Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Australian Bug
Sun, Jan 4, 2009 at 4:25 PM
Hi There Bugman!!
I found your email address on a site and wondered if you could help with the identification of the attached bug he is 6 – 7″ long and very calm and happy to be on my porch – not sure if I like him there though!!!
Thankyou
Angie
Qld Australia

Goliath Stick Insect

Goliath Stick Insect

Hi Angie,
With not too much effort, we identified your Stick Insect as the Goliath Stick Insect, Eurycnemma goliath which feeds on the leaves of eucalyptus trees. We first located it on the Brisbane Insect Web Site, which incidates “Goliath Stick Insects are the master of camouflage. We notice that they have at least the following methods to hide themselves from predators;
1. Their bodies, colour and shape made them look like part of the plant.
2. When staying motionless, they always put their front legs in front of their head, to made themselves look more like part of the plant.
3. They usually feed at night, during the day time they just hang motionless on the plants.
4. They eat the whole leaf, usually they do not leave part of the leaf uneaten, like most grasshoppers do.
5. Even when they move, they simulate the swaying motion, like the movement caused by the wind blowing.
6. Their eggs, called ova, look like seeds, so the predators do not notice the insect by the seeds.
7. They discard their dropping, called frass, very far away so that the predators do not notice the insect.”
Then we found more information on raising it in captivity on the Microcosmos Website.  Also, we believe he is a she.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

female Argiope protensa
Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 2:43 PM
Found this lovely lady in my vegetable patch. Thanks to Ron Atkinson (University of Southern Queensland) and Peter Chew (Brisbane Insects website) for ID of this member of the St Andrews Cross family. The orange stripes are generally not as pronounced as on this specimen but colour variation is apparently common amongst this species.
aussietrev
Capricornia region, Queensland

Argiope protensa

Argiope protensa

As always Trevor,
Thanks for your wonderful submission and identification.  The abdomen on this Argiope protensa is significantly different from that of most Argiope species.

Argiope protensa

Argiope protensa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Locust infected with mites?
Thu, Jan 1, 2009 at 8:48 PM
Hi guys,
This locust was very well disguised by colour and textures to fit in with the semi arid landscape and I only spotted it when it jumped out of my way. After processing the shot I noticed the little red attachments. Would they be some type of mite or some other parasite?
aussietrev
Capricornia region, Queensland

Locust with Mites

Locust with Mites

Hi Trevor,
Your Locust is in the suborder Caelifera and probably one of the Short Horned Grasshoppers in the family Acrididae.  We are not certain if the Mites are parasitic, but that is quite likely.  There are some mites that infest insects, but they are not parasitic.  Rather, they use the insect for transportation purposes, a phenomenon known as phoresy.  We are currently experiencing problems with images going live and hope to resolve this very soon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Male Pollen Beetle (aussietrev)
Mon, Dec 29, 2008 at 8:04 PM
Hi guys,
This is a male Pollen beetle Dicranolaius bellulus in the family Melyridae (sex indicated by the enlarged 3rd segment of the antennae) Only around 8mm overall and very fast. The dark areas on the back are metallic blue/green depending on the lighting. I reckon that thorax looks like a Xmas cherry!
Happy New Year all
aussietrev
Queensland

Pollen Beetle

Pollen Beetle

Hi Trevor,
Thanks for your wonderful image of a male Pollen Beetle.  We posted three new Australian beetles to the web site today.  The Csiro Entomology web site has a drawing of this species showing the enlarged antenna segment.  We can only speculate that those enlarged antennae segments have something to do with mate location.  The Brisbane Insect web site also has some photographs of this member of the family Melyridae, the Pollen Beetles.  This is our last posting for awhile.  We are wasting away the precious winter daylight hours in Los Angeles when we could be gardening.  We have some collard greens to harvest and much weeding to do.  Recent rains have saturated the soil and it is now the warmest day in over a week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Large Flying Bug with big Pincers
Mon, Dec 29, 2008 at 5:31 PM
Hi Bugman,
We have just moved into our new house here in the Barossa Valley in South Australia. It is the middle of Summer and we seem to have a rather large bug invade us! It has 6 long legs and 2 very long antennae. IT is Brown in colour and seems capable of flying but doesn’t very much. It has 2 earwig type pincers that give a nasty bite. My 3 year old was pinched by one as it was hiding in his clothing. It seems like a giant earwig, and we have had a rather bad earwig problem here, but do they grow this big? It’s about 4cm long but I’ve seen ones that are up to about 6cm. It really clings on to thing, and are hard to shake off. THey seem to like dark places like clothing on the floor and we would like to get rid of them please! I cannot send a photo yet but will if it helps. Thanks.
Kate
Barossa Valley, near Adelaide, South AUstralia

Poinciana Longicorn

Parandra frenchi

Hi Kate,
We quickly identified your Poinciana Longicorn, Agrianome spinicollis, on the Csiro Entomology web site.  We then found additional images on the Insects of Townsville Australia web site.  The Save Our Waterways Now web site states:  “A common large species in Brisbane is Agrianome Spinicollis, a large khaki species, which often breeds in rot holes of poinciana trees.”  Pages 3 through 5 of a PDF (
hawskeswood160-1 ) we found has some technical information on this Prionid that is wide spread but uncommon in Australia.

Update:  January 30, 2012
With a new photo that arrived of the true Poinciana Longicorn, we are trying to clean up some errors in our archive.  This is actually
Parandra frenchi.  Trevor made a correction in a comment in February 2010, but alas, we did not update the posting until now.  We are also going to correct another posting from NOvember 21, 2009 where we used this same photo to illustrate a letter without an image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spotted Beetle (?)
Sun, Dec 28, 2008 at 8:22 PM
We found two of these fellows crawling on the inside of a lampshade. I’ve only seen one once before, in a bathroom in Northland, New Zealand. Both sightings were in houses with plenty of moderately untended garden, so they may have wandered in from there… any help identifying would be much appreciated.
David
Auckland, New Zealand

Unknown Soldier Beetle

Unknown Soldier Beetle

Hi David,
We believe this is a Soldier Beetle in the family Cantharidae, but we cannot find a matching specimen on the Brisbane Insect web site. Perhaps one of our readers can provide a species specific identification for this distinctive beetle.

Correction
Nice image of what I’m thinking might be some kind of “false blister beetle” in the family Oedemeridae. I’m sending a query to my entomology listserv to see if anyone can confirm my suspicion of Oedemeridae, and perhaps give a genus and species….
Eric Eaton

Confirmation
Eric is right, it is an Oedemeridae. It the Spotted lax beetle, Parisopalpus nigronotatus, found in Australia and NZ.
Diane.

Thanks Diane and Eric,
Though we wanted to try to link to other online postings of this species, we only found one listing on the New Zealand Landcare Research web site without images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination