Varied Carpet Beetle: Characteristics and Identification Made Simple

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Varied carpet beetles are small but intriguing insects with a wide range of characteristics. These beetles are often found in homes, warehouses, and museums, where they can be a pest to stored organic products source. Originally from Europe, Asia, and North Africa, they have made their way to North America around 1850, giving them a virtually worldwide distribution source.

Identifying varied carpet beetles can be a bit tricky, as they are small insects that can easily go unnoticed. Adult beetles measure about 3-5 millimeters in length and have dark-colored or patterned wing covers source. The larvae are similarly sized with a tapered body, featuring alternating light and dark stripes and are covered with tiny hairs that can be puffed up source.

Understanding the characteristics and identification methods for varied carpet beetles can aid in effectively managing them in your home. In the next sections, we will explore their life cycle, feeding habits, and control measures, helping you better protect your belongings and maintain a beetle-free environment.

Varied Carpet Beetle Overview

Identification and Size

The varied carpet beetle (Anthrenus verbasci) is a tiny insect that can wreak havoc on your home textiles. Adults are small, measuring between 3-5 millimeters or about an eighth of an inch in length 1. The larvae are similarly sized and have a tapered body, which makes them easily distinguishable from adult beetles 2.

Color and Shape

Adult varied carpet beetles have dark-colored or patterned wing covers, depending on the species 1. The larvae feature alternating light and dark stripes and are covered in tiny hairs that can puff up if disturbed 1. The shape of adult beetles is rounded, while the larvae have a narrower head end and a wider tail end 3.

Habitat and Distribution

Varied carpet beetles can be found in homes, museums, and warehouses. Their preferred habitats include areas with natural fibers and dry organic materials 4. These little pests are commonly found in carpets, upholstered furniture, and stored textiles. Their distribution is widespread, and they can be found in various regions around the world 5.

In conclusion, the varied carpet beetle is a small but destructive pest that can infest textiles and organic materials in your home. Being aware of their appearance and typical habitats can help you identify and address an infestation before it becomes a major problem.

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Life Cycle of Varied Carpet Beetles

Eggs to Pupa

The life cycle of varied carpet beetles begins with the female laying tiny, pale yellow eggs. Over time, these eggs hatch into larvae, which are often tear-drop shaped and covered in light brown hairs. These larvae are known to feed on various organic materials, such as lint, pet hair, and dead insects1. You can generally find them behind furniture or along baseboards in homes, scavenging for food and growing as they consume their surroundings.

As the larvae continue to grow and develop, they undergo multiple molts. Eventually, they enter the pupal stage, during which their exoskeleton hardens and they begin to transition into adults. Depending on the environment and temperature, the duration of this stage can vary, making the overall life cycle last anywhere from several months to a couple of years2.

Pupa to Adults

Once the varied carpet beetle larvae complete the pupal stage, they emerge as fully formed adults. Measuring about 1/10 inch long, these black beetles can have an irregular pattern of white, brown, and dark yellow scales on their wing covers3. However, it’s worth noting that older adults may lose these scales over time, resulting in solid black or brown coloring instead.

These adult beetles go through a circannual cycle, often experiencing three to four generations per year4. The variations in temperature and living conditions can have a significant impact on the length of the life cycle of these insects. As you encounter varied carpet beetles in your home, it’s important to be aware of their life cycle stages in order to effectively manage and prevent infestations.

Feeding Habits and Diet

Indoor Diet

Varied carpet beetles are known for their ability to feed on a wide range of materials found indoors. They primarily consume materials of animal origin, such as:

  • Dead insects: They are attracted to insect carcasses, particularly those of other beetles.
  • Hair and fur: They can feed on pet hair, lint, and other types of hair found around your home.
  • Fabrics: Beetles are known to infest carpets, upholstery, and clothing, especially if they are made of natural fibers like wool or silk.
  • Scales and feathers: These insects are also attracted to materials from birds, such as feathers and shed scales.

If you notice damage to woolens, carpets, and furniture, it could be the work of varied carpet beetles or clothes moths. Regular cleaning and maintaining your home can help reduce the chances of an infestation.

Outdoor Diet

Varied carpet beetles are not limited to indoor environments. They also have some preferences for food sources outdoors. Some common dietary preferences include:

  • Pollen and nectar: Adult beetles often feed on pollen from flowers and drink nectar to obtain nutrients.
  • Bird nests: They can infest bird nests due to the presence of feathers, fur, and other materials that they can feed on.
  • Insect nests or carcasses: Outdoor spaces can harbor various insects and their remains, which can serve as a food source for these beetles.

To minimize the risk of attracting carpet beetles to your property, ensure that your outdoor space is well-maintained and free of any potential food sources. Regularly clean bird nests, dead insects, and other debris to prevent them from infesting your home.

In conclusion, varied carpet beetles have a diverse diet both indoors and outdoors. By understanding their feeding habits and taking preventative measures, you can reduce the likelihood of dealing with these pests in your home.

Infestation and Damage

Signs of Infestation

When looking for signs of a Varied Carpet Beetle infestation, you should search for these indicators:

  • Adult beetles flying near windows or caught in spider webs
  • Holes, frayed edges, or bare patches on carpets, wool, or other natural fabrics
  • Shed skins and fecal pellets around infested areas

It’s important to regularly inspect your carpets, furniture, and other belongings for signs of damage caused by these beetles.

Types of Damage

Carpet beetles can cause damage to a variety of materials in your home. Here are some examples:

  • Carpets and rugs: Beetles chew holes, creating unsightly bare spots in natural fiber carpets.
  • Wool clothing and blankets: Holes and worn edges can be found on wool items.
  • Furniture and upholstery: Damage can occur to both natural fabrics like silk or leather and synthetic fabrics.
  • Felt, lint, and other debris: Beetles feed on organic debris hidden behind or under furniture and along baseboards.

To protect your belongings, it’s essential to eliminate accumulations of lint, hair, dead insects, and other debris that serve as food for carpet beetles.

Keep in mind that although synthetic fabrics are not the primary food source for carpet beetles, they can still be damaged as beetles search for more preferred materials.

By staying vigilant and addressing any signs of infestation, you’ll be able to minimize the damage caused by varied carpet beetles in your home.

Prevention and Control

Cleaning and Vacuuming

One of the easiest ways to prevent and control Varied Carpet Beetles is through regular cleaning and vacuuming. It’s crucial to keep areas like attics, baseboards, and cracks free from dust and debris.

For optimal results, consider these practices:

  • Vacuum furniture, carpets, and hard-to-reach areas.
  • Make sure to clean food crumbs and pet hair.
  • Regularly dry clean or wash your clothes and fabrics to remove potential larvae.

Being vigilant about your home’s cleanliness can make a significant difference in preventing a carpet beetle infestation.

Effective Insecticides

In some cases, insecticides might be needed to control a more severe carpet beetle problem. Here are some tips on using insecticides:

  • Apply them in crevices, cracks, and areas where carpet beetles are known to reside.
  • Only use insecticides that are labeled safe for indoor use.
  • Always follow the label instructions and safety guidelines.

However, you should note that insecticides specifically targeting Varied Carpet Beetles are typically less effective on the larvae compared to adult beetles. Also, remember that chemicals should not be your first option; always try regular cleaning and vacuuming first.

By consistently practicing good sanitation and employing appropriate measures like vacuuming and using insecticides when needed, you can effectively prevent and control Varied Carpet Beetle infestations in your home.

Comparison with Similar Species

When trying to identify the Varied Carpet Beetle, it’s helpful to be aware of some similar species. Here, we’ll compare it with the Black Carpet Beetle, Brown Carpet Beetle, Fur Beetle, and Bed Bugs. We’ll focus on differences in their head, legs, and abdomen characteristics.

First, let’s talk about the Black Carpet Beetle. You’ll notice that they are larger than Varied Carpet Beetles. Key differences include:

  • Shiny black, slightly elongated body.
  • Long, thin legs.

The Brown Carpet Beetle is another species to be aware of:

  • Dark brown, round body.
  • Short, sturdy legs.

Now, let’s consider the Fur Beetle:

  • Round, black body with a white spot on each wing casing.
  • Shorter legs compared to Black Carpet Beetles.

Finally, Bed Bugs can be mistaken for carpet beetles, but some distinctions set them apart:

  • Oval-shaped, wingless body.
  • Reddish-brown color.

Here’s a comparison table to make it easier to spot the differences:

SpeciesBody ShapeColorLegsAbdomen
Varied Carpet BeetleRoundBrown with white, yellow, and blackShort
Black Carpet BeetleElongated ovalBlackThin, long
Brown Carpet BeetleRoundDark brownShort
Fur BeetleRoundBlack with white spotsShort
Bed BugsOvalReddish-brownWingless

In summary, when identifying the Varied Carpet Beetle, look out for its round body, distinct color patterns, and short legs. Be sure to compare these features with other similar species, such as the Black Carpet Beetle, Brown Carpet Beetle, Fur Beetle, and Bed Bugs, before reaching a conclusion. Good luck with your beetle identification efforts!

Impact and Role in Ecosystem

As a Domestic Pest

The Varied Carpet Beetle, scientifically known as Attagenus pellio, is a common domestic pest. You might find them in your home where they feed on a variety of materials, including carpets, clothing, and wool. Here are some characteristics to help you identify them:

  • Adult beetles: 1/10 to 1/8 inch long, nearly round, and gray to black1
  • Larvae: Elongated, oval, reddish-brown, about 1/4 inch long, covered with many brownish-black hairs1

In your home, these pests can cause considerable damage to carpets, upholstery, clothing, and any other fabric-based items. If you come across an infestation, it’s essential to address it promptly.

As a Museum Pest

Museum pests, such as the Varied Carpet Beetle, can be a severe threat to natural history collections. The larvae feed on organic materials, such as hides, feathers, and insect collections. In this context, they can cause significant damage to precious specimens and artifacts, making pest management a top priority for museums.

Predators and Threats

Despite their status as pests, Varied Carpet Beetles have their fair share of predators and threats in the ecosystem. They are prey to several insects, birds, and small mammals in North America. Some common predators include:

  • House Sparrows
  • Starlings
  • Ladybird beetles
  • Centipedes

The presence of these predators can help control the population of Varied Carpet Beetles and limit infestations in domestic and museum settings. However, an integrated pest management plan is necessary to effectively deal with these pests in sensitive locations like homes and museums.

Unique Features and Characteristics

Varied carpet beetles are small insects with quite a few unique features. Their adult form is round and oval shaped, measuring about 3-5 millimeters in size. These beetles are often confused with moths due to their similar appearance. One contrasting trait is their distinct wing patterns which are characterized by a mix of white, brown, and yellow scales.

These beetles have some distinctive habits as well. They are drawn to lights, often found around windows. Varied carpet beetle larvae prefer to hide in dark, undisturbed areas, close to their food sources such as lint and pet hair.

Now let’s take a look at the larvae of carpet beetles. These creatures exhibit alternating light and dark stripes, covered with tiny hairs, also known as horns. Interestingly, the hairs can be ‘puffed up’ when the larvae feel threatened. Larvae are the main culprits causing damage to carpets, furniture, and fabrics.

In different regions, the varied carpet beetle undergoes diapause, which is a period of dormancy to escape unfavorable conditions like cold temperatures. This adaptation allows them to survive in various climates and environments.

To help you visualize these characteristics, these are some key features and traits:

  • Round, oval shape
  • Size: 3-5 millimeters
  • Drawn to lights, found around windows
  • Larvae with striped patterns and hairs (horns)
  • Adaptation: diapause

In summary, the varied carpet beetle has distinctive features, habits, and adaptive traits that make them unique in the insect world. Being aware of these characteristics can help you identify and manage their presence in your space.

Footnotes

  1. https://extension.oregonstate.edu/families-health/healthy-homes/finding-removing-variegated-carpet-beetles 2 3 4 5 6
  2. https://njaes.rutgers.edu/fs1181/ 2
  3. https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/HYG-2103-10 2
  4. https://extension.colostate.edu/topic-areas/insects/carpet-beetles-5-549/ 2
  5. https://extensionentomology.tamu.edu/insects/carpet-beetles/

Authors

  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

    View all posts
  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

    View all posts
Tags: Carpet Beetle

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46 Comments. Leave new

  • How can I get rid of these Bugs?

    Reply
    • You need to find the source of the infestation. The adult beetles feed on pollen and they do not survive on items in the home. Larvae feed on a variety of stored foods in the pantry as well as on things like fur, feathers, leather and wool. Vacuuming pet hair might also help with the control of carpet beetles.

      Reply
  • I am in west texas. i also am having issues with these. Whats the best way to get rid of them?

    Reply
    • You need to find the source of the infestation. The adult beetles feed on pollen and they do not survive on items in the home. Larvae feed on a variety of stored foods in the pantry as well as on things like fur, feathers, leather and wool. Vacuuming pet hair might also help with the control of carpet beetles.

      Reply
  • What do the larvae stages look like?

    Reply
  • Isabel Clark
    March 24, 2013 3:32 am

    I did not realize these are house pests. The only ones I have seen have been in woodland nearby. I was told they were Varigated Carpet Beetles but they look the same so I think that is problem just a name variation.

    Reply
  • do the carpet beetles help your plants

    Reply
  • Do varied carpet beetles bite? I sleep under a duck/goose feather quilt and thought I had bed bugs but seeing the images here I think they are carpet bugs, I wake up with bites and they itch – if they are carpet bugs and not bed bugs how do I get them out of the feather quilt??

    Reply
  • How do you get rid of these? I know they are not harmful but I won’t go near the part of my room I found them in, and I have to wash all of my clothing. Is there anything I can spray or place to ward them off, or if I find the origin how do I get rid of them for good. Please please help I need to clean my room and I can’t if I don’t get rid of these.

    Reply
  • Please explain feeding on pet hair. Will they only eat hair of pet or will they feed on their skin, body,or harm them? need to know. Thank you
    Will they eat countertop, tile,or any synthetic material?

    Reply
  • Please explain feeding on pet hair. Will they only eat hair of pet or will they feed on their skin, body,or harm them? need to know. Thank you
    Will they eat countertop, tile,or any synthetic material?

    Reply
  • I found some on yesterday cleaning my guest room i collected some and i put them on a flat Pringles top poured alchol on them and they died actually it burn ed them .i plan on taking some on a towel today to get the ones in the window hope this help

    Reply
  • Dave in Frederick
    April 11, 2014 2:27 pm

    I’m not so sure about the clothes being at lesser risk. I’m pretty sure these little buggers destroyed my only two wool suits, plus several other wool items. I saw several adults in my apartment last summer, and I found a beetle larvae casing on one of the suits, along with a whole bunch of little holes. I haven’t seen any moths, so I’m pretty sure it was the beetles. Of course, I didn’t find out until two days before I was supposed to be attending a wedding.

    Reply
  • when you say “All you need to do is locate the source of the infestation”, what does this entail? What exactly am I looking for? ONE or a NEST of larvae?
    I also believe that I’ve been bitten, on more than one occassion. I fell asleep on the couch last night and woke up with several small spots that were very similar to ant bites……………TOTALLY grosses me out to think that I may have eaten one, because they are right by the side of my mouth!!! I am SO grateful for this site though, because I have been trying to figure out for two weeks straight what these ‘buggers’ are, but the bites today but me over the edge of NEEDING to identify them!!!

    Reply
  • when you say “All you need to do is locate the source of the infestation”, what does this entail? What exactly am I looking for? ONE or a NEST of larvae?
    I also believe that I’ve been bitten, on more than one occassion. I fell asleep on the couch last night and woke up with several small spots that were very similar to ant bites……………TOTALLY grosses me out to think that I may have eaten one, because they are right by the side of my mouth!!! I am SO grateful for this site though, because I have been trying to figure out for two weeks straight what these ‘buggers’ are, but the bites today but me over the edge of NEEDING to identify them!!!

    Reply
  • I have what appears to be varied carpet beetles. Oddly have only found adults so far and they have been on the stovetop, under the exhaust fan, and in the laundry room near the dryer vent. Neither is carpeted and laundry is not kept there. Have seen a decline in them over last two weeks. Do they have a breeding season or is it constant?

    Reply
  • How do I get rid of these varied carpet bug?

    Reply
  • These showed up covering my parsley seed heads this morning in a container pot – first time i am seeing them.
    Should I get rid them by shaking into soapy water? I prefer to leave bugs alone if they are beneficial at all – but don’t want these moving inside my home.

    Reply
  • These showed up covering my parsley seed heads this morning in a container pot – first time i am seeing them.
    Should I get rid them by shaking into soapy water? I prefer to leave bugs alone if they are beneficial at all – but don’t want these moving inside my home.

    Reply
  • Carpet Beetles are an Evil nightmare

    Reply
  • Hello. So how exactly do i find the source of infestation? Please b specific. I 1st started seeing these guys like a week ago, now it’s every day. I’m very grossed out. Especially bcz of their little antenna thingums. Ugh…

    Reply
  • I currently live in Port Angeles and I have client that lives a few blocks from me and she has a bunch of these guys around her house. I find them in every room from top to bottom. She says that this is the first year she’s had them. I found the larvae in her small bathroom rugs that were under her dogs water/food dishes. Washing in hot water fixed that right away. There was a pile of dog food that fell under a cabinet that the larvae were eating on or I should say made into Swiss cheese and they were all over paper bags that were in that said cabinet along with dog treats in boxes that were not sealed. Cleaning up the mess and throwing away contaminated food has worked on eliminating the problem.

    Reply
  • claudia gale
    April 3, 2018 2:55 pm

    i have numerous parasites in my skin, feces, subcutaneous blood, etc. is there any way i can send you some videos in order for you to help me with identification? rhey are quite disturbimg….but my doctor has refused to,look at any of them.

    i found a flea in one of many lesions on my legs and was given Ivermectin….which worked on a temporary basis. not one doctor took skin scarpings or did any of the protocol suggested in the Merck Manual of medicine, prior to deeming me as having delusional parasytosus.

    I took skin scrapings and found all kinds of winged insects in them. videos to proove it. recently had all the skin just peel off my feet…and found all kinds of black fibers and black specks that seemed to have small white worms on them. three days later, i videoed the same skin and was shocked to find an insect acrually crawling from under the skin.

    i also found sand fly larvae in my cats water bowl…which i brought to show my doctor.

    i am beside myself, at this point, as i have found sand flies, some kind of flea and now an insect of unknown origin….in or on my body. i asked for a stool sample,to,test for parasites….but my doctor wrote on the lab slip…”check for occult blood only”…underlying the only twice.

    please help me. thank you.

    Reply
  • claudia gale
    April 3, 2018 2:55 pm

    i have numerous parasites in my skin, feces, subcutaneous blood, etc. is there any way i can send you some videos in order for you to help me with identification? rhey are quite disturbimg….but my doctor has refused to,look at any of them.

    i found a flea in one of many lesions on my legs and was given Ivermectin….which worked on a temporary basis. not one doctor took skin scarpings or did any of the protocol suggested in the Merck Manual of medicine, prior to deeming me as having delusional parasytosus.

    I took skin scrapings and found all kinds of winged insects in them. videos to proove it. recently had all the skin just peel off my feet…and found all kinds of black fibers and black specks that seemed to have small white worms on them. three days later, i videoed the same skin and was shocked to find an insect acrually crawling from under the skin.

    i also found sand fly larvae in my cats water bowl…which i brought to show my doctor.

    i am beside myself, at this point, as i have found sand flies, some kind of flea and now an insect of unknown origin….in or on my body. i asked for a stool sample,to,test for parasites….but my doctor wrote on the lab slip…”check for occult blood only”…underlying the only twice.

    please help me. thank you.

    Reply
  • kristine Barkley
    April 14, 2018 11:12 pm

    how do u get rid of these bugs
    anthrenus verbasci bug its all consider a carpet bug i have parkay floors n tile?? found in water dish

    Reply
  • kristine Barkley
    April 14, 2018 11:12 pm

    how do u get rid of these bugs
    anthrenus verbasci bug its all consider a carpet bug i have parkay floors n tile?? found in water dish

    Reply
  • Hey I’ve been having this problem for about 4 weeks now & I put clean bedding on & I’m terrifed to sleep in my own bed

    Reply
  • I’ve been seeing these on my bed as well and i’m wondering if anyone knows how to get rid of them. I’ve seen 4 in about 2 weeks, and am paranoid about sleeping on my bed now because of them.

    Reply
  • Jilchristina Vest
    March 10, 2019 2:10 pm

    Yes. Please be more specific on finding the source. I have no idea where to look. Like, do I need to throw out my rug/carpet?
    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Just ME Onlyme
      March 18, 2019 3:16 pm

      My Ex is into pest control. High ranking.
      I have gone on sites with her, and this is where you find most of the issues. I have seen ants issues, mice, spiders, bedbugs (NASTY), cockroaches (NASTY) etc. Many places I went to, commercial and residental.
      These Carpet Beetles are not like that of an ant, they don’t leave a trail to make things easy. The Carpet Beetle doesn’t leave a fairmone to say, ‘ go this way to the food!’ and the rest follow. I see they have wings like a Ladybug.

      Best practice to elimate pets are to find:
      Grease source (Roaches), fridge, stove, microwave.
      Dust source/skin (Bedbugs) Beds, Rails, Baseboard, matrices
      Garbage source (Rats/Mice) Self explanatory.
      Sugar source (Ants) Pantry,Under the bed, Garage, etc.
      Water source (Waterbugs-Lg Roaches) Under the house, Kitchen/bathroom sinks, etc.
      Cardboard free/egg laying source(Roach etc) Garages, Kitchen Restaurants: (cling free wrap boxes)(Tinfoil boxes). Pizza boxes.
      So as mentioned above:
      * “Larvae feed on a variety of stored foods in the pantry as well as on things like fur, feathers, leather and wool, and pet hair”
      * “The adult beetles feed on pollen, like to be on window sills and they do not survive on items in the home.”

      Larvae found near the wall and carpet in my bedroom under my window. It has been about a year since I have seen one, and they were a shed of skin like a lizard or snake…not the bug itself.

      Now (today) I see quite a few of the adults in the window track of the same window in the bedroom. On my wall under the window and on the window screen. Past 2 days I have caught 14. I think they are coming from the window track drain slot where condensation runs out. There is a lot of pollen starting here in So Cal. My pantry is FAR from my bedroom. I don’t see any in any other area except my room around my window ledge mostly inside the window track. I locked off the drainage slot to check if they are more that way I know its an internal issue I have to deal with.
      Only thing I can think of is the Larvae now hatching the adults are showing.. the only thing I have of that ‘ list of food ‘ is dust that comes in from the window being open.
      I still think they are coming IN and not caused from being IN my home. I never see them anywhere except my window track. Past 2 days, 14 caught, 3 on the wall under the window. The rest are in the window track that the closed window sits on top of.
      So, for starters, I am blocking entry from outside (Window condensation slot ) and checking how many I find. I don’t see Larvae.
      Hope I helped.

      Reply
  • Jilchristina Vest
    March 10, 2019 2:10 pm

    Yes. Please be more specific on finding the source. I have no idea where to look. Like, do I need to throw out my rug/carpet?
    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Just ME Onlyme
      March 18, 2019 3:16 pm

      My Ex is into pest control. High ranking.
      I have gone on sites with her, and this is where you find most of the issues. I have seen ants issues, mice, spiders, bedbugs (NASTY), cockroaches (NASTY) etc. Many places I went to, commercial and residental.
      These Carpet Beetles are not like that of an ant, they don’t leave a trail to make things easy. The Carpet Beetle doesn’t leave a fairmone to say, ‘ go this way to the food!’ and the rest follow. I see they have wings like a Ladybug.

      Best practice to elimate pets are to find:
      Grease source (Roaches), fridge, stove, microwave.
      Dust source/skin (Bedbugs) Beds, Rails, Baseboard, matrices
      Garbage source (Rats/Mice) Self explanatory.
      Sugar source (Ants) Pantry,Under the bed, Garage, etc.
      Water source (Waterbugs-Lg Roaches) Under the house, Kitchen/bathroom sinks, etc.
      Cardboard free/egg laying source(Roach etc) Garages, Kitchen Restaurants: (cling free wrap boxes)(Tinfoil boxes). Pizza boxes.
      So as mentioned above:
      * “Larvae feed on a variety of stored foods in the pantry as well as on things like fur, feathers, leather and wool, and pet hair”
      * “The adult beetles feed on pollen, like to be on window sills and they do not survive on items in the home.”

      Larvae found near the wall and carpet in my bedroom under my window. It has been about a year since I have seen one, and they were a shed of skin like a lizard or snake…not the bug itself.

      Now (today) I see quite a few of the adults in the window track of the same window in the bedroom. On my wall under the window and on the window screen. Past 2 days I have caught 14. I think they are coming from the window track drain slot where condensation runs out. There is a lot of pollen starting here in So Cal. My pantry is FAR from my bedroom. I don’t see any in any other area except my room around my window ledge mostly inside the window track. I locked off the drainage slot to check if they are more that way I know its an internal issue I have to deal with.
      Only thing I can think of is the Larvae now hatching the adults are showing.. the only thing I have of that ‘ list of food ‘ is dust that comes in from the window being open.
      I still think they are coming IN and not caused from being IN my home. I never see them anywhere except my window track. Past 2 days, 14 caught, 3 on the wall under the window. The rest are in the window track that the closed window sits on top of.
      So, for starters, I am blocking entry from outside (Window condensation slot ) and checking how many I find. I don’t see Larvae.
      Hope I helped.

      Reply
  • Shanelle Harris
    March 14, 2019 6:55 pm

    How do you get rid of them?

    Reply
  • I just killed my 2nd one on my livingroom window seal. I’m beyond worried. How to get rid of them? Never had them before

    Reply
  • have atleast 1 of them every day now, sometimes they fall down from ceiling

    Reply
  • I find something very much like this varied carpet beetle in my bathroom sink. Does that sound right? Why?

    Reply

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