Subject: Green Longhorn Beetle from Barbados
Location: Barbados, Caribbean
April 21, 2014 9:50 pm
Hi, This green longhorn beetle (looks like Chlorida festiva) flew into my room to get its picture taken last night. First time I’m seeing one of these and it was about 4cm (body) long. I also noticed what looks to be mites on its ‘neck’ area, can you confirm this? Thought it would be a nice addition to your collection.
Signature: Niaz

Longicorn, Chlorida Festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn, Chlorida festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Hi Niaz,
We agree that you have correctly identified your Longicorn as
Chlorida festiva, but in searching for an image online for a link, we stumbled upon this Superstock image of Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites identified as Histiogaster arborsignis.  Phoretic Mites do not prey upon the Longicorns, but rather use them to move from location to location.  Back to the Longicorn, according to American Insects:  “Linnaeus described this large and striking species in 1758. It can be found in the West Indies, and from Mexico south to Argentina.”  Your images are gorgeous.

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this bug? a kind of Fly?
Location: Saudi Arabia_Madinah
April 21, 2014 8:45 am
Can you please identify this bug?
I’ve found it sitting on a leaf, in the morning in 21/4/2014.
I couldn’t take any pictures, except for this one.
and thank you.
Signature: M.A

Possibly a Sawfly

Unknown Wasp

Dear M.A.,
We wish your image had more detail.  At first we thought this might be a Fly in the order Diptera, but the antennae look decidedly unflylike.  We now believe this is a Hymenopteran, the order that includes bees and wasps, and we believe it might be a Sawfly.  We wish we were able to tell if there is one pair of wings or two pairs.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this identification.

Subject: What is this?
Location: North Texas area close to Dallas Lake Ray Hubbard
April 21, 2014 11:14 am
Found this bug on the front of my house under the garage light. Has been there for 3 or 4 days now and has only moved a couple of inches that I know of. You can estimate it’s size from the standard house brick it is sitting on. Did not want to bother it until I knew what it was or may be doing. Thank you for your help in the past and I hope you had a great Easter.
Signature: Dan in Texas

Spring Fishfly

Female Spring Fishfly

Dear Dan,
This sure looks like a female Spring Fishfly,
Chauliodes rastricornis, to us.  According to BugGuide:  “The antennae of females are almost linear, with just a little jagginess on the edges, i.e., serrate (saw-like)” and “Adults typically fly late spring: March?-May (North Carolina), April-May (West Virginia). Seen into early June in New England (Massachusetts–guide photo). Further south, much of year (Florida).”

Female Spring Fishfly

Female Spring Fishfly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dung Beetle or Scarab?
Location: Lempira, Honduras
April 21, 2014 8:06 am
Keep up the good work you do, if you have time to tell me what this is I appreciate it! This was taken at a hot springs in the early evening in late March.
Signature: Matthew Hilchey

Ox Beetle

Ox Beetle

Dear Matthew,
This beauty looks like an Ox Beetle in the genus
Strategus to us.  According to BugGuide, they are found in:  “Southern North America, esp. coastal plain of southeastern United States. Genus extends into neotropics.”  The type locality for Strategus aloeus is listed as Honduras on Encyclopedia of Life.

Subject: Stink Bug Nymph … or something else?
Location: Paige, TX
April 21, 2014 1:31 pm
It’s spring in Texas, and that means two things are around the corner: blast furnace temperatures and stink bugs. I noticed some some small black and orange bugs on my onion plants about a week ago. They’re oval, and about 1/8″ wide by about 1/4″ long. They appear to be stink bugs nymphs. However, unlike those I’ve seen before, these are capable of flight. Can anyone help me to identify these critters?
Signature: Pyrrhyuloxia

Plant Bug, we believe

Plant Bug, we believe

Dear Pyrrhyuloxia,
This is not a Stink Bug, but we believe it is a member of the same suborder, Heteroptera, the True Bugs.  We believe this is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae, and a strong contender for the proper identification is
Metriorrhynchomiris dislocatus, though your images are soft and lacking in critical detail, so exact identification might not be possible.  According to BugGuide, this species of Plant Bug:  “has at least 15 color varieties. (Eric Eaton).”

I think you nailed it. Thanks!

Subject: Black & Yellow 2 inch Bug
Location: Concord CA
April 20, 2014 9:19 pm
Should I be concerned about this bug? Or is it just a beetle? It is about two inches long with four inch antennae. The head is black. The body is mostly yellow from the head to the black band before getting to the yellow butt area. There are two symmetrically located black dots in the yellow area of its back. The legs and antennae appear to be brown.
I found this bug on an exterior garage wall under a light on Sunday, April 20, 2014. We live in Concord, CA, about 35 miles east of San Francisco. It is starting to stay warm throughout the day (average of 70′s to 80′s). The weather is cool at night with dew in the morning, and dry/not humid during the day.
The closest I could come to identifying it is calling an “Instable Longhorn beetle Judolia spp Family Cerambycidae” from the website address below:

http://share2.esd105.org/rsandelin/Fieldguide/Animalpages/Insects/Beetles.htm

The attached photo was taken with my iPhone and emailed to me as “Actual” size.
I’m not sure what to make of it. Any information you can provide will be greatly appreciated.
Thank you,
Raymond Winters
Signature: Ray W. of Concord CA

Eucalyptus Longhorn

Eucalyptus Longhorn

Dear Ray,
While you have misidentified this Longhorn Borer Beetle, you did get the family correct.  This is actually a Eucalyptus Longhorned Borer and it is an invasive species in Southern California, but luckily, its host tree is also an introduced genus, the Eucalyptus trees, which are ubiquitous in Southern California.  More information on Eucalyptus Longhorned Borers can be found on the UC Davis Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program website.