Subject: bug party
Location: grand rapids michigan
June 24, 2014 3:54 pm
Found several piles like this today, sitting right out in the open. Any idea what they are? At the least they make for interesting photos.
Signature: dave

Aggregation of Eastern Boxelder Bugs

Aggregation of Eastern Boxelder Bugs

Hi Dave,
This is an aggregation of Eastern Boxelder Bugs, also known as Democrat Bugs.  Your image depicts various instars or stages of growth in immature nymphs.  Adults and nymphs will congregate together in very large masses.  Eastern Boxelder Bugs are considered benign, though they have been know to enter homes to hibernate, making pests of themselves.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Western Pygmy Blue
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 24, 2014 5:00 PM
While taking some images of the California Harvester Ants, we noticed a butterfly so small it could only be a Western Pygmy Blue.  Our images are not as nice as Anna’s are, but they do document this lovely diminutive butterfly in Mount Washington.

Western Pygmy Blue

Western Pygmy Blue

The Western Pygmy Blue is the smallest butterfly in North America.

Western Pygmy Blue

Western Pygmy Blue

California Harvester Ants harvesting
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 24, 2014 5:18 PM
So, two weeks ago, we noticed some California Harvester Ants along a sunny, southwest facing slope, but we did not have a camera.  Today we returned and took some images.  Native Ants like the California Harvester Ants are being displaced by invasive exotic species like the dreaded Argentine Ants.

California Harvester Ant

California Harvester Ant

We were inspired by a recent submission of swarming California Harvester Ants from nearby Red Car Property in Silverlake.

California Harvester Ant

California Harvester Ant harvesting

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Glowing Insect
Location: Vietnam
June 24, 2014 11:15 am
A friend of mine in Vietnam posted a video today. It contains a clip of an weird bug with a glowing bum. The video was taken at Cát Tiên national park (in Vietnam). He and I have both tried researching it with no success. It seems to have beetle like legs up front, but tiny catterpillar like legs on it’s rear end. The video is more helpful than the picture I provided. Could you help us out by identifying this weird insect? Here is a link to the video:
https://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php?v=10152232679183723&set=vb.737983722&type=2&theater&notif_t=comment_mention
Signature: ~Meagan Preston

Firefly

Firefly

Hi Meagan,
This is a Firefly in the family Lampyridae, and we believe it is either a larva or a larviform female.  See this image on BugGuide that shows a similar insect from Texas.

My friend says that looks right except the insect in question was bigger than his thumb. Do they get that big?

We are not certain how large Fireflies grow in tropical countries.  Alas, there is not a good comprehensive identification source for Vietnamese insect identifications that we are aware of that is in English.

He sent me a photograph.

Firefly Larva or Larviform Female Firefly

Firefly Larva or Larviform Female Firefly

Thanks Meagan,
The new image has much more detail.  We stick to our guns on this being a Firefly Larva or adult Larviform (usually female) Firefly.  Again, we are not familar with species from Vietnam, but when time permits, we will attempt to provide you with some additional information.

 

Subject: Yellow Moth
Location: Bourne, Lincolnshire ( 52:46.3518N 0:23.4989W) England
June 24, 2014 12:44 pm
I photographed this moth in my kitchen before carefully putting it outside. I have trawled loads of web sites but failed to identify it.
My garden backs onto the local woodland, and we get hosts of moths that I can’t identify. But I have never seen anything like this before.
Any Idea?
Signature: Bob Harvey

Geometrid Moth

Blood-Vein

Hi Bob,
This lovely moth is in the family Geometridae, and we believe we have correctly identified it as a Blood-Vein,
Timandra comae, thanks to the UK Moths site where it states:  “This attractive moth is fairly common in the southern counties of England and Wales, but scarcer further north and in Ireland.  The adult rests with the wings held in such a position that the reddish cross-lines of the fore and hind wings form a continuous band. The fringes are also suffused with pink.”

Subject: marine blue
Location: Los Angeles (Highland Park)
June 17, 2014 12:42 pm
Dear Bugman,
Here is a tiny butterfly from my garden. I saw a flash of bluish-purple as she was flying, then she landed on my lantana bush. I was able to get fairly close, so I thought you might like this picture. I think she is a marine blue.
Thank you!
Signature: Moira

Marine Blue

Marine Blue

Dear Moira,
We agree with your identification of this Marine Blue,
 Leptotes marina.  Since plumbago, a food plant for the caterpillar, is commonly planted in southern California, the Marine Blue is quite common even in the city.  See BugGuide for more information on the Marine Blue.