Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Mt. Washington"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  The Mantis on my Woody Plant is growing
Geographic location of bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  7/20/2018
Time:  3:19 PM
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I am very happy to report that the California Mantis nymph that had been living on my Sweet Sarah clone, but vanished about a week ago, has returned, and now I haven’t seen the Green Lynx Spider.  Seems predators have some sort of hierarchy and now that the molted Mantis has grown, the Green Lynx Spider feels threatened and left.  It is interesting that this Sweet Sarah clone is the only woody plant in the garden has predators.  I wonder why that is.  It is also interesting that the little Grasshoppers that were common about a week ago have vanished, perhaps eaten.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Immature California Mantis

Dear Constant Gardener,
Your supposition of the hierarchy of predation sounds very plausible to us.  Plants give off attractants including odors to attract insects, especially female phytophagous insects that must lay eggs on the proper food plant, but it is also plausible that the smell given off by this particular plant attracts predators that are interested in insects feeding on the plants, which might help explain the disappearance of those immature Grasshoppers. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

California Harvester Ants
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  July 19, 2018
Time:  8:15 AM
We suspect none of our readers will be as excited about this posting as we are, but we are happy to report that the colony of California Harvester Ants that has been living on a south facing slope in Mount Washington is still present, though perhaps not for long as every available lot in the neighborhood seems to have a “Notice of Intent” sign for a new construction project.  California Harvester Ants are naturally adapted to our Southern California climate and they do not need irrigation to survive, but alas, garden landscaping is responsible for the spread of that scourge, the Argentine Ant, and they have displaced our native Ant species in much of urban Los Angeles.

California Harvester Ant

We also located what we believe to be the back door to the colony right at the edge of the street.

California Harvester Ants at colony entrance

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cloudless Sulphur puddling
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 07/06/2018
Time: 05:15 PM EDT
Last week when temperatures in Los Angeles reached triple digits, Daniel was watering and he was lucky enough to be able to approach a normally very wary and fast flying Cloudless Sulphur as it puddled at the mud created by the hose.

Cloudless Sulphur

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 07/14/2018
Time: 08:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
While tending to my plants, I searched for the small California Mantis that had been there several weeks, but couldn’t find it.  I did notice what appeared to be the same Green Lynx Spider I saw earlier in the month had returned.  It is really shy and as I moved in with the camera, it hid under the leaves.  It is really difficult to find it when it is hiding.  I observed it eating a small fly and I noticed a second Green Lynx nearby on another branch.  It is so fascinating that the same predators are appearing again this year.  I had several Green Lynx Spiders on my plants last summer.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Constant Gardener,
Green Lynx Spiders are frequently found on blossoms where they capture pollinating insects.  Hopefully these predators will keep your plants free from marauding insects.

Green Lynx Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Look at who died on my terrace
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 06/22/2018
Time: 03:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman: It’s so beautiful I took a pretty shawl to show him off.
How you want your letter signed:  Monique

Ten LIned June Beetle

Good Morning Monique,
This is a Ten Lined June Beetle,
Polyphylla decemlineata, and Daniel spotted one about two weeks ago on his screen door.  Though quite common at higher elevations in Pasadena and La Cañada, Daniel did not make a Mount Washington sighting of a Ten Lined June Beetle until 2015 and he has seen them yearly ever since.  According to Charles Hogue in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin:  “Adults feed at night on the needles of coniferous trees.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mantis on my Woody Plant
Geographic location of bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  6/21/2018
Time:  10:01 AM
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
It is another year and another growing season.  I am growing more woody plants this year than I grew last year and I observed my first young Mantis today.  Hopefully it will eat grasshoppers and other insects that might negatively affect my crop this year.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Immature California Mantis

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thanks for the update on your gardening exploits.  We looked at some of your postings from last year and we see you did have California Mantids in your garden.  It seems they reproduced and have progeny to take up the job of patrolling your Woody Plants.  Please keep submitting images.  Many of our readers may benefit from what you are learning.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination