Subject: red-headed bug???
Location: Tahquitz Canyon, Near Palm Springs, CA
March 7, 2015 2:33 pm
Hi
I was hiking in Tahquitz Canyon near Palm Springs, CA yesterday and spotted this bug crawling across the path. It’s almost 2″ long.
Can you let us know what it was?
Many thanks,
Signature: Stu

Master Blister Beetle

Master Blister Beetle

Dear Stu,
This distinctive beetle is a Master Blister Beetle, and your image is the first of what we suspect will be numerous others that are sent to us this spring.

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Subject: Red wasp identification
Location: San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico
March 7, 2015 7:57 am
This red wasp was photographed in San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico in late February. It was in the grass.
Can you help identify it?
Signature: Wasp interest

Probably Paper Wasp

Probably Paper Wasp

We believe this is a Paper Wasp in the genus Polistes, and we have received numerous reports that Red Paper Wasps from Texas are aggressive and have a very painful sting.

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Ceanothus Silkmoth Comment
Location:  Anderson, CA
March 5, 2015
I just found one tonight (3-5-15) at our home in Anderson, CA didn’t know what it was for sure so I looked and this image came up, the one I found looks the exact same! Beautiful moth.
Ali

We wish you had sent in a photo as we have not posted a Ceanothus Silkmoth image recently.

This is the moth we found it was battered pretty bad but still flying.

Battered Ceanothus Silkmoth

Battered Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Ali,
Thanks for sending us your image of a battered Ceanothus Silkmoth.  Adults only live a few days, long enough to mate and lay eggs.  They do not even feed as adults as they do not have working mouthparts.  Adult life is dangerous for a Silkmoth.  They store fat while a caterpillar to get them through the adult stage, and they are an excellent food source for birds and other predators.  Hopefully your individual mated and was able to pass on its genes to a new generation.

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Subject: Ants
Location: Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia
March 6, 2015 8:58 pm
I am not sure that they’re ants. But at least that’s what my father said. They usually lay eggs on doorframes, windows, and clotheslines. It happens almost all the time, finding their eggs. So I’m curious, what are they? Are they dangerous? Thank you!

Immature Hemipterans

Immature Hemipterans

Dear Celine,
These are Hemipterans, True Bugs.  They are also immature nymphs.  The eggs look like Leaf Footed Bug eggs in the family Coreidae, and that is one Hemipteran family.  Our best guess is that they are immature Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae.

Probably Coreid Eggs

Probably Coreid Eggs

Signature: Celine A.

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Subject: Moth identification
Location: Krugersdorp, Gauteng, South Africe
March 6, 2015 12:49 am
Hello, I found this moth? in the swimming pool and happily it was still alive. I have never seen anything like it before. I put it in a glass in order to be able to photograph the underneath as well as the wing. It is about 12mm in length. I hope that you can help with identifying it.
Signature: Kathy Stubbs

Moth Bug

Moth Bug

Hi Kathy,
Though it is not a true moth, this Planthopper in the family Eurybrachyidae is commonly called a Moth Bug in South Africa.  We identified it as
Paropioxys jucundus on iSpot.

Moth Bug

Moth Bug

Hello Daniel
Thank you so much for the identification and your quick response in doing so.
The diversity and design of insects is amazing.  Thank you for your website which enables us to put a name to what we find in our gardens.
Regards
Kathy Stubbs

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Subject: Grasshopper
Location: Malaysia
March 4, 2015 10:37 am
hello :) im doing my insect collection project for my entomology class. however, i have difficulty in identifying the bugs that i have collected. whatsthatbug.com is the only hope i have now as i have searched google for this creature but failed to find it. i found this friend in my bedroom. hope anyone can help me identify this species.
Signature: anyhow

Katydid

Katydid

Dear anyhow,
This is a Longhorned Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera, most likely some species of Katydid.

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