Subject: An Intimate Photoshoot
Location: Singapore
September 9, 2013 10:27 am
Dear Daniel,
I thought you’d appreciate these beauties! I have loved rearing these common palmflies and it’s been sad to see them go – enjoy the photos!
Signature: Cassia

Common Palmfly Caterpillar Hatching

Common Palmfly Caterpillar Hatching

Dear Cassia,
Thanks so much for sending us your metamorphosis images of a Common Palmfly Butterfly,
Elymnias hypermnestra agina, which our readers can learn more about on Butterflies of Singapore where it states:  “The Common Palmfly is the most widespread species of its genus in the Indo-Australian region. Locally, it is also a rather common species with widespread occurrence across multiple habitats. Typically the adults are shade-loving, and usually sighted flying along the edge of vegetated area and in the vicinity of a clump of palm trees. The adults have the habit of puddling and visiting flowers for mineral and energy intakes.”  Sadly, there are no photos showing the opened wings, but we found one on ThaiBugs.

Common Palmfly Caterpillar

Common Palmfly Caterpillar

Your email did not provide much information.  Do you raise the caterpillars or did you just photograph wild individuals?  We believe we might have answered that question when we searched for a link in our own archive.  The only other example of the Common Palmfly in our archive was submitted by you last year.

Common Palmfly

Common Palmfly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gastropacha Quercifolia moth from Italy + issue with the website
Location: Mediterranean
September 9, 2013 8:27 am
Hi bugman,
We found this moth in an island in the Mediterranean.
I did some digging online and I think this may be in the Lasiocampidae family, Gastropachinae (or Tribe Gastropachini) sub-family, Quercifolia or Populifolia genera (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastropacha_quercifoliahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastropacha_populifolia).
By the way, there seems to be an issue with the website. On Chrome the last posting is of September 1st. On Internet Explorer the webiste is all weird and messed-up. On Firefox everything seems fine.
Thanks!
Ciao
Signature: Saverio

Poplar Lappet Moth

Poplar Lappet Moth

Dear Saverio,
Thanks for submitting your photo of this Lappet Moth in the genus
Gastropacha.  It really does look like a dried leaf.  We contacted our webmaster and this is his suggestion for your website issue:  “Can you ask him to refresh his page and check again? I have cleared the caches and I hope that fixed it. It looks fine to me, but I can only see it on my iPad at the moment.” 

Subject: Unknown creature
Location: New Jersey
September 9, 2013 8:30 am
Can you identify this creature? It has a lot of people wondering.
Signature: Mike

Prepupal Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Prepupal Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Hi Mike,
This is a prepupal Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar.  Just prior to pupation, the normally green caterpillars often change color.  If you look closely, you should be able to see a silken girdle that keeps the chrysalis upright.  Within a day, this caterpillar should metamorphose into a chrysalis.  We would love a followup photo of the chrysalis if you are able to take it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large black spider with a large single white spot
Location: Oak Island, NC
September 8, 2013 11:29 am
Found this near our water spigot in Oak Island, NC. Just curious what it is. It moves fairly quick and has a size of a walnut.
Signature: Amanda

Trapdoor Spider genus Ummidia

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider genus Ummidia

Dear Amanda,
We recognized your spider as a Trapdoor Spider, but we cannot recall seeing an individual with the white markings.  We searched the BugGuide archives of the genus
Ummidia and found this matching photo.  There is a comment on that posting that indicates it is not a dangerous spider, but it might bite if carelessly handled.  According to BugGuide, they:  “Dig tunnel in ground and seal with a silk-hinged lid. They hide under this lid and make forays out when prey is sensed, presumably by vibration. Males are often found wandering in late spring, presumably looking for mates.”

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: New Orleans, LA
September 8, 2013 8:26 pm
Dear Bugman,
Do you know what this little guy is called? It fell out of a tree, practically in my friend’s lap, and everyone freaked out and warned her that these leave nasty welts when they bite. That’s disappointing, because it’s awfully cute. Curious what the little fella is.
Signature: Bugged to Know

Callosamia Caterpillar

Callosamia Caterpillar

Dear Bugged to Know,
This is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar in the genus
Callosamia, and we feel the report of bites leaving welts is not true, though there are many stinging caterpillars that can leave welts.  There are three members of the genus Callosamia found in the New Orleans area, and all three have similar looking caterpillars, so we can’t say for certain which of the three species you found.  Our money is on this being the caterpillar of a Tulip Tree Silkmoth, Callosamia angulifera, which you can see on BugGuide.  This might also be the caterpillar of a Promethea Moth, Callosamia promethea, which is also pictured on BugGuide, or the caterpillar of a Sweetbay Silkmoth, Callosamia securifera, which you can find pictured on the Butterflies and Moths of North America.   

Subject: orange caterpillar
Location: Seward, AK
September 8, 2013 11:01 pm
Hi! My son found this caterpillar crawling on the ground in front of our porch. We have looked a little bit online, and can’t seem to find what kind of caterpillar it is. Can you help?
Signature: Cdean

Elm Sawfly Larva

Elm Sawfly Larva

Hi Cdean,
This is the larva of an Elm Sawfly,
Cimbex americana, and they are frequently mistaken for caterpillars.  Sawflies are actually classified in the order Hymenoptera with bees and wasps, though they do not sting.