. Worst fears come true, but now I know for sure! Thanks for your help, I’ve got a landlord to call and food to put in plastic containers…

Subject: Caterpillar Found
Location: Kaneohe, Hawaii
November 2, 2015 4:45 pm
Hi. I’m a preschool teacher in Kaneohe, Hawaii. It rains often here and it a tropical savannah climate. We found this little guy crawling on our sidewalk. I think it probably was eating a hibiscus plant. It was about 6 inches at its longest, has a little tail, and no hair.
Signature: Ms. Lee’s Class

Privet Hawk Moth Hornworm

Privet Hawk Moth Hornworm

Dear Ms. Lee’s Class,
We believe we have correctly identified this Hornworm from the family Sphingidae as the larval form of the Privet Hawk Moth,
Psilogramma menephron, based on images posted to the Sphingidae of the Americas site where it states:  “The Caterpillar is an agricultural pest on Olive trees (Olea europaea, OLEACEAE), but is perhaps most often found in suburbia on Privet (Ligustrum vulgare, OLEACEAE ), Jasmine (Jasminum officinale, OLEACEAE ), and Australian Native Olive (Olea paniculata, OLEACEAE), but also feeds on other plants in the families: OLEACEAE and BIGNONIACEAE.”  The site also states:  “Many Sphingidae larvae will darken (reddish brown to brown) considerably when they are ready to pupate, especially if they are going into a diapausing state” and finding it on the ground indicates it was probably getting ready to dig beneath the surface and pupate, so it will likely emerge in the spring.  You can try keeping it in a terrarium with some dirt and if you are lucky, your class will be treated to the metamorphosis process.

Privet Hawk Moth Hornworm

Privet Hawk Moth Hornworm

Thank you so much for your response. We placed out hornworm in a large jar with dirt last Monday and it immediately dug itself underground. Because we are in a tropical climate, and we do not have a real winter, when do you think we can expect it to emerge, and what steps can we take to take good care of it?
Thanks!

Hello again Ms. Lee,
You should get that Privet Hornworm out of the jar.  A more open container, like a cage or a terrarium with a screen top would be much better as a pupal habitat.  You can spray the top of the soil with water if it appears to be drying out.  A crammed jar is not the best place for the adult Privet Hawkmoth to emerge, especially if you do not notice it shortly after digging to the surface.  We would guess an emergence in about six weeks.