Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified flying object
Location: Esperance, Western Australia
March 5, 2017 11:50 am
Insect has long antennae (about the same length of the body), 6 legs, about an inch long, made a highpitch squeaking noise when I put it in the container, can fly, wings seem to be sheltered like a beetles, body is black with a brown patch in the middle
Signature: With an answer

Eucalyptus Borer

This is a Eucalyptus Borer, a species that has been accidentally introduced to California where it has a plentiful supply of food plants, but no natural enemies to control its populations.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Request for Identification of Mystery Australian Stick insect
Location: Mount Gambier, South Australia, Australia
March 3, 2017 1:46 am
Hello!
I found recently found some mystery phasmids while out doing conservation and land management work, and i would love to try and get a positive ID on them. Ive tried finding information on the internet about the individuals i found, but most of the information is about the larger ‘pet’ Australian species.
The green one was the easiest to photograph, as it stayed still. The smaller brown individuals (who are a different gender judging by genitalia) were much more lively.
The images i included show the green individual, which has a bulkier body, and two thin protrusions at the end. On all the individuals i found, there was no evidence or wings or wing buds (found in nymph stages of other stick insects) so i assume they may be flightless.
With front limbs straight out, the green one was about 11-12cm long total, with about 7cm of that being from head to end of abdomen.
I found these guys on a native grass possibly called “Tussock Grass” (Poa sieberiana or Poa labillardieri) – within close vivacity to Ficinia nodosa (Knotted Club Rush). So they were close to the ground. Others i were working with noticed them on their clothing as we worked in the area, and we assumed they climbed onto us from the grass. Acacia and Shea-oak were also very close by.
Some were observed mating but i didn’t get a chance to see the size of those adults.
I hope all the information i provided helps in identification. For now i will keep them in captivity until tomorrow, where i will probably release them back to the tussock grasses where i found them
I cant seem to attach all the images, so if you need additional images i have them (images of abdomen, close ups of heads, genetalia etc)
Signature: Liam

Sydney Stick Insect

Dear Liam,
We are posting your image in the hopes that one of our readers might be able to assist with a species identification of this Phasmid.  You can try attaching additional images and responding to us.

Here are some other images, but i was already given a positive ID by an australian stick insect breeder. The phasmid is the “Sydney stick insect” Candovia peridromes.

Sydney Stick Insect

Sydney Stick Insect

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bugs in my eucalyptus
Location: Ballarat Australia
February 25, 2017 9:57 pm
I found a cluster of these bugs in one of the eucalyptus trees at my house. They are about 1 cm long and jump / fly when touched – though one did crawl happily over my hand. They don’t seem to bite. Further investigation found about 40 smaller ones – similar legs and body colour – but no wings. I can’t see what they are eating – but if they are likely to eat too much of the tree, I’ll need to do something. So, I’d love to know what they are.
Signature: Kerry

Black Gum Leafhoppers

Dear Kerry,
Thanks to the Brisbane Insect site, we believe we have identified your insects as Black Gum Leafhoppers in the Tribe Eurymelini.  According to the site:  “The Eurymelini are only found on eucalypts, so their common name Gum-leafhoppers. They are brightly coloured or predominantly black.”  We are reluctant to provide a species name as many members of the tribe look similar. 
Eurymela bakeri which is pictured on the New South Wales Government site looks very close, but Eurymela distincta, which is also pictured on the New South Wales Government site looks even more similar.  The site advises:  “Caution Many of the insects depicted on these pages are outwardly similar and you should not use photographs as the sole means of identification. These pages form part of a scientific key which will assist a trained entomologist to identify the species accurately.”  The latter species is also pictured on Jungle Dragon.  All Leafhoppers have mouths designed to pierce and suck fluids from plants, and if they are plentiful and lacking in natural predators, they might pose a health risk to weakened plants, however since they are a native species for you and they are feeding on a native plant, we don’t believe they will cause serious harm to your trees unless they are already stressed because of drought or disease.

Black Gum Leafhoppers

Thank you so much for that.they are rather  cute and the tree looks ok.
Just have to watch them. Kerry

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Feather-Horned Beetle – Rhipicera femorata
Location: Mount Gambier, South Australia
February 23, 2017 1:06 am
Found this beautiful little man today while out taking photos. Its a male Rhipicera femorata. They are uncommon and little is known about them, and i thought you and your readers might enjoy some nice photos 🙂
Taken on 23/02/2017, Mount Gambier, South Australia
Signature: – Liam

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Liam,
This is a very good morning for us.  Generally, the beginning of the year is not the busiest time for our site as winter envelops the northern hemisphere and most of our submissions are blurry images sent by desperate homemakers who find carpet beetles, stink bugs, bed bugs, cockroaches and other household intruders that they fear and loath.  Your submission is the third beautiful and wondrous posting for us today.  We really prefer posting images from people who appreciate the beauty of the lower beasts.  While Feather Horned Beetles are not new to our site, your images are especially lovely.  According to the Atlas of Living Australia:  “Adults may not feed, but fly readily in fine weather. During their short summer flight season, males greatly outnumber females; their flabellate antennae are presumably particularly sensitive to the female’s scent and help them to home in on her. The larvae are thought to be parasites of the nymphs of cicadas living in sandy soils.”  According to Featured Creature:  “The males differ from the females in that their anntenae are much larger and more pronounced. Those anntenae are unique due to the fact that they have more than 20 segments and arise from small knob-like prominences.”

Feather Horned Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant yellow robber fly from Western Australia
Location: Quinninup, Western Australia
February 23, 2017 3:14 am
I found this giant fly on a window, feet caught in spiderwebbing, 25km south of Manjimup. It is 45mm from head to tip of abdomen, is bright orange on the top of the abdomen and black and hairy underneath. It has tufts of black and white hairs down the sides of the abdomen and very strong black legs covered in barbs.
Signature: PK

Giant Yellow Robber Fly

Dear PK,
The Giant Yellow Robber Fly,
Blepharotes coriarius, is one of the most impressive looking flies we have ever received for posting.  We were quite amazed the first time we posted an image of a Giant Yellow Robber Fly nine years ago.  It is one impressive predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this insect
Location: Nsw
February 18, 2017 7:28 pm
Hi just wondering what this is
Signature: Bug identification

Feather Horned Longicorn

Based on images posted to Project Noah and to the Worldwide Cerambycidae Photo Gallery, we are quite confident this is a Feather Horned Longicorn, Piesarthrius marginellus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination