Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bottlebrush Sawfly?
Location: Pakenham Victoria Australia
February 16, 2017 8:08 pm
Hi, just wanting confirmation that this is indeed a Bottlebrush Sawfly. Found it sunning on the edge of a Rose, possibly having a feed of the petal? This is sited in Suburban Pakenham, just out of Melbourne, Australia on a mild Summers day, February 17th 2017.
Signature: Brian C

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Dear Brian C,
This is indeed a Bottlebrush Sawfly,
Pterygophorus cinctus, and since males, one of which is pictured on FlickR, have feathered or pectinate antennae, your individual is a female.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black large flying insect. Blue wings
Location: NSW Australia
February 12, 2017 11:14 pm
Hey, NSW Australia here. Just found this guy near the door. He is larger than a wasp and smaller than a hornet also has the iridescent type blue wings. Just wondering what he might be… haven’t seen this one before
Signature: Regards, andrew

Black Flower Wasp

Dear Andrew,
Though we first located this image on FlickR, we are much more comfortable informing you that this is a Black Flower Wasp,
Austroscolia soror, since the same image is posted to iNaturalist.  The species is also pictured on the Atlas of Living Australia and Encyclopedia of Life.  The Black Flower Wasp is a member of the family Scoliidae, and females withing the family prey on the grubs of Scarab Beetles by laying their eggs, so the beetle grubs provide a live food source for the developing wasp larvae. 

Black Flower Wasp

Black Flower Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Milkweed bug?
Location: Roma, Queensland
February 7, 2017 6:45 am
Hi, im working in australia at the moment and this guy got into my boilersuit and bit my leg! The closest thing i could find on google was a large milkweed bug but it doesnt look exactly like the pictures, and google says they dont bite? Unfortunately my colleague stepped on him before i could take a picture of him and take him outside. I also seen a spider that one of the locals told me is a red back spider, but again it doesnt look like the pictures on google. Just curious as we dont have any of these guys back home and wouldnt want to tell people its the wrong bug!
Signature: Jon

Assassin Bug

Dear Jon,
We feel confident that this is a male Ground Assassin Bug in the genus
Ectomocoris, but the Brisbane Insect site only has images of wingless females and we only have images of wingless females in our archive.  We located a thumbnail of a male Ground Assassin Bug on the Atlas of Living Australia, but we cannot find the page with the full sized image.  We also located these images of mounted specimens on the Swedish Museum of Natural History.  The Spider is NOT a Redback

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery beetle in queensland
Location: Giru, queensland, oz
February 2, 2017 9:10 pm
Hi, I found lots of these little beetles (some mating too) on pumpkin and cucumber vines in the garden… not sure if they’re eating them, just trying to identify them but not getting anywhere! They’re fast movers, and good at scaling sides and tops of things, but got a pic of one. They’re 5-6mm. Thanks so much for your help!
Signature: Holi

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Holi,
We have tried searching both Checkered Beetles and Longhorn Beetles to ascertain the identity of your interesting individual.  We then wrote to Eric Eaton and he made the identification for us.

Eric Eaton Provides Identification
Daniel:
I had to really dig, but I think I found it.  Indeed it is a flat-faced longhorned beetle, family Cerambycidae, subfamily Lamiinae, and the genus Apomecyna, pretty sure:
http://www.ento.csiro.au/biology/cerambycidae/cerambycidae.html#
I hope the above link works to get you the image I am looking at, which is essentially identical to the specimen in the images you e-mailed.
There are some really, REALLY weird longhorned beetles in Australia!  Just do a Google image search and be blown away!
Have a great weekend.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Ed. Note:  Eric’s link took us to the site.  We found Apomecyna histrio on this Csiro page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Princetown, Victoria
February 4, 2017 6:49 am
Landed on our windscreen will driving through coastal sand dunes !
Signature: Rixy

Wattle Pig Weevil

Dear Rixy,
This is some species of Weevil, a large and diverse group of Beetles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’m having trouble identifying what I believe is a species of wasp.
Location: Bayside area, Melbourne Australia.
February 2, 2017 6:13 pm
G’day BUGMAN!!
I’ve got another conundrum for you when you get some spare time.
I saw this bug at Mum’s the other day, he was just chilling out on a blade of grass so I took some pictures. He’s a little bit cute, but also looks a bit waspish. From the pages I’ve looked up to identify Australian wasp species I’m having trouble finding an accurate identity for him. The closest I’ve come across is a Potter Wasp, but from pictures they aren’t similar enough.
As you can see my little wasp friend has an all black face & eyes & no tiny stick waist. Potter wasps appear to have a much thinner, or longer thin section of their abdomen. Also they have more orange on their face & antenne than my little friend.
Would you know of any sites in Australia that allowing uploading of pictures to ask about bug identification like you do?
Your website is so much fun to browse around.
Thank you again for your time.
Have a wonderful day!
Signature: Kindest regards, manda.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Hello again Manda,
Since the internet is global, whyever would you want to locate an Australian counterpart to our site?  That said, we know of no Australian counterpart to our site, though we do have a sister site in Brazil called Insetologia.  Our editorial staff (as if we don’t have enough to do) has toyed with the idea of applying for grant funding to venture into Australia.  We tend to field many more questions from Australia and South Africa from December through February when much of the northern hemisphere is in the depths of winter, which is the main reason we created a WTB Down Under? tag many years ago, and with 880 unique posts (with yours being 881), it is our most popular tag, followed distantly by Bug Love.  Though its coloration resembles that of a Potter Wasp, its antennae are quite distinctive.  Your non-stinging Hymenopteran is a Bottlebrush Sawfly,
Pterygophorus cinctus, and according to Jungle Dragon:  “Sawfly is the common name for insects belonging to suborder Symphyta of the order Hymenoptera. Sawflies do not possess the distinctive thin waist of the other hymenopterans, nor do they possess a sting. Their name comes from the female’s saw-like egg-laying tube, which she uses to make a slit in a plant leaf or stem, into which she lays her eggs. The adult Bottlebrush Sawfly has an orange and black banded body, with a wingspan of about 2cm. Males have feathery (pectinate) antennae.”  The lack of feathery antennae indicates your individual is a female.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination