Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Australian wasp
Location: Hornsby NSW
December 3, 2016 1:03 am
My wife captured this shot in our front garden. I wonder if the wasp removed the huntsman spiders legs for transport purposes?
Signature: Australian wasp

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

We get several very dramatic submissions from Australia each year of Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae with Huntsman Spider prey.  The female Spider Wasps stings and paralyzes the Huntsman Spider and then drags it back to her burrow where she lays an egg on the paralyzed Spider.  When the egg hatches, the wasp larva feeds on the living but paralyzed Spider.  It appears that your Spider Wasp has removed the legs of the Huntsman Spider by biting them off in order to make transportation easier.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site, we believe your Spider Wasp is in the genus Fabriogenia.

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is it?
Location: Sydney, Australia
December 1, 2016 3:20 am
Hi, recently after bringing in the washing a giant moth like bug rose out of my washing. I wish I had taken a photo. It looked nearly as big as my hand.. like a big mottley black/greyish moth type creature. It’s wings moved a bit and it walked around. It’s body was dark and very solid from what I saw. I was hoping for a few suggestions? To lead me in the right direction. I’ve never seen a bug like that my whole life. The picture I put with it was similar, but the one I saw was darker.
Signature: Tiana

Wood Moth, we believe

Wood Moth, we believe

Dear Tiana,
This is either a Ghost Moth in the family Hepialidae (see ButterflyHouse) or a Wood Moth in the family Cossidae (see ButterflyHouse) and we believe it looks like the Wood Moth
Endoxyla secta that is pictured on Butterfly House.  We did make the Giant Wood Moth our Bug of the Month for December.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug found
Location: Adelaide
November 29, 2016 1:06 am
Hi there I was just wondering if you would be able to tell me what sort of bug this is, as I’ve never seen one before and quite curious. Thanks heaps
Signature: Laken ilott

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Laken,
This is a Mole Cricket, a common subterranean dweller found in many parts of the world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug! Queensland Australia
Location: Queensland Australia
November 26, 2016 4:08 pm
Hi,
Could you help us figure out what this bug is? It looks like an assasin bug but still has pink legs where as on google other assasin bugs have full black legs? Is it just a baby?
Thanks!
Signature: No preference

Fruit Spotting Bug nymph

Immature Fruit Spotting Bug

This is NOT an Assassin Bug.  Our gut reaction was that this must be a Leaf Footed Bug or Tip Wilter in the family Coreidae, and that suspicion proved correct when we located this FlickR image taken of Airlie Beach.  We found it identified as a Fruit Spotting Bug, Amblypelta lutescens or A. nitida , thanks to the Brisbane Insect site.  It is called a Banana Spotting Bug on the International Journal of Pest Management site.

Ahh thank you so much! It’s been driving is crazy 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect in Australian Wet Tropics
Location: Cairns, Queensland, Australia
November 24, 2016 6:16 pm
Hi folks,
Please see the pix (on one MSWord doc of 2 pages; I tried sending JPGs but they won’t go through). The insect is huge. The body is about 2 inches long. It was photographed at night in tropical rainforest.
Enjoy your Thanksgiving and thank you.
Signature: Jim (Hackett)

Spiny Rainforest Katydid

Spiny Rainforest Katydid

Dear Jim,
This is a Katydid and we identified it as a Spiny Rainforest Katydid,
Phricta aberrans, thanks to Oz Animals where it states:  “The Spiny Rainforest Katydid is a very unusual subtropical rainforest katydid from eastern Queensland and northern New South Wales. The body and legs have numerous thorny spines and antennae are very long. The insect is greenish above with different shades of green and brownish colours providing excellent camouflage; the underside is pale.”  There is a nice image posted to ipernity.  The ovipositor on your individual indicates she is a female.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much. It is is fact more likely to be the closely related Phricta spinosa, which ranges in rainforest from Cooktown to Innisfail. Cairns is in the middle of this range.
Jim.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Katydid – northwest Queensland, Australia
Location: Cloncurry, Queensland
November 22, 2016 7:07 am
This lady turned up at my workplace today, and the photo was taken because she’s not a bug that we usually see here. With a bit of googling and posting on other sites (reddit), the consensus seems to be that she is a katydid of some sort, but with no positive confirmation. Unfortunately, she is no longer with us, as a nearby Peewee (Magpie Lark) thought that she looked delicious. (“It’s the circle of liiife…”)
She does look a bit like a katydid that was posted here a few years ago (https://www.whatsthatbug.com/2008/05/03/unknown-australian-katydid-killed-for-photo-op/)
Signature: Johnmc

Female Raspy Cricket

Female Raspy Cricket

Dear Johnmc,
The link you provided from our archives was a correct identification on your part, but it is not a Katydid.  We eventually identified that insect as a female Raspy Cricket, probably in the genus
Ametrus thanks to the input of Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki, and somehow, duplicate postings were in our archive.  We deleted your link in favor of the correctly identified posting of the Raspy Cricket.  Here is another posting of what appears to be the same species of Raspy Cricket.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination