Subject: Caterpillar with Horns-ID?
Location: Painter, VA
July 3, 2016 11:06 am
Location of this creature is Painter, VA. Found 7/3/16. Would love to know what he is.
Signature: Evelyn Wolfer

Pine Devil

Pine Devil

Dear Evelyn,
The Pine Devil,
Citheronia sepulcralis, is not nearly as colorful as its close relative the Hickory Horned Devil.  According to BugGuide it is found in:  “Eastern United States: Previously north to Maine but now likely extirpated north of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, common southward to Florida along Gulf Coast west to Louisiana. Found inland from eastern Louisiana northeast through central Tennessee, eastern Kentucky, to Southern Ohio. Single report from Illinois erroneous.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spider
Location: kalloni – lesvos-greece (north aegean)
July 3, 2016 6:18 am
hi its about a spider i found here some details
place: kalloni – lesvos- greece in a church (was climbing the wall)
june-2016
size fits in grown mans palm
thanks
Signature: spider

Huntsman Spider: Eusparassus walckenaeri

Huntsman Spider: Eusparassus walckenaeri

Because the second set of legs is longer than the first set of legs, we suspect this is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae which is profiled on the Australian Museum site. We searched for images from Lesvos and discovered this Alamy posting identified as Eusparassus walckenaeri.  We verified that identification on Araneae Spiders of Europe.  On The Natural History Museum of Crete site, it states:  “This is a common spider of the Eastern Mediterranean. It is characterized by its large body size (5 cm) that looks even larger because of the long legs always laterally extended, and by an iridescent light which may be observed on its outer surface. It can be found in open ground as well as inside houses where it eats small and large insects, especially cockroaches.”  There are also several images of Eusparassus walckenaeri from Lesbos on FocusNatura. Your image is positively gorgeous.

Subject: What is the exactly
Location: Pretoria south africa
July 3, 2016 3:36 am
Found this caterpillar on the bricks by my house. If I’m not mistaken some kind of lappet moth
Signature: Peter

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Peter,
We agree that this is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae, and there is a matching image on iSpot, but it is only identified to the family level.  It appears like it might be the same species or a closely related species to this Indian Lappet Moth Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chrysalis on painted Stucco
Location: Hutchinson Isl. , Ft. Pierce, FL
July 3, 2016 6:35 am
We have had these all over the house since last Autumn. None have emerged as of July. Does anyone know what these are?
Signature: Scott

Bagworm

Bagworm

Dear Scott,
This is a Bagworm in the family Psychidae.  Caterpillars begin constructing a bag when they first hatch and the material is from the plant upon which they are feeding spun together with silk.  The Bagworm eventually pupates within the bag, sometimes after securing the bag to a surface other than the tree upon which they were feeding.  You must have a host tree or shrub near your stucco wall.

Subject:  10 Lined June Beetle
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 2, 2016

10 Lined June Beetle

10 Lined June Beetle

Ten Lined June Beetles started appearing at the What’s That Bug? office just last year.  Our only interaction with them before that was the pine habitat in higher altitude Pasadena and La Cañada.  This lady, who has much smaller antennae than the male who needs to be able to sense her pheromones, appeared on our screen door late last night and we got some flash assisted images today.  We are perfectly happy if she wants to wait on our screen door until a suitable suitor arrives.  The 10 Lined June Beetle we found in June was already dead, and we suspect porch and garage lights are attracting them.  She stridulated (began squeaking by rubbing together parts of her body)  when we picked her up to move her higher up on the screen door in the event marauding raccoons are on the prowl tonight.   

Subject: bug
Location: Michigan
July 2, 2016 3:58 pm
Trying to figure out what this is
Signature: clint bonkowski

Dragonfly Abdomen

Dragonfly Abdomen

Dear Clint,
This is the abdomen of a Dragonfly.  We will attempt a species identification.  We believe this abdomen belongs to a Darner in the family Aeshnidae, and you can see the similarity by looking at Darner images on BugGuide.