Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Colourful from Australia
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney
Date: 05/07/2018
Time: 05:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman, a friend of us found this in Sydney and we have no clue what it is. It’s very beautiful.
How you want your letter signed:  Nexus6

Macadamia Cup Moth Caterpillar:  Mecytha fasciata

Hi,
We’ve solved the mystery :  There is a parent at our school who is an entomologist. It is the caterpillar of the Macadamia Cup Moth ( Mecytha fasciata ). It will turn into a little brown and white furry moth.
Kind regards
Thomas

Dear Thomas,
Thanks for getting back to us.  Of course, though you have provided an identification, we are still posting your image and query because we could not pass up a subject line:  “Colourful from Australia.”  In North America, this family is commonly called the Stinging Slug Caterpillars because many species have venomous spines.
  The Macadamia Cup Moth Caterpillar is also pictured on Australian Nature and Dave’s Garden.  According to Butterfly House “This Caterpillar is green with a yellow stripe down its back. Unusually for this family, it has no tubercles, but is smoothly rounded.”  That is an indication this species does not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found a bug I’ve never seen before
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Victoria, Australia
Date: 04/28/2018
Time: 05:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear bug man, found this sick looking bug when out camping. I’ve never seen anything like it before
How you want your letter signed:  From brett

Flightless Female Soldier Fly: Boreoides subulatus

Dear Brett,
The first time we received an image of this species of flightless Female Soldier Fly
Boreoides subulatus, we did not know if we were looking at a mutilated individual that was missing its wings.  The species is pictured on iNaturalist and on Atlas of Living Australia, and according to the Museums Victoria site:  “Female Wingless Soldier Flies are seen on walls and fences, laying masses of long white eggs. Larvae live in damp soil or rotting vegetation, especially in or near compost.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possibly a Giant waterbug
Geographic location of the bug:  Tom Price Western Australia
Date: 04/19/2018
Time: 03:52 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi me and my daughter found an interesting bug in our pool. We live in Tom Price Western Australia (the Pilbara region) we found It  swimming around in the pool, when it was brought out it made the shape of a leaf. I suspect it is a Giant water bug, but this one is quite thin and it has long “tail”possibly a syphon for air while it lays in wait in the water.
Ive never come across one that looks like this before
How you want your letter signed:  Jordan Chennell-Kuehne

Water Scorpion

Dear Jordan,
We reserve the name Giant Water Bug for the group of aquatic predators in the family Belostomatidae.  This is actually a Water Scorpion, another aquatic predator from the family Nepidae, and both families are classified together in the superfamily Nepoidea, meaning they share physical similarities.  According to Ausemade:  “With their large pincer-like forelegs used for seizing their prey, Water Scorpions can inflict a nasty nip, although they are also known to play dead when disturbed.” 

Water Scorpion

Thank you so much for this information, Ive already got all the details for my daughter she loves insects and is very interested so of course we encourage studying them and learning about them.
Thanks again
Regards,

Jordan
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Feather horned beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Gondiwindi Qld
Date: 04/19/2018
Time: 06:44 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Not sure if you’re still interested in these submissions. I found this one on the clothesline also! They must pick up better signal on the old hillshoists.
How you want your letter signed:  Caleb

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Caleb,
Your images of this Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis, are positively gorgeous, and we always enjoy posting beautiful images.  According to biologist Dr. Carin Bondar on Facebook:  “Aren’t those antennae just amazing?  The large surface provides more space for chemoreceptors which are necessary to smell pheromones and find a partner.”

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Malanda Far North Queensland Australia
Date: 04/18/2018
Time: 04:25 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I am very interested to find out what caterpillar this is
How you want your letter signed:  From Austin

Birdwing Caterpillar

Dear Austin,
This stunning caterpillar is a Birdwing Caterpillar, but we cannot say for certain if it is a Cape York Birdwing, our first choice that is pictured on Butterfly House, or if it is the caterpillar of a Cairn’s Birdwing, also pictured on Butterfly House.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a sawfly and harmless
Geographic location of the bug:  Parramatta
Date: 04/12/2018
Time: 05:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I found this eating my gardenia plant last night. Is this bug harmful to people.  Should I be concerned about dealing with the big as a garden pest?
How you want your letter signed:  Jen

Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Jen,
This is not a Sawfly.  It is a Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar and it will eventually become a diurnal moth that is sometimes mistaken for a bee, hence its common name.

Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination