Subject: Weird bug
Location: Querétaro Querétaro, Mexico
June 6, 2014 4:52 pm
Greetings! I was studying outdoors inside my university campus when I noticed this strange little animal walking on the table I was writing on. This table is located alongside green areas where there is grass, trees and bushes. It is very small, around 2-5 millimeters in length, with its size and color patterns varying depending on the individual. I´ve stumbled across this animal around 6 times between February and May walking on the benches and tables of the green areas.
I also know they bite. The first time I encountered one of these little animals it bewildered me so much that I let it walk on my hand so I could see it more closely. When it reached my index finger it bit me without showing any other signs of aggression. After that incident another one bit me in my arm without me noticing its presence before it bit. The feeling when it bites is comparable to when a mosquito is biting you and it only leaves some itching for some minutes (no skin reddening or weals).
I took every photo indexed here inside my university campus. The one with the green background seems like it is from the same species, but it has some unique characteristics by itself, like haired sides, less pronounced fangs and awesome color patterns.
I have way more photos and even videos of this little creature in case it is needed.
Signature: David Chavarín Flores

Aphid Wolf

Aphid Wolf

Dear David,
These are larval Lacewings, important predatory insects, along with Lady Beetles, in controlling Aphids and other pests that plague gardeners and farmers.  Lacewing Larvae are often called Aphid Wolves.  While we do not have the necessary skills to distinguish one species of Lacewing Larva from another, it seems that your images represent two different species.

Lacewing Larva

Lacewing Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect with lime green diamond
Location: Houston Texas
June 6, 2014 6:50 pm
Sorry I just email you about this bug cause I thought my mom found it but it was found in Houston Texas, Not Western Nebraska.
Signature: Wick

Ambush Bug

Ambush Bug

Hi Wick
While we were pretty certain that this is an Ambush Bug, we had not seen any examples in the past with this distinctive marking.  When we searched BugGuide, we learned that Ambush Bugs in the genus
Macrocephalus are characterized by this particular pattern.  While we have no shortage of Ambush Bug images on our site, we believe this is the first documentation we have of the genus Macrocephalus, at least that we have identified to that level.

Subject: did we build on an Indian burial ground?
Location: Tx Hill Country
June 6, 2014 10:45 am
All the bugs at our place in the Texas Hill Country are gynormous. Can you ID what kind of beetle this is? Thanks so much!
Signature: Mark and Brenda

Ox Beetle we believe

Ox Beetle we believe

Dear Mark and  Brenda,
Your image, though interesting, lacks critical detail.  This is definitely a Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabaeidae, and we suspect it is an Ox Beetle in the genus
Strategus.  Male Ox Beetles have horns.  Females do not.  You can learn more about Ox Beetles on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found in Southern NJ
Location: Moorestown NJ
June 5, 2014 8:57 am
Hello,
I found this bug last night in my house. I cannot seem to find it anywhere to identify it. I live in South Jersey, close to Philadelphia. The bug was about 3/8″ to half inch long.
Any help in figuring out what this is would be great. Thanks!
Signature: Megan

Male Oak Timberworm

Male Oak Timberworm

Dear Megan,
We have been obsessed with trying to identify your beetle, and we started researching it yesterday.  The mandibles are quite unusual, so we suppose it is understandable that we did not think this could be a Weevil or Snout Beetle.  We eventually located a matching image on BugGuide of a male Oak Timberworm,
Arrhenodes minutus, and upon viewing the information page on BugGuide, we learned the species is sexually dimorphic, and the female has a more typical snout.  We also learned:  “males are territorial and guard egg-laying females.”

Subject: What is this?
Location: UK
June 4, 2014 10:24 am
My friend found it on his lampshade. Ughhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Signature: Don’t really care.

Tarantula Hawk???

Tarantula Hawk???

Dear Don’t really care,
We thought this resembled a Tarantula Hawk, but we couldn’t figure out why it was sighted in the UK, so we contacted Eric Eaton.  His reply is posted below.  Can you provide any additional details regarding the sighting?  Did your friend recently receive any packages from abroad?

Eric Eaton’s Response
Definitely a pompilid (spider wasp), and it looks like Hemipepsis or Pepsis.  I’d be curious to know the circumstances under which it was found.  It is probably a stowaway in a shipment from the southwest U.S. or Central or South America.
Eric

Subject: Spotted Apatelodes
Location: Caledonia, Michigan
June 5, 2014 1:26 pm
Dear Bugman,
My fiancé, Michael, found this bug sitting on a stack of patio furniture outside our local grocery store today. Upon first glance, he thought it might be a baby bat or something of that sort, but after some research I am led to believe that it is a Spotted Apatelodes Moth,Apatelodes Torrefacta. Could you confirm if I am correct? Thanks!
Signature: Melissa Chaplin

Spotted Apatelodes

Spotted Apatelodes

Hi Melissa,
You are absolutely correct.  This is a Spotted Apatelodes.