What Eats Mites: Tiny Predators Explained

folder_openAcari, Arachnida
comment14 Comments

Mites are tiny arachnids found in various environments, and they can cause problems for humans, animals, and plants. Some mite species are considered pests, causing irritation to humans and animals or wreaking havoc on agricultural crops. You might wonder what creatures help control mite populations.

There are various predators that feed on mites in nature, contributing to the balance of ecosystems. These predators can range from larger arthropods, such as insects and spiders, to small animals like birds and rodents.

By understanding the natural predators of mites, you can appreciate the delicate balance of ecosystems and how different species interact to maintain harmony. This knowledge may also help in finding natural solutions for mite infestations, protecting our health and environment.

What Are Mites?

Mite Characteristics

Mites are tiny arachnids that are often oval-shaped and translucent. They usually have eight legs, but some species may possess six legs in their larval stage. These creatures are so small that they are often difficult to see without magnification. Here are some common characteristics of mites:

  • Arachnids, related to spiders and ticks
  • Most have eight legs, with some having six in the larval stage
  • Oval-shaped and translucent
  • Extremely small, often needing magnification to see

Common Mite Species

There are a wide variety of mite species. Some of the most common species include:

  • Sarcoptes scabiei: These mites are responsible for scabies, a contagious skin condition that can be transferred between humans and animals. They burrow into the skin, causing intense itching and rash source.
  • Dermatophagoides: These are the common house dust mites, well known for causing allergies in sensitive individuals source.
  • Tyrophagus putrescentiae: Better known as the flour or grain mite, it is pale, pearly, or grayish-white, with legs varying in color from pale yellow to reddish-brown. They can infest stored grains and dry food products, resulting in spoilage and potential health problems source.

There are many more species of mites, each with their unique features and habitats.

Here’s a comparison table of the mentioned common mite species:

Mite Species Common Name Affects Characteristics
Sarcoptes scabiei Scabies Mite Humans, animals Causes scabies, burrows into skin
Dermatophagoides House Dust Mite Humans Triggers allergies
Tyrophagus putrescentiae Flour Mite Food materials Infests stored grains and dry foods

Types of Common Household Mites

Dust Mites

Dust mites are tiny creatures that thrive in warm, humid environments. They feed on dead skin cells and are commonly found in bedding, carpets, and upholstered furniture. To keep them at bay, maintain a clean and dry environment in your home. Wash your bedding regularly and consider using allergen-proof covers on mattresses and pillows.

Here are some characteristics of dust mites:

  • They are invisible to the naked eye
  • They can cause allergic reactions in some individuals

Spider Mites

Spider mites are another type of mite that can cause problems, especially for houseplants. They feed on plant sap and can cause significant damage if left unchecked. You may notice small yellow spots on the leaves of your indoor plants, which is a sign of spider mite infestation.

Here’s how to deal with spider mites:

  • Check your plants regularly for signs of infestation
  • Isolate affected plants to prevent the spread of mites
  • Use insecticidal soap or neem oil to treat infestations

Itch Mites

Itch mites are a type of mite that can cause skin irritation and itching in humans. They are commonly associated with scabies, a skin condition caused by the Sarcoptes scabiei mite. Itch mites burrow into the skin, causing an allergic reaction and intense itching.

To reduce the risk of itch mite infestation:

  • Practice good personal hygiene
  • Wash clothes, bedding, and towels regularly
  • Avoid sharing personal items like clothing and bedding with others

In summary, dust mites, spider mites, and itch mites are common household mites that can cause various issues, from allergies to damage to houseplants. By maintaining cleanliness and monitoring your indoor environment, you can help prevent and manage these mite problems.

Mite Infestations

Identifying Mite Infestations

Mite infestations can harm your plants, causing yellow spots and damaging leaves. To identify mites, look closely at the plant leaves. If you notice small yellow spots appearing on the leaves, this is a sign of a mite infestation. Some mites, like spider mites, create webbing on the plants, which is another clear indicator of their presence.

To further inspect your plants, use a magnifying glass to spot the tiny mites. They may be crawling on the leaves or even on the webs they create.

Impact of Mite Infestations

Mite infestations can have serious consequences on your plants. The damage caused by these pests can lead to reduced growth, weakened plants, and in worst cases, loss of the entire plant. Here are some common impacts of mite infestations:

  • Yellow spots: Mites feed on plant leaves, causing yellow spots to appear on the surface. These spots disrupt the plant’s ability to photosynthesize, affecting overall health.

  • Weakened plant growth: With limited photosynthesis, plants can’t grow properly. As a result, their growth slows, and they become vulnerable to additional issues like diseases.

  • Loss of the entire plant: Severe mite infestations can result in complete defoliation or even plant death if not properly addressed.

To protect your plants and prevent further damage, it’s essential to address mite infestations as soon as you identify them. Keep an eye out for yellow spots, leaf damage, and webbing, and take necessary steps to eliminate the mites from your garden or indoor plants.

What Eats Mites?

Mite Predators

There are various natural predators that help control mite populations. Some examples include:

  • Predatory mites: These mites feed on other harmful mite species. One notable example is the Phytoseiidae family of mites that prey on the harmful eriophyid mites.
  • Ladybugs: These beneficial insects also feed on mites, especially spider mites.
  • Stethorus: A type of small black ladybug, Stethorus is another mite predator.
  • Parasitic wasps: Some parasitic wasp species target mite populations.

Leveraging these beneficial insects can be helpful for pest management in various environments.

Parasitic Relationships

Some mite species engage in parasitic relationships, which negatively impact their host. For example, Dicrocheles phalaenodectes, also known as the moth ear mite, invades the ear of a moth and forms colonies inside it.

Here’s a brief comparison of the mite predators mentioned above:

Predator Target Mite(s) Advantages Disadvantages
Predatory mite Eriophyid mites Help to control harmful mite populations; widely available Species-specific
Ladybugs Spider mites Common; natural solution for pest management May migrate
Stethorus Various mite species Highly efficient; can detect spider mites from a distance May fly away
Parasitic wasp Various mite species May indirectly reduce pests like aphids by controlling mite prey Host species-dependent

By understanding the natural mite predators and their parasitic relationships, you can better manage mite populations and protect your plants or animals from harmful mite infestations.

Signs and Symptoms of Mite Bites

In Humans

Mite bites can cause different reactions in humans, ranging from mild irritation to severe allergies. The most common symptoms include:

  • A puffy, reddish bump appearing a few minutes after the bite
  • A hard, itchy, reddish-brown bump appearing a day or so after the bite1
  • Discomfort, prickling, or an itching sensation at the site of the bite2

If you notice these symptoms after coming into contact with mites, it’s important to treat the affected area to prevent further irritation.

In Pets

Mite bites can also affect pets, especially dogs and cats. The symptoms in pets can vary, but some of the most common signs include:

  • Excessive scratching and grooming
  • Red, inflamed skin or rash
  • Hair loss in the affected area

When dealing with mite bites in pets, it’s crucial to consult with a veterinarian for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Preventing and Managing Mite Infestations

Pesticides and Mite Control

When facing mite infestations, you might consider using pesticides. One common choice is miticides, which target mites specifically.

Here’s a comparison table of two popular pesticides for mite control:

Pesticide Pros Cons
Insecticidal Soap -Environmentally friendly
-Low toxicity to beneficial insects
-Less effective on heavy infestations
-May need frequent reapplication
Horticultural Oil -Can suffocate mites
-Minimal impact on beneficial insects
-Potential to harm some plants
-Weather-dependent effectiveness

Remember that when using pesticides, it’s essential to follow product directions and avoid using more than necessary.

Natural Mite Control Methods

For a friendly approach to mite control, consider using biological control methods. Introducing predators such as ladybugs or lacewings into your garden can help keep mite populations in check.

Here are some features of biological control in bullet points:

  • Low environmental impact
  • Targeted to specific pests
  • Self-sustaining populations of predators

Keep in mind that these natural methods might not be as quick or effective as pesticides, especially for severe infestations. Ultimately, the choice between pesticides and natural mite control methods depends on your specific needs and preferences.

Mite Lifecycle

Mite development, like many tiny arthropods, goes through several stages. They begin as eggs, hatch into larvae, molt into nymphs, and finally become adults. We’ll briefly explain each stage below.

Eggs: The life cycle starts when female mites lay their eggs. Mite eggs are typically found in clusters and in optimal conditions, they can hatch in just a few days.

Larvae: When eggs hatch, they reveal the larvae, the first active stage of a mite’s life. These tiny creatures have six legs and feed on surrounding sources like plants, animals, or decomposing organic matter. Within a week or less, they prepare to molt into the next stage.

Nymphs: Nymphs usually have eight legs, similar to adult mites. They may go through multiple molts before maturing into adults, and their feeding behavior is quite similar to the larvae.

Adults: Fully developed mites still feed on their preferred food sources, depending on the species. They are also responsible for reproduction, ensuring the continuation of the mite lifecycle.

Now, let’s quickly compare these stages in a table for easier understanding:

Stages Legs Feeding Duration Purpose
Eggs A few days Begin life cycle
Larvae 6 Feed on various sources Up to a week Grow and molt
Nymphs 8 Feed on various sources Multiple molting Transition to adult
Adult 8 Feed and reproduce Until end of life Sustain species

In conclusion, understanding the lifecycle of mites makes it easier for you to deal with and potentially prevent or control their presence. Always remember the stages – eggs, larvae, nymphs, and adults – as they play an important role in the mite’s development and survival.

Mites and Agriculture

Impact on Crops

Mites can be a significant agricultural pest, affecting a wide range of fruits and vegetables. For example, broad mites can cause severe damage to strawberries. When these tiny creatures infest your crop, they feed on the plant’s leaves and fruits. This can result in distorted growth, reduced yield, and even plant death. By keeping an eye on your plants and taking action at the first sign of damage, you can minimize the impact these pests have on your crops.

Agricultural Pest Control

To manage the mite population and reduce the damage to your crops, various pest control methods can be employed. Here are some strategies to consider:

  • Biological control: Introduce predatory mites that feed on plant-feeding mites. These natural predators help keep the mite population in check without causing harm to your plants.
  • Chemical control: If biological control methods are not enough or not applicable, you may need to use miticides specifically designed to target mites. However, always be cautious when using chemicals and avoid excessive use, as it can lead to resistant mite populations and harm non-target organisms.
  • Cultural control: Implement good agricultural practices such as crop rotation, removing infested plant debris, and selecting mite-resistant plant varieties. These actions can help prevent and minimize mite infestations.
Method Pros Cons
Biological Non-toxic, sustainable, targets specific pests May not be effective in severe infestations
Chemical Fast-acting, broad-spectrum control Can harm beneficial organisms, resistance
Cultural Long-term prevention, overall plant health boost May not provide immediate relief

Remember, it’s essential to closely monitor your crops for signs of mites and take appropriate action to keep these pests under control. Maintaining a healthy crop through good agricultural practices will not only reduce the impact of mites but also promote overall plant health and productivity.

Mites and Personal Health

Mites are small arthropods that can have a significant impact on your personal health. They can cause various health issues like disease, itching, and allergies. Some mites even invade and parasitize the human body, resulting in a condition called acariasis.

One common type of mite that affects humans is the Sarcoptes scabiei, which causes the condition known as scabies. This mite infests your skin and results in intense itching and rashes. The scabies mites usually transfer from person-to-person contact, but it’s possible for them to transfer from animals too.

Having a mite infestation in your stored food products is not only harmful to your health, but it also causes economic losses. These mites may lead to deterioration in the quality and nutritional composition of the infested food.

If you are suffering from itching or allergies due to mite exposure, you can try using hydrocortisone cream to relieve the discomfort. However, it’s essential to consult your healthcare provider before using any medication or for a proper diagnosis.

Remember that prevention is the best way to protect your health from mite-related issues. Keep your living spaces clean, and be mindful of your surroundings, especially when handling food products. This friendly approach will help in maintaining your overall well-being.

Footnotes

  1. Mosquito Bite Symptoms and Treatment | Mosquitoes | CDC

  2. What are the signs and symptoms of rabies? | Symptoms | CDC

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Predatory Running Mite

 

please identify these bugs
Hello,
My property has become infested with millions of little vibrant red bugs. The look like tiny spiders or mites. if you squash them, they leave bright red marks like blood stains. They are everywhere on our driveway, the exterior walls and windows of the property. Absolutely everything outside is covered with them. They appeared last summer and were gone before winter. They have returned about 2 months ago and are much worse than last year. I have washed the driveways down with pesticides and soap which kills them off, but by the next morning, they are all back again. Please help me to get rid of them. My house is located next to allotments and there is about 1/2 acre of lawn in my backyard. a few trees and small shrubs. I think they might be red spider mites.
Thank you in advance,
Lee

Hi Lee,
Your Mites are the good guys, Predatory Running Mites. If they are plentiful, there must be a food source, possibly damaging insects or other arthropods, upon which they are feeding. Sorry we do not offer extermination advice.

Update From Barry M. OConnor (05/23/2006)
Predatory running mites. All of the mites in the photos you call by this name are species in the family Erythraeidae, genus Balaustium. I think you have these confused with species in the family Anystidae, genus Anystis. Both of these mites are relatively large (for mites!), red in color, and commonly occur in aggregations. Anystis are the very fast moving, predatory mites. Their body is almost circular in outline. They run in what appears to be a random fashion until they encounter small arthropod prey. These are harmless to people. Balaustium, on the other hand, are more elongate as seen in your photos, with a distinct gap between the 2nd and 3rd legs. Species of Erythraeidae have piercing mouthparts and are also predatory on small arthropods or eggs in their post-larval stages, but Balaustium are unusual in being pollen feeders. They can be found in large numbers in flowers, but are most often seen by people on flat surfaces where pollen falls. These mites have been reported to bite people, causing some irritation, although why they do this is uncertain since they’re not parasitic.

Letter 2 – Predatory Running Mite

 

red mite
Hi,
I live in NJ and have these teeny tiny pin size red bugs covering my concrete porch and steps. They’ve also started climbing up my house around the door frame but haven’t managed to get themselves inside yet. They appeared around this time last year and eventually went away, however this year there are many many more of them. They leave red stains when squished. They look similar to predatory running mites I’ve seen on your site, although I can’t tell if they are exactly the same. What are they, what can I do, how long will they last? Are they dangerous to children? I have a 2 year old that is obsessed with them and as much as I try to keep her away from them, I’m fearful she’ll get a hold of them sooner or later. Please help!
Kelly

Hi Kelly,
Generally, but not always, small predators need small prey. In the spring, newly hatched insects are small. Predatory Running Mites are more plentiful when their food supply abounds. As insects grow too large to be prey, the predator population will decline. These Predatory Running Mites will not harm your child.

Update From Barry M. OConnor (05/23/2006)
Predatory running mites. All of the mites in the photos you call by this name are species in the family Erythraeidae, genus Balaustium. I think you have these confused with species in the family Anystidae, genus Anystis. Both of these mites are relatively large (for mites!), red in color, and commonly occur in aggregations. Anystis are the very fast moving, predatory mites. Their body is almost circular in outline. They run in what appears to be a random fashion until they encounter small arthropod prey. These are harmless to people. Balaustium, on the other hand, are more elongate as seen in your photos, with a distinct gap between the 2nd and 3rd legs. Species of Erythraeidae have piercing mouthparts and are also predatory on small arthropods or eggs in their post-larval stages, but Balaustium are unusual in being pollen feeders. They can be found in large numbers in flowers, but are most often seen by people on flat surfaces where pollen falls. These mites have been reported to bite people, causing some irritation, although why they do this is uncertain since they’re not parasitic.

Letter 3 – Possibly Tropical Fowl Mites from Australia

 

Bird Mites?
December 22, 2009
After awaking two mornings in a row after a restless night feeling like something was crawling all over me, I took a close look at the bed sheets and found these little critters crawling everywhere.
After washing and bleaching the sheets and vacuuming and steam cleaning the carpet, they returned the next morning!
Comparing my photo to photos of ticks found on the internet, I was convinced that they were ticks. After speaking to a few local pest control companies, they were sceptical at first until they saw the photo and also believed they were ticks.
One company suggested that the behaviour wasn’t consistent with ticks. They did not attach when biting, and they only appears upstairs, even though our dogs only every stay downstairs. He suggested that they could be bird mites.
Then I came across your site, and saw Bernard from South Aftrica’s post titled “MITES CRAWLING ON SKIN IN SOUTH AFRICA”, with a picture almost identical to what I’ve seen.
Mark S.
Melbourne, Australia

Tropical Fowl Mite???
Tropical Fowl Mite???

Hi Mark,
One of your photos does look identical to the Mite in Bernard’s images from South Africa, but the third image (though we are posting it second) looks like it might be another species.  Possibly that individual is engorged with blood.  As we indicated to Bernard, we do not have the necessary qualifications to properly identify Mites to the species level, though Bird Mites would be a strong possibility.  In November 2008, we posted an image that might be a Tropical Fowl Mite, Ornithonyssus bursa, and we provided a link to an Australian Website on that Mite.  Perhaps an acarologist will chime in at some point, and we would recommend that you post a comment to your own letter so that you will be informed of any further comments from our readership.

Tropical Fowl Mite??? Blood Engorged???
Tropical Fowl Mite??? Blood Engorged???

Letter 4 – Probably Aphid, notMite, as we believed

 

Bugs that like the corners of walls and ceilings
Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
February 9, 2012 12:46 am
Howdy!
This thing is tiny — between 1/16th to 1/8th of an inch. located inside our house in South Carolina in Februrary. They tend to like the corners of the walls. Thank you for your help.
Signature: db

Mite, probably

Dear db,
We believe this is probably some species of Mite and we hope an acarologist might be able to provide more specific information.

Correction:  April 21, 2012
We just received a comment indicating this is more likely an Aphid

Letter 5 – Mites on Reptiles and Remedy

 

small mite type bug in reptile cage?
What is it? Are they harmful? There were a bunch in the snake water bowl where the snake was laying. They are quite small, less than 1/2 mm.
Thanks!!
Kevin

Hi Kevin,
It is our suspicion that these Mites are up to no good in the reptile cage. You should try to get rid of them.

Mite Remedy (12/31/2005)
Hello WTB, I ran across your wounderful website today while trying to save the life of a missunderstood house centiped that had been called a silverfish by a staff member today. The critter ran past us and avoided a near squishing foot by ducking under our surgery table. I had seen this guy or his relatives in our basement from time to time and though they can move very quickly and startle me they have never seemed to have any intentions of harming anyone. I managed to capture our visiter in a urine cup…it’s all I had and it was sterile =x and decided I would try to identify him so that he would not be sentenced to death simply for being scary. Well your website saved his life and proved he was not a silverfish, but a house centipede that would take care of any spiders or other insects he could find. I released him in our basement and the other staff memebers agreed he was scary but better than having spiders around. His new name is Fluffy. After work I revisited your site, I’ve been a long time fan of bugs and can still be seen with my head in a bush if I see something interesting. As I browsed around I saw a post from someone named Kevin on 11-30-05 on your mite page. His snake’s cage has been invaded by some mites. While I do like bugs and insects, I realy hate ectoparasites. My columbian red tail boa, Link, had a similar problem this spring. While our office does not see reptiles we researched the topic and came up with a plan to free my snake of his friends. I changed his cage completely, discarded all items that could harbor mites, branches, sticks and the like. Link himself was treated with Frontline Spray (fipronil), this is an off lable use, and Merial the company that makes the product has not tested it for use on reptiles. Kevin should check with a local reptile vet before treating his snake. We sprayed a paper towel with frontline and gently wiped Link down then returned him to his cage. In cats and dogs you have to wait 24 hours before giving them a bath after applying frontline. I did not want to deprive my snake that long so I returned his swimming pool after about 6 hours. The mites have not been seen or heard from again. I hope this helps Kevin’s poor snake.
Jessica Leonard, CVT

Thank you Jessica for your awesome solution as well as the anecdote of the House Centipede in the operating room.

Update from Barry M. OConnor (05/23/2006)
Mites on reptiles and remedy (11/10/05). This is the "snake mite", Ophionyssus natricis (family Macronyssidae). This is a very serious, blood feeding pest of many snakes, especially captive individuals. They can be a mortality factor if the owner lets numbers build up in the enclosure. These mites feed only on blood, but remain off the host unless feeding. They can quickly build up a significant population. Keeping the snake enclosure clean is the best preventative.

Letter 6 – Mites that bite

 

what are these buggers?
Dear Dr Bugman,
We have suddenly and violently been infested by these tiny mites. My boyfriend is bitten (and itchy) all over but I have not been touched. We think they have come in through the window and are speculating that they could be from the nest of pigeons below our window. I have included a few photos. You can see them against the frame of my powerbook…that frame is about 1/3" wide. The smallest ones are white, the slightly larger ones are a dark brown. They appear to have 2 antennae. We just fumigated with a product from the store. What are they? Will this work?
thank you so much,
Laila Ames

Hi Laila,
The symptoms you describe are consistant with Bird Mites, but we can’t give you anything more conclusive based on your photo. From what we hear, biting mites can be very difficult to erradicate and may take professional help. Good luck.

Letter 7 – Predatory Running Mites

 

Red bugs on the porch
Hello,
Great site! I live in Richmond, VA and the weather has been fairly warm for the last month. I’ve ventured out onto porch for the first time this year only to find several hundred little red bugs crawling over the painted wooden railing of my historic Fan district apartment. I am concerned that these bugs might be harmful in some way. It appears they are or are related to mites, but I was hoping you could confirm that with the attached macro shots. Sharpening in Photoshop has whitening the edges of their bodies slightly. Thanks,
Doug

Hi Doug,
They are Mites, but not all Mites are troublesome. These look like Predatory Running Mites that eat other small arthropods including young spiders and insects. They would be considered beneficial. We have been getting numerous letters lately without images from people complaining about the little red spiderlike creatures running around on their window sills. When squashed they leave a red mark. Thank you for supplying us with an image.

Update From Barry M. OConnor (05/23/2006)
Predatory running mites. All of the mites in the photos you call by this name are species in the family Erythraeidae, genus Balaustium. I think you have these confused with species in the family Anystidae, genus Anystis. Both of these mites are relatively large (for mites!), red in color, and commonly occur in aggregations. Anystis are the very fast moving, predatory mites. Their body is almost circular in outline. They run in what appears to be a random fashion until they encounter small arthropod prey. These are harmless to people. Balaustium, on the other hand, are more elongate as seen in your photos, with a distinct gap between the 2nd and 3rd legs. Species of Erythraeidae have piercing mouthparts and are also predatory on small arthropods or eggs in their post-larval stages, but Balaustium are unusual in being pollen feeders. They can be found in large numbers in flowers, but are most often seen by people on flat surfaces where pollen falls. These mites have been reported to bite people, causing some irritation, although why they do this is uncertain since they’re not parasitic.

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts
Tags: Mites

Related Posts

14 Comments. Leave new

  • One of my favorite sf novels is “Dust” by Charles R. Pelligrino. It’s an itchy story revolving around insects, particularly mites!

    Reply
  • This is probably not a mite but an aphid whose antennae look like legs. The small appendages at the back end look like aphid cornicles.

    Reply
  • I was bitten by what I think is the bug in your photo because I play tennis and those bugs are everywhere on that day I pick up a tennis ball with one side filled with these little red bugs that looked like the bugs. My friend calls them blood bugs because they pop and leave blood stains everywhere but I was wondering what do they do other than an small dot on your leg

    Reply
  • why do they bite people.

    Reply
  • hello,
    im 11 years old and I love to climb the wall but I cant climb the wall in the summer because there are these tiny red bugs that are really gross I climbed the wall today and I squished one by mistake and it looked like I was bleeding I know that they come every summer please help me get rid of them and I want to climb the wall. 🙁 🙁 🙁 🙁 from neveah stowe

    Reply
  • hello,
    im 11 years old and I love to climb the wall but I cant climb the wall in the summer because there are these tiny red bugs that are really gross I climbed the wall today and I squished one by mistake and it looked like I was bleeding I know that they come every summer please help me get rid of them and I want to climb the wall. 🙁 🙁 🙁 🙁 from neveah stowe

    Reply
  • I just searched for “Tiny red bugs with 6 legs in Alberta” and got your site. My bugs look exactly like Predatory Running Mites except they don’t run and are only on flowers and stems, not sidewalks, etc. They are almost teardrop shaped with very fine legs. They don’t look much like Erythraeidae, genus Balaustium at all. So are mine just lazy running mites?
    Thanks!

    Reply
  • I just searched for “Tiny red bugs with 6 legs in Alberta” and got your site. My bugs look exactly like Predatory Running Mites except they don’t run and are only on flowers and stems, not sidewalks, etc. They are almost teardrop shaped with very fine legs. They don’t look much like Erythraeidae, genus Balaustium at all. So are mine just lazy running mites?
    Thanks!

    Reply
  • Hah there was one walking on my notebook, and I realised that he couldn’t or wouldn’t walk over the lines I had drawn (with a pen), so I drew a circle around it and it stayed in it! Though after awhile I put it outside, it’s mean to bully they who are smaller than you.

    Reply
  • It’s a…….. TRAMBOMBBADAY!

    Reply
  • My granddaughter has gotten into him and it’s cover all over her arms back and legs what can I do to get rid of them

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fill out this field
Fill out this field
Please enter a valid email address.
You need to agree with the terms to proceed

keyboard_arrow_up