Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Hollywood, fl
November 30, 2016 3:15 pm
What type of catetpillar is this
Signature: Dave

Pluto Sphinx Caterpillar

Pluto Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Dave,
Your Caterpillar is the Hornworm of a Pluto Sphinx,
Xylophanes pluto, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas site:  “There are three known colour morphs: green, brown, and purple/brown. The false eyes are rather striking in this purple/brown form.  Larvae feed beginning at dusk and through the night, hiding during the day at the base of their host plant or in nearby surrounding vegetation. The caterpillars usually either consume entire leaves or half of a leaf.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ugly Bug
Location: Houston, Texas
November 29, 2016 7:28 pm
I am glad this isn’t 6 feet long!!
Signature: Donathon Houston

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Donathon,
We agree that we would not want to run into a six foot long Mole Cricket, though there are many other lower beasts that we would not want to encounter at that size before the Mole Cricket.  Mole Crickets are subterranean dwellers found in many parts of the world, and they pose no threat to humans in their current size.

Subject: Moth
Location: Brisbane
November 30, 2016 3:46 am
Huge moth dog was trying to get. Was wondering what it is?
Signature: Shaun

Giant Wood Moth we believe

Giant Wood Moth we believe

Dear Shaun,
We believe this is a Giant Wood Moth in the family Cossidae, possibly Endoxyla macleayi which is pictured on Butterfly House, though there are other similar looking species in the same genus.  We would not rule out that it might be a Ghost Moth in the family Hepialidae, a very similar looking family that is well represented on Butterfly House, and we should also point out that other members of the family Cossidae are represented on Butterfly House.  We have difficulty distinguishing between the two families.  Caterpillars of Wood Moths are known as Witchety Grubs.  Because of your timely submission, we have selected this posting as our Bug of the Month for December 2016.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange bug
Location: Texas
November 29, 2016 3:13 pm
Wondering whats this guy, recently moved some things out of a self Storage building and found them in my belongings.
Signature: Justin s

Silverfish

Silverfish

Dear Justin,
There is not much left of this Silverfish, a common household pest that will eat most anything organic, including the glue in book bindings. 

Subject: large beetle
Location: west end of St Thomas, USVI
November 29, 2016 5:26 pm
Hi, Bugman.
I live in the US Virgin Islands. After coming home today, I noticed a large (about 9 cm long) brownish-black beetle hiding in a notch in the outside of our balcony railing. I was hoping I could get a better photo if it came out from its hiding spot after dark, but it hasn’t moved yet. I tried identifying it going on the assumption that it’s a stag beetle, but I’ve been going in circles trying to pinpoint the species. Can you help me?
Signature: Stumped on St Thomas

Stump Borer

Stump Borer

Dear Stumped on St Thomas,
This is NOT a Stag Beetle.  It is a Prionid or Stump Borer in the tribe Mallodonini.  I greatly resembles the Hardwood Stump Borer,
Mallodon dasystomus, a North American species that is known to range as far south as Columbia.  It might be the same species as this Prionid from Puerto Rico.  The site Insectoid has a checklist of species from the Caribbean.  According to the Worldwide Cerambycidae Photo Gallery, Hovorodon bituberculatum  is found on St Thomas.  The mandibles on your individual indicate it is a male.  We would advise that you steer clear of those mandibles as they look like they might do some damage.

Hi, Daniel.
Thank you for all the information. He’s still in his spot on our railing, and looking more and more like the male Hovorodon bituberculatum. I agree that his mandibles look strong and sharp and I will definitely stay out of their way.
~Mae

Subject: Bug found
Location: Adelaide
November 29, 2016 1:06 am
Hi there I was just wondering if you would be able to tell me what sort of bug this is, as I’ve never seen one before and quite curious. Thanks heaps
Signature: Laken ilott

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Laken,
This is a Mole Cricket, a common subterranean dweller found in many parts of the world.