Subject: Bug found on Interior Wall..
Location: Connecticut
December 25, 2013 8:49 am
Never seen a bug crawling up my wall, pretty quick bugger too! Any way you can identify this? Trying to figure out where it came from and how.
Thank you
Signature: CB

Immature Cockroach

Immature Cockroach

Hi CB,
This is an immature Cockroach, and we suspect if you have one, there are surely more.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible Deaths Head Hawk Moth?
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
December 26, 2013 12:08 am
Hi,
I found this moth last night after investigating a very loud screeching sound in my house. Turns out that it was this moth. Looks similar to a Deaths Head Hawk Moth, but not sure as markings seem different from what I have seen online.
Your views?
Thanks,
Signature: Ryan

Cicada

Cicada:  Is this the newly discovered species????

Hi Ryan,
This is not a moth, but rather, a Cicada.  Cicadas are capable of making sounds which would explain the loud screeching you heard.  We typically see photos of Cicadas with clear wings, so this individual with its forewing markings (that do resemble the wings of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth) and brightly colored underwings is quite distinctive.  We did not think it would be difficult to identify to the species level, and we did find matching images on the Photographs from South Africa website, however, the Cicada is not identified to the species level.  Continued research led us to a matching photo on the Wildlife Extra News site with the subject 18 New Species of Invertebrate Discovered in South Africa.  The photo is captioned:  “A cicada currently in the process of being named and described. Photo credit Earthwatch.”  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to find more current information on the name of this unusual Cicada.

Hi there,
Many thanks for the fast and informative response! Cicada was my second option, but didn’t think so due to the wings.
Very cool to experience something that unusual flying into my house twice on the same evening :-)
Thanks,
Ryan

Update:  Possibly Orange Wing Cicada
Thanks to a comment to this posting, we now believe this may be an Orange Wing Cicada in the genus Platypleura.  There are photos posted to ISpot that look very similar to the Orange Wing Cicada.

Subject: hairy Slater bug?
Location: Albany, western Australia
December 25, 2013 9:41 pm
I’ve got a bug about the size of a pinky finger nail on top of its eggs sitting beneath the hand rail of the verandah. It’s eggs are hairy as is the body of the animal. Very strange, its body shape looks like a cross between a Slater and a giant flea and the front half of a moth with its legs at the front near its nose.
Signature: here

Flightless Female Tussock Moth with Eggs

Flightless Female Tussock Moth with Eggs

We were struck by the resemblance between your photo and an image in our archive of a flightless female Western Tussock Moth with her egg mass, and we quickly learned that the genus Orgyia is represented in Australia as well.  Birds on the Brain pictures a flightless female Tussock Moth in the genus Orgyia, but she is not identified to the species level.  Butterfly House indicates that Orgyia australis is found in Australia, but does not even indicate that the female is flightless.  The Brisbane Insect website indicates the common name is the Painted Pine Moth and pictures a flightless female.  The Government of South Australia has an excellent pdf on the life cycle of Australian Tussock Moths.  Your photograph pictures a flightless female that has laid her eggs in and on the cocoon she emerged from.  Since she is flightless, she cannot move about in search of a mate, but since she releases a pheromone upon emergence, a winged male can locate her to mate.  The pdf states:  “On hatching, the female remains clinging to the outside of the cocoon where she mates and lays eggs. The eggs are laid in a mass amongst the hairs on the outside of the pupal cocoon. Each female may lay up to 700 eggs. The eggs hatch into tiny caterpillars which swarm over nearby twigs and needles.”

That’s fantastic and interesting! Thanks a lot, I’m so glad you got back to me! Hope you have a wonderful new year!
Linton

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: South African Insect
Location: South Africa, Kwa Zulu Natal
December 25, 2013 11:52 am
Hi, please help me identify this bug! I can’t seem to find it on the web.
Signature: Claire Dunford

Longicorn:  Monochamus species

Longicorn: Monochamus spectabilis

Dear Claire,
This is a Longicorn or Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae.  When conditions are right, insects from the same species that are awaiting metamorphosis into the imago or adult form will emerge at roughly the same time in an entire region.  Just over a week ago, we posted a photo of a Longicorn from South Africa that was identified as
Monochamus spectabilis by Karl, and we believe your Longicorn is the same species.

Subject: Unidentifiable Hairy Caterpillar
Location: East London, South Africa
December 25, 2013 5:27 am
Hello WTB. My dad and I came across this hairy caterpillar in my garden in South Africa. Unfortunately none of the insect guides offer pictures of butterfly and moth larvae, and as a result I am familiar with adult butterflies and moths, but know very few of their respective larvae. We found this caterpillar on our Bauhinia gaupinii and I was wondering if you could identify it or give me a rough idea of what it could be so I can research it further. Thanks in advance.
Signature: Simon Robinson

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Cape Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Hi Simon,
We believe this is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae, but we have not had any luck matching its markings to any South African species online.  There are many similar looking Caterpillars on the ISpot website, and the Cape Lappet
, Eutricha capensis, pictured there looks close, but the coloration and markings are different.  We would not discount that this might be individual variation, or perhaps there are changes that occur during the various instars the caterpillars undergo during metamorphosis.  Interestingly, the moment we wrote that comment and returned to ISpot, we followed a link that revealed an example of the Cape Lappet that looks exactly like your individual.

Cape Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Cape Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Subject: Dead Leaf mantis
Location: Mumbai, India
December 24, 2013 10:28 pm
I would have never seen this fellow if he didnt fly right into us!!
beautiful camouflage. this was the best photo i could click, he was too active for me to focus!
Signature: Sid

Wandering Violin Mantis

Wandering Violin Mantis

Hi Sid,
The quality of your photograph is much higher than most of the images we receive.  Despite the resemblance to dead leaves, this is actually a Wandering Violin Mantis,
 Gongylus gongylodes, and based on the information we have learned on the sexual dimorphism in this species on A Gardener’s Chronicle blog, she is a female.  Males have more feathery antennae and longer wings.