Subject: Baffled by Big Black Bug
Location: Beaverton, OR
April 26, 2014 7:41 pm
Daniel,
Just in case it’s interesting, here’s another picture from the same excursion of a tiny critter we found in a pond.  My “Pond Life” book leads me to believe it’s not a larva but a mosquito pupa. I had no idea that pupas could be free swimming, lively animals as opposed to motionless inside a cocoon!
Thank you again,
Laura

Tumbler, AKA Mosquito Pupa

Tumbler, AKA Mosquito Pupa

Hi Laura,
Thank you for sending in your excellent image of a Mosquito Pupa, or Tumbler as it is sometimes called.  Mosquito Pupae are incredibly mobile, and they are also capable of sensing danger, tumbling away from the water surface and into the depths.  Mosquito Larvae are called Wrigglers because of the way they move through the water, and the tumbling motion of the Pupae led to the common name Tumblers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Beetle, Pale Yellow Thorax
Location: Hendersonville, NC
April 25, 2014 11:29 am
My wife shot this photo with her Droid. She says it was about the diameter of a penny, or maybe a nickel.
It was taken in Hendersonville, NC on 04/25/14.
Any idea what it is?
Thanks.
Signature: Mike Wright

American Carrion Beetle

American Carrion Beetle

Our Automated Response
Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can
!

Hi,
Thanks, but I found it. American carrion beetle, Necrophila americana.
– Mike

Hi Mike,
We haven’t received any images of American Carrion Beetles lately, so we are posting your submission.

Cool.
Glad y’all are doing this sort of thing.
– Mike

Subject: Caterpillar on Fuschia
Location: Cape Town, RSA
April 26, 2014 12:16 am
Hello Bugman,
I discovered a lot of these little caterpillars on my fuchsias recently. The change colour from green to purple depending on if they are hiding under the leaf or are on the stem of the plant. It took me a really long time to find them…
I think it is a moth species, but not sure.
Do you know what they are?
Signature: Waldi du Toit

Silverstriped Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Silverstriped Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Hi Waldi,
We are relatively certain that this Hornworm is the Caterpillar of a Silverstriped Hawkmoth,
Hippotion celerio, which we found on Photographs From South Africa.  This is a wide ranging species and it is also known as the Vine Hawkmoth.  According to the Australian website Butterfly House, fuschia is identified as a larval food plant.  Butterfly House also notes:  “It can occur in several different colour forms: green, brown, red or dark grey. It usually has an eyespot each side of the first and second abdominal segments, those on the first segment being larger. There are variable cryptic stripes and bands along the rest of the body. The Caterpillar has a tailhorn curved slightly backwards which tapers to a point.”  We also found documentation of it on this FlickR Pests and Problems page devoted to Fuschia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue legged Mystery
Location: Andover, NJ
April 26, 2014 8:48 am
Hoping you can help me with yet another mystery. I found this wasp-like insect on a service berry bush this morning. It was climbing around on the buds but did not appear to be gathering food, although it was quite active. It was very small, around 1/3 inch in length. I am wondering if it a newly emerged wasp or bee of some sort?
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Webspinning Sawfly

Webspinning Sawfly

Hi Deborah,
There are not too many images available online of your insect, a Webspinning Sawfly,
Pamphilius semicinctus, and your images are among the best.  Though BugGuide has three images, there is no species specific information available, but there is some information on the family Pamphiliidae on BugGuide, including:  “Adults have many-segmented antennae” and “larvae spin webs in a variety of woody plants where they feed on foliage.”  Since you observed your individual on Serviceberry, that might be a good indication that it is the host plant.  Watch for the larvae forming webs, and if you happen to observe them, please take some images and send them our way so we can update this posting, which is a new species for our site.

Webspinning Sawfly

Webspinning Sawfly

Webspinning Sawfly

Webspinning Sawfly

 

Subject: Small mantis
Location: Saudi Arabia_ Madinah
April 27, 2014 3:30 am
Hi!
I’ve found this tiny little guy hanging under a light, it was approximately less than centimeter long and was sitting high on the wall so I couldn’t get any better photos.
Although it seems like a mantis, it looks somewhat a bit strange.
found 27/4/2014
Signature: M.A

Mantispid

Mantisfly

Hi M.A.,
Though it resembles a Mantis, this Mantispid or Mantisfly is from the order Neuroptera, which includes Lacewings and Antlions, and it isn’t even closely related to a Mantis.  Like a true Mantis, the Mantisfly uses its raptorial front legs to capture prey, which includes small insects.

Subject: Baffled by Big Black Bug
Location: Beaverton, OR
April 26, 2014 7:41 pm
My son and I were in a nature park today, and found many of these large insects. They were ambling through short clover and grass by the side of the trail. I’ve been trying to identify them but am completely baffled! Any help greatly appreciated!
Signature: Laura B

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Hi Laura,
This is one of the Blister Beetles in the genus
Meloe, and they are commonly called Oil Beetles.  We are uncertain of the exact species, however, according to BugGuide, Meloe strigulosus is found along the “Pacific coast from Kodiak, AK to Baja & AZ.”

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Daniel,
Thank you so much!  The shape of its head had me thinking it was related to ants and wasps, and its unusual elytra had me thinking it could not be a beetle. I was totally on the wrong track. You are quite amazing! I definitely appreciate your hard work, which I know does much to spread the wonder of bugs.
Just in case it’s interesting, here’s another picture from the same excursion of a tiny critter we found in a pond.  My “Pond Life” book leads me to believe it’s not a larva but a mosquito pupa. I had no idea that pupas could be free swimming, lively animals as opposed to motionless inside a cocoon!
Thank you again,
Laura