Subject: What is tis
Location: Port Richey, Florida
May 4, 2016 10:25 pm
Saw this bug today in Port Richey, Florida Pasco county. Lived here 30 years. Have never seen it before. Tried to figure it out myself. Best I came up with was a whhte spotted Sawyer beetle..but then attennae would be much longer. Some have said locust, others cricket. What is it exactly?
Signature: Marie

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper

Dear Marie,
This is the dark form of the Eastern Lubber Grasshopper,
Romalea microptera.  There is also a light color variation of the Eastern Lubber Grasshopper.  When conditions are favorable, flightless Eastern Lubber Grasshoppers can get quite plentiful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big on my Chicken Coop
Location: Ohio
May 3, 2016 6:47 pm
Hello,
I live in southern Ohio and have been seeing these small bugs all over my chicken coop. They do not seem to bother the chickens. Just wondering what this bug is.
Signature: Thank you!

Springtails

Elongate Bodied Springtails

Though they have six legs, primitive Springtails are classified independently from Insects into the class Collembola.  As you observed, they are benign creatures that can become a nuisance if they get plentiful when conditions are favorable.  According to BugGuide:  “Springtails are ‘decomposers’ that thrive mostly on decaying organic matter, especially vegetable matter. They may also graze on spores of molds and mildews, especially indoors where there is a lack of other food sources.”  Springtails are cosmopolitan, and they can be found worldwide.

Springtails

Elongate Bodied Springtails

Subject: insecten
Location: in de tuin in nederland
May 4, 2016 11:38 am
de Bugman
Ik stuur u een foto van een insect waarvan ik niet weet wat het is
Signature: Marinus

Aphid

Aphid

Dear Marinus,
This is an Aphid.  Aphids are generally considered garden pests because they suck nourishment from plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strang bug on a leaf.
Location: Southern California, LA County
May 4, 2016 4:18 pm
So I first noticed this guy a couple months ago on the leaf of my plant. I’m super curious as to what it is. Every time I go check it out it’s always in the same spot, it never moves from there and it even tries to hide from me when I try to get a look at him. It’s so strange, it’s gotten a little bigger since the first time I noticed it and now there is a second one! What is it? I hope you guys can help out. I plan on just leaving them there I’m not a fan of killing anything. I’m just curious.
Signature: Andy

Immature Leafhoppers

Immature Leafhoppers

Dear Andy,
These are immature Leafhoppers in the family Cicadellidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  Leafhoppers have mouths designed to pierce the outer walls of plants so they can suck nutritious fluids from the plants.  They are not considered beneficial insects in the garden.

Immature Leafhopper

Immature Leafhopper

Subject: Found in Markham, Ontario
Location: Markham, Ontario, Canada
May 4, 2016 5:09 pm
What is this bug?
Signature: Kevin Alves

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Kevin,
Because they frequently enter homes to hibernate, Western Conifer Seed Bugs are one our our most common identification requests.

Subject: Weird bug near water
Location: Vancouver, BC
May 3, 2016 7:10 pm
This bug was found near a salt water inlet from the ocean, on the seawall. It was near by some restaurants. The weather was overcast, but warm.
Location: Vancouver, BC
Signature: Z

Sea Slater

Sea Slater

Dear Z,
Based on this Wikipedia image, we are pretty confident this is a Sea Slater,
Ligia oceanica, but we would not rule out the possibility that it is a closely related species in the same genus.  Ligia pallasii is another species in the genus that is pictured on BugGuide as well as on ASnailsOdyssey where it states:  “Studies on field diets of sea slaters Ligia pallasii on rocky, wave-swept shores on the outer coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia indicate a preference for diatoms, filamentous green (Cladophora photograph of a large male isopod Ligia pallasiisp. and Ulva sp.) and red (Bangia sp.) algae, membranous (Porphyra spp.) red algae, and various kelps.”  According to BugGuide, that species is commonly called a Common Rock Louse and its habitat is “Caves and crevices on rocky sea cliffs” from “Northwestern US; Central California to Alaska.”

Oh my goodness, thank you so much!
Best, Zoë