Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  King cricket
Geographic location of the bug:  Whyalla south australia
Date: 12/18/2017
Time: 02:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Seen this at work today after a big storm lastnight never seen one before just wanna know what it is and how it got here
How you want your letter signed:  Adam ellis

Female King Cricket

Dear Adam,
This does look to us like a female King Cricket,
Australostoma australasia, but alas, the images of female King Crickets on the internet that are the closest match are all from our own archives, and we do not like to cite our own archives when doing identifications.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp??
Geographic location of the bug:  Byrnestown qld. 4625.
Date: 03/07/2018
Time: 01:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Have had a lovely yellow and black wasp  building a very small mud nest on the toilet seat of all places! I have not seen another one like her, there are a lot of the mud dauber wasps that build their nests everywhere in the house, this ones stripes are more yellow than the mud dauber, she was trying to put a caterpillar in the nest but caught me watching her and took off  and I haven’t seen her return, usually the mud dauber wasps don’t care if you watch them, actually can get very close, would you happen to know the species?, seems very shy.
How you want your letter signed:  Leigh

Potter Wasp Nest

Dear Leigh,
This looks to us like the nest of a Potter Wasp in the subfamily Eumeninae, a subfamily well represented with yellow and black individuals from Australia pictured on the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “Potter Wasps in Eumeninae build mud nest. They are solitary wasps. They are typically black and yellow or black and orange in colours. Potter wasps usually prey on caterpillars which they paralyze and place inside cells in their nests for their young. Nests are either dug into the ground, constructed from mud, in wood, or in existing burrows of their hosts.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flying stinging bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Perth Western Australia
Date: 03/04/2018
Time: 07:52 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My mother has been stung by this and I have no idea what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Stinging bug

Spider Wasp, we believe

The antennae and the spines on the hind legs lead us to believe this is a species of Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, but alas, we have not had any luck locating any images online that look like your individual.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had.  According to Brisbane Insects:  “Most of the Spider Warps [sic] are orange and black, black and grey/white markings or just black, i.e., the very strong warning colours. They usually have tinted wings, smooth and shiny body. Their hind-legs are long and always have two prominent spurs. They tend to coil their antennae. They usually hunting on ground with the characteristic wing flicking movement.  Females have very powerful sting.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Central West western australia
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 06:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen these many times over my lifetime but never known what they are. I have tried to find info via Google and the closest thing I’ve found is cicada.
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, Helen

Antlion

Dear Helen,
This is an Antlion, not a Cicada.  The larvae of Antlions are frequently called Doodlebugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange bug found by swimming pool
Geographic location of the bug:  Brisbane Australia
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 09:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi  we came across this guy the other day. Found by my grand daughter. Just wondered if you have seen anything like it before. Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Gary Buckle

Mealybug Destroyer Larva

Dear Gary,
This looks to us like the larva of a Lady Beetle known as a Mealybug Destroyer, a species native to Australia that has been exported for agricultural purposes to help control populations of Mealybugs in agricultural areas.  The larva is pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this an assasin bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Meani NSW (2234)
Date: 02/25/2018
Time: 08:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bit my wife on the finger when she grabbed it accidentally, attempting to cut the flower. Had a sharp pain for the next few minutes, but it subsided. This is now about 30 hours later and the area is warm, and she feels numbness and tingling.
Is this an assasin bug? does she need medical help?
How you want your letter signed:  Menai Resident

Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear Menai Resident,
This is indeed an immature Assassin Bug and it appears to be an immature Common Assassin Bug,
Pristhesancus plagipennis, that is pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.  While the bite of most Assassin Bugs will only produce a local reaction, individual reactions may differ due to allergies and other factors.  We are not qualified to dispense medical advice, but considering the time that has elapsed, it might be wise to consider seeing a specialist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination