Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this Queensland Moth?
Wed, Mar 18, 2009 at 9:44 PM
Hey there bugman!
I found this dude in the collar of one of my tee shirts that I had on the line today, and he gave me a little freight since I’ve not seen a moth as big as he is before. However, after my initial shock I decided to get him identified by you. After he’d had enough of the photo shoot he took off, possibly to find another collar to sleep in. He was about the size of my thumb and very fuzzy.
thanks bugman
Pseudo
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Convolvulvus Hawk Moth

Convolvulvus Hawk Moth

Dear Pseudo,
We quickly located your moth on the Brisbane Insects Website and it is a Convolvulvus Hawk Moth, Agrius convolvuli.  We located much information on the species, including another website that indicates has a large range and migrates freely in Europe, Asia and Africa as well as Australia.  More information and photos can be found on the Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic website.

Convolvulvus Hawk Moth

Convolvulvus Hawk Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Strike the pose, amazing moth.
Tue, Mar 17, 2009 at 6:42 PM
Hi guys,
Found this stunning moth and was fortunate enough to have Donald Hobern, an entomologist from CSIRO provide the ID of Eporectis tephropis (Noctuidae: Catocalinae. I could imagine that if it wasn’t against the green surronds that it would look much like a dead leaf. There are no images of this one on the web at the moment but will supply it to Australian Moths Online as well
aussietrev
Queensland, Australia

Owlet Moth:  Eporectis tephropis

Owlet Moth: Eporectis tephropis

Hi Trevor,
As always, your images and contributions to our website are a treasure.  We can only wonder when you will begin your own site.  Thanks for this stunning Owlet Moth image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Stunning Assassin
Wed, Mar 11, 2009 at 8:49 PM
Found this one today. Only small so hopefully it is not just an early instar of something plain or horrible, it would be a shame to see it grow out of this stunning colour scheme. Hope you like it.
aussitrev
Queensland, A

Orange Black Stink Bug

Orange Black Stink Bug

Hi Trevor,
While we agree that your insect is stunning, we disagree that it is an Assassin Bug.  It is actually an Orange Black Stink Bug, Novatilla virgata, and we identified it on the Brisbane Insect Website.  This is an adult insect as it is winged, and its coloration will not change.

Orange Black Stink Bug

Orange Black Stink Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Robber eats bee foodchain
Sun, Mar 8, 2009 at 11:34 PM
Hi guys,
This robberfly has caught itself a native bee. It is dull and windy here today with a cyclone off the coast so I took the flash with me and was quite pleased with the result. Hope you like it too.
aussietrev
Queensland, Australia

Robber Fly eats Bee

Robber Fly eats Bee

Hi Trevor,
Thanks for sending us a photo demonstrating your new technique. It looks like a studio portrait. We are a bit behind in our posting since we have embarked upon fulfilling a longtime desire to establish a home aquarium. This endeavor has occupied much of our free time since the cabinet needs to be stained and sealed before we can even begin to stock the aquarium with freshwater Amazon species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Green Beetle with “eye brow” like antennae
Sat, Mar 7, 2009 at 11:34 PM
While typing a research paper “Do big buttresses break with passing wind” in the Australian jungle within the Atherton Table lands, this “Groucho Marx” bug flew onto my keyboard and despite much prodding wouldn’t leave me alone. Could you give me a less affectionate name to call it?
Lonely Dinosaur
Atherton Table lands, NE Australia

Feather Horned Longicorn

Feather Horned Longicorn

Dear Lonely Dinosaur,
This is the second submission of this spectacular beetle we have received since Christmas. This is a Feather Horned Longicorn Beetle, Piesarthrius marginellus, indeed a longhorned beetle native to Australia. You can find photos online on the Up Close and Spineless website as well as at http://www.cerambycoidea.com/foto.asp?Id=830.

Feather Horned Longicorn

Feather Horned Longicorn


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Food Chain of Events
Thu, Mar 5, 2009 at 9:50 PM
Hi guys,
It appears these two small flys were having an argument and didn’t notice the lynx spider coming to make a meal of both. One of the flys looks like a common long legged fly but the bright blue one is a new one for me. It appears to have two large forward facing eyes, reminiscent of a jumping spider, set into a metallic looking carapace. Strange one eh?
aussietrev
Queensland, Australia

Lynx Spider gets Two-fer

Lynx Spider gets Two-fer

Hi Trevor,
Your photos always amuse us.  This tangle of bodies is quite wonderful.  Seems as though the Spider got a double meal, though it is uncertain that is will suck the fluids from both flies.

Lynx Spider eats two flies

Lynx Spider eats two flies

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination