Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Australian Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Queensland, Australia
Date: 03/30/2018
Time: 09:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this large caterpillar on a vine bush just curious as to what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Anonymous

Hornworm: Gnathothlibus eras

Thanks to Butterfly House, we quickly identified this Hornworm as Gnathothlibus eras, the Aussie White-Brow Hawkmoth.  Butterfly House states:  “When disturbed, the caterpillar curls its head down onto its first two pairs of legs, and displays the third pair. The caterpillar can also exude liquid from its mouth, and has even been heard to give a squeal.”  Listed food plants include Grape vine and Sweet Potato Vine.

Hornworm: Gnathothlibus eras

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle with tree bark camoflauge
Geographic location of the bug:  Near Lake Burrendong in NSW Australia
Date: 03/29/2018
Time: 10:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
On the 28h of March, in the location specified, a beetle with an interesting camoflauge that looked rather like tree bark landed on my green t-shirt. I was curious as to what kind of beetle it was so I managed to take a few photos before it flew away. It stayed on my t-shirt without moving very much for quite a while, maybe 10-20 minutes before it flew away. I knew it was a beetle of some sort since it had wing covers, which I saw when it took flight. It also had six legs, which I observed while it walked across my t-shirt.
It would be great if this beetle could be identified, thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  A 16 year old, Alvin Yao

Bark Gnawing Beetle

Dear Alvin,
The best clue we have based on your image as we embark upon trying to provide you with an identification are the beaded or moniliform (see BugGuide) antennae.  We searched the Brisbane Insect site for Darkling Beetles, but found nothing similar.  We just took a guess at the family.  We will post your images as unidentified and continue to research your request.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with an identification.

Bark Gnawing Beetle

Update:  Thanks to a comment from frequent contributor Karl, we agree that this is a Bark Gnawing Beetle which is depicted on Life Unseen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Omg what is this and where did it come from
Geographic location of the bug:  Mittagong NSW  Australia
Date: 03/27/2018
Time: 08:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  It’s the beginning of Autumn
Surrounded by privet trees
Several veggie gardens
Southern Highlands region of NSW
Nearly stepped on this thing at 4am in morning on my lounge room rug
Never seen anything like it
Realise it’s a grub of some kind
Put it in container
What should I do with it
Keep or let go
Will it damage my veggies
Does it turn into a butterfly or moth or something
Please help ASAP
Don’t want to leave it in container to die if it needs to finish it’s life cycle but don’t want it damaging my veggie gardens
How did it get here
No one I’ve asked had ever seen one before
My niece thinks it may be a type of horn worm
Please help
How you want your letter signed:  Freaked me out – sarah

Hornworm: Psilogramma casuarinae

Dear Sarah,
Your niece is correct.  This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  We identified it on Butterfly House as
Psilogramma casuarinae, a species with no common name, thanks to this additional image.  Butterfly House has a list of food plants including olive, privet and jasmine, and the site also indicates “The caterpillar grows to a length of about 8 cms. When the caterpillar is fully grown, it leaves the food plant and walks up to 20 metres to pupate under the soil.”  Because of the pink coloration, we are surmising that your individual is pre-pupal,  and we suspect it might have already begun to transform.  You can return it outside to an area where it can dig underground.  It will not continue to feed at this time and it will not eat your veggies.

Hornworm: Psilogramma casuarinae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange beefly
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Helen
Date: 03/16/2018
Time: 01:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So, I had just got home and went to check the letter box when I saw this fly sitting on it. But it wasn’t just any fly! It had a strange pattern, opposite to a wasp’s and it had oval eyes, it also had a strange antenna that split into two at the end, it’s wings were a strange shape and were covered with orange and black fur. It had no stinger bus was similar in colours to a bee. And also it’s legs were slim but it’s body was wider. It didn’t move no matter how close I put my camera, which is ver strange. I’ve never seen a fly with thick fur, let alone an orange a black one! Please help me discover what this strange insect is, but also, it could be new!
How you want your letter signed:  From Bethany

Tachinid Fly

Dear Bethany,
We are presuming you are from Mount Helen, Montana.  We are feeling confident that this is a parasitoid Tachinid Fly, but we have not had any luck identifying it to the genus or species level.  According to BugGuide:  “Second largest dipteran family (after Tipulidae), with ~1350 spp. in >300 genera of 4 subfamilies in our area.”

Tachinid Fly

Actually I’m in Mt Helen, Victoria. Is it possible that the fly is a new species?

Dear Bethany,
Thanks for getting back to us, clarifying the original vague location information you provided for us.  Now that we have established your actual location, we have located this image on Diptera Info that is identified as ” Tachinidae –
Microtropesa sp. from western Australia.”  We have another member of the genus Microtropesa among the postings in our archives.  The genus is well represented on Atlas of Living Australia.

Thank you for the clarification, it looks a lot like what I saw

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  brown  bug with yellow stripes and blue legs
Geographic location of the bug:  150km north east of Esperance Western Australia
Date: 03/16/2018
Time: 06:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this bug while at work. Looks a big like a cockroach.
How you want your letter signed:  GT

Mitchell’s Diurnal Cockroach

Dear GT,
Quite some time ago, we first identified this colorful Cockroach,
Polyzosteria mitchelli, as a Mardis Gras Cockroach, a name we found on Esperance Fauna where it is described as:  “most striking with its brilliant color combination. It is mainly recorded from the semi-arid areas of WA, SA and NSW, where always a delight to encounter.”   Getty Images uses the common name Mitchell’s Diurnal Cockroach.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  King cricket
Geographic location of the bug:  Whyalla south australia
Date: 12/18/2017
Time: 02:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Seen this at work today after a big storm lastnight never seen one before just wanna know what it is and how it got here
How you want your letter signed:  Adam ellis

Female King Cricket

Dear Adam,
This does look to us like a female King Cricket,
Australostoma australasia, but alas, the images of female King Crickets on the internet that are the closest match are all from our own archives, and we do not like to cite our own archives when doing identifications.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination