Subject: Box Elder Bug Love
Location: Monmouth County, NJ
May 22, 2016 8:46 pm
At first I thought these were beetles, but after a bit of google research I have come to think they are Box Elder Bugs. I found them like this on my window screen (mating?) where they stayed for 2-3 days with little movement.
I was unable to get a photo of the top side (or even see it), but I spotted another one about a week later and after viewing its top side it appeared to be a box elder bug.
Location: Monmouth County, NJ
Time: Around the last week of April
Signature: Anonymous

Mating Boxelder Bugs

Mating Boxelder Bugs

Dear Anonymous,
A ventral view is not ideal for an exact identification, but the red eyes that are clearly visible on the pair in your image and in this BugGuide image are a very strong indication that they are mating Boxelder Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Creepy in Oregon
Location: Southern Oregon, Rogue Valley
May 21, 2016 8:49 am
We found this guy in our kitchen this morning. (May 21st) we’ve both lived all over the country and have never see any thing like this before.
Signature: KJH

Potato Bug

Potato Bug

Dear KJH,
This is a Potato Bug or Jerusalem Cricket in the genus
Stenopelmatus, and though most of our sightings come from Southern California, they range much farther, according to BugGuide.

Subject: What kind of (caterpillar)?
Location: Hong Kong
May 22, 2016 7:24 am
We saw this in Hong Kong on 22 May 2016 in the woodland area by a reservoir. It looked like a caterpillar to us but we could not be sure with the strange patterned head and ‘horns’. Any insight as to what bug this may be and if it is poisonous would be very much appreciated!
Signature: Tai Tam

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Tai Tam,
This is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae.  We found some matching images from China of Caterpillars in the genus
Trabala on FlickR.  Here is another FlickR image.  Some Lappet Moth Caterpillars have urticating or stinging hairs that can cause a skin reaction in sensitive people.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Friend found a bug
Location: North carolina
May 21, 2016 8:56 pm
Spring time north Carolina friend got bit, she said it burned for a few minutes but now has gone away
Signature: James A Jendrusik

Corsair Nymph

Corsair Nymph

Dear James,
This is an immature Assassin Bug, and we believe it is one of the Corsairs in the subfamily Peiratinae based on this BugGuide image of
Sirthenea carinata, this BugGuide image of a nymph in the genus Rasahus, and most especially, this BugGuide image of Rasahus biguttatus, a species that according to BugGuide is called the Orange Spotted Assassin Bug and which is:  “Ground-loving, frequently found under rocks. Comes to lights.”

Subject: 5-lined Skink
Location: Tampa, Florida
May 21, 2016 9:01 pm
I saw this interesting little guy in my backyard In August a few years back. I used google and came up with an identity of: Eumeces inexpectatus, the Southeastern five-lined skink.
I hope that’s right. It didn’t mind me holding it at all, but was probably happy to go its own way after I bugged it for pictures.
Signature: Shell

Southeastern Five Lined Skink

Southeastern Five Lined Skink

Dear Shell,
With its blue tail, this Southeastern Five Lined Skink is sure a pretty lizard.  We don’t have many reptiles represented on our site, so your submission is a very welcomed addition.  According to the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory:  “Young have a bright blue tail while adult males’ stripes may fade and a reddish or orange coloration may develop on the head.”  It seems your individual may be a male nearing maturity.  The site also states:  “Southeastern five-lined skinks may be found on the ground or in trees, but are generally less arboreal (tree dwelling) than broadhead skinks. Although sometimes seen in the open, these lizards are most often found beneath logs or under tree bark. When pursued, these lizards generally run for the nearest tree or log and can be quite difficult to capture. Like many other lizards, southeastern five-lined skinks will break off their tails when restrained, distracting the predator and allowing the lizard to escape.”

Subject: Insect???
Location: South west England
May 22, 2016 5:57 am
Do you please know what insect it is. Looks kinda like a moth. I found it in south west England in spring in my garden. It has 2 sets of wings underneath the shell bit. And weird antenna and a pointy tail. Thanks
Signature: I don’t know what this means but I have to fill it in anyway

Cockchafer

Cockchafer

The signature line on our standardized form is a place for the submitter to include either their real name or some pseudonym, like “Perplexed in England” as a signature to the submission.  This is a Cockchafer or Billy Witch, Melolontha melolontha, a native Scarab Beetle that generally appears in the spring.  Thought to be on the decline in England for years, populations seem to once again be on the rise.