Subject: Nice Black Beetle
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
August 26, 2016 5:29 pm
I’ve lived in Alaska for 2 years and I’m not well acquainted with the insects here. I caught this guy ambling around in my garage. I took a photo and set it outside. What kind of beetle is this?
Signature: Sara

Ground Beetle

Ground Beetle

Dear Sara,
This is a beneficial, predatory Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae.  There are many similar looking species found in Alaska on the Carabidae of the World site, and we are not certain of your species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle orgy on goldenrod!
Location: Schenectady, NY
August 27, 2016 11:46 am
Hello WhatsThatBug,
I thought you’d enjoy this shot of no less than four pairs of mating beetles on the same goldenrod plant! There were actually at least two other pairs that I didn’t get in the shot, so clearly this plant is the place for looooove. I think they are Goldenrod Soldier Beetles.
I spotted them at a local park that has a perfect pond for dragonflies. This stand of goldenrod grows alongside a tiny stream that runs through the grass in an open area, and as you can imagine it is a very popular spot for all kinds of insects, including a huge variety of bees and wasps. I’ll need to go back with extra batteries in my camera to see what else I can photograph!
Signature: Susan B.

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Dear Susan,
Your lurid images of mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles,
Chauliognathus pensylvanicus, are a wonderful addition to our Bug Love tag.  Many years ago we created a Milkweed Meadow tag because there is such a diverse group of insects, including the Monarch Butterfly, that depend upon milkweed for survival, and there are many other insects that are attracted to the nectar rich blossoms.  At that time, we had planned a companion plant community tag called the Goldenrod Meadow because similar to milkweed, goldenrod is also associated with a very diverse insect community.  We are taking the opportunity to launch our Goldenrod Meadow tag with your wonderful submission, and now we will have to go back through our archives to tag appropriate postings from the past.  When you return to the goldenrod patch with extra batteries, please send us any images that you feel will be of interest to our readership. 

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Subject: caterpillar
Location: Northern CA United States
August 26, 2016 1:53 pm
Hello~
I live in Northern California (Redding –Shasta County)
I’m in need of assistance identifying this caterpillar/worm.
He looks similar to a tomato worm with the exception of his color and no horn on his rump.
My SO claims he is indeed a tomato worm but has a pinkish color because he’s been eating our purple grapes. I say no. If that was so… tomato worms would be red 😉
Please help me be right!! He hates that… :)
Signature: Little T

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Little T,
You were right to notice the similarities between your caterpillar and that of the Carolina Sphinx or Tobacco Hornworm, one of two species that feed on the leaves of the tomato, because they are in the same family.  Your caterpillar is that of an Achemon Sphinx,
Eumorpha achemon, a species that feeds on the leaves of grapes.  Caterpillars often have coloration that camouflages them while they feed, but the color is not a result of the pigment in the food.  So, you win.  Go rub it in.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weed brownies g
Location: Ottawa ontario
August 27, 2016 10:57 am
I am not sure what these are but they are all over the weeds in my back yard. Is it something dangerous?
Signature: Sarah Knox

Aphids

Aphids

Dear Sarah,
These are Aphids, but we are not certain of the species.  According to BugGuide:  “Aphids suck juices from plants and may be quite damaging. Some are restricted to a single plant species or group of related plants. Others may alternate between two entirely unrelated host plants as a necessary part of their life cycle” and “Aphids may be identified by two tubelike projections on the posterior, called cornicles or siphunculi. These appear to function as a means of chemical defense, emitting pheromones to alert other aphids about a predator nearby. They also offer mechanical protection, as the fluid emitted can gum up the mouthparts of the predators. Species may sometimes be identified by the host plant, but several aphid spp. may infest the same host.”

Subject: Beautiful Green Wormy
Location: Georgia, USA
August 27, 2016 2:59 am
3 inch worm/caterpillar
Aug. 25, 2016
I left the back door open & this little guy wandered into my house . I’m just wondering what it is . I’ve never seen anything like it before. Its green with some light reddish, orangeish or brownish color all along its back. it has 1 very tiny tail . its about 3 – 3 1/2 inches long and a little thicker then a cigarette .
Signature: Suni S.

Possibly Waved Sphinx Caterpillar

Possibly Waved Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Suni,
There is not much critical detail in your image, so we cannot be certain of the species, but this is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae.  We believe it is most likely the Caterpillar of a Waved Sphinx,
Ceratomia undulosa, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas site:  “Just prior to pupation, larvae frequently take on a rosy hue.”  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed preferentially on leaves of ash (Fraxinus spp.), especially Green Ash (F. pennsylvanica) in Canada, but also feed on fringetree (Chionanthus spp.), hawthorn (Crataegus), lilac (Syringa), oak (Quercus), privet (Ligustrum), and other woody plants.”  Do any of those plants grow near where you made this sighting?

Subject: Swimming bug?
Location: Tennessee
August 27, 2016 7:45 am
I live in Chattanooga TN, I noticed 4 or 5 of these in the kiddie pool in the backyard. The pool is a blow up pool, and has not been cleaned out for a very long time. I usually see these in the late morning, around 10, and they are very fast swimmers. I caught one and put it on the pavement to take a picture. It has 6 legs, and is kind of a clearish yellow. Its about 3/4 of an inch long. Any ideas what it could be? Thanks for any help:)
Signature: Holly Hickam

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Holly,
This is the larva or Naiad of a Dragonfly.  As you probably realize, standing water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes.  Dragonfly larvae will eat any mosquito larvae that develop in standing water, so they are a beneficial insect.  Adult Dragonflies also feed on winged adult mosquitoes.  We hope you are able to relocate the larvae in your stagnant pool into a suitable area pond.