Where Do Earwigs Come From: Unraveling the Mystery of Their Origins

Earwigs are fascinating insects that have captured the attention of many due to their distinctive appearance and their somewhat undeserved reputation. You might have come across these reddish-brown insects that measure about 5/8 inches long. A pair of strong pinchers at the tip of their abdomen is what sets them apart from other insects. But where do earwigs come from, and why do they sometimes appear unexpectedly in your home?

To answer this question, it’s essential to understand their natural habitat and habits. Earwigs are most active during the night, seeking refuge during the day by hiding in moist and dark spaces. They thrive in clusters, often found under wood, stone, mulch, compost, and debris piles. As opportunistic scavengers, they feed on soil organisms, fungi, algae, and other insects such as fleas and aphids, as well as snails.

Learning more about earwigs’ origins can help you understand their presence in specific environments and assist in controlling them, if necessary. Understanding their natural habitat and behavior is crucial to maintaining an earwig-free home or garden. So the next time you spot an earwig, remember that they come from the outdoors, where they play their role as nighttime scavengers.

Understanding Earwigs

Origins of Earwigs

Earwigs are intriguing insects belonging to the order Dermaptera. The name “earwig” comes from Old English, and despite its menacing reputation, these insects are not dangerous to humans. They have been around for quite some time, with over 2,000 species found worldwide.

Physical Features and Abilities of Earwigs

Earwigs are known for their unique physical features. They have flattened bodies, measuring about 5/8 inches in length, with reddish-brown coloring. They are equipped with medium-length antennae, short wings, and powerful pincers, also known as cerci or forceps, on the tip of their abdomen. The forceps of males are stout and curved, while females have straight-sided forceps.

These insects are surprisingly agile. They have two sets of wings: hindwings and forewings. Although their wings are short, earwigs can occasionally fly, demonstrating their adaptability.

Some characteristics of earwigs include:

  • Curved cerci for males
  • Straight-sided cerci for females
  • Flat and reddish-brown body
  • Short wings
  • Medium-length antennae

Diet and Habitat of Earwigs

Earwigs can be found dwelling in various environments. They typically prefer places with mulch and organic debris on the ground. Their diet consists of both plant and animal matter. In some cases, they can be considered beneficial, as they consume pests, such as aphids, mites, and nematodes, along with algae, fungi, and decaying plants. However, they can also cause damage to some plants.

Here’s a comparison of their pros and cons:

Pros Cons
Feed on pests, such as aphids and mites Can damage plants
Consume algae, fungi, and decaying plants

Ultimately, earwigs are fascinating creatures with distinctive features, complex habitats, and diverse diets. Understanding their origins, characteristics, and behavior can help you appreciate these insects and properly manage them in your environment.

Life Cycle of Earwigs

Earwigs Reproduction

Earwigs mate during the late winter or early spring. The female lays 20 to 50 eggs in small chambers underground, under logs, or under stones. Interestingly, earwigs display maternal care, which is rare among insects. The mother stays with her eggs and guards them until they hatch, cleaning them to prevent fungal infections.

Earwigs Development

Earwigs undergo incomplete metamorphosis, which means they develop through a series of nymphal instars, with four to five stages before reaching adult form. As they grow, their coloration and body parts change slightly, but they mostly resemble adult earwigs throughout their development.

Some notable features of earwig development include:

  • Eggs: Pearly-white or cream-colored, smooth, and oval in shape.
  • Nymphs: Smaller and lighter-colored than adults, wingless, and with softer bodies.
  • Adults: About 5/8 inch long, reddish-brown, flat body, with short wings and medium-length antennae.

Here’s a comparison of nymphs and adult earwigs:

Feature Nymphs Adults
Size Smaller than adults About 5/8 inch long
Color Lighter-colored Reddish-brown
Wings Wingless Short wings
Antennae Shorter and softer Medium-length and more prominent

In conclusion, understanding the life cycle of earwigs, including their reproduction and development, can help you better manage these insects and deal with them effectively.

Earwig Infestation

Signs of Earwig Infestation

Earwigs are typically harmless creatures, but their presence indoors can be annoying and unwanted. Some common signs of an earwig infestation include:

  • Finding earwigs inside your home, particularly in damp areas like basements and bathrooms.
  • Discovering damage to your plants, fruits, and flowers in your garden.
  • Noticing small, irregular holes in leaves or petals, which are indicative of earwig feeding.

Where Are Earwigs Most Frequently Found

Earwigs are more active during the night and often dwell in dark, moist environments. They’re commonly found in:

  • Outdoors: They thrive in gardens1, mulch, and near fruit trees.
  • Indoors: They may enter your home searching for shelter and can be found in basements2, near windows, and under doors.

Preventing and treating earwig infestations

To prevent and get rid of earwigs in both indoor and outdoor spaces, consider the following tactics:

  • Seal cracks and crevices around your home, especially near windows and doors.
  • Keep your garden free of excessive leaf litter and mulch.
  • Maintain proper moisture levels in your home to avoid creating a damp environment.

Myths About Earwigs

There are several myths surrounding earwigs that have contributed to their undeserved fear and infamy. One widespread belief is that earwigs crawl into people’s ears and burrow into their brain. This unsettling idea may have originated from the insect’s name, which is derived from an ancient superstition.

Rest assured, this myth has been debunked. While it’s true that earwigs can sometimes enter human ears, they do not have any interest in attacking your brain or causing you harm. In reality, they are more likely to be found in moist, dark environments like soil or under decaying wood.

Another misconception is that earwigs are dangerous and can cause harm with their pincers. In fact, their pincers, or cerci, are mainly used for defense against predators, as well as for mating purposes. They might give you a slight pinch if you pick one up, but they are generally considered harmless to humans.

Here’s a comparison table to summarize the common myths vs. reality:

Myth vs. Reality Earwigs
Myth: Earwigs crawl into ears to reach their brains.
Reality: Earwigs sometimes enter ears but pose no danger to the brain.
Myth: Earwigs are dangerous and can harm humans with their pincers.
Reality: Earwigs’ pincers are mainly used for defense and mating and they are considered harmless to humans.

To sum up, earwigs are simply misunderstood insects, and their fearsome appearance has led to many mistaken beliefs. Dispelling these myths helps us better understand and appreciate the role they play in nature.

Earwigs as Pests

Impact on Plants and Crops

Earwigs can cause damage to your garden, especially when they feed on the leaves, flowers, and fruits of various plants and vegetables. For example, they may create small holes on the leaf surface of young seedlings or chew around the edges of older leaves, giving them a ragged look 1. You might also find earwigs on the ripening fruits of trees, such as peaches 2.

Some common targets of earwigs include:

  • Seedlings
  • Young leaves
  • Flowers
  • Fruits (e.g., peaches and berries)
  • Vegetables

Preventing and Controlling Earwig Infestation

To prevent and control earwig infestations in your garden, consider the following tips:

  1. Remove hiding spots: Earwigs prefer moist, dark environments, so eliminate leaf piles, piles of vegetation, and damp areas near your plants and shrubs 3.
  2. Install screens and lights: Adding screens to your windows and doors can keep earwigs out of your home. Swapping outdoor lights for yellow bulbs can also help, as they are less attractive to earwigs 4.
  3. Use traps: Create simple traps using shallow containers filled with vegetable oil and a drop of honey, or by placing damp newspaper rolls or cardboard near the affected areas. Be sure to dispose of trapped earwigs daily 5.
  4. Apply boric acid: Sprinkling boric acid around the perimeter of your house can act as a barrier to deter earwigs, but be cautious when using it near edible plants 6.
  5. Vacuum: Regularly vacuum your home to eliminate any earwigs that might have gained access 7.
  6. Consider using pesticides: If earwigs have become a significant nuisance, consult a professional about the possibility of using pesticides in your garden 8.

However, it’s essential to keep in mind that earwigs can also be beneficial insects as they feed on other pests like aphids, mites, and nematodes 9. In some cases, their presence might be helpful in controlling other harmful pests in your garden.

Interesting Facts About Earwigs

Earwigs are fascinating creatures with unique features. For example, they have a pair of strong pinchers called cerci at the tip of their abdomen. These forceps are used for protection and capturing prey. You might be curious to know these facts:

  • Origin: The European earwig, also known as the German earwig, is native to Europe but has spread throughout the United States and North America.
  • No venom: Despite their intimidating appearance, earwigs are not venomous. However, they can give you a little nip if you pick one up, but they are generally harmless.

Earwigs, commonly referred to as pincher bugs, are often misunderstood. Some people believe that they are dangerous and spread diseases, but this is not true. On the contrary, earwigs can actually be beneficial due to their predatory habits, as they feed on a variety of smaller insects.

In terms of appearance, earwigs are usually about 5/8 inch long with a flat, reddish-brown body. They have medium-length antennae, chewing mouthparts, and very short wings. Interestingly, male earwigs have stout, strongly curved cerci, while females have more slender cerci.

To summarize:

  • Earwigs are native to Europe but now widely spread
  • They possess strong cerci for protection and capturing prey
  • They are not venomous or dangerous
  • They can be beneficial as predators
  • They display different cerci shapes between males and females

By learning more about earwigs, you can appreciate their role in the ecosystem and debunk some of the myths surrounding these unique critters.

Footnotes

  1. https://extension.umn.edu/nuisance-insects/earwigs 2

  2. https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/earwigs/ 2

  3. https://extension.umn.edu/nuisance-insects/earwigs

  4. https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/earwigs/

  5. https://extension.unh.edu/resource/earwigs-fact-sheet

  6. https://hortsense.cahnrs.wsu.edu/fact-sheet/common-insects-and-mites-earwigs/

  7. https://homegarden.cahnr.uconn.edu/factsheets/earwigs/

  8. https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/earwigs/

  9. https://hortsense.cahnrs.wsu.edu/fact-sheet/common-insects-and-mites-earwigs/

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Earwig from South Korea

 

Can’t identify
Location: Camp Casey, South Korea
November 12, 2010 6:47 am
I am sure you will know this one immediately since I see you have several of them on your page as part of the art. I found this in my room earlier, it was very small around 1 inch.
Signature: Mini Man

Earwig

Dear Mini Man,
This is an Earwig, and it has several very distinctive features that should make it relatively easy to identify to the species level, however it is not one of the five species pictured on the Earwigs of Korea webpage we located.  The unique features on your specimen include the very lengthy forceps and the narrow neck between the head and thorax.

Letter 2 – Earwig from Puerto Rico

 

Unknown insect from Puerto Rico
December 19, 2009
My mother in law found this in her home in Puerto Rico, I have no idea what it is and I only have pictures. It black with tan spots on the black. Have 6 tan legs and the back look like horns. the head looks like an ant! (for some reason it somewhat similar to the insect drawing on the left of page). Can you help? Sadly my in laws don’t know any better and they already kill it…its a shame…i hate to kill insects!
Joel
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico

Earwig
Earwig

Hi Joel,
Sometimes we just send a quick identification answer to questions, and letters we plan to post take additional time.  Though we already informed you this was an Earwig, we are touched by your letter and want it to appear on our website.  We thought species identification might be easy since the markings are so prominent, but alas, BugGuide does not have any photos that resemble your lovely spotted Earwig.  Earwigs are generally nocturnal insects that sometimes do damage to garden plants and produce.  They are otherwise harmless to humans, though the name originates from the belief that earwigs will crawl into the ears of sleeping people, which probably occurred with more frequency when people slept on straw beds.  The forceps at the end of the abdomen can pinch slightly, but we doubt they can ever break through human skin.

Earwig
Earwig

It would be an honor to be on the page! I love your page and this is the third insect I send for identification! Keep the good work.

Update from Karl
December 23, 2009
Hi Daniel:
I believe this earwig is probably Doru albepes (Forficulidae: Forficulinae) which occurs throughout the Greater and Lesser Antilles. Information is hard to find but I did find one description that indicated a body length of 8-15 mm, with forceps 2.5-10 mm (males) and 2-3 mm (females). So this would be a male. The Earwig Research Centre website has several photos and drawings, including a female, male and male forceps (cerci). The individual in Joel’s photo appears to have a yellow patch on the side of the abdomen which I haven’t seen in any description for this species. I suspect that there are color variations that would account for this, but I suppose it could also be another closely related species. Regards.
Karl

Letter 3 – Earwig from Israel

 

Identifyi a bug
Tue, Dec 30, 2008 at 4:20 AM
We have this bug in our garden and sometimes in our house.
It is about 2 cm long, has 6 legs, 2 tails and 2 front antenas.
It is brown/black in color and has 4 yellow spots/dots on its back.
I have seen it lays many white eggs.
What is its name and is this bug dangerous?
Sorry the pictures are not that focused.
Actually, I think this is the bug you have illustrated on your site.
Thank you
Israel

Earwig
Earwig

Your insect is an Earwig in the order Dermaptera.  Earwigs are harmless to people but they are not completely benign in the garden.  They generally hide during the day in leaf litter and other places, and by night they feed on plants, organic material and small insects.  We often find several inside the blossoms of roses in our own garden and they chew holes in the petals of the flowers.  Though they damage some blossoms, we tolerate them in the garden and do not consider them to be a pest insect.

Letter 4 – Earwig from Australia

 

Subject: Western Australia Bug
Location: western australia
January 12, 2016 7:23 am
Just saw one of these little guys in my living room and wife got panicked…
couldn’t find anything similar on-line… initial thought was that it is a centipede or a small scorpion.
would love to know what it is, as we already stumbled across them in the yard, and if it is poisonous or not.
cheers
Signature: creepy insect terrorize

Earwig
Earwig

This is an Earwig and you have no cause for alarm.  You may read about Australian Earwigs on Bunyipco where it states:  “Earwig biology can be complex. Females of some species look after the eggs and young. Males have pinchers that are larger than those of the females that are probably used in male combat. Although earwigs live in tight places, the chances of one entering a persons ear while sleeping at night, are very slight. But it can happen!  Briefly there are 85 described Australian species in seven families. It is estimated that three times that number probably exist on the continent. Australia is a hotspot for earwigs but generic endemism is low with only about 10% of the genera endemic to the continent.”  According to the Queensland Museum:  “Earwigs are easily identified by the stout pair of pincers at the tip of the abdomen. These are used to capture prey, for defense and also to help fold up the semicircular hindwings under the short, hard wing covers. Some species are predatory, others are herbivorous. They live in concealed places during the day.”

Letter 5 – Earwig from India

 

Subject: a bug I caught 🙂
Location: India,Nagaland
May 19, 2015 12:23 am
While I was curious to know the name of the bug .
Signature: Benjamin achumi

Earwig
Earwig

Dear Benjamin,
This really is a primitive looking Earwig in the order Dermaptera.  We suspect he is a male because of the well developed forceps.  Your individual is quite distinctive and we had hoped to be able to provide a genus and species, but alas, we have not been able to locate any matching individuals online.
  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

Letter 6 – Earwig from Puerto Rico

 

Earwig?
Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico
December 1, 2011 12:15 pm
I first saw this bug in my bathroom floor and posted it on facebook, noone knew what it was. It measured 1cm in lenght with its tail straight back. This time it kept its tail rolled up and forward like a scorpion even when running wild. It was very fast. Its back legs are bigger. 6 feet total. Last time I had played with it a little and felt its back with a metal pick and it felt hard. I would like to know if it is a dangerous bug or not. I also looked it up here and saw a similar one but the tail is different. The one in your site, also from Puerto Rico is from the west coast of the Island. This one is from the Northeast side. Nearby is a river. I let it go outside, even though a couple people said I should kill it.
Signature: Samuel

Earwig from Puerto Rico

Dear Samuel,
You are correct that this is an Earwig, and it does look like the same species we posted previously from Puerto Rico that Karl identified as
Doru albepes.

Letter 7 – Earwig from Saudi Arabia

 

Subject: Eastern Province Saudi Arabia Bug
Location: Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia
November 16, 2014 10:49 pm
Hello, we’d be grateful to know what this is. It was seen last Tuesday, 11th November on a tennis court built on reclaimed land sticking out into the Arabian Gulf at Al Khobar. It was about 2 inches long. It was near where small children play so an idea as to whether it is venomous or not would be helpful. The immediate concern was that it was a scorpion but it has no claws and apparently a double stinger apparatus.
Signature: Catharine

Earwig
Earwig

Dear Catharine,
This is an Earwig in the order Dermaptera and Earwigs are frequently called Pincher Bugs because of the cerci at the tip of the abdomen that resemble forceps.  Your individual is in a threat position, but as Earwigs do not have venom and are not considered dangerous, the threat position is more of a bluff.

Letter 8 – Earwig from Saudi Arabia

 

Subject: What is this insect
Location: Al hijr, saudiarabia
January 7, 2017 8:46 am
I saw this insect near water sources in Saudi Arabia near one of the oldest dig site called al hijr(madian saleh)
Signature: Junaid Zaman

Earwig

Dear Junaid,
This is an Earwig in the order Dermaptera, and though it has distinctive markings, our initial search did not provide a species name.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck at a species identification.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Earwig from South Korea

 

Can’t identify
Location: Camp Casey, South Korea
November 12, 2010 6:47 am
I am sure you will know this one immediately since I see you have several of them on your page as part of the art. I found this in my room earlier, it was very small around 1 inch.
Signature: Mini Man

Earwig

Dear Mini Man,
This is an Earwig, and it has several very distinctive features that should make it relatively easy to identify to the species level, however it is not one of the five species pictured on the Earwigs of Korea webpage we located.  The unique features on your specimen include the very lengthy forceps and the narrow neck between the head and thorax.

Letter 2 – Earwig from Puerto Rico

 

Unknown insect from Puerto Rico
December 19, 2009
My mother in law found this in her home in Puerto Rico, I have no idea what it is and I only have pictures. It black with tan spots on the black. Have 6 tan legs and the back look like horns. the head looks like an ant! (for some reason it somewhat similar to the insect drawing on the left of page). Can you help? Sadly my in laws don’t know any better and they already kill it…its a shame…i hate to kill insects!
Joel
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico

Earwig
Earwig

Hi Joel,
Sometimes we just send a quick identification answer to questions, and letters we plan to post take additional time.  Though we already informed you this was an Earwig, we are touched by your letter and want it to appear on our website.  We thought species identification might be easy since the markings are so prominent, but alas, BugGuide does not have any photos that resemble your lovely spotted Earwig.  Earwigs are generally nocturnal insects that sometimes do damage to garden plants and produce.  They are otherwise harmless to humans, though the name originates from the belief that earwigs will crawl into the ears of sleeping people, which probably occurred with more frequency when people slept on straw beds.  The forceps at the end of the abdomen can pinch slightly, but we doubt they can ever break through human skin.

Earwig
Earwig

It would be an honor to be on the page! I love your page and this is the third insect I send for identification! Keep the good work.

Update from Karl
December 23, 2009
Hi Daniel:
I believe this earwig is probably Doru albepes (Forficulidae: Forficulinae) which occurs throughout the Greater and Lesser Antilles. Information is hard to find but I did find one description that indicated a body length of 8-15 mm, with forceps 2.5-10 mm (males) and 2-3 mm (females). So this would be a male. The Earwig Research Centre website has several photos and drawings, including a female, male and male forceps (cerci). The individual in Joel’s photo appears to have a yellow patch on the side of the abdomen which I haven’t seen in any description for this species. I suspect that there are color variations that would account for this, but I suppose it could also be another closely related species. Regards.
Karl

Letter 3 – Earwig from Israel

 

Identifyi a bug
Tue, Dec 30, 2008 at 4:20 AM
We have this bug in our garden and sometimes in our house.
It is about 2 cm long, has 6 legs, 2 tails and 2 front antenas.
It is brown/black in color and has 4 yellow spots/dots on its back.
I have seen it lays many white eggs.
What is its name and is this bug dangerous?
Sorry the pictures are not that focused.
Actually, I think this is the bug you have illustrated on your site.
Thank you
Israel

Earwig
Earwig

Your insect is an Earwig in the order Dermaptera.  Earwigs are harmless to people but they are not completely benign in the garden.  They generally hide during the day in leaf litter and other places, and by night they feed on plants, organic material and small insects.  We often find several inside the blossoms of roses in our own garden and they chew holes in the petals of the flowers.  Though they damage some blossoms, we tolerate them in the garden and do not consider them to be a pest insect.

Letter 4 – Earwig from Australia

 

Subject: Western Australia Bug
Location: western australia
January 12, 2016 7:23 am
Just saw one of these little guys in my living room and wife got panicked…
couldn’t find anything similar on-line… initial thought was that it is a centipede or a small scorpion.
would love to know what it is, as we already stumbled across them in the yard, and if it is poisonous or not.
cheers
Signature: creepy insect terrorize

Earwig
Earwig

This is an Earwig and you have no cause for alarm.  You may read about Australian Earwigs on Bunyipco where it states:  “Earwig biology can be complex. Females of some species look after the eggs and young. Males have pinchers that are larger than those of the females that are probably used in male combat. Although earwigs live in tight places, the chances of one entering a persons ear while sleeping at night, are very slight. But it can happen!  Briefly there are 85 described Australian species in seven families. It is estimated that three times that number probably exist on the continent. Australia is a hotspot for earwigs but generic endemism is low with only about 10% of the genera endemic to the continent.”  According to the Queensland Museum:  “Earwigs are easily identified by the stout pair of pincers at the tip of the abdomen. These are used to capture prey, for defense and also to help fold up the semicircular hindwings under the short, hard wing covers. Some species are predatory, others are herbivorous. They live in concealed places during the day.”

Letter 5 – Earwig from India

 

Subject: a bug I caught 🙂
Location: India,Nagaland
May 19, 2015 12:23 am
While I was curious to know the name of the bug .
Signature: Benjamin achumi

Earwig
Earwig

Dear Benjamin,
This really is a primitive looking Earwig in the order Dermaptera.  We suspect he is a male because of the well developed forceps.  Your individual is quite distinctive and we had hoped to be able to provide a genus and species, but alas, we have not been able to locate any matching individuals online.
  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

Letter 6 – Earwig from Puerto Rico

 

Earwig?
Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico
December 1, 2011 12:15 pm
I first saw this bug in my bathroom floor and posted it on facebook, noone knew what it was. It measured 1cm in lenght with its tail straight back. This time it kept its tail rolled up and forward like a scorpion even when running wild. It was very fast. Its back legs are bigger. 6 feet total. Last time I had played with it a little and felt its back with a metal pick and it felt hard. I would like to know if it is a dangerous bug or not. I also looked it up here and saw a similar one but the tail is different. The one in your site, also from Puerto Rico is from the west coast of the Island. This one is from the Northeast side. Nearby is a river. I let it go outside, even though a couple people said I should kill it.
Signature: Samuel

Earwig from Puerto Rico

Dear Samuel,
You are correct that this is an Earwig, and it does look like the same species we posted previously from Puerto Rico that Karl identified as
Doru albepes.

Letter 7 – Earwig from Saudi Arabia

 

Subject: Eastern Province Saudi Arabia Bug
Location: Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia
November 16, 2014 10:49 pm
Hello, we’d be grateful to know what this is. It was seen last Tuesday, 11th November on a tennis court built on reclaimed land sticking out into the Arabian Gulf at Al Khobar. It was about 2 inches long. It was near where small children play so an idea as to whether it is venomous or not would be helpful. The immediate concern was that it was a scorpion but it has no claws and apparently a double stinger apparatus.
Signature: Catharine

Earwig
Earwig

Dear Catharine,
This is an Earwig in the order Dermaptera and Earwigs are frequently called Pincher Bugs because of the cerci at the tip of the abdomen that resemble forceps.  Your individual is in a threat position, but as Earwigs do not have venom and are not considered dangerous, the threat position is more of a bluff.

Letter 8 – Earwig from Saudi Arabia

 

Subject: What is this insect
Location: Al hijr, saudiarabia
January 7, 2017 8:46 am
I saw this insect near water sources in Saudi Arabia near one of the oldest dig site called al hijr(madian saleh)
Signature: Junaid Zaman

Earwig

Dear Junaid,
This is an Earwig in the order Dermaptera, and though it has distinctive markings, our initial search did not provide a species name.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck at a species identification.

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

4 thoughts on “Where Do Earwigs Come From: Unraveling the Mystery of Their Origins”

  1. I want to kill the earwig population in my home.

    what do you suggest?

    diamataceous [spelling] earth in every nook and cranny??

    I’ve never seen such a persistent rascal…
    one has been in an airtight plastic bag covered in scented baking soda
    for days and it’s STILL running around like mad

    I understand that you state they are beneficial, however my
    adult son has always had bug nightmares about bugs entering
    ears and skin……….. it would be difficult to even tell him I have
    something NAMED earwigs.

    Reply
  2. I want to kill the earwig population in my home.

    what do you suggest?

    diamataceous [spelling] earth in every nook and cranny??

    I’ve never seen such a persistent rascal…
    one has been in an airtight plastic bag covered in scented baking soda
    for days and it’s STILL running around like mad

    I understand that you state they are beneficial, however my
    adult son has always had bug nightmares about bugs entering
    ears and skin……….. it would be difficult to even tell him I have
    something NAMED earwigs.

    Reply
  3. I bit into a peanut butter cookie and It was in there and stung me inside my mouth on my lip . Not sure if this bacterial.

    Reply

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