Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possibly a Giant waterbug
Geographic location of the bug:  Tom Price Western Australia
Date: 04/19/2018
Time: 03:52 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi me and my daughter found an interesting bug in our pool. We live in Tom Price Western Australia (the Pilbara region) we found It  swimming around in the pool, when it was brought out it made the shape of a leaf. I suspect it is a Giant water bug, but this one is quite thin and it has long “tail”possibly a syphon for air while it lays in wait in the water.
Ive never come across one that looks like this before
How you want your letter signed:  Jordan Chennell-Kuehne

Water Scorpion

Dear Jordan,
We reserve the name Giant Water Bug for the group of aquatic predators in the family Belostomatidae.  This is actually a Water Scorpion, another aquatic predator from the family Nepidae, and both families are classified together in the superfamily Nepoidea, meaning they share physical similarities.  According to Ausemade:  “With their large pincer-like forelegs used for seizing their prey, Water Scorpions can inflict a nasty nip, although they are also known to play dead when disturbed.” 

Water Scorpion

Thank you so much for this information, Ive already got all the details for my daughter she loves insects and is very interested so of course we encourage studying them and learning about them.
Thanks again
Regards,

Jordan
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Feather horned beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Gondiwindi Qld
Date: 04/19/2018
Time: 06:44 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Not sure if you’re still interested in these submissions. I found this one on the clothesline also! They must pick up better signal on the old hillshoists.
How you want your letter signed:  Caleb

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Caleb,
Your images of this Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis, are positively gorgeous, and we always enjoy posting beautiful images.  According to biologist Dr. Carin Bondar on Facebook:  “Aren’t those antennae just amazing?  The large surface provides more space for chemoreceptors which are necessary to smell pheromones and find a partner.”

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Malanda Far North Queensland Australia
Date: 04/18/2018
Time: 04:25 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I am very interested to find out what caterpillar this is
How you want your letter signed:  From Austin

Birdwing Caterpillar

Dear Austin,
This stunning caterpillar is a Birdwing Caterpillar, but we cannot say for certain if it is a Cape York Birdwing, our first choice that is pictured on Butterfly House, or if it is the caterpillar of a Cairn’s Birdwing, also pictured on Butterfly House.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a sawfly and harmless
Geographic location of the bug:  Parramatta
Date: 04/12/2018
Time: 05:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I found this eating my gardenia plant last night. Is this bug harmful to people.  Should I be concerned about dealing with the big as a garden pest?
How you want your letter signed:  Jen

Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Jen,
This is not a Sawfly.  It is a Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar and it will eventually become a diurnal moth that is sometimes mistaken for a bee, hence its common name.

Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stripey black and white Grasshopper?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bullsbrook area, Perth, Western Australia
Date: 04/07/2018
Time: 01:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! I found this cute looking little guy in my front yard and I cant seem to identify him.  Thank you for helping.
How you want your letter signed:  Taylah

Grasshopper

Dear Taylah,
We have not had any luck providing you with a species identification.  We could not locate any similar looking Grasshoppers on the Esperance Fauna page nor on the Brisbane Insect site.  The bulbous eyes on your individual are quite distinctive. 

Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney Australia
Date: 04/01/2018
Time: 02:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was on my herb pot plant never seen it before like to identify
How you want your letter signed:  Lady bug

Long Legged Fly

Dear Lady bug,
This is a Long Legged Fly in the family Dolichopodidae, and according to Ecologistics:  “Dolichopodidae generally are small flies with large, prominent eyes and a metallic cast to their appearance, though there is considerable variation among the species. Most have long legs, though some do not. In many species the males have unusually large genitalia which are taxonomically useful in identifying species. Most adults are predatory on other small animals, though some may scavenge or act as kleptoparasites of spiders or other predators.”  Thanks to images on Save Our Waterways Now, we believe your individual is
Austrosciapus connexus, and the site states that though there are other similar looking species:  “Austrosciapus connexus is the commonest of them, and found in backyards, gardens, as well as wilder country.”  The species is also pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination