Subject: wasp?
Location: Chandler AZ
June 7, 2016 5:52 pm
curious about the 3 dots on the head.
This is a great site and I want to thank you for all your effort.
Signature: Doc

Paper Wasp

Paper Wasp

Dear Doc,
This is a Paper Wasp in the genus
Polistes, and we believe it most closely resembles Polistes aurifer which is pictured on BugGuide.  Though the article is talking about bees, The Honey Bee Guide has a good explanation of the three simple eyes at the top of many insects’ heads:  “The three other eyes are called simple eyes or ocelli. They are at the top of the bee’s head in a triangular pattern and are very small. These eyes don’t see images but can detect light, especially changes in light. The ocelli help bees escape danger because if something is swooping down to eat them, the shadow created by the predator alerts the bee that something is wrong and gives it time to fly away. The compound eyes together with the ocelli make it very hard to sneak up on a bee.”  Just FYI:  This will probably be our last response to an inquiry for the next week as we will be away from the office, returning on June 17.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Spider is this?
Location: Simsbury, CT
June 7, 2016 6:57 pm
Found this guy/gal outside of my house? Was concerned it might be a brown recluse but can’t find the signature violin markings. Other people are suggesting a wolf spider, but again I don’t think so.
Signature: Brooks Parker

Nursery Web Spider

Nursery Web Spider

Dear Brooks,
This is a female Nursery Web Spider,
Pisaurina miraNursery Web Spiders exhibit a strong maternal behavior, carrying the egg sac and eventually spinning a nursery web and guarding the spiderlings once they hatch.

Subject: Beautiful Insect
Location: Birmingham Alabama
June 7, 2016 4:35 pm
Found on a bed in Birmingham Alabama . Presuming it entered through an open window and was comfortable enough to stay.
I carefully got it to crawl into a paper towel and carried it outdoors.
Signature: David Gentry

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

Dear David,
We love that you consider this male Dobsonfly to be beautiful.  Male Dobsonflies are harmless.  We are tagging this submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award for the kindness you showed in relocating it outdoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Maui
June 7, 2016 2:11 pm
Please ID
Thanks!
Signature: Jason

Caterpillar eating Marijuana Leaf

Caterpillar eating Marijuana Leaf

Dear Jason,
This appears to be a Caterpillar eating a Marijuana Leaf.

Yeah I’ve seen plenty of caterpillars eating cannabis flowers… I did not realize they also ate/attacked leaves.
Thanks

Subject: Unknown
Location: Columbus ohio
June 7, 2016 2:30 pm
What kind of big is this? A nest is in the dirt under our tree
Signature: Thanks jenny

Male European Earwig

Male European Earwig

Dear Jenny,
We believe your Earwig is a male European Earwig based on this BugGuide image.

Subject: wasp? bee? hornet?
Location: Whitewater, California
June 7, 2016 10:02 am
Hello!
My kids and I normally play bee rescue in our pool. We live just outside Palm Springs, CA so there is not much water just laying about so bees love our pool, sadly a lot of them hit the water and almost drown so we will fish them out and let them dry off before they decide to go on their way.
However, the other day after lunch we found this poor thing in the pool, we didn’t get to it in time since we were in the house.
Although, I am a bit nervous as to what it is because it was so much bigger! It was about 1 1/2 -2 inches long!! Huge compared to our little bees. Can you tell me if this one is safe to save and what it is? I have looked through your site and can’t find anything like it.
Thank you so much for your help!!
Signature: Cristena

Mydas Fly

Mydas Fly

Dear Christena,
None of the above.  This is a Mydas Fly in the family Mydidae, but it does not look like any species we have seen.  We cannot even locate a conclusive match on BugGuide,
but our best guess is that it is in the genus Nemomydas like this unidentified species on BugGuide or this Nemomydas venosus also pictured on BugGuide.  Neither image looks exact, but they are close enough for us to guess your individual is closely related.  According to BugGuide, Mydas Flies are:  “Large flies, often wasp mimics. Have prominent, clubbed antennae and distinctive wing venation” and to the best of our knowledge, they are perfectly harmless.  As an aside, it is not possible to make out the head of the Mydas Fly in your image as it is partially obscured by the wings and body of a smaller fly.