Subject: can you identyfy this large beetle
Location: hythe, kent
February 28, 2015 2:08 pm
Dear all
We found this bug in our bathroom , running down the door.
Can you help with his identity
Thanks Grant
Signature: G West

Australian Cockroach

Australian Cockroach

Dear Grant,
At first we were going to send a brief response that this is a Cockroach, but we decided the thoracic markings are so striking that we would attempt to identify the species of Cockroach you encountered.  After finding several similar looking images that only identified it as a Cockroach, we found the Suffolk Pest Control Company that identified it as an Australian Cockroach,
Periplaneta australasia., and that provided this information:  “Inspite of their exotic origins Australian cockroaches are making a home for themselves in the UK, where they can found in most major cities.”  Not confident that the Australian Cockroach is actually native to Australia, we found this information on BugGuide:  “Adult has thorax outlined in yellow with black/brown center marking somewhat like a sideways number eight. Differentiating Australian cockroaches from other species of Periplaneta requires identification of the narrow yellow mark along front outside edge of wings”, but nothing was written about the country of origin.  The garden is calling us from additional research at this time.

Hi Daniel
Thanks for your help. Am guessing we need to contact some form of pest control company as they seem quite dangerous.
Because we d found one , I suppose there are more so will get onto it straight away.
Thanks again
Grant

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Subject: hemipteran nymph
Location: Valley View, South Australia
February 27, 2015 9:58 pm
I found thousands of tiny bugs climbing my back fence from the ground upwards this morning and wondered what they were. I took the attached micrograph using a USB microscope. The background grid is 5mm squares
Signature: Geoff Smith

Possibly Seed Bug Nymphs

Possibly Seed Bug Nymphs

Hi Geoff,
Since these Hemipterans are immature nymphs, they may be difficult to identify to the species or genus level.  We believe they are Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae, and they do not look too dissimilar than these unidentified nymphs from Australia, and they also resemble these nymphs from California.
  Whenever a species appears in a heretofore new location, we suspect it may be an invasive, exotic, introduced species without natural predators.  The climate in California and Australia are similar enough that species from either location can easily adapt, so they may be native, or introduced, and since they look so similar to the California sighting, it is possible they are the same species, and that one or the other, or both, are introduced.

Many thanks Daniel
I agree with what you’ve said – interestingly the block behind my house has recently been cleared and the bugs are swarming all over the fences around this newly bare ground. They are all still there today and the ants don’t appear to like them, although I noted that a small spider had eaten just a few of them overnight. I accidentally squashed a few against my hand when I first noticed them and they smell unpleasant.
Regards
Geoff

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Subject: Bee? Fly? Friend or Foe?
Location: TN
February 27, 2015 8:47 am
I’m hoping someone can help me identify this bug. I’ve found 3 of them thus far. They appear to have been created in my large pot of amaryllis that I drag indoors and outdoors each year. Last fall, I quit watering the large pot and stored it in cool, darkish conditions (unheated garage) for about 4 months. After moving it to a warm sunny location – these gentle creatures are making their appearance. Google hasnt helped. Thanks for any information you can share!
Signature: Green thumb – newbie apridarist

Narcissus Bulb Fly

Narcissus Bulb Fly

Dear Green thumb-newbie apridarist,
This is a Narcissus Bulb Fly,
Merodon equestris, which we identified on BugGuide, and though they are generally associated with daffodil and narcissus bulbs,  according to the North Carolina State University Insect and Related Pests of Flowers and Foliage Plants site:  “Distribution -The narcissus bulb fly occurs wherever narcissus are grown throughout the United States. This pest was introduced from Europe in about 1869.  Host Plants -The narcissus bulb fly has been reported to infest amaryllis, daffodil, Galtonia, Flanthus, hyacinth, Iris, lilies, Leucofum, Narcissus, Scilla, tulips, and Vallota.  Damage -The center of the bulb is hollowed out and the flower bud is destroyed. Many infested bulbs rot away although some survive to send up a few scrawny grasslike blades the following year.”

Narcissus Bulb Fly

Narcissus Bulb Fly

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Subject: Strange bug
Location: Pyramid hill, Victoria, 3575, Australia
February 28, 2015 7:34 am
I have never seen anything like it! This bug looks like a bug cream coloured wasp! Please help me identify it… By the way i am in Australia, Victoria, Pyramid hill.
Signature: Abi

Katydid

Katydid

Dear Abi,
This is a harmless female Katydid, and we suspect you mistook her for a wasp because of the stinger-like ovipositor which is used to deposit eggs.  We are not certain of the species, but you may be able to identify it on the Brisbane Insect website.

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Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
February 27, 2015 3:44 am
We found this caterpillar in our garden today -late summer in Johannesburg, South Africa. I have never seen anything like it. Would love to know what it is. Many thanks!
Signature: Elizabeth

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Elizabeth,
Though you may have never seen one before, the Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Acherontia atropos, is a relatively common species in South Africa.

Daniel, thank you so much for your help!  Just to let you know, we carefully relocated the creature to an uncultivated verge further down our road so it is safe and well and not tempted to eat any more Arum Lilies.  Best regards, Elizabeth.

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Subject: bug in the algarve, portugal
Location: lagos, portugal
February 26, 2015 12:02 pm
Hi, i found this in the mouth of my four month old puppy this morning, just wondering if it dangerous?
Signature: clare curry

Hi, have managed to find out, it is a violet flower bee

Violet Carpenter Bee

Violet Carpenter Bee

Dear Clare,
Though you have identified your Carpenter Bee,
Xylocopa violacea, we are happy to post the image to our site.  According to TrekNatureReadily identified by its color, this handsome solitary bee flies in summer and autumn and again in spring, after hibernation.”  We don’t know what your weather is like right now, but we are speculating this sighting occurred on a warm day which brought the Violet Carpenter Bee out of hibernation.

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