Subject: ID of Butterfly
Location: Southwest Virginia near New River
April 11, 2015 8:21 pm
This little butterfly landed near me on the trail along New River in Southwest Virginia. I haven’t been able to ID it, though I have searched online. Please help!
Signature: Carolyn

Grapevine Epimenis

Grapevine Epimenis

Dear Carolyn,
The reason you are having a difficult time with this identification is that this is a diurnal Owlet Moth, the Grapevine Epimenis,
Psychomorpha epimenis.

No wonder!  Thank you so much!  It’s such a pretty little moth–new to me!  You guys are great!!!

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Subject: Spider on patio
Location: Los Angeles
April 9, 2015 1:21 pm
Who is his friendly spider?
Signature: Curious patio farmer

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Curious Patio Farmer,
Your Jumping Spider is in the genus
Phidippus, but we are uncertain of the species.  We found a nearly identical match, also from Los Angeles, posted to BugGuide, but it is only identified to the genus level.  It might be Phidippus formosus, and BugGuide provides this comment regarding that name:  “If I’m reading the World Spider Catalog correctly, Phidippus formosus is an older name for what is currently called Phidippus johnsoni.  I don’t have Hogue’s book to see what was pictured, but since it appears to have been published in 1974, shortly after the name change, it was probably a photo of Phidippus Johnsoni and Hogue just didn’t have the most up-to-date name for it.”  Though BugGuide has numerous images of the Johnson Jumper, not exactly matches the coloration and markings on your individual.

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

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Subject: green moth
Location: Babati, Tanzania
April 10, 2015 10:14 am
Dear Bugman –
I would love help in identifying this green moth from Tanzania.
Perusing pictures, the closest thing I would find was the Large Emerald and other geometers.
Signature: Robert Siegel

Geometer Moth

Geometer Moth

Dear Robert,
We agree that this looks like an Emerald in the family Geometridae, and we attempted a more specific identification, but alas, the best we could do was this image on iSpot that is only identified to the family level Geometridae.

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Subject: Flying insect identification
Location: Pacific Northwest, Southwest Washington state
April 11, 2015 11:21 am
Hello,
I live in a wooded area of southwest Washington state and saw this insect on the door of our shed. I tried to look up something on it, but can’t seem to find anything. You you please help?
Thank you
Signature: Tia Miller

Crane Fly

Tiger Crane Fly

Dear Tia,
This distinctive insect is a Tiger Crane Fly,
Phoroctenia vittata angustipennis.  As it does not sting nor bite, it is a harmless insect.

Crane Fly

Tiger Crane Fly

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Subject: unknown Longhorn beetle
Location: Central Kalahari, Botswana
April 9, 2015 3:02 am
Hey :)
I have been looking through the forum and the web in search for an ID to these two species. Both of them showed up on the ground in our camp in Central Kalahari. The surroundings are pretty much dominated by different Acacia trees/bushes, however Silver Cluster-leaf (Terminalia sericea) is more abundant just around the camp.
I am collecting all different kind of insects around the farm area where our camp is stationed, to make a species list and show room of the insects you can espect to find during your stay.
It will be a huge help If you can help me out :)
There are pictures of two different species of Longhorn beetles.
Signature: Mathias

Unknown Longicorn #1

Unknown Longicorn may be Pycnopsis brachyptera obsoleta

Dear Mathias,
We did an internet search and we were not able to determine the identity of your Longicorns, so we are posting them as unidentified in the hope that we will eventually be able to provide you with an answer.

Unknown Longicorn #2

Longicorn #2:  Titoceres jaspideus

Update: We just received a comment that these may be Pycnopsis brachyptera obsoleta based on this FlickR image and Titoceres jaspideus which is pictured on iSpot.

Subject: looks like an ant/wasp???
Location: Inverness, FL
April 10, 2015 7:34 am
I live in Inverness, FL. I just started noticing these bugs in the last few days. They are everywhere. I just went to the gas station and they were covering the pumps and the awning over the pumps. Then I came home and they are all over the outside of my house and under the roof overhang. What are they? Do they bite or sting? There were hundreds of them at the gas station. There are so many that it reminds me of when the love bugs swarm twice a year. Thank you!
Signature: concerned mom

Ant Alate

Female Carpenter Ant Alate

Dear concerned mom,
These are winged, reproductive Ants, known as Alates.  It appears that you have submitted images of both a male and a female Carpenter Ant Alate.  The individual with the longer, thinner antennae is a male, which we matched to this image on BugGuide of a male Red Carpenter Ant,
 Camponotus castaneus.  When conditions are right, Ants from the same species will mate at approximately the same time, helping to ensure that there is some crossing between different colonies which diversifies the gene pool.  We cannot state with certainty the species, but we are rather confident we have the genus Camponotus correct.  Though a bite may occur if they are carelessly handled, these Carpenter Ants are not considered to be dangerous.

Male Carpenter Ant Alate

Male Carpenter Ant Alate

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