Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Perth- western australia
Date: 09/01/2018
Time: 02:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Bug was found in lawn when removing african beetles.
Is over 6mm in length.
Wondering what the beetle is and if it is destructive to plants or harmful to pets
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, Daniel Jones

Devil’s Coach Horse

Dear Daniel,
Because of its red head, this is an amazing looking Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae, and we identified it as
Creophilus erythrocephalus, commonly called a Devil’s Coach Horse, thanks to images on Wild South Australia.  According to Museums Victoria:  “Devil’s Coach Horses eat maggots (fly larvae) and are usually found living in rotting animal carcasses.”  While that might seem unsavory, we would consider them beneficial as they help to control Fly populations.  The species is also pictured on Atlas of Living Australia.  The common name Devil’s Coach Horse is also used with a European species of Rove Beetle that has naturalized in North America.  This Devil’s Coach Horse does not look like it died of natural causes, so we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

Devil’s Coach Horse

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Orpheus Island, North Queensland
Date: 07/21/2018
Time: 06:36 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi!
I encountered this moth hanging out on the wall at my work and I’m having a hard time figuring out what he is?!
How you want your letter signed:  KMcAuley

Hawkmoth: Daphnis placida

Dear KMcAuley,
This is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, and they are very powerful fliers and they are also long lived, which does allow them to fly across large bodies of water. Thanks to images posted to Butterfly House, we are confident your individual is
Daphnis placida, a species with no common name.  According to Butterfly House:  “The adult moth has a complex pattern of light and dark brown on the wings, and a white bar across the first abdominal segment. The moth has a wingspan of about 6 cms.”  According to Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic, the global distribution is:   “Nicobar and Andaman Islands (Kailash Chandra & Rajan, 2004), Thailand, southern China (Hainan Island), Philippines, Indonesia (Sumatra, Java, Bali, Flores, Timor), northern Australia, Vanuatu, New Caledonia and Loyalty Islands.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s That Big?
Geographic location of the bug: Glassell Park
Date: 06/04/2018
Time: 09:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
What’s this bug? It has joined us in the early glassell park evening. Sunglasses for scale.
How you want your letter signed:  Best Locust love

Ten Lined June Beetle

Dear Locust love,
This is a Ten Lined June Beetle.  Our editorial staff just saw one yesterday and we have been seeing them yearly recently.  Our first Mount Washington sighting was 2015.

Update:  June 7, 2018
Just as he was getting ready to leave for a holiday in Ohio, Daniel was visited by this Ten Lined June Beetle at our Mount Washington office.

Ten Lined June Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hawkmoth
Geographic location of the bug:  Bruny Island, Tasmania
Date: 05/18/2018
Time: 03:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This moth came to our patio lights when on vacation in Tasmania in 2008. Been trying ever since to find its ID.
How you want your letter signed:  Stephen Smith

Rain Moth

Dear Stephen,
Though it resembles a Hawkmoth, this is a member of a different family, Hepialidae, the Ghost Moths or Swift Moths.  We believe we have correctly identified it as
Abantiades atripalpis, a Rain Moth or Waikerie, thanks to images posted to Butterfly House where it states:  “The moths have grey-brown wings, often with two ragged silver flash markings across each forewing. The forewings often also show intricate sinuous patterns of pale lines. The wingspan of the males can reach 12 cms. That of the females can reach 16 cms.  The adult females deposit large numbers of eggs. Indeed, this species holds the World Fecundity Record, for the greatest number of eggs being deposited by a non-social insect. One dissected female had 44,100 eggs. It is thought that the eggs are laid in flight, just being scattered across the ground.” 

Many thanks, I’ve quite a few Australian moth photo’s as yet unidentified. If you don’t mind I’ll post more in the future as I work my way through them.
Regards Steve.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Warner’s Bay NSW
Date: 05/11/2018
Time: 04:12 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you identify this caterpillar which was on a dwarf Lime Citrus tree? I tried uploading a video before. Wouldn’t allow it. Couldn’t cancel it. Had to start over
How you want your letter signed:  Brian Holt

Orchard Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Brian,
This is the Caterpillar of an Orchard Swallowtail,
Papilio aegeus, and you can verify our identification on Butterfly House where it states:  “Although this Caterpillar is a pest on suburban Lemon trees, it is one of the most interesting caterpillars in Australia, Both its structure and its behaviour have evolved to an extraordinary degree to give it protective mechanisms against predators. It also grows into one of the largest butterflies to grace suburban gardens.”  Here is an image from FlickR.  Though they feed on the leaves, unless you have a very small tree and a large number of caterpillars, the damage is not lethal to the tree.  We would allow the caterpillar to remain so you can enjoy the adult Orchard Swallowtail.

Thank you for your help. This is exactly the advice I gave my customers on my gardening FB Page. I’d like to publish your response there.
Regards, Brian Holt
HOLTS Prestige Gardens

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Colourful from Australia
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney
Date: 05/07/2018
Time: 05:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman, a friend of us found this in Sydney and we have no clue what it is. It’s very beautiful.
How you want your letter signed:  Nexus6

Macadamia Cup Moth Caterpillar:  Mecytha fasciata

Hi,
We’ve solved the mystery :  There is a parent at our school who is an entomologist. It is the caterpillar of the Macadamia Cup Moth ( Mecytha fasciata ). It will turn into a little brown and white furry moth.
Kind regards
Thomas

Dear Thomas,
Thanks for getting back to us.  Of course, though you have provided an identification, we are still posting your image and query because we could not pass up a subject line:  “Colourful from Australia.”  In North America, this family is commonly called the Stinging Slug Caterpillars because many species have venomous spines.
  The Macadamia Cup Moth Caterpillar is also pictured on Australian Nature and Dave’s Garden.  According to Butterfly House “This Caterpillar is green with a yellow stripe down its back. Unusually for this family, it has no tubercles, but is smoothly rounded.”  That is an indication this species does not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination