Subject: Green Caterpillar with Red-Tipped Scales
Location: Southwest Texas (Val Verde County)
September 23, 2016 7:29 am
The following caterpillar was found on a nature trail at the Amistad National Recreation area in Del Rio, Texas (a semi-arid environment in Southwest Texas with influences by the Chihuahuan desert, Edwards plateau, and South Texas plains). The creature was found in the morning (~10 am) in September. It is predominately green in color, with a darker olive green dorsal side and lighter green belly. It appears to have 10 segments. Each of the first two segments behind the head has 4 green spine-like structures on the dorsal side (two per side). Most of the following segments had 4 scale-like spines that were predominately white with red tips. The head was predominately green with two yellow-ish vertical stripes. A dark green postabdominal spine was located on the dorsal side of the 10th segment.
Signature: n/a

Sphingicampa Caterpillar

Sphingicampa Caterpillar

Dear n/a,
This is a Silkmoth Caterpillar from the genus
Sphingicampa, and there are several similar looking species found in Texas, according to BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Hanover PA
September 24, 2016 4:21 am
Hi. I just found this “thing” on the side of my house. I live in Hanover, PA and was wondering if you can tell me what in the world it is!
Signature: Gayle

Tolype

Tolype

Dear Gayle,
This is a Lappet Moth in the genus
Tolype.  According to BugGuide:  “there is considerable variation among individuals and between the sexes of all Tolype species, which complicates identification of species based on color.”

Subject: Moth like Bug
Location: Dallas Texas
September 24, 2016 5:02 pm
Hello! For a few weeks now I have seen these moth like bugs in my house! At first I thought it was just from us in and out the door when the porch light was on or the garage door was open. However, now I know that there is some type of issue. Back in March I had a 60 lb bees honey comb removed from in between my bedroom floor and the bottom level of the house, my son’s bedroom ceiling. Is it a termite, a moth in my grains, larva for another bug? Please be so kind to give me your expertise and advice.
Warmest,
Signature: Tiffiney

Indian Meal Moth

Indian Meal Moth

Dear Tiffiney,
It is time to clean out the pantry.  This is an Indian Meal Moth, a species that infests stored grain products like oatmeal and cornmeal that were left on the shelf too long.  They will also infest stored nuts and spices.

Daniel,
Thank you so much. Last night I finally seen some in the top of the pantry. I had read that they can be attracted to grains. I had some old cornmeal I never used that has been there for over a year on the top shelf. I so appreciate you responding and your expertise! I love your website and I would love to blog about it soon.
warmest and thank you so much,
Tiffiney

Cornmeal is one of their favorites.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Iris Borer Moth
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
September 24, 2016 4:09 pm
Greetings, Daniel!
I mentioned an Iris Borer Moth I saw years ago. Back in 2013 I still had Flag Iris growing in my Rain Garden. As I weeded, I found rotting rhizomes, large larva and numerous pupae, all of which got tossed into the yard for later raking up and taking to compost. The robins were quite happy with the feasts they found in the “weeds” I was pulling up! I even got a couple photos of robins with the grubs in their beaks!
Well, that summer I decided no more iris for me in my garden. Just before that decision, I was working in a section when I saw this large moth. It was resting at the base of an iris plant so I had my suspicions as to what it was. An absolutely gorgeous moth as I previously mentioned, with patterns reminiscent of Native American Cave Paintings or even petroglyphs. Being me, I took several photos from a couple angles to use for possible identification (this was before I discovered your awesome website!). And of course my suspicions were confirmed.
So here are three of my best photos of an Iris Borer Moth, taken September 2013. Enjoy!
Blessings,
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Iris Borer Moth

Iris Borer Moth

Dear Wanda,
Your excellent images of an Iris Borer Moth,
Macronoctua onusta, are a noteworthy addition to our archives as this represents a new species for our site.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae bore into iris plants and feed on the rhizomes”

Iris Borer Moth

Iris Borer Moth

Wow, a new species for your archives! That’s fabulous!
This gorgeous moth I photographed was holding on to the base of an upright iris leaf so the moth was facing up (the pictures should be vertical rather than horizontal). I remember when I took the photo wondering how many people even get to see an adult Iris Borer Moth. People who want to grow iris are going to remove the larvae before they get to the pupae stage whenever possible, so the number of adults is not likely to be substantial. Then again, adult females can lay hundreds of eggs which keeps the population going …
I’m glad I could help your archives grow, Daniel.
Blessings,
Wanda

Thanks Wanda,
We rotated the images because all images on our site are horizontal, and to orient them vertically, we would have had to reduce the magnification.

Subject: Insect Identification
Location: Oklahoma, USA
September 24, 2016 11:51 pm
My son has these in his garden. What are they?
Signature: BPWO

Larva of a Caterpillar Hunter

Larva of a Caterpillar Hunter

Dear BPWO,
This is the larva of a Caterpillar Hunter, a Ground Beetle in the genus
Calosoma.  Many times immature insects have a different diet than the adults, but not so with the Caterpillar Hunters.  Both larvae and adults ravenously feed on Caterpillars.

Subject: Catapilars
Location: France
September 25, 2016 2:35 am
Saw this South of France, Gorges dHeric.Can’t seem to find it in a general search any ideas?
Signature: Jules

Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Jules,
Though your image does not illustrate the caudal horn, one of the most significant physical features of the Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles euphorbiae, the coloration is unmistakable.  The Spurge Hawkmoth  is found in North America as well as Eurasia, because they were released to help control the invasive spurge plants that have become naturalized in North America.   The Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic site has some excellent images that should substantiate our identification.

Thank you for clearing that up.