Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Mt. Washington"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wild Honey Bee Hive
Location:  Elyria Canyon Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  January 28, 2017 10:00 AM
We never had a chance to post this image we shot of a wild Honey Bee Hive in a hollow California Black Walnut Tree in Elyria Canyon Park.

Wild Honey Bee Hive

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Metallic Wood Boring Beetles mating on a native California Black Walnut Branch
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 17, 2017 2:33 PM
We just discovered these Metallic Wood Boring Beetles “in flagrante delicto” on a twig of a Calfornia Black Walnut in our office garden.  They have excellent eyesight and moved to avoid the camera.  Interestingly, Charles Hogue does not list any members of the family in his landmark book, Insects of the Los Angeles Basin.  We are currently on a mission to attempt to identify the species.

Mating Jewel Beetles:  Dicerca hornii

We have put in a request to Dr Doug Yanega at UC Riverside, but meanwhile, we found this information on Dicerca horni Crotch on the UC Riverside Urban Entomology page:  “This is a common flatheaded borer of the Pacific Coast states. It belongs in a genus of medium-sized buprestids that are characterized by their dull-bronze color and the prolonged tips of the elytra (plate II, 1; figure 126). Dicerca horni is a dark, grayish bronze, 13 to 25 mm long, and has small, black, narrow, broken ridges on the dorsum. The larvae are approximately 2.33 times longer than the adults. This species occurs on many species of deciduous trees (including fruit trees) and shrubs, inhabiting dead or dying trees or dead wood on living trees. Adults may be seen from April to September. This is not a pest, but we receive many requests for its identification.” The species name led to this BugGuide image of Dicerca hornii (BugGuide has added an additional i to the scientific name) and it looks like a match.  There is also a lovely image on CalPhotos.  Our image shows some very pretty magenta highlights on the legs and edges of the thorax.

Confirmation Courtesy of James Hogue
This looks like a good name to me.  I have specimens of this species from the mountain ranges surrounding the L. A. Basin and from the lowlands of the San Fernando Valley.
Jim Hogue

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Swarming Midges
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles
May 14, 2017 5:21 PM
Though we pride ourselves on daily postings, even postdating submissions to go live when we are away from the office, we have not had a live post in a week due to a bout of pneumonia hospitalizing our editorial staff, but Daniel is now back on the job.  This image of Dancing Midges is several weeks old, but we are always thrilled to see this phenomenon, generally in the spring, and frequently near the Los Angeles River.

Dancing Midges

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: blood worms
Location: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 1, 2017 9:18 pm
Though it might make us unpopular with the neighbors, we keep standing water in the yard for wildlife, and we skim with a net daily to feed Mosquito Larvae to the Angelfish, and Boris is still thriving alone in his tank since killing Medea Luna several years ago.  This week the Mosquito Larvae have been replaced by Blood Worms, the larvae of non-biting Midges, and Boris has been greedily eating everyone put in the tank.

Blood Worms

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Eucalyptus Leaf Beetles found in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
April 25, 2017
About two weeks ago, we were walking down the street and we noticed that something was chewing the leaves of a big eucalyptus tree growing on the side of the road.  Sure enough, we found Eucalyptus Leaf Beetles,
Paropsisterna m-fuscum, including one larva.  When we returned to take some images, we could not locate the larva.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Australia, introduced into so. CA (ca. 2003).”  According to iNaturalist:  “This insect can become very prolific and is a serious pest species in the forestry industry. This particular species is a problem on Blue Gum in California, USA.  The beetles are pale, with variable brown markings on the elytra and pronotum and sometimes with bright flaring at the base of the elytra. The larvae are larviform and pale green like the leaves they eat.”

Eucalyptus Leaf Beetle

Eucalyptus Leaf Beetle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Spider scurries from under the recycle bin!
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
December 13, 2016 11:30 AM
Alas, we did not have a camera handy when we made this exciting sighting of a reddish colored, male Southern House Spider which is reported from Los Angeles according to BugGuide.  We had to take a close look to ensure this was not a Recluse Spider.

Southern House Spider

Southern House Spider (from our archives)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination