Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black wasp with 4 yellow dots
Geographic location of the bug:  South Australia, Elizabeth
Date: 01/31/2018
Time: 07:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this wasp on my driveway and can’t find any relating pictures of it online. Do you know what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Naiomi

Flower Wasp

Dear Naiomi,
This looks to us like a Flower Wasp in the family Scoliidae, similar to this individual posted to FlickR, or this individual also posted to FlickR.

Flower Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this please?
Geographic location of the bug:  Perth Western Australia
Date: 01/08/2018
Time: 02:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found in my carport.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you in advance

Katydid

The closest visual match we could locate online of your female Katydid are the postings of the genus Pachysaga on Atlas of Living Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Coon Bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  Cowra NSW
Date: 01/27/2018
Time: 09:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just read your response to another person re these bugs so thought I would also add my location sighting fyi. While we don’t have cotton, we do have marshmallow weed and peach trees.
How you want your letter signed:  Jennie

Aggregation of Coon Bugs

Dear Jennie,
Thanks for submitting your image of an aggregation of Coon Bugs,
Oxycarenus arctatus, in the family Oxycarenidae.  This is only our second submission of Coon Bugs since we initially posted in 2014.  According to Cesar Australia:  “The coon bug is a seed and fruit feeder, which occasionally swarms on cultivated plants including cotton, stone fruits and some vegetables. They prefer malvaceous plants such as marshmallow weed, but can reach pest status on crops, especially in dry seasons when other food is scarce. Feeding causes young fruit to shrivel and leaves discoloured patches on ripening fruit. These small bugs are most abundant in warm weather and are often found swarming around fowl yards, on fences and around the walls of houses. Adults are about 3 mm long with a black and white body. Nymphs are black with a conspicuous blood-red abdomen.” 

Aggregation of Coon Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Juvenile assassin bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Canberra, ACT
Date: 01/24/2018
Time: 04:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, does this look like an assassin bug instar to you? I can’t find anything  in picture files with the two spots…
How you want your letter signed:  Edwin

Hi, actually don’t bother! I think now it’s a eucalyptus tip bug instar. Thanks for your great work anyway!
Edwin

Immature Crusader Bug

Dear Edwin,
We got your subsequent communication indicating that your believe this is a “eucalyptus tip bug instar” instead of an Assassin Bug nymph, but we disagree.  Five different species of Eucalyptus Tip Wilter Bugs from the tribe Amorbini are pictured on the Brisbane Insect site, and none resemble your nymph.  We did find an image on Alamy identified as Australian Crusader bug nymphs that is a better match, and that identification is supported by images of
Mictis profana on the Brisbane Insect site.  Congratulations on identifying the correct family.  The identification of immature insects is often a challenge.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Name of bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Geilston Bay, Tasmania, Australia
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I wonder if you could tell me what kind of bug this is? They range in size from not much bigger than a pinhead to about 5 mms. I only see them for a short period in summer. Usually in small clusters on the road, though this year I have noticed them in the vegetation on the roadside. I have never seen them anywhere except this one small section (approximately 15 ft) of road. Thanks so much for your time
How you want your letter signed:  Ruth Gooding

Immature Jewel Bugs

Dear Ruth,
These are immature Shield Bugs in the family Scutellaridae, and because many members of the family have bright metallic colors, they are frequently called Jewel Bugs.  We located a nearly identical image on FlickR from Tasmania that identifies the species as
Choerocoris paganus creche.  The tripart name stands for genus, species and subspecies.  We found additional information on the genus and species from Australia, which leads us to believe the subspecies C. p. creche is a Tasmanian subspecies.  Geographically isolated populations often form subspecies, and with the passage of time, they might even become distinct species.  The Atlas of Living Australia calls the species the Ground Shield Bug, and the Brisbane Insect site calls it the Red Jewel Bug.  According to Jungle Dragon:  “Adults and nymphs feed primarily on the sappy contents of seeds of hop-bush (Dodonaea viscosa), including those which have fallen to the ground.”

Immature Jewel Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Melbourne
Date: 01/20/2018
Time: 05:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Wondering what this is
How you want your letter signed:  LB

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Dear LB,
While this Bottlebrush Sawfly is classified in the same insect order, Hymenoptera, as the wasps and bees, it is not considered either.  Unlike wasps and bees, Sawflies, including this Bottlebrush Sawfly, do not sting.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination