Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dragonfly like bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Australia
Date: 11/24/2017
Time: 05:46 AM EDT
There is this bug that looks like a dragonfly but is like a noctrural bug
How you want your letter signed:  Oliver lee

Blue Eyes Lacewing

Dear Oliver,
This elegant looking, but feeble flying predator is a Blue Eyes Lacewing which you can verify on the Insects of Brisbane site where it states:  “They have a pair of transparent wings of about equal size. When fly, they may be mistaken as dragonflies. But their wings are fold in tent shape whish dragonflies do not do. They can also distinguished by their long antenna. Adult body is orange-brown in colour, with iridescent grey eyes. The moniliform antennae are black with pale apex. Legs are pale yellow. Their transparence wings are narrow with a white marking on the wing tips.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug in garden.
Geographic location of the bug:  Gippsland Victoria
Date: 11/20/2017
Time: 10:01 PM EDT
Im trying to find out what bug this is. And is it a good bug or bad bug?
How you want your letter signed:  Anyway.

Fiddler Beetle

Each year as summer approaches in the southern hemisphere, we receive identification requests for Fiddler Beetles, like the one in your image, from Australia.  When it comes to insects, good and bad are relative terms.  Fiddler Beetles pose no threat to humans.  According to Australian Museum:  “Adult beetles emerge from soil in early summer and feed on the nectar of flowers” and “Female Fiddler Beetles lay their eggs in rotting logs or in the damp soil under logs. The grubs feed on rotting timber and build cocoons of soil and debris in which they pupate.”  As pollinating insects with larvae that help break down rotting wood, we feel confident stating they are beneficial in the garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Gardenia Munchers in Queensland, Australian‼️
Geographic location of the bug:  Caloundra, Queensland, Australia
Date: 11/21/2017
Time: 07:48 AM EDT
I’ve got these gorgeous specimens chowing down on my Gardenia Buds, Flowers &, to a lesser extent, leaves.
I’ve put two in a glass jar with a little water, with Gardenia Buds, Blooms & leaves.
How long before this big fellow Pupates? Anything in particular that I should do to care for them?
Many thanks for your time👍🏼‼️
Warmest Entomological Regards,
How you want your letter signed:  Nikkii

Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Nikkii,
What pretty Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillars,
Cephonodes kingii, you have.  The only image we have in our archives is a green individual.  According to Butterfly House:  “These Caterpillars when they first hatch are pale green with a short black tail horn.  The caterpillars later become black, grey, or green, often with black lines across the back. The back of the head and the final claspers are covered in small white warts. The caterpillars have posterior horn shaped like a shallow ‘S’, and have white spiracles along each side outlined in red. The head colour varies from brown to green.”   The site also states:  “When threatened, the caterpillars arch back, and regurgitate a green fluid. If the caterpillars are crowded, they may eat each other.  The caterpillars pupate under the soil. The pupa is naked and dark brown, with a length of about 5 cms.”  You might want to consider moving them to a terrarium with clean, moist, but not wet potting soil in the bottom so they can pupate underground.  There is also a nice image on 1000 for 1KSQ.

Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

G’Day Daniel,
My apologies – when I went back to your site, it must’ve re-submitted my request. I didn’t realise that was happening, soz
I’d like to thank you for your reply. It’s quite informative, & I’m rather excited to see the Bee  Hawk Moth emerge from Pupation ‼️
Gosh, they really go to town on the Gardenia Buds‼️ They seem to have a preference for the Buds, however they do munch on the leaves  & the flowers.
I have 2. The big one, & a small one. I can see the small one getting larger throughout the day. It’s all very interesting to me, as I’m an Environmental Scientist .
I have a small Fish Tank which I will convert to a terrarium. I have some potting mix/soil which has been out of use for some time. I am concerned about purchasing some new potting mix, as it has all of the added Fertilisers, soil wetting agents, & various other chemicals. Do you think I’m better off using the older/aged potting mix – just to be on the safe side?
I don’t want the Pupae to be compromised in any way.
Again, many thanks for your reply (very much appreciated ‼️). I do apologise for accidentally sending through 3 requests .
Warmest Entomological Regards,
Nikkii
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Cricket or Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Broken Hill
Date: 10/28/2017
Time: 07:20 PM EDT
I found this guy last night in the laundry room but my mums dead set on saying it’s a giant cricket, i think it’s a giant grasshopper myself, it’s about 7 cm long and the antennae puzzle me with being so long, all the images I’ve seen of grass hoppers they don’t have as long as this one.
poor things missing part of it’s leg.
can anyone identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Hayden Crowley

Striped Raspy Cricket

Dear Hayden,
We are going to have to agree that mum is more correct than you are.  This appears to be either a Striped Raspy Cricket,
Paragryllacris combusta, or a closely related species.  According to the Brisbane Insect site:  “Striped Raspy Crickets are also known as Tree Crickets. Adults are dark brown to pale brown in colour with fully developed wings. They have very long antenna, all legs are spiny.  They hide in nest on tree during the day. Their nest is usually two board leaves hold together by silky material. They are well known for their ability to find the way home after foraging distance away. ”  It is also pictured on Atlas of Living Australia.

Striped Raspy Cricket

Wow thnks a lot, I was starting to agree with mum, the feet and antennas felt off eventho it had a body simular to that of a grasshopper, the only other crickets Iv’e seen are common ones that look completely diffrent.
Hayden Crowley
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this cool bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Melbourne Australia
Date: 10/23/2017
Time: 06:10 AM EDT
G’Day and thanks in advance! I was in the garden today looking for interesting bugs to photograph and found this little fellow on the fence, he did a wobble back and forward on each step, around 1cm long it is spring at the moment!
How you want your letter signed:  Ray

Spiny Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear Ray,
This looks to us like a Spiny Assassin Bug nymph in the genus
Sinea, which is pictured on BugGuide.  We will research if you have any related species in Australia.  It might be an immature Brown Spiny Assassin Bug, Neoveledella aculeata, which is pictured on the Brisbane Insect site, but there are only adults pictured.

Spiny Assassin Bug Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Adelaide Australia
Date: 10/17/2017
Time: 03:33 AM EDT
Hi I’m just wondering if you can tell me what bug this is theres little things like this all over the outside of house
How you want your letter signed:  Email

Paper Wasp

This is a Paper Wasp in the genus Polistes, possibly Polistes humilis, based on this Atlas of Living Australia posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination