Subject: Strange Bug
Location: Burlingame, CA, USA
March 25, 2017 10:18 am
Hello WTB!
I live in Burlingame, CA (near San Francisco) and I was trying to identify this bug on your web site but I haven’t been able to find it. At first I thought it was a spider. However, it has only six legs. The front two appendages don’t seem to be legs, but seemed to be antennae or maybe some sort of stinger. This bug was very aware of me, and as I got close to it, it would point its front antennae at me menacingly, which is why I thought they might be a stinger. Any clue as to what this might be? Thanks!
Signature: JM

Jumping Spider

Dear JM,
This is in fact a Spider and what you have mistaken for antennae are the first pair of legs on this Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae.  Jumping Spiders do not build webs to snare prey.  Rather they pounce on prey, often from a considerable distance, and they are such adept hunters because of their excellent eyesight.  We will attempt a species identification for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chrysalis?
Location: Southeast Pennsylvania
March 25, 2017 9:16 am
We found this on a knock out rose bush, that came with a home we just bought. We did find evidence of rose cane borers, but this doesn’t appear to be related. Did some searching for chrysalis and cocoons online, but they all see so much prettier than this.
Signature: Scott

Mantis Ootheca

Dear Scott,
This is the ootheca or egg case of a Preying Mantis.  When the weather warms, several hundred hatchlings should emerge.  Mantids are predators that will help keep unwanted insects from your plants without the use of pesticides.

Subject: A spider I’ve never seen before
Location: Uruguay
March 25, 2017 6:03 am
I took this picture yesterday at my place, nobody here seems to know what kind of spider it is.
Signature: Luchi

Silver Argiope

Dear Luchi,
This harmless Orbweaver is a Silver Argiope,
Argiope argentata, a species that ranges from North America, through Central America and into South America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange creature–land or sea?
Location: Anna Maria Island, Florida
March 25, 2017 5:47 am
We were walking the beach on Anna Maria Island in Florida when we came upon this fellow. It was right on the wet sand where the waves come up. Couldn’t tell where he came from or where he was going. Any ideas?
Signature: Nan

Bristle Worm

Dear Nan,
This Bristle Worm is actually an Annelid marine worm.  We found this matching image on Matthew Meier Photo and another on Florida Sportsman.    

Subject: death valley bee
Location: Darwin Falls, west of Death Valley National Park, CA
March 24, 2017 6:50 pm
Can you identify this bee (or fly)? I think the flower it is on is a Desert Gold (Geraea canescens) bush located in the western side of Death Valley National Park, near the Panamint Resort area.
Signature: Bonnie Borucki

Flower Fly

Dear Bonnie,
This is a Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many members of the family mimic bees and wasps for protection.  Harmless insects benefit from being confused with stinging insects.  We imagine you were in Death Valley during the peak bloom.  We are jealous.

Subject: Large Spinder
Location: Alvin, Texas
March 23, 2017 8:40 pm
We found this large spider on the front porch eating dinner. Then shortly found what we belive to be the father carrying the eggs on his back. Not sure what it is… if you could please help us identify them that would be cool.
Gulf Coast region
March – early spring
Warm outside
Signature: Robin Kralovetz

Female Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Robin,
The second Spider is a female Wolf Spider and she is carrying Spiderlings, not eggs.  Thanks so much for including the penny for scale as it provides a sense of the difference between the sizes of these two spiders.  The Spider with its prey is a much larger individual.  The carapace looks to us to resemble that of a Fishing Spider (see this BugGuide image) in the genus
Dolomedes rather than a Wolf Spider and Fishing Spiders are larger.  Wolf Spiders in the family Lycosidae and Fishing Spiders in the family Pisauridae are both hunting spiders that do not build webs to snare prey.  We may be wrong, bug we believe the larger spider is a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes.  The prey appears to be a Scarab Beetle.

Fishing Spider eats Scarab Beetle