Subject:  Are these venomous?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sao Paulo, Brazil
Date: 08/16/2019
Time: 10:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  Are these stinging caterpillars or slugs?
How you want your letter signed:  Danirl

Owl Butterfly Caterpillars

Dear Danirl,
These caterpillars are not venomous and they do not sting.  They are some species of Owl Butterfly Caterpillars from the genus
Caligo based on this CanStock Photo image and this Alamy image.  You can find some good information on Insetologia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Atop Casper Mtn,. Wyoming
Date: 08/16/2019
Time: 02:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I would love to know the identity of this cat.  Photo taken 8/13/19.
How you want your letter signed:  Dwaine

Unidentified Moth Caterpillar

Dear Dwaine,
Despite the excellent detail in your images and the distinctive characteristics of this Moth Caterpillar, we are unable to provide you with an identification at this time.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this identification.

Unidentified Moth Caterpillar

Subject:  Worm found on oak tree
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia beach, VA
Date: 08/16/2019
Time: 05:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found these on my oak tree this morning. 8/16/2019
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Duane Heidler

Sawfly Larvae

Dear Duane,
These are Sawfly larvae.  Sawflies are non-stinging relatives of wasps and bees with larvae that are frequently mistaken for caterpillars.  Based on the appearance of the individuals in this BugGuide image, and that the host plant is oak, we suspect your individuals are in the genus
Arge.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  interesting spider with body spikes in NH!
Geographic location of the bug:  Francestown, NH
Date: 08/15/2019
Time: 11:35 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this spider on a dead oak leaf today, very interesting body with spikes!
Googled around a bit and could not find it.
Would love to know what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Alfred Eisenberg

Arrow-Shaped Micrathena

Dear Alfred,
This intriguing spider is an Arrow-Shaped Micrathena,
Micrathena sagittata, and according to BugGuide:  “This spider does not pose a danger to humans (and neither do any others in this family).”

Arrow-Shaped Micrathena

Thanks for that!  I did actually find that eventually but nice to have it confirmed.   Beautiful spider I have not seen before.

Subject:  Walnut Underwing Perch
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, California
Date: 08/16/2019
Time: 11:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dearest Bugman,
It was lovely spending time with you during the almost full moon. Please enjoy this shot of you with a Walnut Underwing on your shoulder.
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie on the Irish Chain

The Bugman with a Walnut Underwing

Dear Melanie,
We are so happy you were able to get a cellular telephone image of Daniel as he removed the Walnut Underwing back to the outdoors after it entered the house Monday night.  After several minutes of eluding capture, luckily the moth alighted on Daniel’s shirt, and it could easily be walked outside.

Walnut Underwing

Subject:  Adorable bee
Geographic location of the bug:  Long Beach, California
Date: 08/16/2019
Time: 02:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman! This cute fat fuzzy little friend and her buddies are frequent guests in my garden. My understanding is that only females have pollen baskets. Do they also distinguish her as a bumblebee, rather than a carpenter bee? If so, can you tell what kind of bumblebee she is? She’s taking her job very seriously and she is welcome in my yard.
How you want your letter signed:  Rachel L

Sonoran Bumble Bee

Dear Rachel,
We wish we had your luck.  Daniel hasn’t seen a Bumble Bee in the WTB? garden for quite some time, despite there being numerous other native pollinators.  We believe based on images posted to The Natural History of Orange County that is is a Sonoran Bumble Bee,
Bombus sonorus.  According to Accent on Natural Landscaping:  “Male bees do not actively collect pollen, only the queen and worker bumblebees do. They transfer the pollen they collect to the sacs or baskets on their hind legs to make it easier to transport back to the hive. Bumblebee pollen sacs or baskets are known as corbicula.”