Subject: Blue planar spidernet chile
Location: Osorno, Chile
December 18, 2014 2:30 am
Hallo bugman,
can you identify the spider which produced this
horizontally spanned blue chaotic net near the Osorno in Chile in December?
Unfortunately, the spider was absent.
Greetings
Signature: Joachim

Unknown Spider Web

Unknown Spider Web

Dear Joachim,
Thanks so much for sending a higher resolution image.  We have not been able to determine the identity of the spider that created this web, but we are posting the image and many times our readers write in to contribute to the identification process.  Hopefully we will be able to provide you with an identification in the future.
  Can you provide us with any additional information.  Was it near a body of water.  We seem to have a recollection of horizontal webs near streams, but we are still attempting to locate those sources.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: whats that bug
Location: brisdane moggil
December 18, 2014 3:28 pm
have not been able to identify these insects I took these photos myself please help.
Signature: cheers dylan

Leaf Beetle Larva

Leaf Beetle Larva

Dear Dylan,
We received your submission with three unrelated insects attached to a single, very brief identification request.  Before we could even begin, we needed to research the location of “brisdane moggil” which we quickly learned was a spelling error of Brisbane Moggil, an area in Queensland Australia.  We try to the best of our ability to classify postings correctly on our site and information on the sighting is often very helpful.  With that stated, one of your images is of a Leaf Beetle Larva.  If you want any additional identifications, please submit a single individual, but you may attach as many as three images of that individual as sometimes multiple views assist in our identification process.  Please include any relevant anecdotal information regarding the sighting.

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Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Subject: Gibbifer gibbosus?
Location: La Estrella, Antioquia, Colombia
December 17, 2014 9:39 am
I found this beautiful beetle walking over a fungus, near Medellin, Colombia, at about 1700 m over the sea level. So I think it could be a “pleasing fungus beetle”, but I only find references of this species in Central American countries.
During my search in internet, I also found the latin word “gibbosus” that means “humpback”. It seems to be clearly the case of this beetle.
Signature: luchogu

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Dear luchogu,
Your images of a Pleasing Fungus Beetle on its namesake food are spectacular, but they took us so long to format for the web that we don’t have the after final energy to research their identity, but we believe the genus
Gibbifer is correct.
It’s a new day and we are linking to a Costa Rican Pleasing Fungus Beetle submission from earlier in the year that might be
Gibbifer gibbosus, but we were never able to substantiate that identification.  Insetologia from Brazil has an image of a Pleasing Fungus Beetle that look identical to your individual that is identified as being in the genus Cypherotylus, a name we cited as obsolete in a posting from our archivesFlickR includes an image of a Pleasing Fungus Beetle in the genus Gibbifer, but it looks nothing like your individual.  A search for Gibbifer led us to another FlickR image from Peru that looks similar to your individual, but it is only identified to the genus level.

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Santa Clarita, CA
December 18, 2014 8:51 am
found this spider climbing up my patio. Wondering what it is
Signature: Thank you

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Male California Trapdoor Spider

This gorgeous creature is a male California Trapdoor Spider, and we frequently receive sightings and submissions after the first heavy rains of the season when the males leave their burrows and seek mates.

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Subject: sergio
Location: Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico
December 17, 2014 6:18 pm
hi i found this bug flying around my room, i killed it becouse i really never saw anything like this before, at fist i thought it was stick bug, but im not sure.
Signature: sergio

Thread Legged Bug

Thread-Legged Bug

Dear Sergio,
This Thread-Legged Bug is a predatory Assassin Bug in the subfamily Emesinae, and though they might bite a human if carelessly handled, they are not considered dangerous.  Since they are predators, they are considered beneficial.  We hope you refrain from future Unnecessary Carnage now that you know this is not a harmful insect.  See BugGuide for additional information on Thread-Legged Bugs.

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Subject: Wasp and it’s eight legged prey
Location: Mooroolbark, Victoria, Australia
December 18, 2014 1:11 am
Hi,
I saw this wasp yesterday (December 18) and as you can see it has caught a spider, and quite a large one. The wasp itself was about an inch long maybe (as you can see in the pics it’s about half the height of a standard house brick).
I didn’t see the initial attack, but was walking by and saw it dragging the spider by its face (do spiders even have “faces”? haha) through the leaf litter by the side of the house. I watched it drag the spider at least 5 meters to the front of the house where it then hauled it up the wall with apparent ease (the first picture) and pulled it into the gap in the bricks as demonstrated in the last picture.
I found the whole thing quite amazing. It was like watching a documentary :)
I would love to know what kind of wasp this is. Pity I couldn’t get better pictures, but hopefully they’re enough to identify this awesome wasp.
I was also wondering a few things about the spider. If that spider was on my bedroom wall, I would call it a “Huntsman” but I don’t know it’s actual name. Was the spider going to end up as the wasps meal, or was the spider going to have eggs laid in it, so they can hatch and consume the spider alive? Is that even something wasps do or am I just being creative? Haha
Thanks
I’m wondering if the spider is for food, or whether it’s for the wasp to deposit eggs into.
Signature: Matt P

Spider Wasp preys upon Huntsman Spider

Spider Wasp preys upon Huntsman Spider

Dear Matt,
We have no shortage of Australian Spider Wasps with their Huntsman Spider (yes your ID on the spider is correct) prey on our site, most likely because they are a common Australian summer sighting that corresponds to the dearth of interesting North American sightings of our northern winter.  You are also correct that the female Spider Wasp will lay an egg on the Huntsman Spider which will provide a fresh meal for the developing Spider Wasp larva as it feeds on the still living but paralyzed Huntsman Spider.  We believe the Spider Wasp is
Cryptocheilus bicolor.  Spider Wasps will frequently climb a wall or fence dragging the Huntsman Spider so they can glide with the prey as it would be too difficult to take off from the ground with such a heavy load.

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