Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Mt. Washington"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cabbage White Caterpillars
Geographic location of the bug: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 12/16/2018
Time: 04:59 PM EDT
In late December, Daniel noticed that the leaves on the wild mustard that was growing in the garden looked as though he had eaten them, but he knew he did not want to begin eating the leaves on such young plants.  When Daniel eats the mustard greens, he generally only picks half the leaf, leaving being the central vein and half a leaf to help the plant gain strength.  These Cabbage White Caterpillars seem to have adapted to eating only partial leaves to minimize the damage to the plant, though still rendering the organic leaves unappetizing to many picky eaters.  Here is a Cabbage White Caterpillar from BugGuide.

Cabbage White Larvae

Cabbage White Larva

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  We received an early telephone call from our neighbor Lisa Anne who used our personal email address to submit these images

Subject:  Worm invasion
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 01/07/2019
Time: 09:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What are these?????
How you want your letter signed:  Lisa Anne

Leatherjacket

Dear Lisa Anne,
These are the larvae of Crane Flies, commonly called Leatherjackets.  Expect to see a robust population of adult Crane Flies this spring.

Leatherjackets

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mating California Mantids at our porch light
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 09/28/2018
Time: 11:30 PM PDT
Daniel was up late sitting in the kitchen when a large Walnut Underwing caused him to go outside with the camera.  There has been a female California Mantid at the porch light for a few weeks now, and she has been getting fat eating moths and other insects that are attracted to the light.  Well, seems she attracted a mate, and true to her expected behavior, she bit off his head to ensure their coupling would be successful.  The next morning, the corpse was gone.  Did she finish her meal as a post-coital snack?  The female California Mantid living at the porch light last season was not so lucky.  Daniel is thinking of moving her to the plum trees where she will have numerous choices where to lay her oothecae.

Mating California Mantids

Update:  September 29, 2018
Daniel did move the Mantis to the plum trees with the hope she will lay her oothecae there.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this egg on my woody plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 09/19/2018
Time: 07:32 AM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Harvest time is fast approaching, and I am inspecting my colas for dreaded Budworms, and I have learned to recognize their eggs, but I noticed a few different eggs I would like identified.  They are on a stalk.
Thanks for your time.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Lacewing Egg

Dear Constant Gardener,
We suspect we will get a few comments from our readers regarding the content of your image, but the stalked egg in the lower left corner was laid by a Green Lacewing.  Green Lacewings are predators, and their larvae are commonly called Aphid Wolves.

Mel Frank Comments
Yes, they are all over my plants, every year. It’s one of the reasons I have had only very minor insect infestations and is a main reason I don’t use insecticides–I don’t want to kill the biological helpers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Metamorphosis of a Gray Bird Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 09/15/2018
Time: 03:30 PM PDT
Daniel glanced at the carrot seeds that are ready to plant and noticed something unusual from a distance.  The backlighting on the wings of this newly metamorphosed Gray Bird Grasshopper caught the light beautifully.  Sure enough, the cast off exuvia was at the base of the plant.  The next day, after its wings had fully hardened, it was gone.

Metamorphosis of a Gray Bird Grasshopper

Exuvia of a Gray Bird Grasshopper

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider eats Cabbage White on Lavender
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 09/16/2018
Time: 03:30 PM PDT
Daniel took the weekend off from responding to the numerous queries that arrived from the public to entertain a friend and to do some gardening.  This drama of a male Green Lynx Spider feeding on a Cabbage White on the lavender was too interesting to ignore.

Green Lynx Spider eats Cabbage White

Green Lynx Spider eats Cabbage White

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination