Subject:  Orange moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Redmond, WA
Date: 10/14/2018
Time: 03:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, found this on east facing side of house the morning after our first frost of October. Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  BugzFriend

Geometer Moth

Dear BugzFriend,
This is a Geometer Moth or Spanworm Moth in the family Geometridae.  We will attempt a species identification as well when time permits.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black wasp with orange wings
Geographic location of the bug:  In Genesee id
Date: 10/13/2018
Time: 09:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey, so I have never seen one of these before… Google said it is a tarantula wasp??? Just curious what it is…
How you want your letter signed:  Shara cook

Spider Wasp

Dear Shara,
Tarantula Hawks are Spider Wasps in the genera
Pepsis and Hemipepsis that prey on Tarantulas, and according to BugGuide data, the latter genus is not found as far north as Idaho, and similarly, BugGuide data on the genus Pepsis also shows a more southern range.  Other Spider Wasps have similar coloration.  Your individual might be Calopompilus pyrrhomelas which is pictured on BugGuide and reported from Idaho based on BugGuide data.

Are they dangerous, or like a normal sting or bite?   I picked it up with a leaf , and put it in the sun.   It was cold on my porch.

Spider Wasps are not aggressive towards humans, and Tarantula Hawks are reported to have very painful stings.  Since your individual is also a member of the tribe Pepsini that includes Tarantula Hawks, it might also have a painful sting.  Again, Spider Wasps are not aggressive, but they can sting.

Subject:  Is this a tarantula?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sebastopol, CA
Date: 10/11/2018
Time: 02:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My husband was getting ready to ride the GranFondo bike ride in Santa Rosa last weekend and saw this huge spider by his bike shoe.  What is it and is it dangerous?
How you want your letter signed:  Spiders in Sebastopol

Tarantula

This is indeed a Tarantula.  California Tarantulas are not aggressive and they are not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Robber fly type
Geographic location of the bug:  monmouth county, new jersey
Date: 10/10/2018
Time: 04:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hey i am looking through archived photos and i would love more specific input on this robber fly. is it possible to id genus/species from this photo. taken mid june 2016. at the time i thought hanging thief but that’s as far as i got. thanks in advance!
How you want your letter signed:  WS

Giant Robber Fly

Dear WS,
We believe this is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, but we are not certain of the species.  See BugGuide for examples.

Subject:  Curious bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  South Africa, Kwa-Zulu Natal, Asbhurton
Date: 10/09/2018
Time: 01:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there. We have lived in Ashburton for almost two years and in that time have only ever seen one of the two bugs. We have never seen them before in our lives and no one knows what they are. They are both about 5-6cm in length and both have hard exterior. there are two pictures of the one and one of the other.
Do you know what they are?
How you want your letter signed:  Amy Peacock

Ship Timber Beetle

Dear Amy,
One of your beetles is a Ship Timber Beetle.  According to Beetles in the Bush:  “Placed in the family Lymexylidae (ship-timber beetles), species in this genus look less like beetles than they do large flying ants or strange damselflies due to their highly reduced elytra that expose their greatly elongated abdomen and leave the hind wings uncovered.  The hind wings also are unusual in that they are held fan-like in repose rather than folded as in most other beetles. 
Atractocerus brevicornis is the only species in the genus found in Africa (Scholtz & Holm 1985).” Your other beetle is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.

Subject:  Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  St Petersburg,  FL
Date: 10/09/2018
Time: 06:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this insect fluttering around my backyard. I suspect it is some kind of moth.  It was October 6th around 1430. Each time it landed it would pump it’s wings several times slowly before settling down.  What a beauty.  Um…. what is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Del

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Dear Del,
This Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth is a very effective wasp mimic.  Though you are not located for a direct hit, we hope you don’t have much damage from Hurricane Michael.

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth