Subject: What type of grub is this?
Location: The Pas, Manitoba, Canada
March 23, 2014 7:34 pm
We found this grub burrowed in the middle of a frozen dead ash? tree we knocked down. We were cutting it up with an axe and noticed a few of them. The inside of the tree was totally eaten and was full of dark brown casings/guano. The fat big grub was right in the hard wood in a self made hollow.
We thought ands were damaging our trees but maybe this is the culprit! What is it? Any information about how to get rid of it, damage it causes, etc? Pretty gross but pretty cool at the same time. Thank you
Signature: Snug as a grub

Scarab Grubs

Scarab Grubs

We believe these are Scarab Beetle Grubs, most likely Rhinoceros Beetle Grubs from the subfamily Dynastinae.  We do not believe the Grubs are responsible for the demise of the tree.  They will infest dead and dying trees that are beginning to decompose, but they will not kill healthy trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Rhino Beetle
Location:  Kruger national Park, South Africa
February 2014
Thought I’d send my prize photo of a rhino beetle.   It was on the same wall as the Southern Cat’s-Eyed Emperor moth, but on a different night.  I was told by a guide that I am very lucky to have seen this beetle.   Trying to photograph it at night under CFLs was a trick.
Thanks again for IDing the moth.
Jeanne

Dung Beetle

Dung Beetle

Hi Jeanne,
We believe this is a Dung Beetle, not a Rhino Beetle.  Both are classified as Scarab Beetles.  It might be
Copris elphener which is pictured on PHotograph s from South Africa.

Oh, rats!   I see what you mean.   But when I Googled rhino beetle, I saw photos identical to mine.   Oh,well, I find dung beetles fascinating.

Subject: Fly identification
Location: Colorado
March 21, 2014 6:51 pm
Hi,
I have a couple of flies that I haven’t been able to identify.
The first I thought would be easy, however, I’m coming up empty! I’ve Googled lots of phrases, and gone through the photos on here (I think I hit them all), but didn’t see any matches. This one was in late June of 2010 in the Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs, CO.

Thank you so much for your help! (Also, your book is fabulous!)
Signature: Amy

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Hi Amy,
Your first image is of a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, and this image of
Exoprosopa caliptera that we found on BugGuide is a very close match.  Exoprosopa dorcadion, also pictured on BugGuide, is another possibility, so we are confident with the genus, but we would have to defer to someone with more experience to definitively identify the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp???
Location: Whangarei, Northland, New Zealand
March 23, 2014 10:11 am
Hi there. Attached is a picture of a wasp-like creature I found in my windowsill. I’ve never seen one before and a friend who lives nearby also found one in her house and has also never seen it before. We live in Whangarei, New Zealand which is in Northland (at the North of the North Island). We wanted to make sure it wasn’t a new immigrant.
Signature: Jana in New Zealand

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Hi Jana,
This is an Ichneumon, member of a group of Parasitic Wasps that prey upon Arthropods.  Many species of Ichneumons are very host specific, often preying upon a single species of Lepidoptera, Hemiptera or even one of the Arachnids.  Identifying the exact species of Ichneumon in the large and confusing family Ichneumonidae is a daunting task, but if you want to pursue that route, the Landcare Research site for New Zealand might be a good point of departure.

Subject: Mexican spider??
Location: Quintana Roo, Riviera Maya, Mexico
March 23, 2014 9:07 pm
This spider? Was in our hotel room, twice!, during a recent trip to the Riviera Maya in Mexico. What kind of spider is it? Does it bite? If so, is it poisonous? Thanks for your help!
Signature: Freaked out traveller!

Tailless Whipscorpion

Tailless Whipscorpion

Dear Freaked out traveller,
We know that traveling is a very traumatic experience fraught with the unknown, but you needn’t fear this Tailless Whipscorpion.  It doesn’t have venom and it is unlikely that it would bite a human unless it was carelessly handled.  Tailless Whipscorpions are shy, nocturnal hunters that are often tolerated in Mexico, where they are known by the name Cancle, because they feed on Cockroaches and Bed Bugs.

Subject: Unidentified beetle or fly
Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
March 23, 2014 11:57 am
Hello bug lovers,
I caught this photo of a bug that looks like a fly which is as big as a tree sparrow. I first taught it was a bird who got trapped in my condo which is on the 16th floor. Its wings is wide and has striking orange veins. Which from a far looked like a bird and one would assume that since its on the 16th floor. So i wanted to help it find the openings to freedom but it kept flying low down the wall on the floor and beneath the sofa. So i decided to capture it first which was difficult cause i was a bit frightened by the size. I finally caught it in a container ( dont worry i didnt hurt the guy not even a scratch) then i took photos of it. I got worried since it decided not to move anymore after it got caught but it was only playing dead. Then i released it on the ground floor of my condo. It flew away really quick but it looked majestic. From the photo i took you can see its bright green neck. The only sound it made was from flapping the wings. Hope you can identify it for me b ecause this is the first time ever ive seen it. It is a really beautiful insect, you shouldve seen it fly with its wings spread wide and bright. I live in a condo which is in the heart of the city, Kuala Lumpur.
Signature: Danial

Cicada:  Tacua speciosa

Cicada: Tacua speciosa

Dear Danial,
This gorgeous insect is neither a beetle nor a fly, but rather a Cicada.  It is
Tacua speciosa, and there are several images on Cicada ManiaAccording to Cicada Mania:  “The Tacua speciosa is a beautiful cicada native to Malaysia, Indonesia, Borneo, Sumatra, and other countries & islands in the Malay Archipelago” and it “is one of the largest cicadas.”  Though you did not hear any sounds, Cicadas are among the loudest of all insects.

Cicada:  Tacua speciosa

Cicada: Tacua speciosa