Subject: Red beetle (?)
Location: Nashville, TN
September 15, 2014 1:13 pm
Saw this guy in Nashville recently. Never have seen anything like this in thus region, its body shape is similar to what we call ‘stink bugs’.
Any thoughts?
Signature: Cpuryear

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymph

Dear Cpuryear,
The reason this striking nymph reminds you of a Stink Bug is that it is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae,
Euthyrhynchus floridanus, AKA Florida Predatory Stink Bug.  The specificity of the names, both common and scientific, belies the fact that the Florida Predatory Stink Bug naturally ranges far beyond the border of our southernmost state, according to BugGuide.  The Florida Predatory Stink Bug, which is called a Halloween Bug in its seasonal adult attire replete with wings, is an effective predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Orthoptera
Location: Cape Point, South Africa
September 15, 2014 3:23 am
Good morning from Cape Town !
I found this lovely little chap at Cape Point at the weekend, so he’s a deep southern African spring lover, and I cannot figure out what he can be. I think maybe he is a juvenile something, but none of my resources have anything to say that the bugs I would expect to find here start out with thes little pink protuberances on their bodies.
Any assistance with identification would be greatly appreciated.
Signature: Cathy

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Dear Cathy,
We were only able to locate one posting on iSpot that looks like your immature Grasshopper, and it is identified as a member of the family
Thericleidae, but the other members of the family do not look similar.

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Subject: strange sea urchin looking creature
Location: lawrencevilla Ga
September 14, 2014 8:38 pm
Hello. I recently found this strange looking creature which looks like something out n of this world! It looks like a sea urchin looking creature in my back yard . It was just sitting on my trashcan. It is a bright green color and about the size of a dime. It is super sticky and would not respond to my touch or a few drops of water being dropped on it. I have been monitoring it all day and it has not moved a bit. Please take a look at the photos.
Signature: Victor S.

Beutenmueller's Slug Moth Caterpillar

Beutenmueller’s Slug Moth Caterpillar

Dear Victor,
This amazing looking caterpillar is a Beutenmueller’s Slug Moth Caterpillar,
Isochaetes beutenmuelleri, which we quickly identified on BugGuide thanks to an awesome series of images.  BugGuide also indicates another appropriate common name “Spun Glass Slug Moth.”  Many members of the family of Slug Moth Caterpillars are capable of stinging.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting Ohio find

Location: Central Ohio USA
September 14, 2014 12:22 pm
Just the obvious questions of “What the blank is this?” and “Can it hurt me?” come to mind when looking at this. It caused my sister’s adrenaline to pump and just about everyone else’s skin to crawl, but I suspect it’s a harmless (to humans) caterpillar. Unless you eat it maybe?
Signature: Jack

White Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

White Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Jack,
This is the caterpillar of a White Marked Tussock Moth,
Orgyia leucostigma, and according to BugGuide:  “CAUTION: Avoid handling the caterpillar, as its hair is known to cause allergic reactions, especially in areas of the body with sensitive skin (e.g. back, stomach, inner arms). Seek medical treatment if a severe reaction occurs.”

Subject: color I have not seen

Location: interior Alaska ( Fairbanks)
September 11, 2014 3:22 pm
Found this fellow in Interior Alaska today (Sep 11 2014) seems late in the season and I am not accustomed to seeing them in dark colors. Can you tell me what it is ?
Signature: Curious in AK

Gallium Sphinx Caterpillar

Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Curious in Alaska,
This is a Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar and the species has a highly variable caterpillar with green individuals and tan individuals occurring as well as this black form.  See Sphingidae of the Americas for more information on the Bedstraw Hawkmoth.

Subject: Unusual Black Spider
Location: Vancouver Island, British Columbia
September 13, 2014 11:43 am
Hello Bugman! I was walking down the street and I saw this guy puttering along the sidewalk out of the corner of my eye. At first I thought it was a large black beetle but upon closer inspection it turned out to be a rather large and unusual spider. I’ve lived on Vancouver Island my whole life and have come across a lot of our native spiders which have all looked pretty similar, but this one looks nothing like anything I’ve ever seen in the wild! He/she was quite meaty looking and fairly large. Any ideas about what spider this is and where he/she could have come from?
Signature: Britt

Folding Door Spider

Folding Door Spider

Dear Britt,
We are confident that your Trapdoor Spider is a native male Folding Door Spider in the genus
Antrodiaetus thanks to this comparable image posted to Bugguide.