Subject: Butterflies
Location: Westford, MA
July 29, 2014 3:42 pm
Hello,
A friend of mine was at a butterfly zoo in Westford, MA and she came across several exotic species that she wanted identified
Signature: Collin

Birdwing Butterfly

Golden Birdwing Butterfly

Dear Collin,
Butterfly habitats are not natural settings for butterflies, and it can be difficult to identify unknown species without knowing the country of origin, which is one method we use to search for identifications.  Additionally, the quality of your friend’s images is very poor, which is also detrimental for identification purposes.  We do know that one image is of a Birdwing Butterfly in the tribe Troidini.  It appears to be in the genus
Troides.  You can compare your image to this image of a female Troides rhadamantus from the Goliathus website.  As you can see from this FlickR image, the Golden Birdwing, which is the common name for Troides rhadamantus, is a resident in the Chicago Botanic Garden Butterfly House, which is a good indication it can be found in other butterfly habitats that often use the same breeders to obtain stock.  Let your friend know that butterfly habitats often have displays with images that assist in identifying the residents.  The Westford Butterfly Place has a website with a gallery.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cannibis Eater?
Location: Central Calif, USA (city of Bakersfield)
July 29, 2014 7:59 pm
We have found these 4 winged “flies” on our cannabis plant. Are they insect or plant eaters?
So far they haven’t eaten me!
Signature: Lynn

Sharpshooter

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Hi Lynn,
Your images are very tiny and not of the highest quality, so we enlarged them and enhanced them for posting, but we prefer high resolution, high quality images for identification purposes.  This appears to be some species of Leafhopper or Sharpshooter, and there are many agricultural pests in the family.  Leafhoppers suck the juices from plants, and some species are known to spread viral infections to plants.  Our best guess is that this is a Glassy Winged Sharpshooter,
Homalodisca vitripennis, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “A major vector of Pierce’s disease on grape. Usually not a serious pest within its native range, this sp. was introduced into so. California, where it has become a serious threat to viticulture.”  We attempted to locate any documentation on the relationship between Glassy Winged Sharpshooters and Marijuana, and we did find a different species of Sharpshooter feeding on Marijuana on the FloraFinder site.  The University of California Davis Integrated Pest Management site has an excellent article on the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter, and though we scanned it, we could not find a reference to marijuana. 

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Subject: Large beetle with serious pinchers
Location: Rhode Island
July 29, 2014 6:09 pm
Hello, I live in Rhode Island and found this beetle floating in my pool. Unfortunately, it could not be saved. I’m just wondering what type of bug this is and if I should be concerned that there may be more and if they are destructive.
Thank you in advance!
Signature: Lisa

Drowned Reddish Brown Stag Beetle

Drowned Reddish Brown Stag Beetle

Hi Lisa,
Did you attempt mouth to mouth resuscitation?  This is a male Reddish Brown Stag Beetle.  Males have the more developed mandibles.  This and other Stag Beetles are not destructive, nor are they in any way detrimental to humans, their homes or their belongings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug from Honduras
Location: Roatan, Honduras
July 28, 2014 9:46 pm
Hello there!
We found this insect in Roatan, Honduras in my friend’s shower. We have spend hours online trying to identify this creature and are coming up empty. The wings on it’s head are so strange! Like long eyelashes! It also looks like the bottom might have a stinger. Please help. We are dying to know the answer.
Signature: Lynette

Male Glowworm Beetle

Male Glowworm Beetle

Hi Lynette,
This is a male Glowworm Beetle in the family Phengodidae, and you can see its resemblance to this image on BugGuide.  The wings and feathered antennae indicate this is a male.  According to BugGuide:  “Adult males have variously shortened/narrowed soft elytra, branched antennae, and bulging eyes; adult females are larviform (often all but impossible to tell from fully-grown larvae) and, like the larvae, have bioluminescent organs.”

Subject: Butterfly – Ashland, OR
Location: Siskiyou Mtns. – Ashland
July 28, 2014 9:49 pm
My friend has claimed this as a Lorquin’s admiral. Is it?
Signature: TerryDarc

Which Admiral is it???

Which Admiral is it???

Dear TerryDarc,
We wish you had access to a dorsal view as the orange-brown wingtips on the Lorquin’s Admiral are absent in other Admirals.  This is most definitely an Admiral in the genus
Limenitis, and there is a good chance that it is a Lorquin’s Admiral, but we have some other possibilities.  There is a strong resemblance to the Lorquin’s Admiral posted to BugGuide, but there is also a resemblance to this Weidemeyer’s Admiral posted to BugGuide.  It might also be an interspecies hybrid or other aberration as the genus has many examples represented on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Lorquin’s Admiral has brown wing tips, above and is much more brown on the underside. Its range encompasses the west coast.”  If we limit our response to our top choice, based on your location and the brownish coloration, we have to go with Lorquin’s Admiral.

Thanks, Daniel!
It didn’t look quite right for a Lorquin’s. Hybrid is a good possibility. Sorry but that’s the only pic we’ve got.
-Terry

Subject: bug or bee
Location: Belleville, PA in a flower garden
July 28, 2014 4:20 pm
This bug flies like a bee, it is all around my flowers and acts like a bee. I have never saw it until this year. It is yellow, then green, then black. Sometimes the yellow and green are reversed.
Signature: Deb

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hummingbird Clearwing

Dear Deb,
You need an extremely fast shutter speed, in excess of 1/1000 second, to freeze the wings of this Hummingbird
Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe, a diurnal species of Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  Another member of the genus, Hemaris diffinis, is smaller and is called the BumbleBee Moth.