Subject: Good bug or bad bug
Location: Apache Junction AZ
March 29, 2016 5:33 pm
This insect was found in Apache Junction AZ.
What is it?
Signature: Wondering

Master Blister Beetle

Master Blister Beetle

Dear Wondering,
When it comes to bugs, the adjectives good and bad are quite relative, and this Master Blister Beetle is no exception.  Master Blister Beetles, according to BugGuide, appear in late winter in the states of the Southwest.  Like other members of the genus, Master Blister Beetles should be handled with caution or not at all because according to BugGuide:  “Pressing, rubbing, or squashing blister beetles may cause them to exude hemolymph which contains the blistering compound cantharidin. Ingestion of blister beetles can be fatal. Eating blister beetles with hay may kill livestock. Cantharidin is commercially known as Spanish Fly.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange fly/bug
Location: thornlie, western australia
March 29, 2016 4:55 am
Hi, my mum had a bug/fly land on her and swatted it. It died but is dark in colour but when the photo is taken with flash has amazing colours and a very big sting, similar to a bee but much bigger and with barbs on it.
Signature: Email

Cuckoo Wasp

Cuckoo Wasp

Though it appears to be a stinger, the Cuckoo Wasp is incapable of stinging.  The female uses her stinger-like ovipositor to lay eggs and according to the Brisbane Insect site:  “Most species are external parasites of other wasp larvae. Females lay eggs in nest of other wasps (Eumeninae of Vespidae and  Sphecidae) while the nest host collect food for larvae. Cuckoo Wasp larvae hatch and feed on the food or the host larvae.”

Cuckoo Wasp

Cuckoo Wasp

Subject: Caterpillar Tanzania
Location: Ndutu, Tanzania
March 29, 2016 5:47 am
This large caterpillar c 9cm was found on the ground in the Ndutu area of Serengeti in Tanzania in February. The area was grassland and acacia woodland.
Is it possible to identify it please?
Signature: Mary Berry

Lappet Moth Caterpillar we believe

Lappet Moth Caterpillar we believe

Dear Mary Berry,
We believe this is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar from the family Lasiocampidae.  There is a similar looking image from South Africa on iSpot.

So many thanks for amazingly quick response!   Now scolling through Lappets.
Thanks again Mary

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Golden SIlk Orb Weaver
Location: East Java, Indonesia
March 29, 2016 12:04 am
Hi, I’m an amateur photographer and I found this Golden Silk Orb Weaver on a mango tree, all I know is that it is of Nephila Genus but I can’t find out about the species. Here’s the story :
The female spider is roughly about 3,5 – 4 inches long (including leg span), I also spot a smaller yet looked very different most likely to be the male roughly about 1 – 1,5 inches long including leg span. It has about 0,75 m x 1 m wide shiny golden web on one side of the mango tree. I also managed to get a sample of her silk which looks very pretty and shiny.
I’m very curious about the species.
Thank you.
Signature: A17N Photography

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Dear A17N Photography,
You image showing the underside of this Golden Silk Spider does not reveal the markings, but one species found in Java, according to Getty Images, is
Nephila pilipes.   It appears that there are two smaller spiders directly above the female at the top edge of your image, just above the tangle of golden silk that gives this distinctive genus its common name.    

Subject: Which Tiger Moth Is This
Location: Sonoma County California
March 27, 2016 7:34 pm
Having trouble identifying this particular Tiger Moth. Can you help?
Signature: Wayne Ball

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth

Dear Wayne,
Your Tiger Moth is in the genus
Grammia, and many species in this genus look very similar.  We believe this may be Grammia ornata which is reported from Sonoma County on BugGuide.

Subject: Periodic Insect In Bedroom!
Location: Toronto, Canada
March 27, 2016 8:10 pm
Hi these days starting in February Toronto, Canada I’ve seen this large insect in my room fly from no where onto my bed when I’m studying! It’s as big as my half index finger! It’s got long legs and crawls… Sorry but I’ve been too scared to touch it and kill them so the first time I saw it I sweeper it out. They seem hard to kill as my brother killed one before after it “revived” after being smashed by a broom twice. They have long antennae. What are they and where do they come from? Do they normally infest rooms?
Signature: J.J

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear J.J,
This Western Conifer Seed Bug is a member of a species originally native to the Pacific Northwest, however, it expanded its range across North America, beginning in the 1960s, presumably with the assistance of humans.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs seek shelter indoors when weather begins to cool, and they become active indoors when the weather outside begins to warm.  At that time, they are noticed as they attempt to gain egress.