Where to Sleep if You Have Bed Bugs: Practical Solutions for a Peaceful Night

Dealing with a bed bug infestation can be incredibly frustrating and stressful.

During the process of eliminating them from your home, one main concern is figuring out where to sleep without being bitten.

In the following paragraphs, we’ll explore some options that can help you avoid bed bugs while you sleep.

Where to Sleep if You Have Bed Bugs
Bed Bug
 

To start, it’s important to consider if it’s safe to continue sleeping in your own bed. If the infestation is minor and you’re actively treating it, then you may be able to stay put.

By encasing your mattress and box spring in bed bug-proof covers, you can protect yourself from bites while also trapping the bugs inside, where they will eventually die without access to food.

However, if the infestation is severe or covers multiple rooms, you might need to consider sleeping elsewhere. In these cases, try using a temporary air mattress or a cot in a room that hasn’t been affected by bed bugs.

Be sure to keep any personal items and clothing contained in sealed plastic bags to prevent the spread of the infestation.

Remember, staying vigilant and consistently checking for signs of bed bugs are crucial steps in addressing this problem.

Understanding Bed Bugs

Bed bugs are nocturnal pests that can cause immense discomfort and stress. These parasitic insects, scientifically known as Cimex lectularius, feed on human blood during the night.

They are attracted to the warmth and carbon dioxide of sleeping humans. So, knowing their habits can help you find ways to avoid them while sleeping.

These tiny insects are notorious for their resilience and adaptability. Bed bugs can hitchhike from infested locations to your home through luggage, furniture, clothing, and more.

Therefore, awareness and prevention are essential in keeping them away from your sleeping area.

Bed Bug

Some common hiding spots for bed bugs include:

  • Seams, piping, and tags of mattresses and box springs
  • Cracks in bed frames and headboards
  • Seams of chairs and couches, and drawer joints
  • Between cushions and in the folds of curtains

The above information on bed bugs, their behaviors, and their preferred hiding places helps you better understand these pests.

Armed with this knowledge, you can make more informed decisions on how to protect your sleeping area and home from bed bug infestations.

Identifying Bed Bug Infestations

Bed bug infestations can be a nightmare, but identifying them early is crucial. Here’s what to look for:

First, check your sleeping area. Bed bugs like to hide near the piping, seams, and tags of your mattress and box spring.

They can also be found in cracks on your bed frame and headboard. If you spot any small, brownish insects, you might have an infestation.

However, bed bugs don’t just stay around your bed. They can also hide in seams of chairs and couches, between cushions, and in the folds of curtains. Additionally, they may be lurking in drawer joints.

When you’re inspecting for bed bugs, keep an eye out for tiny black or brown fecal spots on your sheets and mattresses. These are a telltale sign of their presence.

Remember that bed bug infestations are not determined by the cleanliness of your living conditions.

Bed Bug

They can be found in various types of accommodations, from apartments to five-star hotels. So, don’t hesitate to scrutinize these areas no matter where you live.

If you suspect an infestation, it’s essential to act fast. Consider consulting a professional exterminator or follow the EPA’s guidelines for bed bug control and prevention.

How Bed Bugs Spread?

Bed bugs are notorious for their ability to spread quickly and hitch rides on various items. Let’s explore how these pesky critters travel and infest different areas.

Travel and Luggage

When you’re traveling, bed bugs can easily latch onto your luggage or clothing. For example, they might hide in hotel rooms, waiting for a chance to hitch a ride home with you.

To avoid this, inspect your hotel room for signs of bed bugs and keep your luggage off the floor on a luggage rack.

As bed bugs can also transfer from one piece of luggage to another, it’s crucial to check your bags upon returning home.

If you notice any sign of bed bugs, make sure to wash your clothes on high heat and vacuum your suitcase thoroughly.

Spreading in Shared Spaces

Bed bugs can spread through your home or apartment building by crawling short distances or by attaching themselves to people, clothing, or various objects.

Shared living spaces like dormitories or apartment buildings often have a higher risk of bed bug infestations due to the close proximity of living quarters.

  • Here are some common ways bed bugs spread:
    • Hiding in furniture or bedding that’s been discarded, then brought into a new space.
    • Crawling through tiny cracks and crevices between walls or floors, especially in apartment buildings.
    • Transferring from one person to another in public spaces like buses or movie theaters.
Bed Bug

To minimize the risk of bed bugs spreading in your home, practice good housekeeping habits, such as vacuuming regularly, reducing clutter, and inspecting second-hand items before introducing them to your living space.

Overall, being aware of how bed bugs spread and taking preventative measures is key to keeping your home and belongings free from infestations.

Recognizing Bed Bug Bites

Bed bug bites are often mistaken for other types of bug bites. To spot a bed bug bite on your skin, look out for these common aspects:

  • Itching sensation on your skin
  • Red, raised bumps
  • Bites that appear in a line or cluster

Here’s a brief comparison of bed bug bites to other common bug bites:

Bug BitesSymptomsAppearance
Bed Bug BitesRed, raised bumps; itching sensationLine or cluster; on exposed skin
Mosquito BitesRed, raised bumps; itching sensationRandom; usually on exposed skin
Flea BitesRed, raised bumps; intense itchingCluster; often around ankles

In many cases, the symptoms you experience are the result of your body’s reaction to the bites rather than the bites themselves. Some people may have an allergic skin reaction, while others might experience a milder response.

Remember, if you suspect that you have bed bug bites, it’s essential to inspect your surroundings to confirm their presence and address the issue as soon as possible.

Pay close attention to areas like mattress seams and folds, box spring piping, and joints in furniture. You can even spot bed bugs hiding in the seams of chairs or couches and between cushions.

Bed Bug

Detected Locations for Bed Bugs

When facing a bed bug infestation, it is essential to know their common hiding spots. One of the primary locations they inhabit is your mattress. These pests often reside near the piping, seams, and tags of the mattress and box spring.

A frequent spot for bed bugs is your bed frame and headboard, particularly in cracks and crevices. Inspecting these areas thoroughly is crucial to detecting their presence.

In addition to beds, bed bugs can also live in other furniture items, such as couches and chairs. You may find them within the seams, between cushions, and in other tight spaces in these furnishings.

It’s equally important to inspect your living space. Bed bugs can sometimes be found hiding behind wallpaper and electrical outlets, especially if they are loose. Make sure to check these areas as well.

Here are some critical areas to investigate:

  • Mattress (piping, seams, tags)
  • Box spring
  • Bed frame (cracks, crevices)
  • Headboards
  • Couches and chairs (seams, between cushions)
  • Wallpaper (loose areas)
  • Electrical outlets

It’s always a good idea to conduct regular inspections for signs of infestations, as early detection can help prevent a more significant problem.

Understanding these common hiding locations can help you be prepared against these pests and make informed decisions on how to protect yourself and your belongings effectively.

Bed Bug

Protection and Prevention Measures

When it comes to bed bugs, prevention is key. To protect your sleeping area, consider using a mattress encasement that covers both the mattress and box springs. This will keep bed bugs from hiding in these areas.

Maintain cleanliness by frequently washing and drying your bedding and clothing at a high temperature. This will kill any bed bugs present.

You might also want to use bed bug interceptors under your bed legs, which can help catch any unwanted invaders.

Essential oils may provide some relief from bed bugs, but they’re not a substitute for proper prevention measures. Try adding a few drops of lavender or eucalyptus oil to your laundry detergent as a supplementary measure.

Leaving the lights on might seem like a good idea, but this won’t deter bed bugs from biting you while you sleep. Instead, focus on maintaining a clean environment and using encasements and interceptors for protection.

To summarize:

  • Use a mattress encasement and cover for box springs
  • Wash and dry bedding and clothing at high temperatures
  • Place bed bug interceptors under bed legs
  • Add essential oils (like lavender or eucalyptus) to laundry detergent as a supplementary measure
  • Keep your living space clean and clutter-free

With these measures, you can do your best to create a bed bug-free sleeping environment and prevent any infestations from taking hold.

Consulting Health Care and Pest Control

When you suspect you have bed bugs, the first step is to consult a health care provider or a doctor. They can help identify any allergic reactions related to these pests.

For example, you might have red, itchy welts on your skin or even experience trouble breathing. Your doctor will check your symptoms and recommend proper treatments.

Moreover, it’s important to address any mental health concerns that might arise due to bed bug infestations.

The stress and anxiety of dealing with bed bugs can take a toll on your well-being. Talking to a mental health professional can help you cope with the situation effectively.

Remember, dealing with bed bugs requires a collaborative effort between you, your health care provider, and the pest control professionals. Combining their expertise will help you regain a peaceful night’s sleep as soon as possible.

Bed Bug

Bed Bug Extermination Methods

If you’re struggling with a bed bug infestation, there are several methods to help you get rid of these pests:

1. Steam Cleaning: Using a high-temperature steam cleaner is an effective way to kill bed bugs on contact. Make sure to cover all furniture, mattresses, and other items in your home where bed bugs might be hiding.

2. Heat Treatment: A professional heat treatment can effectively eliminate bed bugs by raising the temperature of your entire home to a level that they cannot withstand. This approach requires a specialist to ensure the process is done correctly and safely.

3. Vacuuming: Regularly vacuuming your home, especially in areas where you sleep, can help reduce bed bug populations. Ensure that you dispose of the vacuum bag in a sealed plastic bag and place it in the trash outside your home.

Here are some pros and cons of these methods:

MethodProsCons
Steam Cleaning– Chemical-free
– Effective in killing bed bugs
– Time-consuming
– May not reach hidden bed bugs
Heat Treatment– Can eliminate bed bugs in one treatment
– Covers entire home
– Expensive
– Requires professional assistance
Vacuuming– Simple, DIY method
– Helps maintain cleanliness
– May not eliminate all bed bugs
-Requires consistent effort

Remember to follow an Integrated Pest Management approach to ensure that bed bugs are completely eradicated and to prevent their recurrence.

This includes regularly washing and drying your bedding, reducing clutter, and the use of mattress encasements.

As you try each method, keep in mind the importance of thoroughness and consistency in your bed bug extermination efforts.

Where to Sleep if You Have Bed Bugs? Choosing Temporarily Sleep Locations

When dealing with bed bugs, it’s essential to find alternative sleep locations until the issue is resolved. Consider these options:

Sleep at a hotel

  • Staying at a hotel can provide a temporary, comfortable solution.
  • Ensure the hotel follows strict hygiene standards to prevent any bed bug transfer.

For example, look for a reputable hotel with positive reviews and inquire about their pest control measures.

Sleeping at a friend’s or family member’s house

  • Reach out to someone you trust and explain the situation.
  • Be cautious not to transfer bed bugs to their home.

Here are a few precautions you can take:

  • Launder your clothes and belongings before visiting.
  • Store your items in sealed plastic bags.

Sleep in another room or area in your home

  • Choose a room or space far from the infestation.
  • Implement preventive measures to avoid spreading bed bugs.

Make sure to:

  • Fully clean and vacuum the area before sleeping there.
  • Use an air mattress or portable bed instead of your usual bedding.

Remember, wearing clean pajamas and keeping your luggage away from sleeping areas can also help reduce the risk of bed bug transfer.

Bed Bug

Post-Bed Bug Infestation Recovery

Dealing with a bed bug infestation can be a stressful experience, but there are steps you can take to reclaim your living space and find peace of mind.

First and foremost, consider investing in mattress encasements as a preventative measure. These specialized covers can trap bed bugs inside, preventing them from spreading and eventually causing their demise.

When it’s time for bed, be sure to wear clothes that cover most of your skin. This will help minimize any bed bug bites and the subsequent anxiety or insomnia that may follow. Some people experience unease or restlessness following a bed bug infestation.

  • Pros of mattress encasements:

    • Keep bed bugs from escaping
    • Easy to clean and maintain
    • Protects the mattress from future infestations
  • Cons of mattress encasements:

    • Can be expensive
    • May not be compatible with all mattress types

In addition to securing your sleep environment, don’t hesitate to communicate with your landlord if you’re renting.

They should be responsible for addressing the issue and working with a professional pest control company to eradicate the bed bugs.

Finally, remember that it’s natural to feel unsettled following a bed bug infestation. Be patient with yourself and understand that recovery might take some time.

Reach out to friends, family, or a therapist if the experience is causing overwhelming distress. Early detection and intervention are key to preventing further distress and managing the recovery process.

Conclusion

In conclusion, effectively managing a bed bug infestation involves understanding their behavior, early detection, and adopting appropriate sleeping arrangements.

Whether it’s encasing your mattress or relocating to an unaffected area, the key is to prevent further bites and spread.

Regular cleaning, using interceptors, and consulting professionals for extermination and health advice are crucial steps.

Remember, bed bugs are resilient, but with vigilance and comprehensive measures, you can reclaim your peaceful sleep.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about bed bugs. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Bed Bug nymph found in tank with Bearded Dragon

Subject:  Audrey
Geographic location of the bug:  Northwest ohio
Date: 04/06/2018
Time: 06:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey I found this in my bearded dragon tank and can’t figure out what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Audrey

Bed Bug Nymph

Dear Audrey,
This sure looks to us like a Bed Bug nymph, and you can compare your individual to this BugGuide image.  This is quite puzzling for us.  According to BugGuide, the members of the Bed Bug family are “ectoparasites of birds and mammals; most are associated with birds & bats, only 2 spp. (
Cimex lectularius and C. hemipterus) are permanently associated with humans.”   According to the U.S. Government Environmental Protection Agency site:  “Young bed bugs (also called nymphs), in general, are: smaller, translucent or whitish-yellow in color; and if not recently fed, can be nearly invisible to the naked eye because of coloring and size.”  Your individual appears to have recently fed, presumable from the blood of your Bearded Dragon.  We would also wonder why a single Bed Bug nymph appeared suddenly in your reptile tank leading us to speculate if it was bred in your home or if it was recently transported to the tank from something you got at the pet store.  We imagine mammals and birds sold at pet stores might become prey to Bed Bugs and kin in the family Cimicidae.  BeardedDragon.org contains a Q&A forum posting regarding bearded dragons and bed bugs, but no definitive answer is provided.

Letter 2 – Bed Bug Infestation

Subject: Do I have bedbugs?
Location: Elko, NV
February 26, 2014 12:31 am
Bugman
For the past week I have found these little bugs in my daughters room on her wall surrounding her night light. I get rid of them daily and each morning there are 5-10 more bugs around her night light. I have searched everywhere in her room for more of them, or to see if I can find a nest or more signs of them but nothing. I haven’t found them anywhere else in the house. She has no bite marks or rashes. I’m not sure how to get rid of them or find out where they are coming from. I have no pets but just moved into my home 5 months ago it is a older home and was vacant for 3 years prior to us moving in.
Please help me??
Signature: Freaked out by bugs.

Bed Bugs
Bed Bugs

Dear Freaked out by bugs,
You have a serious problem with either Bed Bugs, or another closely related, blood sucking relative in the family Cimicidae.  According to BugGuide, they are:  “ectoparasites of birds and mammals; most are associated with birds & bats, only 2 spp. (
Cimex lectularius and C. hemipterus) are permanently associated with humans.”  We urge you to take immediate action as you have an infestation, judging by the numbers you cite and the size of the individuals in the images you provided.  They are definitely reproducing nearby.

Bed Bugs
Bed Bugs

Even species not normally associated with humans will bite sleeping people if no other prey is available.  Most of the identification requests we receive of potential Bed Bugs are Carpet Beetle larvae or something too blurry to identify, but you have the real deal.

Bed Bugs
Bed Bugs

Thank you much for quick response.  Now I’m totally freaked out.  What is the best course of action to take to insure that I get rid of all of them? That they don’t come back?  Is this something I can do on my own or do I need to find professional help?
Thanks

We just approved a comment to your site from a pest control agency that states:  “These are definitely bed bugs. Freaked out by bugs should definitely check the crevices of the daughter’s mattress, along with the sheets, pillows and night stand. There is definitely an infestation and it should be treated immediately.”  It would require incredible diligence on your part to eradicate the infestation.  This would be a situation where we believe the best course of action would be to have a professional assess the situation.  Eradication is compounded by the fact that Bed Bugs can survive a long time without feeding.

Letter 3 – Bed Bug Information

Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius)
Dear Bugman
I have just been reading your page on Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius) and can tell you Bed Bugs do travel on hosts having myself been a transport for some. Many of my colleagues have also had incidents with them. They are the largest cause of Delusitory Parasitosis within our industry. Early identification is the only way to stop heavy infestations as a female can lay 3-5 eggs per day once fed. 200-300 in two months. Blood smears or stains on bed sheets is a very good warning sign, as well as black specs to the joints of furniture as they swell up to twice their normal size having fed. So when getting into their harborages after feeding will excrete some blood that dries to a black tear drop shaped mark. They will normally harbour 20cm away from a possible host. The nymphs will feed on excreted blood, so will not always bite. Back to their traveling, recently I have been involved in the insect monitoring in a world renowned Museum with a textile insect pest problem. We have found Bed Bugs on our insect detectors in the galleries, so someone visiting the museum has them on them. Lastly and for me one of their most amazing habits is that they can go up to a year without feeding. So you could go to sleep in a bed no one has slept in for six months and they will get you. Regards
Mark Walsh
Rentokil Pest Control

Hi Mark,
Thanks for all swell information.

Letter 4 – Bed Bug in the work place

A Tick or Roach Perhaps?
Location: Ohio
August 9, 2011 7:07 pm
On August 9th I was at work minding my own business when I notice this small bug crawling from my knee to my waist. It’s about as big as the letter A in the subject line above.
At first I thought it was a tick but then checked out pictures of ticks on google and the legs on this bug appear to be ”finer” than a tick I’m familiar with however I know that there are many variations of a tick. The legs aren’t as curled as a tick seems to be. Perhaps this is just a roach of some sort? If that’s the case then it definitely came from a coworker.
Signature: Mr. Felts

Bed Bug

Dear Mr. Felts,
We are sorry to inform you that the creature you found crawling on you appears to be a Bed Bug.  The resolution on your photos is not very good, so we might be mistaken, but the general anatomy and outline of the insect in the photos you provided sure looks like a Bed Bug to us.  If you are certain that the insect you found crawling on you originated at your job site, you should probably notify your employer.  If you have any doubts, please refer to the images of Bed Bugs on BugGuide for comparison.

Bed Bug

Letter 5 – Bed Bug Graphic

Bedbug Educational Graphic
Website: bedbugs.org
February 28, 2012 4:36 pm
Hi there. I just got through designing an educational graphic about bedbugs and was hoping you might consider sharing it with your readership. You can see it here:  http://www.bedbugs.org/educational-graphic/
I realize that it takes time and effort to blog, so I’d be more than happy to make a donation for your time if you’d like.
Thanks so Much,
Signature: Stephanie

Dear Stephanie,
Send us a gif or a jpg and we will post it along with your email.  We have linked to Don’t Let The Bed Bugs Bitewebsite.

Bed Bug Graphic

Letter 6 – Bed Bug in PHiladelphia

Subject: Tell me this isn’t a beg bug
Location: philadelphia
May 20, 2015 5:00 am
Hello,
I am hoping you can help me figure out what this is. This is the third one of this bugs I have seen in my apartment, the first was on the wall by our linen closet, the second on the couch, and this was on the wall above my bed. I flushed the first and squished the second two and both had a blood like color left behind when I squished it. I live with roommates so any of us could have tracked something like this in. We also live around a few large trees so it is not uncommon for us to see various bugs/spiders. I have also checked my mattress and have not seen anything suspicious.
Signature: nervous renter

Bed Bug
Bed Bug

Dear nervous renter,
This is a Bed Bug.

Letter 7 – Bed Bug in Ireland

Subject: Bug on wall by bed
Location: Dundalk ?
June 1, 2016 5:26 am
Well ive had problems with bedbugs before and i thought i got rid of them but now im not sure cc i seen this bug today by my bed. But it dosent look like any bedbugs ive seen before.
Signature: Dominick

Bed Bug
Bed Bug

Dear Dominick,
The bad news is that this is certainly a Bed Bug.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Bed Bug nymph found in tank with Bearded Dragon

Subject:  Audrey
Geographic location of the bug:  Northwest ohio
Date: 04/06/2018
Time: 06:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey I found this in my bearded dragon tank and can’t figure out what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Audrey

Bed Bug Nymph

Dear Audrey,
This sure looks to us like a Bed Bug nymph, and you can compare your individual to this BugGuide image.  This is quite puzzling for us.  According to BugGuide, the members of the Bed Bug family are “ectoparasites of birds and mammals; most are associated with birds & bats, only 2 spp. (
Cimex lectularius and C. hemipterus) are permanently associated with humans.”   According to the U.S. Government Environmental Protection Agency site:  “Young bed bugs (also called nymphs), in general, are: smaller, translucent or whitish-yellow in color; and if not recently fed, can be nearly invisible to the naked eye because of coloring and size.”  Your individual appears to have recently fed, presumable from the blood of your Bearded Dragon.  We would also wonder why a single Bed Bug nymph appeared suddenly in your reptile tank leading us to speculate if it was bred in your home or if it was recently transported to the tank from something you got at the pet store.  We imagine mammals and birds sold at pet stores might become prey to Bed Bugs and kin in the family Cimicidae.  BeardedDragon.org contains a Q&A forum posting regarding bearded dragons and bed bugs, but no definitive answer is provided.

Letter 2 – Bed Bug Infestation

Subject: Do I have bedbugs?
Location: Elko, NV
February 26, 2014 12:31 am
Bugman
For the past week I have found these little bugs in my daughters room on her wall surrounding her night light. I get rid of them daily and each morning there are 5-10 more bugs around her night light. I have searched everywhere in her room for more of them, or to see if I can find a nest or more signs of them but nothing. I haven’t found them anywhere else in the house. She has no bite marks or rashes. I’m not sure how to get rid of them or find out where they are coming from. I have no pets but just moved into my home 5 months ago it is a older home and was vacant for 3 years prior to us moving in.
Please help me??
Signature: Freaked out by bugs.

Bed Bugs
Bed Bugs

Dear Freaked out by bugs,
You have a serious problem with either Bed Bugs, or another closely related, blood sucking relative in the family Cimicidae.  According to BugGuide, they are:  “ectoparasites of birds and mammals; most are associated with birds & bats, only 2 spp. (
Cimex lectularius and C. hemipterus) are permanently associated with humans.”  We urge you to take immediate action as you have an infestation, judging by the numbers you cite and the size of the individuals in the images you provided.  They are definitely reproducing nearby.

Bed Bugs
Bed Bugs

Even species not normally associated with humans will bite sleeping people if no other prey is available.  Most of the identification requests we receive of potential Bed Bugs are Carpet Beetle larvae or something too blurry to identify, but you have the real deal.

Bed Bugs
Bed Bugs

Thank you much for quick response.  Now I’m totally freaked out.  What is the best course of action to take to insure that I get rid of all of them? That they don’t come back?  Is this something I can do on my own or do I need to find professional help?
Thanks

We just approved a comment to your site from a pest control agency that states:  “These are definitely bed bugs. Freaked out by bugs should definitely check the crevices of the daughter’s mattress, along with the sheets, pillows and night stand. There is definitely an infestation and it should be treated immediately.”  It would require incredible diligence on your part to eradicate the infestation.  This would be a situation where we believe the best course of action would be to have a professional assess the situation.  Eradication is compounded by the fact that Bed Bugs can survive a long time without feeding.

Letter 3 – Bed Bug Information

Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius)
Dear Bugman
I have just been reading your page on Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius) and can tell you Bed Bugs do travel on hosts having myself been a transport for some. Many of my colleagues have also had incidents with them. They are the largest cause of Delusitory Parasitosis within our industry. Early identification is the only way to stop heavy infestations as a female can lay 3-5 eggs per day once fed. 200-300 in two months. Blood smears or stains on bed sheets is a very good warning sign, as well as black specs to the joints of furniture as they swell up to twice their normal size having fed. So when getting into their harborages after feeding will excrete some blood that dries to a black tear drop shaped mark. They will normally harbour 20cm away from a possible host. The nymphs will feed on excreted blood, so will not always bite. Back to their traveling, recently I have been involved in the insect monitoring in a world renowned Museum with a textile insect pest problem. We have found Bed Bugs on our insect detectors in the galleries, so someone visiting the museum has them on them. Lastly and for me one of their most amazing habits is that they can go up to a year without feeding. So you could go to sleep in a bed no one has slept in for six months and they will get you. Regards
Mark Walsh
Rentokil Pest Control

Hi Mark,
Thanks for all swell information.

Letter 4 – Bed Bug in the work place

A Tick or Roach Perhaps?
Location: Ohio
August 9, 2011 7:07 pm
On August 9th I was at work minding my own business when I notice this small bug crawling from my knee to my waist. It’s about as big as the letter A in the subject line above.
At first I thought it was a tick but then checked out pictures of ticks on google and the legs on this bug appear to be ”finer” than a tick I’m familiar with however I know that there are many variations of a tick. The legs aren’t as curled as a tick seems to be. Perhaps this is just a roach of some sort? If that’s the case then it definitely came from a coworker.
Signature: Mr. Felts

Bed Bug

Dear Mr. Felts,
We are sorry to inform you that the creature you found crawling on you appears to be a Bed Bug.  The resolution on your photos is not very good, so we might be mistaken, but the general anatomy and outline of the insect in the photos you provided sure looks like a Bed Bug to us.  If you are certain that the insect you found crawling on you originated at your job site, you should probably notify your employer.  If you have any doubts, please refer to the images of Bed Bugs on BugGuide for comparison.

Bed Bug

Letter 5 – Bed Bug Graphic

Bedbug Educational Graphic
Website: bedbugs.org
February 28, 2012 4:36 pm
Hi there. I just got through designing an educational graphic about bedbugs and was hoping you might consider sharing it with your readership. You can see it here:  http://www.bedbugs.org/educational-graphic/
I realize that it takes time and effort to blog, so I’d be more than happy to make a donation for your time if you’d like.
Thanks so Much,
Signature: Stephanie

Dear Stephanie,
Send us a gif or a jpg and we will post it along with your email.  We have linked to Don’t Let The Bed Bugs Bitewebsite.

Bed Bug Graphic

Letter 6 – Bed Bug in PHiladelphia

Subject: Tell me this isn’t a beg bug
Location: philadelphia
May 20, 2015 5:00 am
Hello,
I am hoping you can help me figure out what this is. This is the third one of this bugs I have seen in my apartment, the first was on the wall by our linen closet, the second on the couch, and this was on the wall above my bed. I flushed the first and squished the second two and both had a blood like color left behind when I squished it. I live with roommates so any of us could have tracked something like this in. We also live around a few large trees so it is not uncommon for us to see various bugs/spiders. I have also checked my mattress and have not seen anything suspicious.
Signature: nervous renter

Bed Bug
Bed Bug

Dear nervous renter,
This is a Bed Bug.

Letter 7 – Bed Bug in Ireland

Subject: Bug on wall by bed
Location: Dundalk ?
June 1, 2016 5:26 am
Well ive had problems with bedbugs before and i thought i got rid of them but now im not sure cc i seen this bug today by my bed. But it dosent look like any bedbugs ive seen before.
Signature: Dominick

Bed Bug
Bed Bug

Dear Dominick,
The bad news is that this is certainly a Bed Bug.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

14 thoughts on “Where to Sleep if You Have Bed Bugs: Practical Solutions for a Peaceful Night”

  1. I have noticed a few of these in my bed recently too, however I do know where they cam from unfortunately I didn’t check myself well enough before coming in from fence work I was doing, they were lining some of the vines intertwined in the fence now I find myself needing to get rid of the things in my apartment, how can I extinguish this problem without needing to get a new bed all together?

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  2. These are definitely bed bugs. Freaked out by bugs should definitely check the crevices of the daughter’s mattress, along with the sheets, pillows and night stand. There is definitely an infestation and it should be treated immediately.

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  3. Omg im kinda freaking out after seeing this. My old apartment that i moved out of I’m pretty sure had these. We thought it was infested with oriental/german roaches. But as I’m looking at this I’m thinking bedbugs.and everyone that lived there had these bugs. Should i call the health department or something?

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