Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Mt. Washington"

Subject:  Sunflower Fruit Fly and immature California Mantis on Cannabis
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 07/15/2021
Time: 09:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
As you know, we are having muggy weather in Los Angeles and the humidity seems to bring out more bugs.  My “girls” of 2021 are starting to show their stigmas and they are beginning to attract new insects.  I don’t have any identification requests for you today, but I wanted to submit a new photo of the pretty Fruit Fly you identified as Paracantha cultaris in 2019.  It is on a first generation plant (a genie) from a seed that I found on the Kernal Kush I grew last year.  The flies really like my Cannabis, and you assured me they will not harm my plants, and that they actually are associated with sunflowers which are always growing near the Cannabis.  I think it is sad that this pretty fly doesn’t have a common name and I would like to suggest Sunflower Fruit Fly.
I also eagerly await the appearance of immature California Mantids on my plants and I’m including an image of an inch long individual on my favorite strain Woodhead, and this is the fifth year I have grown plants descended from the original Woodhead I grew in 2017.  Once again, it is so nice to see you posting again.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Sunflower Fruit Fly

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thanks for your kind words.  It is curious that this distinctive fly does not have a common name and Sunflower Fruit Fly does seem very appropriate in light of BugGuide’s comment:  “breeds in
Helianthus annuus” which is identified on CalScape as simply Sunflower.  Also, thanks for being so conscious of native insects in your horticultural endeavors.

Immature California Mantid

Subject:  Monarch Caterpillar and Chrysalis on Indian Milkweed
Geographic location of the bug: Elyria Canyon State Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 06/29/2021
Time: 8:30 AM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Readers,
As part of physical therapy rehabilitation for knee surgery, Daniel has begun hiking again, and this morning he was pleased to find first a Monarch Chrysalis and then a Monarch Caterpillar feeding on Kotolo or Indian or Wooley Milkweek,
Aesclepius eriocarpa, in Elyria Canyon State Park.

Monarch Caterpillar

Monarch Chrysalis

Subject:  Solitary Bee and Gray Hairstreak
Geographic location of the bug: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 06/26/2021
Time: 11:01 AM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Readers,
There are numerous native Bees visiting blossoms in Daniel’s garden right now, and he does have difficulty with some species identifications.  This pollen-laden Solitary Bee was being very elusive, flying away when Daniel aimed his magicphone and attempted to move in for a closeup.  Most of the images are blurry.  When a Gray Hairstreak appeared and Daniel turned his attention to the Gossamer Wing, the Solitary Bee decided to ZOOM bomb the photo.  The Bee may be
Anthophorula albicans which is pictured on BugGuide and the Natural History of Orange County.

Solitary Bee and Gray Hairstreak

 

Subject:  Flame Skimmer rests on tomato cages
Geographic location of the bug: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 06/24/2021
Time: 11:04 AM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Readers,
As Daniel’s final days as a full time college professor near an end, he is easing into retirement, including spending large portions of the day in the yard just puttering around and observing the wealth of wildlife, including numerous insects.  As the years pass, patterns begin to emerge and species begin to make their annual appearances, somewhat on schedule.  For years, Daniel has observed Dragonflies in his yard that he thought were Flame Skimmers, but thanks to this BugGuide description, he now believes they have been Neon Skimmers which means updating numerous old postings with the corrections.  Though originally identified as Flame Skimmers, Daniel now believes he has been observing both male Neon Skimmers and female Neon Skimmers near the stagnant fountain that serves as a nursery for the naiads, the Dragonfly nymphs that live in the fountain and eat the mosquitoes.

Male Neon Skimmer

Daniel suspects this beauty recently metamorphosed into a winged adult.  It was not at all shy, allowing Daniel to get quite close with his magicphone to capture a series of images, but in this final shot, the Neon Skimmer rotated its head, very much aware that Daniel was staking it with the camera, but it did not fly off for nearly an hour.

 

Subject: Budworm
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 06/21/2021
Time: 05:46 PM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found a bud worm on a sprout indoors under lights????
How you want your letter signed: Mel Frank

Tobacco Budworm eats Cannabis sprout

Dear Mel,
Thanks so much for your submission of a Tobacco Budworm caterpillar,
Chloridea virescens.  We are honored to get this important documentation from such a distinguished expert.  BugGuide also has documentation of a Tobacco Budworms feeding on marijuana.

 

Subject:  Glassy Winged Sharpshooter on my herb
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 06/18/2021
Time: 04:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I missed you last growing season.  I noticed a recent comment from Peter about Glassy Winged Sharpshooters on budding marijuana. I sent in a photo two years ago of a Green Lynx Spider eating a Glassy Winged Sharpshooter on one of my plants, but I have to do manual hunting of this unwanted visitor.  I don’t like to use pesticides on my plants, so I catch the litter buggers and just squash them. They can be very difficult to catch though.  Seems they have an uncanny ability to move to the other side of the stem when they are threatened.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thanks for sharing your tips to the manual control of unwanted insects on your crops.  We are also thrilled to learn you do not use pesticides which can often kill beneficial insects as well as the targeted “pest” species.

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter