Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Princetown, Victoria
February 4, 2017 6:49 am
Landed on our windscreen will driving through coastal sand dunes !
Signature: Rixy

Wattle Pig Weevil

Dear Rixy,
This is some species of Weevil, a large and diverse group of Beetles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’m having trouble identifying what I believe is a species of wasp.
Location: Bayside area, Melbourne Australia.
February 2, 2017 6:13 pm
G’day BUGMAN!!
I’ve got another conundrum for you when you get some spare time.
I saw this bug at Mum’s the other day, he was just chilling out on a blade of grass so I took some pictures. He’s a little bit cute, but also looks a bit waspish. From the pages I’ve looked up to identify Australian wasp species I’m having trouble finding an accurate identity for him. The closest I’ve come across is a Potter Wasp, but from pictures they aren’t similar enough.
As you can see my little wasp friend has an all black face & eyes & no tiny stick waist. Potter wasps appear to have a much thinner, or longer thin section of their abdomen. Also they have more orange on their face & antenne than my little friend.
Would you know of any sites in Australia that allowing uploading of pictures to ask about bug identification like you do?
Your website is so much fun to browse around.
Thank you again for your time.
Have a wonderful day!
Signature: Kindest regards, manda.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Hello again Manda,
Since the internet is global, whyever would you want to locate an Australian counterpart to our site?  That said, we know of no Australian counterpart to our site, though we do have a sister site in Brazil called Insetologia.  Our editorial staff (as if we don’t have enough to do) has toyed with the idea of applying for grant funding to venture into Australia.  We tend to field many more questions from Australia and South Africa from December through February when much of the northern hemisphere is in the depths of winter, which is the main reason we created a WTB Down Under? tag many years ago, and with 880 unique posts (with yours being 881), it is our most popular tag, followed distantly by Bug Love.  Though its coloration resembles that of a Potter Wasp, its antennae are quite distinctive.  Your non-stinging Hymenopteran is a Bottlebrush Sawfly,
Pterygophorus cinctus, and according to Jungle Dragon:  “Sawfly is the common name for insects belonging to suborder Symphyta of the order Hymenoptera. Sawflies do not possess the distinctive thin waist of the other hymenopterans, nor do they possess a sting. Their name comes from the female’s saw-like egg-laying tube, which she uses to make a slit in a plant leaf or stem, into which she lays her eggs. The adult Bottlebrush Sawfly has an orange and black banded body, with a wingspan of about 2cm. Males have feathery (pectinate) antennae.”  The lack of feathery antennae indicates your individual is a female.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I believe this may be a Giant Christmas Beetle?
Location: Cheltenham, Melbourne, Australia.
February 2, 2017 5:55 pm
G’day BUGMAN!!
Here is my photo of what I now believe is a Giant Christmas Beetle, as per our previous discussion & my wrongly identifying him as a Goldsmith Beetle.
For anyone else who maybe reading, this little guy (although quite big really) was buzzing around the car wash while I was washing my car on Nov 28 2016. He landed in a huge pile of suds in the corner of my wash bay. As I was rinsing my car at the time, I thought it might be a good idea to put the nozzle on as gentle as possible & wash some suds away & rinse him off. He wasn’t looking too good after his Sud pile dive, so I gently picked him up & moved him to a safe place & dry land 🙂 I would’ve taken him home to keep an eye on him, but I thought he’d been through enough stress for one night & freedom was probably more comforting than being carried around & stuck in a box. Plus I wasn’t sure what they eat.
Thank you for the link of where to post him for you Bugman & thank you for being BUGMAN!!
Have a fabulous day!
Signature: Kindest regards, manda.

Christmas Beetle

Dear Manda,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a Christmas Beetle in the genus
Anoplognathus.  According to the Australian Museum:  “There are 36 species in the genus with all but one unique (endemic) to Australia and 21 species found in New South Wales. At least 10 species occur in the Sydney region – more if the Blue Mountains are included. Because they are such a feature of the eastern Australian experience some common species have been given English names, such as the Washerwoman, Anoplognathus porosus, and (rarer) King Beetle, Anoplognathus viridiaeneus (see photos, right). Distinguishing some species can be tricky, but it helps to examine the hairs on their ‘bums’ (posterior). (This is something of an in-joke among entomologists but it actually works for this group!)”  Based on the images included on the Australian Museum Christmas Beetle Project page, the markings on the elytra of your individual look most like theWasherwoman.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Canberra, Australia Insect
Location: Canberra Australia
February 1, 2017 4:05 am
Hi,
I’m hoping you can help identify what kind of Insect I found on my Lemon Tree.
The closest family I can discern are the Stick insects, but the fused wing case throws me off.
There is a few pictures in my Flickr album, but I think this is the best.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kai74/32539737646/in/album-72157679697878035/
Hope you can help,
Signature: Kai Squires

Australian Pollen Feeding Katydid

Dear Kai,
We doubt that this is a Stick Insect, and we believe it is a Longhorned Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera, possibly one of the Tree Crickets which you can find pictured on the Discover Life site.  The ovipositor indicates your individual is a female.  Two Spotted Tree Crickets have a similar roll wing appearance.  We may try to contact Piotr Naskrecki who specializes in Katydids to see if he knows the identity of your very unusual Orthopteran.  We suspect we may get comments from our readership on this identification today.

Fantastic thank you.
I did feel the ovipositor was very cricket,grasshopper like, but nothing else was.
Thanks, k.

Update:  Australian Pollen Feeding Katydid
Cesar Crash and Matthew both wrote comments that this is Zaprochilus australis, commonly called the Pollen Katydid.  The Atlas of Living Australia indicates it is a member of the Katydid family Tettigoniidae, does not provide a common name but indicates:  “At rest by day, these katydids camouflage themselves as twigs. They lie lengthways along a small branch, with antennae pointing directly forwards and hind legs pointing backwards. They hold their wings at a distinctive angle from the body, with the fore wings ‘rolled’ so that they are almost cylindrical. If disturbed, a purple patch is revealed at the base of the hind wings. At night, they fly to flowers to feed on nectar and pollen, using their specialised lengthened mouthparts to reach deep into flowers and using specialised molar plates to crush pollen grains. They have a preference for grass-trees but visit many other flowers. Adults are active from late winter and early summer. Males have a simple stridulatory file and produce a simple, barely audible call to attract mates. Females lay their eggs in crevices in bark.”  Csiro provides the common names Twig-Mimicking Katydid and Australian Pollen Feeding Katydid.  According to BunyipCo:  “As an aside that might be of interest,
Zaprochilus australis (Brullé) is one of the earliest described species of Australian Orthoptera. The first specimen was collected on an expedition authorised by Napoleon Bonaparte that comprised two vessels, one, Le Géographe the other Le Naturaliste. The former ship was captained by Capt. Nicholas Baudin, the purported collector of the type of the species on Kangaroo Island, South Australia in 1802 or, perhaps, in 1803 when another ship, the Casuarina returned there. This species is the most widespread of the genus and occurs across the southern end of the continent and seems quite abundant at times.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you please help.
Location: Canberra Australia
January 31, 2017 2:09 am
Hello thank you for taking the time to help me out I am wondering if you can help me identify this bug? I’m in Canberra Australia and right now it’s summer thank you
Signature: Andy

Fiddler Beetle

Dear Andy,
Normally, we do not like to repeat our Bug of the Month designations, but submissions in January and February are at their lowest, and we just realized it is the Ten Year Anniversary of the Fiddler Beetle,
Eupoecila australasiae, from Australia being designated as the Bug of the Month on our site in February 2007.  According to the Australian Museum:  “Female Fiddler Beetles lay their eggs in rotting logs or in the damp soil under logs. The grubs feed on rotting timber and build cocoons of soil and debris in which they pupate.”  According to Museums Victoria:  “The adult beetles emerge in early summer. They are strong fliers and fly between eucalypt and other trees to feed on nectar. They are found in all states except for Western Australia and are harmless to humans.”  According to Climate Watch:  “It buzzes loudly while flying.”  The markings on the Fiddler Beetle can be green or yellow.

Fiddler Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these clay light shells
Location: Sydney Australia
January 28, 2017 8:07 pm
Found these in the backyard and just wondering what they were shells of..
Signature: Cindy

Mud Dauber Nest

Dear Cindy,
This is a mud nest constructed by a Wasp, probably a Mud Dauber in the genus
Sceliphron based on the image posted to Oz Animals.  The Brisbane Insect site has images of a female Mud Dauber constructing her nest as well as this information:  “The wasps build mud cells in sheltered locations. If the cell is opened, you will find a wasp larva, together with some spiders which are the larva’s foods. They are collected by the mother wasp.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination