Subject: Beetle identification
Location: North America
August 10, 2016 12:32 pm
I wanna know what this is and facts about it
When can you answer what time
Signature: Doesn’t matter

Female Eastern Hercules Beetle

Female Eastern Hercules Beetle

Please provide us with a more specific location, like a state, county or city, so that we can provide you with the most accurate identification.  This appears to be a female Eastern Hercules Beetle, our first sighting of the year.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Didn’t know Utah had spiders this size
Location: Saratoga Springs
August 9, 2016 8:23 pm
What is this? Maybe the Salt Lake Brown Terantula? Is it a poisonous spider? Saw it coming from a boulder rock wall in Saratoga Springs, Utah.
Signature: Daniel

Tarantula

Tarantula

Dear Daniel,
This is a Tarantula in the genus
Aphonopelma and BugGuide led us to this quote from the Journal of Arachnology:  “The Aphonopelma of North American are poorly known. Although many species have been described few specimens can be properly identified either by using available keys or by wading through species descriptions. Most identifiable specimens belong to species found in Mexico or Central America that are easily recognized by unique color patterns, such as that of A. seemanni. Correct identification of specimens collected within the United States is often suspect since determinations must be based on the process of elimination using collection dates and locality data in combination with coloration, coxal setation, and metatarsal scopulation.”  BugGuide does list Utah sightings in August and September.  We searched Salt Lake Brown Tarantula and found a posting in our own archives with the subject Salt Lake City Brown Tarantula, which was not a name, but rather a subject line for the posting, and we also found a Salt Lake County Brown Tarantula identified as Aphonopelma iodius on the Natural History Museum of Utah site where it states:  “The teddy bear of the desert, these harmless fuzzy darlings live much longer than you might think — up to 25 years for a female and about half that for a male!  Tarantulas aren’t the fastest runners.  Their primary defense is the irritating hairs on their abdomens.  When chased or frightened, they can use a back leg to brush these hairs into the eyes or mouth of a predator.   In the late summer, you’re likely to see tarantulas wandering in the foothills.  They aren’t migrating. They are mature males looking for females, with little interest in food or their own safety…just mating.”  We were going to try to link to the species on BugGuide and see if we could get additional information, but alas, BugGuide currently seems to be experiencing technical difficulties.

Subject: What is this cat spiller?
Location: Benchley N Brazis county
August 9, 2016 9:45 pm
Found this bug on. My feed cam
Signature: Betsy

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Dear Betsy,
With all due respect, are you in North Brazos (not Brazis) County in Texas?  Also, please clarify what you mean by “Found this bug on. My feed cam” because we don’t understand.  This appears to be a Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar,
Euclea delphinii, based on this BugGuide image, though BugGuide notes:  “BugGuide photos from the southeastern states previously identified as Spiny Oak-Slug Moth (Euclea delphinii) have been moved to the genus page because we have no information (as of December 2006) on how to distinguish adults or larvae of delphinii from the virtually identical Euclea nanina.”  DNA analysis might be required for precise species identification, so we would not rule out another member of the genus as three species seemingly have overlapping ranges in Texas.  Stinging Slug Caterpillars, including the Spiny Oak Catepillar, should be handled with caution as they are capable of inflicting a painful sting as well as a bad reaction in some individuals.

Thank you. I hadn’t seen an “asp” in many years. The ones I remember were gray or cream color. The colors on this little guy, were so vivid.
I live in the Benchley area off the OSR. It was on chicken’s Feed can. “Gotta” keep the raccoons out.
Thank you for your time.
Betsy

Hi again Betsy,
Thanks for clarifying that.  Asps are actually a different family of stinging Caterpillar, also called Puss Moth Caterpillars in the Flannel Moth family Megalopygidae while Stinging Slug Caterpillars are in the family Limacodidae.  There are other families with stinging caterpillars including Io Moth Caterpillars in the family Saturniidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this insects name
Location: Nl canada
August 10, 2016 5:11 am
Hello what kind of insect is this
Signature: U choose

Mosaic Darner

Mosaic Darner

Oh Yee of So Few Words,
As instructed, we have chosen a name for you that seems most appropriate.  We cannot thank you enough for providing us with such cryptic information that we needed to go to the internet even to learn where this insect was sighted.  We do not have the Canadian provinces committed to memory, and we are guessing that Nl is the abbreviation for the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, meaning that you are in the far north.  Insect identification presents enough challenges for us since we have no formally trained entomologists on our staff, and we understand that you are so busy (with all those extra daylight hours that your geographic location provides during the summer) that you are unable to type out complete words, or even to add punctuation to your sentences, so we didn’t mind increasing our knowledge of Canadian geography before we began the research necessary to determine that your Mosaic Darner in the genus
Aeshna is most likely the Canadian Darner, Aeshna canadensis, which BugGuide lists as having been sighted in Newfoundland and Labrador in July, the Lake Darner, Aeshna eremita, which BugGuide lists in Newfoundland and Labrador in August, the Variable Darner, Aeshna interrupta, which BugGuide lists for Newfoundland and Labrador in August, the Sedge Darner, Aeshna juncea, which BugGuide lists in Newfoundland and Labrador in July or the Shadow Darner, Aeshna umbrosa, which BugGuide lists in Newfoundland and Labrador in both July and August.  We would not rule out one of the other 15 species of Mosaic Darners in the genus Aeshna that BugGuide recognizes from North America as many other species are found in nearby Canadian provinces.  At any rate, we do not possess the necessary skills to definitively identify your Mosaic Darner to the species level, so we will stop at the genus level and we hope one of our more skilled readers will be able to nail the identification properly.  We sincerely apologize if we have written more than you have time to read in your busy life, but unlike one of the major candidates for the highest office in The United States of America, we appreciate the beauty of the written word that loses so much in either 140 characters or sound bytes.
P.S.  We believe the bright colors indicate that this Mosaic Darner is a male.

Thank you so much for your reply you are awesome made me smile.

Subject: Need ID: Bugs seen mating in Mumbai, India
Location: Mumbai, Maharashtra – India
August 9, 2016 12:45 am
Spotted these bugs in the moist deciduous forest in the monsoon season here in Mumbai.
Signature: Rizwan Mithawala

Unknown Mating Weevils

Unknown Mating Weevils

Dear Rizwan,
Your image of mating Weevils is quite stunning.  It depicts both the mating behavior and the damage the beetles make to the leaves while feeding.  Many Weevils are generalist feeders, meaning they do not limit their diet to a single plant, or even a single genus or family.  We are not sure of the species, and since Weevils are members of the largest family of animals on planet earth, and since India does not have the best online archive for insect identification, we are not even going to attempt a species identification, but we would challenge our readership to give it a try.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your help!
Could it be this one?
Asiatic oak weevil
Cyrtepistomus castaneus
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cyrtepistomus_castaneus_Kaldari.jpg
http://www.invasive.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=2136
http://bugguide.net/node/view/52987
Rizwan Mithawala
Photographer & Correspondent
The Times of India, Mumbai

Perhaps.  Was it feeding on Oak or Chestnut?

Sorry, I don’t know. Can you guess looking at the leaves?

sorry, we are What’s That Bug? not What’s That Leaf?

Hahaha…thanks for your help!

Unknown Mating Weevils

Unknown Mating Weevils

Our pleasure Rizwan.  Seriously, we really have no scientific credentials and this site began as a lark many years ago as part of an art project/writing collaboration.  Since knowing the plant upon which a particular insect is feeding is often a great assistance in the identification process, we are going back to your original uncropped image and posting it as well.  Weevils are such an enormous family, and though it does contain many colorful and distinctive species, most are rather drab and ordinary, and look alike to our relatively untrained eyes.  Proper identification of insects often includes careful examination of the actual specimen, counting things like antennae segments, or wing veins, or even the examination of genitalia, and all of that is well beyond our capabilities.  Additionally, many folks just want to know what something is in a general sense, and not a specific one.  We are pretty good at general.  Specific often eludes us.  We never really know what the purpose of an identification request is when we receive it.  Is it feeding on a treasured plant in the garden?  Was it seen on vacation?  Will it bite and kill me?  Is this an exotic introduction that will decimate the crops in its newly expanded range?  These are just some of the myriad possibilities that go unstated when a brief request is made.  Perhaps someday a real expert will see your image on our site and write in and comment with a proper identification.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much; really appreciate your interest and efforts. These pictures are shot for a newspaper story about how life flourishes in the monsoon (in the forest). It’s a photo-feature about the season of abundance, feeding and mating. Hence, I needed to identify the beetles and know their role in the forest ecosystem. Any additional information you can share will be of great help for me. Thanks!
Regards,
Rizwan

Hi again Rizwan,
We suspect general weevil information will suffice for your readership, and exact species information might not be necessary.

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Monkton MD
August 9, 2016 5:31 pm
Help. Our neighborhood cannot figure out what this bug is
Signature: Curious

Beetle Larva we presume

Beetle Larva we presume

Dear Curious,
Your somewhat blurry image reminds us of the classic photo of Nessie.  Our best guess on this is that it is some beetle larva, possibly a Ground Beetle larva as it looks rather similar to a Caterpillar Hunter larva.