Subject: What kind of beetle is this ?
Location: Victoria, BC Canada.
July 21, 2014 2:45 am
I took a picture and I would like to know what kind of beetle is in the picture?
Signature: Thank you, in advance.

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

These are not beetles.  They are immature Conchuela Stink Bugs.

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting fly
Location: North Kingstown, RI
July 21, 2014 6:47 am
This fly (at least I think it’s a fly) was on my car in North Kingstown, RI on July 20, 2014. I’ve never seen one like this before.
I tried searching google images, but nothing came up that looked like this.
Can you tell me what it is?
Thanks,
Signature: Gary Brownell

Male Horse Fly

Male Horse Fly

Hi Gary,
The close-set eyes indicate that this Horse Fly in the family Tabanidae is a non-biting male.  Biting female Horse Flies have a space between the eyes.  See this Horse Fly eye comparison from our archives.  A dorsal view would make species identification easier.

Thanks. I guess I’ve never looked closely at one of these before. It was the white eyes that caught my attention…
Gary Brownell

We believe the faceted eyes are most likely not pigmented white, but rather reflecting the light from the sky.

Interesting. They didn’t seem to change color as the fly changed position. Unfortunately, I only got pictures from this one angle, so I can’t be sure about all that in hindsight. But it was definitely the white eyes that drew my attention.
Thanks,
Gary Brownell

Subject: Black and Orange Beetle
Location: South Central, PA
July 20, 2014 6:46 pm
I found this beetle in my orchard. He is about the size of a June bug. I have not seen a bug like this before and wonder if my orchard is in danger. I have not been able to find what he is. Even after searching through this site.
Signature: Jeremy

Burying Beetle

Burying Beetle

Hi Jeremy,
This is a Burying Beetle or Sexton Beetle in the genus Nicrophorus, and its presence probably indicates that there is a small, dead animal carcass nearby.  Burying Beetles bury small animals like birds, mice, snakes and lizards after laying eggs on the carcass.  They will not harm your orchard.  You can read more about Burying Beetles on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’ve never seen this bug before….
Location: Delaware
July 20, 2014 5:29 pm
I’d really like to know what this bug is, why I’ve been seeing them so often lately, and why I have not seen them before (if that’s possible to answer).
I live in Delaware (the state in the US) and this summer I’ve been seeing these everywhere I go.
Signature: ….I don’t really have a preference?

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

We just posted a lengthy description of a Hanging Thief.  As to why you have seen them recently, we can only respond that insect populations fluctuate due to weather conditions, food supplies and other factors.  Then again, perhaps you have just gotten more observant.

Subject: Weird bug
Location: Pennsylvania
July 20, 2014 12:02 pm
Found this bug on my house in northeast Pennsylvania in the summertime. Any idea what it may be?
Signature: Shannon

Ailanthus Webworm

Ailanthus Webworm

Dear Shannon,
This pretty native Ermine Moth is commonly called an Ailanthus Webworm.  It is one of the few insects known to feed on the invasive, exotic Tree of Heaven,
Ailanthus altissimus, which is recognized on the government website Weeds Gone Wild as being a major threat with this statement:  “Tree of heaven is reported to be invasive in natural areas in 30 states across continental U.S. and Hawaii. It is highly adaptable to disturbance and a huge range of soil types and conditions, grows best in full sun and is tolerant of drought.  Ecological Threat  A common tree in urban areas where it causes damage to sewers and structures, ailanthus poses a greater threat to agriculture and natural ecosystems. It is a vigorous growing tree and prolific seeder that establishes dense stands that push out natives. Tree of heaven contains chemicals, including ailanthone, that have been found to have strong allelopathic (herbicidal) affects on the growth of other plants which help it establish and spread.”  Though the native Ailanthus Webworm has adapted to feeding on an invasive plant, it is doubtful that the Ailanthus Webworm will have much of an impact on controlling the spread of the scourge.

Subject: what is this?
Location: North carolina (central)
July 20, 2014 10:23 am
Please tell me name of this bug never have seen anything like it–was on my back porch
Signature: c santana

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

Dear c santana,
This impressive, predatory Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites is commonly called a Hanging Thief because they frequently hang by one or two legs while feeding.