Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Mt. Washington"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider on my Woody Plant
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 27, 2017 7:20 PM
Dear Bugman,
Several weeks ago, you identified a tiny Gray Bird Grasshopper for me.  I have noticed many chew marks on the plant’s leaves, and I noticed that the little guy has grown quite a bit, so I captured it and relocated it elsewhere in the garden.  At the same time I found this well camouflaged predator that I have learned is a Green Lynx Spider.  What can you tell me about this spider?  I’m presuming it will not harm my plant and I am letting it stay where I found it.
Signature:  Constant Gardener

Male Green Lynx Spider

Dear Constant Gardener,
Because of your kindness to the young, hungry Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Your Green Lynx Spider is a male as evidenced by his pronounced pedipalps and long legs.  Male Green Lynx Spiders of breeding age will wander in search of a mate, and he will most likely move on as that is his primary goal.  If you had discovered a female on your “woody plant”  and if the hunting there was to her liking, she might remain and even raise her young, all while keeping unwanted insects from feeding on the plant.  You have quite a thriving ecosystem on your “woody plant”.

Immature Gray Bird Grasshopper, shortly before relocation.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Ten Lined June Beetle
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 13, 2017 10:08 AM
Though we have been quite familiar with Ten Lined June Beetles in Southern California, prior to 2015, our encounters were limited to higher elevations including Pasadena and La Cañada, but that changed with our first Ten Lined June Beetle sighting at our urban Los Angeles, Mount Washington location.  Since that time, they have become a regular summer sighting at our office, much to the amusement of our feline.  This male Ten Lined June Beetle began to stridulate quite loudly when the cat threatened from the other side of the screen.

Ten Lined June Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Immature California Mantis comes to porch light
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 17, 2017 5:37 PM
Each year, we are treated to both immature California Mantids and adult California Mantids that visit our porch light.

Immature California Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s Eating my Woody Plant?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
July 8, 2017 6:47 PM
I have several woody plants in my garden and I am very concerned with them being eaten by insects.  What is this on my plant?
Signature:  Constant Gardener

Gray Bird Grasshopper Nymph

Dear Constant Gardener,
This is a very young Grasshopper nymph and considering your location, we suspect it is a hatchling Gray Bird Grasshopper.  Though this nymph is quite small, adult Gray Bird Grasshoppers get quite large, with a wingspan well over four inches.  According to BugGuide, they feed upon:  “Apparently a wide variety of plants” and “Apparently overwintering primarily as eggs, hatching over an extended season from spring to late summer (perhaps hatching is related to rainfall events?), and maturing from late spring till late summer or early autumn. Some adults overwinter, and perhaps nymphs too (?).”  There appears to be a notch chewed off the leaf upon which this little Grasshopper is resting, which is a good indication it is feeding off your “Woody Plant”.  Since Gray Bird Grasshoppers are not limited to a single plant species as food, you can probably safely relocate this individual if you are concerned about your “Woody Plant” being eaten.

Gray Bird Grasshopper Nymph

Facebook Comment from Jennifer
LOL…. all I see is pot! lol
oh wait… now I see it! lol

Facebook Comment from Michael
I know, they keep saying that. I’m like, damn, just grow some balls and say marijuana.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wild Honey Bee Hive
Location:  Elyria Canyon Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  January 28, 2017 10:00 AM
We never had a chance to post this image we shot of a wild Honey Bee Hive in a hollow California Black Walnut Tree in Elyria Canyon Park.

Wild Honey Bee Hive

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Metallic Wood Boring Beetles mating on a native California Black Walnut Branch
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 17, 2017 2:33 PM
We just discovered these Metallic Wood Boring Beetles “in flagrante delicto” on a twig of a Calfornia Black Walnut in our office garden.  They have excellent eyesight and moved to avoid the camera.  Interestingly, Charles Hogue does not list any members of the family in his landmark book, Insects of the Los Angeles Basin.  We are currently on a mission to attempt to identify the species.

Mating Jewel Beetles:  Dicerca hornii

We have put in a request to Dr Doug Yanega at UC Riverside, but meanwhile, we found this information on Dicerca horni Crotch on the UC Riverside Urban Entomology page:  “This is a common flatheaded borer of the Pacific Coast states. It belongs in a genus of medium-sized buprestids that are characterized by their dull-bronze color and the prolonged tips of the elytra (plate II, 1; figure 126). Dicerca horni is a dark, grayish bronze, 13 to 25 mm long, and has small, black, narrow, broken ridges on the dorsum. The larvae are approximately 2.33 times longer than the adults. This species occurs on many species of deciduous trees (including fruit trees) and shrubs, inhabiting dead or dying trees or dead wood on living trees. Adults may be seen from April to September. This is not a pest, but we receive many requests for its identification.” The species name led to this BugGuide image of Dicerca hornii (BugGuide has added an additional i to the scientific name) and it looks like a match.  There is also a lovely image on CalPhotos.  Our image shows some very pretty magenta highlights on the legs and edges of the thorax.

Confirmation Courtesy of James Hogue
This looks like a good name to me.  I have specimens of this species from the mountain ranges surrounding the L. A. Basin and from the lowlands of the San Fernando Valley.
Jim Hogue

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination