Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Solomons swallowtail
December 17, 2009
This is another video frame. Unfortunately the butterfly never stopped moving. This frame is the closest to “sharp” as I could grab from the video. I’m guessing it is a swallowtail sp.
Bruce, Atlanta
Solomon Islands, Tenaru River, Guadalcanal

Citrus Swallowtail

Citrus Swallowtail

Hi Bruce,
This appears to be a male Citrus Swallowtail, Papilio aegeus.  The Lepidoptera Butterflyhouse website has nice images of the entire metamorphosis.  This species exhibits sexual dimorphism, where the two sexes look radically different from one another.  Additionally, there are many races and subspecies throughout Australia, Indonesia, the Solomons and New Guinea.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

caterpillars found on gardenias in cairns
December 19, 2009
Dear Bugman, I am wondering if this is the bee hawkmoth I saw on your website from another lady. Our caterpillars are a little different colour wise to the picture on your website. They have a bluse stripe on their back, red and black dots above he leg pairs, and fine yellow and red stripes down the sides. They are bright green with a large spike at the back. They are (so far) up to 5cm long.
Leith B
Cairns,Australia

Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Leith,
The Bee Hawkmoths in the genus Cephonodes are represented by at least four species in Australia that are listed on the Moths of Australia Website, and from what we have researched, they all feed on gardenia.  The caterpillars are somewhat variable, and though they resemble your specimen, none are an exact match.  Our first choice is  Cephonodes hylas, the Coffee Hawkmoth, which can be found on the Moths of Australia website, and the caterpillar is pictured on a stamp.  The Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic website has images of the caterpillars that look very similar to your photo.  The caterpillars of the Gardenia Bee Hawk, Cephonodes kingii, are quite colorful as pictured on the Moths of Australia website.  We cannot locate an image of the caterpillar of Cephonodes picus, but it is described on the Moths of Australia website as “These caterpillars are usually green, with pale lines along the back and each side.

Dear Daniel, many thanks for that. We agree it looks like cephonodes hylas. It’s nice to know what it is going to turn into!
Kind Regads, Leith Banney and John EVans, Cairns.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What type of bug is this?
December 18, 2009
Hi, my husband found this bug crawling up his leg. After his initial shock he snapped a photo. We were camping on the Nullabour Plain, South Australia. The climate there is very dry and hot, with little vegitation and very little water. The bug was about 40mm in length. It would be great to put a name to this amazing bug.
jackie
Nullabor Plain, South Australia

Unknown Newly Metamorphosed Moth

Newly Metamorphosed Wood Moth

Hi Jackie,
This is a newly metamorphosed Moth whose wings have not yet expanded.  We believe it may be a Tiger Moth in the family Arctiidae, but we are not certain.  Perhaps one of our readers can supply a species identification.

Update:  May 12, 2015
We just received a comment that this appears to be
Endoxyla amphiplecta, or a related species and the image on ButterflyHouse looks very similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please identify this fly
December 12, 2009
Hey bugman, whislt gardening I came across this fly, sitting in the sun, on a concrete pipe.
Its markings I have never seen before, and had to down tools and take a snapshot..its the only one I have as me getting close caused him/her to take off..can you help…and now I am on the hunt as I have never in my 40 odd years seen a fly like this..
regards
Nick Trikilis
Coningham, TAS, Australia 7054

Tachinid Fly, we think

Tachinid Fly, we think

Hi Nick,
We would not have expected such a distinctive looking fly to be so elusive to properly identify.  We believe it is a Tachinid Fly, though we could not identify it on the Brisbane Insect Website, nor the Life Unseen website.  There is a body of an Euamphibolia Fly on the Life Unseen website that looks quite close, but we could not locate another image to substantiate that.  Perhaps one of our readers can assist with this identification.  We also had a vague recollection of seeing a similar photo in the past, and sure enough, we found a still unidentified posting in our archive.

Eric Eaton Concurs
Daniel:
Yes, I do think the black and white fly is a tachinid, but have no idea how to explain it, or be able to be conclusive, either…..I’ll keep looking for an answer.
Eric

Hi Daniel,
many thanks, I have sent the image off to the CSIRO head of entymology for id (if possible) it seems going from the other posting earlier that it is in the same area Cygnet is approx 15 mile from my area.
just in time for christmas, if i receive a response from CSIRO i will let you know, thanks again for responding so quickly..
regards
Nick.

Update
December 16, 2009
Hi Daniel,
I have a name !
response from CSIRO
Hi Nick,
This is a bristle fly, Amphibolia vidua (Tachinidae), one of perhaps 3-4,000 species of this family occurring in Australia.  Its larvae feed as a parasite internally on other insects.  On sunny days in summer the adults often rest on smooth eucalypt tree trunks, and similar structures such as poles and pipes.
Best
Thanks again Daniel.
kindest Regards
Nick Trikilis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Some sort of assassin bug?
December 10, 2009
The other day my girlfriend ran into the room holding a bug that had been biting her arm. It was a tiny Hemiptera that, legs and all, would be only the size of someones fingernail. We examined it for a while then released it back out into the garden only to find dozens more. Despite the aggressive first encounter they proved to be very pretty, shy little things and proved to be rather difficult to photograph.
These pictures were taken in Taree NSW, Australia in early-mid summer.
My suspicion is that they are an assassin bug, or something similar. I hope you will be able to narrow it down for me.
-Jish
Taree, NSW, Australia

Common Assassin Bug

Common Assassin Bug

Dear Jish,
Nymphs are sometimes difficult to properly identify, but we believe this is an immature Common Assassin Bug, Pristhesancus plagipennis, which we identified on the Brisbane Insect website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Are these bed bugs?
December 12, 2009
Hi,
I’m living in Sydney Australia in an apartment and in the last month (summer just started) my place has become infested with these bugs. They seem to have pointy and long mouth parts. They climb the walls, fall, and then get stuck in the carpets… I have attached 2 pics using a microscope (4X magnification). One is a dead bug and the other is immersed in oil to get it to stay still. They are both 0.2 cm long. Your help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
EAW
Sydney Australia

Grain Weevil

Grain Weevil

Hi EAW,
This is a Weevil, and we suspect it may be infesting some food product in the pantry, possibly rice.

Thank you!
Thank you so much for your quick reply. I have found the culprit. A 5 kilo bag of wild bird seed in the closet.
Thanks again.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination