Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these clay light shells
Location: Sydney Australia
January 28, 2017 8:07 pm
Found these in the backyard and just wondering what they were shells of..
Signature: Cindy

Mud Dauber Nest

Dear Cindy,
This is a mud nest constructed by a Wasp, probably a Mud Dauber in the genus
Sceliphron based on the image posted to Oz Animals.  The Brisbane Insect site has images of a female Mud Dauber constructing her nest as well as this information:  “The wasps build mud cells in sheltered locations. If the cell is opened, you will find a wasp larva, together with some spiders which are the larva’s foods. They are collected by the mother wasp.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird Insect
Location: Sydney Australia
January 29, 2017 2:36 am
Just curious about this one. Never seen one like this before.
Signature: Russell

Lychee Stink Bug Exuvia

Dear Russell,
This appears to us to be an Exuvia or cast-off exoskeleton that an immature insect leaves behind when it matures and molts.  Our best guess is that it is the member of an order that has incomplete metamorphosis, with immature nymphs resembling adults.  Alas, we do not recognize the order.  We will continue to research this and we hope to get some input from our readership.

Lychee Stink Bug Exuvia

Karl Provides a Suggestion
Hi Daniel and Russel:
My first thought was that this exuviae belonged to a true bug nymph in the family Tessaratomidae. The horn-like caudal projections are a common feature among Tessaratomids, especially nymphs. A quick internet search came up with several photos of Lychee Stink Bug nymphs (Lyramorpha rosea) that appear to me as a possible candidate. I believe the black filaments visible in both exuvia photos are likely the antennae sheds. Interesting photos…regards Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Wollongong NSW
January 29, 2017 9:17 pm
I took a few photos of this large moth today. It’s colour was mainly greys and olive drab. It was large and solid, motionless near ground level on the leaf in the photo. I would say from the top of the head to the bottom of the abdomen it would have been about 10cm with the wingspan being maybe 12cm. Is this an Australian Hawk Moth? I have seen photos identified that look similar to mine but there were orange colours underneath the wings and on the tip of the abdomen.
Signature: Philip Reuter

Australian Hawkmoth

Dear Philip,
It took us a bit of searching to identify your Australian Hawkmoth as
Coequosa australasiae.  Part of the reason it took so long is that the image posted to Butterfly House is quite different looking than your individual, and we eventually found a visual match on Csiro.  A very worn looking individual on A Roving I Will Go is the best color match to your individual.  The condition of your individual is so perfect we are guessing it has just emerged from the pupa and perhaps it has yet to take its first flight.  This species does have orange underwings that are hidden in your image. 

Dear Daniel,
Thankyou so much for confirming that! It was quite a magnificent specimen. Thankyou for your time.
Regards,
Philip Reuter

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Little green beetle
Location: South Australia
January 24, 2017 10:51 pm
Hi Bugman,
My name is Brooke. Today I found the cutest little beetle and after hours of failed research I couldn’t find the name! Please, do you know what bug this is?!
Signature: Curiouser and curiouser

Clown Beetle

Dear Brooke,
Because of the general shape of the beetle, and especially the shape of the antennae, we are quite confident this is a Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabaeidae, but alas, we did not find any matching images on the Brisbane Insect website.  Perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had with a species identification for you.

Clown Beetle

Correction:  Clown Beetle, NOT Scarab Beetle
Thanks to two readers who provided comments with corrections, we now know that this is a Clown Beetle in the genus Saprinus.  According to the Australian Museum site:  “Histerids are usually shiny black or metallic-green beetles with introverted heads. Carrion-feeding forms generally hide under a corpse during the daylight, and only become active at night when they enter the maggot-infested part of the corpse to capture and devour maggots. Like other beetles inhabiting carrion, they have fast larval development with only two larval stages.  Beetles of the genus Saprinus are among the first beetles to arrive at carrion. The adults feed on both the larvae and pupae of all species of blowfly, although they have a preference for fresh pupae. The adults lay their eggs in the corpse, and the larvae feed on blowfly pupae when they emerge.”  The Atlas of Living Australia has supporting imagery and a nice range map.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify bug please
Location: Sydney, Australia
January 19, 2017 9:41 pm
We saw this unusal bug that sometimes walked like a crab with the antennae pointing up and we also saw it with them down on the surface. They seemed to be at the rear too.
It was about 10mm long and a bit hairy.
See attached photo. Not that crisp a shot as it kept moving!
Many thanks!
Signature: Mark B

Board-frons Planthopper Nymph

Dear Mark,
We knew this was an immature Hemipteran, and we quickly located this matching image of two Board-frons Planthoppers from the family Eurybrachyidae on the Brisbane Insect website where it states:  “The Australian Eurybrachyidae are  quite distinctive from the world fauna. All Australian species belong to the subfamily Platybrachyinae. Members in this group are small to medium in size with broad body. They have mottled forewings and coloured abdomen, usually brown, red, yellow or orange in colour. All of them have broad frons (front part of head). Like other members in the Hemiptera order, Planthoppers have their sucking mouth-parts to feed on host plants by sucking up the sap.  They can be found resting on the main tree trunk or stems of their host plants, usually Eucalyptus or Acacia. They are not easily noticed because of their camouflaged colours. When come closer to them, they will walk to other spots, either up, down or sideway, then stop moving. If come even closer and try to touch them, they will jump with a ‘tick’ sound and fly away. ”  The site also states:  “Planthopper nymphs can be found on leaves, stems and tree trunks. They are usually dark brown in colour, becomes lighter-brown colour when grown. Most planthopper nymphs look very similar. The two long upwards pointing “tails” are the characteristic.”  There is not enough detail in your image for us to attempt a species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: weird bug
Location: Gisborne, Victoria, Australia
January 15, 2017 6:43 pm
In Macedon we saw this insect that was about 1.5 inches long, it looks like a bee but with an unusual tail end?
Signature: ?

Mole Cricket

Dear ?,
Since we are a global website, we needed to research your location as it was unknown to us.  We though Gisborne was an unusual name for Macedonia.  We have since learned Gisborne is a town in Victoria, Australia.  This is a Mole Cricket, a commonly sighted subterranean insect found in many locations around the world.

Thank you, yes it is Gisborne Victoria, Australia………..sorry.
Wow very interesting as it could hardly walk as its back feet were just dragging along, it was found under a seat at a cafe and its obviously been disturbed and wanting to get back into the earth.
Thank you again!
Steve

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination