Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Larva of some sort??
Geographic location of the bug:  Perth, Western Australia
Date: 01/02/2018
Time: 09:56 PM EDT
Hi! The weirdness of this situation compelled me to look online for information. This tiny little creature was found in the cistern water of a toilet that had been unflushed for a while. I apologise profusely for the blurry nature of the photos but as you can see from the mm markers it is a tiny little thing, and I took its photo through a magnifying glass with my phone. Thank you 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Curiously Confused

Mosquito Larva

Dear Curiously Confused,
This looks like an aquatic Mosquito larva or pupa, or some other immature stage of a Fly to us, so finding it in an unused toilet makes sense, but it is puzzling there was only one.  The Department of Medical Entomology site has some images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rainbow spiky caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Victoria, Australia
Date: 01/03/2018
Time: 08:50 PM EDT
I was at St Andrews  market around February or June 2017 when I saw a strange rainbow caterpillar on the tree. It had green spikes and was about the size of a fingernail. It looked poisonous because of it’s spikes but I have no idea.
How you want your letter signed:  From Bethany

Four Spotted Cup Moth Caterpillar

Dear Bethany,
In North America, we refer to this as a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, and in Australia, the family members are known as Cup Moths.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site, we are confident this is a Four Spotted Cup Moth Caterpillar,
Doratifera quadriguttata.  The Brisbane Insect site states:  “The Four-spotted Cup Moth caterpillar is colourful, with pale green body, pink back with black and white patterns on the top.  There are eight green spikes on the each side, at the front and end there are a pair of red spikes. On the top of thorax section, there are four hidden red spikes, will erect with stinging hairs when disturbed.”  According to Butterfly House:  “Red stinging hairs are protruded from the four at the front on the thorax when the caterpillar is disturbed.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Can you please help me identify this beetle.?
Geographic location of the bug:  Perth, Western Australia.
Date: 01/02/2018
Time: 09:17 PM EDT
Hello, I found this beetle in my ensuite but I’m having trouble identifying it. I found The spotted rose beetle but I can’t see that there in Australia. I was hoping you could help me identify him. As I’m not sure whether to let him go or where to put him.
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, Narida Doherty.

Brown Flower Beetle

Dear Narida,
We quickly identified this Scarab Beetle as a Brown Flower Beetle,
Glycyphana stolata, thanks the the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “The Brown Flower Beetle usually found feeding nectar on gum tree flowers. This beetle can be found feeding nectar on various native plants during summer.”  The species is also pictured on the Atlas of Living Australia and Oz Animals.

Thank you so much Daniel, that’s exactly what it is!
Regards,
Narida.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What Is this wierd fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Nsw, Sydney, Australia
Date: 12/19/2017
Time: 07:09 PM EDT
It has yellow spots on one side, and a sliver green surface (like a fly) on the other side.its overall shape is that of a fly, But the head is in the form of a wasp with it being yellow. It also has the wings of the fly. Overall, It is also prettt big, and It looks like a hybrid of a fly and a wasp. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  S.A

Unknown “Fly”

Dear S.A.,
Alas, your image is far too blurry for us to identify, but we are posting it.  Perhaps one of our readers will take a stab at an identification.

Update:  We can’t believe Cesar Crash provided what seems to be an excellent possibility:  a female Yellow Headed Parasitic Snail Blow Fly that is pictured on Brisbane Insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Buderim, Queensland, Australia
Date: 12/29/2017
Time: 01:15 AM EDT
Can you identify this beetle please ?
How you want your letter signed:  Steve Ormerod

Common Assassin Bug

Dear Steve,
This is not a Beetle.  It is an Assassin Bug and we believe we have correctly identified it as a Common Assassin Bug,
Pristhesancus plagipennis, thanks to images posted to the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “As all other assassin bugs, Common Assassin Bugs have the long head with powerful proboscis. They use the powerful proboscis to puncture their prey. Their legs are long so that they have long attack distance. Adult bugs are brown in colour with transparent wings. Nymphs are dark brown to black with brightly orange abdomens.”  We would advise you not to attempt to handle Assassin Bugs.  They might bite.

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for your prompt reply and your identification of this insect.  It is very much appreciated.
Kind regards,
Steve Ormerod

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Avondale Heights, Melbourne Australia
Date: 12/16/2017
Time: 05:18 PM EDT
Hi
Can you identify this spider?
How you want your letter signed:  Thankyou Suzana

Huntsman Spider

Dear Suzana,
This is one of the Huntsman Spiders in the family Sparassidae.  There are some nice images of Huntsman Spiders on the Brisbane Insect site.  We are postdating your submission to go live to our site at the end of December when our editorial staff is away for the holidays.

Great thanks for the speedy reply Daniel…didn’t know it was there until.my cat noticed it and went nuts. Thankfully it was up high and out of reach
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination