Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very Strange Grub
Location: Northern ACT, Australia
December 13, 2016 6:37 pm
I found a very strange grub underneath my sliding door. It is rather small, it is green mostly and has an interesting pattern on its body. It appears to have two fake eyes on the top of its head and has a barb on the rear of the bug. It doesn’t have legs which is why I am calling it a grub. It is not worm like. It is highly active when I touch it with a straw. It doesn’t move without stimulation. It’s probably about the same size of the top half of your thumb and about as wide. The sliding door where it is currently hiding is between the kitchen and the outdoor area which contains gardens and lawn.
Signature: Sincerely, Anonymous

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Your Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar, Hippotion celerio, is a wide-ranging species found across Australia as well as many other parts of the world.  You can read more about the Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar on Butterfly House.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big beetle id please
Location: Lake Macquarie NSW
December 12, 2016 8:52 pm
Hi, I’ve seen this beetle today for the first time, although my partner says he has seen it on the tree before. I have never seen one like it. It’s very big, about 60mm and appears to have been living on a sawn off palm trunk. I’m at Wyee Point, in the Lake Macquarie region of NSW. We have a lot of Eucalypts around.
Just wondering if it’s something that’s going to attack the timber in my home?
Thanks very much
Heather
Signature: Regards.

Prionid

Prionid

Dear Heather,
This Longicorn is a Prionid in the subfamily Prioninae, and just last month we identified a submission (and corrected a misidentified submission from our archive) as
Agrianome spinicollis.  Longicorns are members of the family Cerambycidae, and they are also known as Longhorned Borer Beetles because they have larvae that bore in wood, generally living or recently dead trees.  Milled lumber is generally safe from infestation, however, it appears that your deck is surrounding a standing trunk.  Beetles in this family are usually host specific, and not general feeders.  According to the Queensland Museum site:  “This species is found in rainforest and open forest in eastern Australia. It is common in Queensland and New South Wales and also occurs on Lord Howe Island. The larvae are huge white grubs found in rotten wood, especially dead Poinciana or fig trees. It is an important pest of pecan trees. The large adults sometimes blunder into house lights.”

Prionid

Prionid

Thank you,
we’ve relocated the beetle into the bush. The trunk (a palm) in the deck is not live, so I’m watching it for larvae. There are numerous holes in it, so it seems the beetle made a home there.
Have a nice Christmas and new year!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Veggie garden visitor
Location: St Clair, New South Wales, Australia
December 9, 2016 11:01 pm
Hey big man! My sister had this bug hanging around her veggie garden and we are very fascinated to know what it is! The pictures are a tad blurry but it’s ‘furryness’ made it very distinct. We are located in Sydney, Australia and are currently in summer. Doing some hunting it looks to me like a hummingbird moth but they are found in America. Any help? Thanks heaps
Signature: Bianca

Hawkmoth

Hawkmoth

Dear Bianca,
The reason your sister’s garden visitor reminds you of a Hummingbird Moth is that your Hawkmoth is a member of the same family, Sphingidae.  We believe you submitted images of a species of Hawkmoth from the genus Cephonodes, and the two likeliest candidates are the Coffee Hawk Moth,
Cephonodes hylas, which is pictured on Butterfly House, or the Gardenia Hawk Moth, Cephonodes kingii, which is also pictured on Butterfly House.

Hawkmoth

Hawkmoth

Thank you so much! You guys do such a great thing ☺️

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Melbourne Australia
December 6, 2016 5:53 am
Hi have never seen anything like this before can you identify it for me
Thanks Kelly
Signature: Bug person

Green Lacewing

Green Lacewing

Dear Kelly,
Because both adult Green Lacewings, and their larvae which are known as Aphid Wolves, consume large quantities of insects, including Aphids, they are considered beneficial insects in the garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: This has bitten my daughter. Is it a type of Assasian Bug?
Location: Canberra, Australia
December 5, 2016 11:45 pm
Hello, thank you so much for your help in advance. This has just bitten my young daughter on her wrist. It’s left a red bite that has swollen into a huge welt very fast. She certainly screamed and screamed so it must have been very painful.
I think it is a type of Assasian Bug but I’m not quite sure. If it is .. is that dangerous? Ive given her some bite cream to use and an antihistamine tablet.
We live in Canberra, Australia.
Thank you
Signature: Fiona Crispin

Ground Assassin Bug

Ground Assassin Bug

Dear Fiona,
This is indeed a Ground Assassin Bug,
Ectomocoris patricius, a species we identified on the Brisbane Insect website where it states:  “We found those orange and black assassin bugs running very fast on forest floor. This bug will bite if handle by bare hand. The insect has very strong front pair legs. All its legs are orange in colour. Its orange colour body and black pattern are the standard assassin bug warning colours. ”  This appears to be a wingless female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Funky disco boots Spider Karijini
Location: Karijini, North West Western Australia
December 6, 2016 6:08 am
Hello,
Camping one night in the out back in WA we pitched up next to a cool spider. this guy lived in a hole about 20mm diameter. When he plucked up the courage he sat out, on top of his hole guarding it like a bouncer at flares, he was out in the evening and had a really vibrant party suit on. white and orange legs and a snow white body.
Any ideas?
curious to find out and haven’t seen anything similar before nor after.
Signature: Tim

Wolf Spider

Desert Wolf Spider

Dear Tim,
We have one previous submission in our archives of a Desert Wolf Spider,
Hoggicosa bicolor, from Western Australia, but that individual is much more yellow than your individual.  There is also an excellent image on FlickR where it states:  “Hoggicosa bicolor is arguably one of the most spectacular wolf spiders in Australia. It is fairly common in the arid zone and can be found in WA, NT, SA, Qld and western NSW. This photograph shows a penultimate male, and as all other Hoggicosa, the male will turn drab with the final moult (see the other photo of a male H. bicolor in this set).”

Thanks Daniel,
Really interested to find out.
Tim Barlow

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination