Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Southern California/High Desert
March 30, 2015 8:29 am
I found a really pretty green beetle on campus today. Some mean boys were throwing it, and I thought it was dead, but when I picked it up it moved a little bit! I’d like to know what kind of bug it is, so I can maybe save it, and if not, maybe I’ll keep it.
Can you help me?
Signature: Ms. London

Shining Leaf Chafer:  Paracotalpa puncticollis

Shining Leaf Chafer: Paracotalpa puncticollis

Dear Mrs. London,
This gorgeous Scarab Beetle is a Shining Leaf Chafer in the subfamily Rutelinae that does not have a distinct common name, and its scientific name,
Paracotalpa puncticollis, is quite a mouthful.  It is pictured on BugGuide, but there is not much additional information.  According to the Coleopterists Bulletin:  “Paracotalpa puncticollis is usually found in pinyon-juniper areas, and appears to be associated with plats of the genus Juniperus.  Observations of adults emerging from litter at the base of juniper may indicate that larvae feed on roots of this plant.  Adults have been observed feeding on needles of juniper, and analysis of fecal material has confirmed this adult diet.”  Because of your kindness, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Shining Leaf Chafer

Shining Leaf Chafer

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Little black and orange bugs
Location: Mojave, California
March 26, 2015 12:47 pm
I work in Mojave, CA and a bunch of these little guys live right outside my workplace. The thorax is a blackish/grey color while the abdomen is bright orange with symmetrical black spots. The wing coverings are orange with black shapes and two little white dots. They have six legs, two antenna, and are about the length of a thumbnail. They’re always out and about during the day, and most of them appear to be mating at this time. I tried looking them up online but couldn’t find anything so hopefully you can help me out!
Signature: Lexi

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Dear Lexi,
These are mating Small Milkweed Bugs,
Lygaeus kalmii, and they are generally found in conjunction with milkweed, though they may feed on other plants as well.  You can read more about Small Milkweed Bugs on BugGuide.

Small Milkweed Bug

Small Milkweed Bug

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Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Santa Barbara California
March 27, 2015 6:42 pm
My backyard has been completely over run by thousands of these bugs over last 6 months. What are they?
Signature: Jeff

Red Shouldered Bug

Red Shouldered Bug

Dear Jeff,
This is a Red Shouldered Bug,
Jadera haematoloma, and according to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Yards, gardens, riparian areas, and other areas in association with hostplants. Often found in large aggregations feeding on leaking tree sap, dead insects, or seeds that have fallen from trees overhead. Also forms aggregations in winter to hibernate, often in association with human residences.”  BugGuide has a list of host plants, and eliminating the food source should help to control the numbers of Red Shouldered Bugs in your yard.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: insect identification
Location: Sindh, Pakistan.
March 29, 2015 10:32 pm
I encounterd this insect in a public bathroom. I suspect it might be a cockroach but I have never seen anything like this. I do not know if the brown shell is another insect or an egg. I am very eager to know what insect this is.
Signature: Zayd M

Metamorphosis of a Cockroach

Metamorphosis of a Cockroach

Dear Zayd,
You witnessed the metamorphosis of a Cockroach.  Unlike the literary Franz Kafka version where a man is transformed into a Cockroach, the metamorphosis process is a natural means for insects and other creatures to grow and mature.  Insects and other Arthropods have hard exoskeletons that do not grow.  When the insect outgrows its exoskeleton, it molts, shedding the old skin, and then the insect expands in size.  In your image, the old exoskeleton is dark and the new exoskeleton is white and soft.  It will soon darken and harden and the Cockroach will be larger than before the metamorphosis.

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Subject: What is this
Location: Cleburne, Tx (north central , Tx
March 29, 2015 7:42 pm
This showed up on a plant in my kitchen. I am in Cleburne,tx. It has been there about a week. It is attached at the top and bottom.
Signature: Bekah White

Probably Fungus

Probably Fungus

Dear Bekah,
We do not believe this phenomena is insect related.  Our best guess is that it is some type of fungus.

Fungus we suppose

Fungus we suppose

Possibly a Fungus

Possibly a Fungus

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Woolly Bear found at What’s That Bug? office garden
Location: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
March 29, 2015

Painted Tiger Moth Woolly Bear in Mount Washington

Painted Tiger Moth Woolly Bear in Mount Washington

We can’t believe we are approaching the 20,000 mark with postings, and we decided to do a countdown of sorts.  We found this Woolly Bear that will eventually metamorphose into a Painted Tiger Moth, Arachnis picta, while weeding in the front garden.  Later while walking into Elyria Canyon Park to tag Fiesta Flowers in a Vernal Stream, we noticed several smashed, dead Woolly Bears along the “dirt” Burnell path where hikers walk on a daily basis and we can only hope the dead Woolly Bears were the result of accidental stompings.  We also noticed several living Woolly Bears in Elyria Canyon Park.

Tagged Fiesta Flowers

Tagged Fiesta Flowers

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