Subject: West Texas Grasshopper
Location: El Paso, Texas
October 27, 2014 4:05 pm
Greetings bugman!
I am a Park Ranger for Texas Parks & Wildlife in El Paso, Texas. The other day I was walking through our park and found this beauty. I thought it might be some species of short-horned grasshopper, but I will admit that my entomology knowledge isn’t what it should be.
This specimen is roughly 3-4 inches long and was hanging out in a semi-marshy/overgrown area. Any idea what it is?
Thank you for your time!
Signature: Entomology Challenged Park Ranger

Bird Grasshopper

Bird Grasshopper

Dear Entomology Challenged Park Ranger,
We believe your Bird Grasshopper in the genus
Schistocerca is most likely an American Bird Grasshopper, Schistocerca americana, based on this image posted to BugGuideAccording to BugGuide:  “Large, usually has creamy strip extending from head to forewings. Characteristically flies up and into trees when disturbed, behavior quite different from most other grasshoppers.”  Do you have an additional image from above that shows the top of the head?  We could confirm its identity if the “creamy strip” is visible.

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Subject: Tailless Whip Scorpion
Location: Saint James City, FL
October 27, 2014 10:24 am
Dear Bugman,
Can you tell me the Genus and species of this tailless whip scorpion? I found it underneath a rotting slash pine log, near a salt marsh at Pine Island Preserve at Matlacha Pass, in Saint James City, Florida. I was also wondering if there is a resource describing the distribution and life history of this species. Thanks!
Signature: Conservation Foundation of the Gulf Coast

Tailless Whipscorpion

Tailless Whipscorpion

Dear Conservation Foundation of the Gulf Coast,
According to BugGuide,
Phrynus marginemaculatus “is the only tailless whipscorpion known to occur in Florida.”  We will attempt to find you more information.

Tailless Whipscorpion

Tailless Whipscorpion

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Subject: What is this bug?! Mutated wasp?!?! Please help!
Location: Windsor, ON Canada
October 27, 2014 12:49 am
Hi there! I’m from Windsor, ON Canada and I was raking leaves in my front yard today and this peculiar, very big and scary bug had landed on my arm. I immediately jumped and swatted it off and it landed on a leaf at my feet… My sister and I took a closer look because it appeared to be stunned or discombobulated so we took the opportunity to snap some photos and examine it. I have never seen a bug such as this, it looks like a mutated wasp and it bothers me to think there are more out there like this… I’m confused because it is now autumn and chilly where I live and most of the bees and wasps are no longer flying around for the season. I would really like to know what bug this is! It appeared to have a stinger, as well as some sort of tail? It did have black and yellow alternating stripes, long yellow legs and it was around 2 inches I would say.
Signature: Thanks so much!! -Sonia

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Dear Sonia,
This Pigeon Horntail, which is sometimes called a Wood Wasp, is related to wasps, though Pigeon Horntails do not sting.  The female Pigeon Horntail uses her ovipositor to deposit eggs in dead and dying trees.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Maybe a Velvet Ant?
Location: California
October 27, 2014 5:01 am
I found this strange little guy (or gal) in my back yard. Couldn’t figure out what it was even after exhaustive searching (Mainly me typing Furry Ant-Spider Hybrid into various image search engines and forums), hopefully you may recognize it. In terms of size, it looked to me to be about 1cm long. I took pictures from a couple angles, it is a remarkable looking little thing, would love to know what it is! Thanks!!
Signature: Ace

Furry Bycid might be Lophopogonius crinitus

Furry Bycid is Ipochus fasciatus

Hi Ace,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, not a Velvet Ant.  The furry covering is quite unusual for the family, but we did post a similarly hairy Bycid from Puerto Rico in January from the genus
Ecyrus.  We searched the genus Ecyrus on BugGuide and found only representatives in Eastern North America, but we expanded the search to include other members of the tribe Pogonocherini and that led to a single mounted specimen of  Lophopogonius crinitus that is pictured on BugGuide.  We also located images of mounted specimens on A Photographic Catalog of the Cerambycidae of the World.  There is not much information on this species online.  We have contacted Eric Eaton to get a second opinion of the identification.  Are you able to provide us with a county or city location?

Possibly Lophopogonius crinitus

Ipochus fasciatus

Eric Eaton Responds
Close.  Sort of.  Ipochus fasciatus:
http://bugguide.net/node/view/125447
Nice images considering how tiny.
Eric

Thank you so much! It feels so good to finally know what it is hahaha! The location is Santa Cruz, right along the coast, if that helps add to info about it’s geographical spread. Thank you again so much!!

Subject: “Scorpion Spider ?”
Location: Northcliff / Cresta / Fairland
October 27, 2014 8:32 am
Found it in upstairs bedroom in Fairland close to the N1 & 14th Ave
Signature: Tommy Steyn

Scorpion Spider

Scorpion Spider

Dear Tommy,
Thanks for sending your wonderful images of a Scorpion Spider in the genus Platyoides.  Our first posting on a Scorpion Spider in 2010 resulted in a robust comment exchange, but alas, there is not much information online regarding the bite of a Scorpion Spider, which leads us to speculate that the bites are not dangerous.

Scorpion Spider

Scorpion Spider

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Subject: Beetle? Kampala Uganda
Location: Kampala, Uganda
October 26, 2014 11:00 pm
Hello,
Attaching two pictures (hopefully they go through…my internet is bad!)
Found this guy on my shoe this morning. I’m in Wakiso District Uganda, just outside of Kampala. Can you help me identify him/her?
Cheers!
Signature: Beth

Cicada

Cicada

Hi Beth,
This is not a beetle, but a Cicada, a group of insects known for the loud sounds they produce, often from the tops of trees.  Your individual is  dead ringer for the individual in this Wikimedia Commons image also from Uganda.

Cicada

Cicada

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