What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Do you have a bug you need identified? Do you want to submit an interesting photo of a bug? The more information you can give us, the better your chances of getting your bug identified. Season? Geographic location? Picture(s) should be as clear and well lit as possible.

If you have a general question or comment, please use the Comment Form instead. We generally cannot identify a bug without a photo!
By submitting an identification request and/or photo(s), you give WhatsThatBug.com permission to use your words and image(s) on their website and other WhatsThatBug.com publications. Also, you swear that you either took the photo(s) yourself or have explicit permission from the photographer or copyright holder to use the image.

Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). And while we appreciate the support, donating through the PayPal link does *not* increase your chances of having your identification request answered.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

49 Responses to Ask What’s That Bug?

  1. [...] site. and they ID it for you. I’ve use them in the past and gave fast and and friendly responses. Ask What’s That Bug? | What’s That Bug? __________________ "An orchid lover and their money are soon parted" [...]

  2. [...] I was looking for information on insects and @z_rose sent me this link “for all your bug-related queries” What’s that bug? [...]

  3. [...] Ask What’s That Bug? | What's That Bug? Hope that helps just enough to get me out of doing work! [...]

  4. [...] 22, 2010 · Leave a Comment Here’s hoping the folks at What’s That Bug solve the [...]

  5. [...] })(); Are we experts yet?Skip to contentHomeAbout What’s That BugAsk What’s That Bug?buglinksComments and Questions (not bug identification)Login / RegisterLoginTest What's That Bug? [...]

  6. [...] s); })(); Are we experts yet?Skip to contentHomeAbout What’s That BugAsk What’s That Bug?buglinksComments and Questions (not bug identification)Login / RegisterLoginTest What's That Bug? [...]

  7. [...] location? Picture(s) should be as clear and well lit as possible.” Click here to ask: http://www.whatsthatbug.com/ask-whats-that-bug/ This entry was posted in News. Bookmark the permalink. ← Bill Roston Buttefly House [...]

  8. Stefani says:

    When I was in colleg in Lawrence, Kansas I was at a parade and was standing under this big tree. I didn’t feel anyting land on me but I could smell this somewhat stink odor and I and my sister got into my car and drove back to my dorm and I could still smell this odor. There was a sage colored bug with a tennis ball size body and maybe six legs on my shoulder. I never saw a bug that big in my life. I panicked and knocked it off my shoulder onto the passanger side floor. Both my sister and I jumped off the car and a male passerby got out of the car with a stick. He was scared of it too. That was in 1995. I have never seen a bug like that again. I don’t have an image of the bug but do you have any idea what I am talking about? Just curious. Thank you.

    • Buggirl says:

      I’m not completely sure, but I think you’re referring to a beetle. Did it look like a giant beetle? We see those all the time around the neighborhood. It is called a Japanese beetle, it can grow very large, and it is multicolored and shiny. Just a suggestion, if you want to check it out.

      • bugman says:

        Dear Buggirl,
        You have multiple comments that are not associated with specific postings. Please make your comments on specific postings. The Ask What’s That Bug? link is used to submit images for identification or for consideration as unique, new postings. All of your comments seem to be headed to that page on our site as opposed to being routed to postings. I have requested assistance from our webmaster to see if he can determine why your comments seem to be going there.

  9. John Mahr says:

    Sent a request with 3 photos but the pics were so large (20M each) they took FOREVER to load, so sent a second request with same pics downsized for expediency. Hope that helped.

  10. Erica mowery says:

    I live in Mesa Arizona and have noticed a small bug roaming around the house.
    It’s small,clear cream color, and looks very similar to a silver fish. Except much smaller and clearish, It’s about 1 1/2 cm long. It doesn’t move much, and I have been able to dispose of them without problem. Although I dont think they are harmful I don’t really want bugs roaming around the house. I have only seen 3 in my home i found one in my couch,bathroom,and on a shirt that was on the floor. I live in a very suburban area of mesa and in a little town house. I unfortunately don’t have a photo, but I’m hoping you’ll at least be ale to come up with some ideas of what it could be and how I can get rid of them for good.
    Thanks so much!!
    -Erica

  11. Roo says:

    Hello! I’ve been trying to submit some photos, and it keeps saying “Failed to send your message. Please try later or contact the administrator by another method.” I’ve tried waiting a day, using different browsers, and waiting another day. Do you know if it’s something that’s wrong on my end?
    Thanks!

  12. 504 says:

    I tried submitting two photos and a video that was 2 minutes long but took 3 hours of uploading with no end in sight so I resubmitted with a third photo, if you get a double submission that is my fault, apologies. The good side of that would be you got the video clip but I don’t think it went through. Anyway. Thanks and happy Memorial Day

  13. neoivanneo says:

    Is it normal that it takes really long to process my question?

  14. cupcake423499999 says:

    how long does it take to process my question?

  15. Kelly says:

    Dear Bugman, I tried to put this through via the regular submission method, but kept getting rejected, hope it’s okay to leave this here.

    I just got startled by an absolutely massive insect I’ve never seen before. I live on the east side of Los Angeles, CA and this bug flew slowly into my back porch area. It was so big and loud that I thought it was a hummingbird, and it was also a brilliant green color. It appeared flat, but flew slowly, like a bumblebee. I was stunned at its sheer size! I was tending to my rabbits, who live in the back, and the huge bug dropped down into a pile of rabbit waste I was cleaning and started moving around in it. I tried to get a look at it, but didn’t want to get too close. I’ve never seen anything like it, and I’m positive it wasn’t a common cicada.

    Any thoughts as to what this might be? I really appreciate your time! I’m sorry I couldn’t get a photo– the creature had gone far below the regular levels of hay by the time I worked up the nerve to even get closer to snap a picture, and I could only tell it was in there by the way the hay was rustling around.

  16. Andy says:

    I tried to submit a query, but it wouldn’t let me submit because I need at least one picture, and I can’t take one. When I finish explaining, you’ll see why.
    My sister brought home this bug today, and we have no idea what it is. It looks exactly like a ladybug, but it is about the size of a peppercorn and completely black. It’s very glossy and if I look really closely, I can kind of see ridge-like armor on it’s underside. It is so tiny that even on macro setting, I can’t get a half decent picture. Just a blur. I’ve looked around the internet, but can’t get a good answer. Any idea what it could be?

    • bugman says:

      There are so many different beetles, it is nearly impossible to try to pin down what your sister found, especially without any information about where she found it. Was it in her bed, in the kitchen or in France?

      • Andy says:

        It was outside. We live in Utah. I doubt you could identify it even if I did have a picture. I might be able to draw one with keyboard symbols. It looks like this, only biggger -> .
        The dot. It looks like the dot, but bigger.

        • Megan D. says:

          A joke, right? lol!

          “It looks like a bug, but different. It’s like a speck, only bigger; and like a boulder, only smaller. What is it?”

          lol!

  17. Forrest Ortiz says:

    Hello! Just stumbled onto your site, and am very curious and have viewed a lot of the material here. Mainly the camel crickets and spiders. As the subject states, I do not have a picture, but am very curious about a particular bug I’d seen while visiting a friend in central New York.

    We were in central New York and I was sitting on a recently cut tree stump. I started to notice a loud buzzing sound, similar to a power saw, but quieter. I walked around the stump and saw the bug seemingly digging around in the pile of wood chips. It was about the size of a large or medium dragonfly, but the tail or body was a bit thinner, and seemed to be very “wriggly” and flexible. The segment where the legs attached was quite thick and noticeably large. The legs were about as long or slightly longer than those of a mosquito hawk, but a tad thicker and much sturdier looking. It had a long proboscis (or similar organ), that was fairly thick when it sprouted. The bug was a dark, matte black, but seemed to be mixed with that of a dark, shiny green. I didn’t stick around for much longer, and left the bug as I found it.

    I know how difficult it can be to nail down the species of anything without proper photographs, but any information you guys could share would be appreciated! Thanks!

    • bugman says:

      Because of the sound you describe, we are guessing an Annual Cicada or Dog Day Harvestfly. Your physical descriptions sounds a bit like a Giant Ichneumon in the genus Megarhyssa.

      • Forrest Ortiz says:

        I did a google search, and found the bug I’d seen! It was the Giant Ichneumon. There was a picture on google that has a hand on a wall next to the Ichneumon, which shows a good size comparison, a lot like the one I had seen. Thanks a lot for getting back to.

  18. Cassandra says:

    Here’s hoping I can find out what kind of bug has my dog refusing to go outside at sunset! And I didn’t think Jack Russell Terriers were afraid of anything…

  19. Lya says:

    Hi Bugman, I have tried to upload my bug description with three great pictures taken with my phone, probably 6mb total (is that too big?). I have what I think is a roach-type bug, .25 inch long, brown, hard exoskeleton, moves quickly, avoids light. Found him dead between some papers on my desk, but not hurt in any way, totally intact. he is mostly dark brown with light brown marking on back (dark brown along spine), long-ish legs in front. The shape is rounded with a tapering at the tail. I’m in Sonoma County, CA, I’ve seen a few of these in the house this past summer. Thanks for any help!

    • bugman says:

      Use our standard submission form on the Ask What’s That Bug? link. The photo size is not a problem.

      • Lya says:

        I tried numerous times to upload the pictures earlier and kept getting an error message, which is why I wrote in the comments section. I will keep trying, but you might have a bug in the submission process.

        • Lya says:

          This is the message I get when I try to send the photos on the Standard Submission Form:
          Failed to send your message. Please try later or contact the administrator by another method.

  20. Carlos Huang says:

    Hello, I’ve been trying to submit a form, but the sign next to the SEND button keeps rotating and it won’t submit the form. I’ll just write it here:
    Hello, my name is Carlos and I live in an apartment building in San Juan, Puerto Rico. A couple of months ago I found a couple of strange insects in my storage room. They are fast and a little bit bigger than regular ants. The insect has six legs, it has a black and yello body, and on its back torso there are three yellow spots which form some kind of smiley face. That first time I saw the insects, I captured one, but it died while I was investigating what insect it was. Two days ago I found one walking on a wall of my balcony and I captured it.
    where can I send you the pictures? I have three photos of the insect.

    • bugman says:

      Hi Carlos,
      You submit photos with our Ask What’s That Bug? link, however we will be away from the office for the next week and we will not be taking any new submissions during that time. When we return, we will not be able to respond to many requests that arrived during our absence. You might want to wait a week.

  21. Kal says:

    I have no picture, I’m sorry it makes it sooo much harder to help, but I’m so paranoid and too scared to go to bed since I had found the bug on my wall. I have looked up all spiders//scorpions//pincer-related bugs, and as you will read I have had no success. I live in Virginia.

    Well I have no pictures of it, I kind of was scared and yelled for my mom to kill it.
    However it was spider looking and yet had pincers in the front. I tried looking it up and to no avail, it was none of the bugs listed in a website that was suppose to have all of Virginia’s bugs. I really wish I would have taken a picture but it was VERY aware of my presence! As I had gotten closer to inspect it before yelling for my mother, it would tilt its pincers at me, I was sure because I then moved my head and it followed. Praying it didn’t move, I ran downstairs got my mom and ran back up as she killed it. I am an extremely paranoid person, but only wish to know if it lived in a pack//hoard like my most feared bug does. It looked most like the stag beetle, but it didnt seem to have wings and its body was more spider like, and it had no tail or anything.

  22. tower climbing bug explorer says:

    Furry ant / wasp without wings ?
    I just asked about this bug but eventually found a picture online and it looks like it’s a red vvelvet ant ? Which is actually a wasp but the females don’t have wings ? Love your site! :D

  23. nuttybug says:

    need help cannot seem to send you pistures

  24. I am a teacher in the foothills of the Canadian Rockies — just east of Calgary. We are currently experiencing a lovely fall — aka “Indian Summer”. I was walking past a lot of autumn leaves that were on the ground from Poplar trees above. Then I saw that one of these poplar-leaf shaped brownish-gray leaves that was sort of blowing around had legs, etc. It was the same size as a regular poplar leaf — a large, flat beetle of some sort. I did not have a camera on me unfortunately. I have been searching online for something similar — and came across your site — which I have now spent over 2 hours on! What a great site you have. I really hope you can help with this query. I will NEVER allow children to jump into a pile of fall’s fallen leaves again — now that I realize that this type of insect may be residing in the piles of leaves. I have NEVER seen anything as scary — and large! It was blowing around with the poplar leaves — so well-camouflaged!! Thank you so much. (I am absolutely LOVING your site, by the way, and have it bookmarked for future reference — I am scheduled to teach Sr High Science second semester. I LOVED the post about the Sesame Seeds — and plan to use it when we begin to supplement the lesson on “Creating a Hypothesis” — going to be just perfect!) Thank you SO MUCH for any help you can provide.

    • bugman says:

      Thanks for the compliment. We love that query and we had fun writing about sesame seeds. Our first guess as to the identity of your Poplar bug is a Cottonwood Borer, a magnificent black and white beetle with long antennae that feeds on poplar. If the Cottonwood Borer is in Michigan and South Dakota, as BugGuide indicates, then it might be in Calgary. As much as we want what you saw to be a Cottonwood Borer, we speculate you must be a little too far North for that to be likely. We believe you are too far North for a Wheel Bug to be your insect. We don’t know if Toe-Biters would hide in the leaves and you are not too far North to encounter Toe-Biters.

  25. Correction — I am teaching just WEST of Calgary, not EAST!!

  26. Impressive — speedy reply! So, upon looking at the pics of the above species, it definitely was NOT a Cottonwood Borer. This critter looked EXACTLY like a fallen poplar leaf (all brownish-grey) — and was the same SHAPE as the poplar leaves it was amongst — however, I saw that it was trying to get its footing in the wind — it had legs, antennae, etc. I just about died!! It would be closer to a Toe Biter — actually, Surrey BC is due west of me — so certainly possible, latitude-wise. I would still emphasize the shape of the bug/beetle was identical to the leaves — and the same size!! Scary!! Thank you for your speedy response!! – LW

  27. Hmmmm — yes, closer to your toe-biter from the Dominican Republic post’s picture! Our school sits atop the banks of the Bow River — the river originates ~ 70 kms further west in the mountains at Bow Falls in Banff. I wondered about June Bugs — but it’s October — and I’ve never seen a June bug that size before! We do get food ordered to the school weekly — perhaps some beetle that hitch-hiked along with some bananas or something?? I also meant to mention that I 100% support your stance on not identifying bug collections for homework projects. Providing the resource for students to be able to research it themselves is a much preferred method for them to learn. I was shocked to read the venom that was spewed in your direction at your refusal to do the assignments for the students themselves! You took the RIGHT approach — and as a teacher in my 36th year of teaching, I feel confident in offering my viewpoint! Way to go — your site is very user-friendly — no reason whatsoever that a student can not search around and locate their assignment answers themselves — and actually learn the material!! On behalf of teachers, THANK YOU!!! :)

    I don’t know why the above did not post last night — but I see the new submission from Canada’s east coast of a toe-biter. Yes — that was what I saw — but I believe it’s wings were extended as it was trying to fly (against the wind gust it was contending with) therefore it assumed the same shape of the poplar leaves — it was amazingly camouflaged! Thank you so much — love your site!!

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