Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"

Subject:  Black beetle on princess gums
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Victoria Australia
Date: 09/28/2021
Time: 09:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I cannot find a picture anywhere of this beetle .. four white spots on its back .. non on it’s head
How you want your letter signed:  corobin knox

Common Jassid

Dear Robin,
We believe we have correctly identified your Leafhopper (not Beetle) as a Common Jassid,
Eurymela fenestrata, thanks to the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “Common Jassid is one of the largest size leafhopper in the Eurymelinae. We sometimes call them Large Gum-treehoppers, The adult is brown and dark violet under sunlight. There are some white spots on its wings. Nymph has the reddish-brown body with black markings. Gum-leafhopper sometimes called Jassid because they were classified as family Jassidae before, then now the family Cicadellidae.

Subject:  You’re Bristle Fly post
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Yorke Peninsula S.A
Date: 06/05/2021
Time: 09:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I took these photos in a Flora Park on the 27th of Dec. 2020 in Edithburgh. My home town. Interesting to see all your varieties. I just thought it was beautiful, like a piece of jewellery, all golden.
Only ‘just’ learnt it was a fly– 2 wings.
Please respond with the fly’s official name. Would like to have this submitted in the local newsletter. The photo was taken on my Samsung S5.
Thank you for your time.
How you want your letter signed:  Mrs Charyl Turner

Bristle Fly

Dear Charyl,
We believe your Bristle Fly is
Formosia speciosa.

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Australia, Victoria, Dandenong
Date: 04/12/2021
Time: 05:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello bugman,
I’m curious about what this bug is. I have found a few in my shed. Any help will be greatly appreciated. A small donation haha.
Cheers
How you want your letter signed:  Nathan

Wingless Female Soldier Fly

Dear Nathan,
This is a wingless female Soldier Fly in the subfamily Chiromyzinae, and the first time we ever saw one of these, it had us puzzled for quite some time.  There are numerous images posted to iNaturalist.

Wingless Female Soldier Fly

Subject:  Moth? Butterfly?
Geographic location of the bug:  SE Queensland Australia
Date: 04/10/2021
Time: 10:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey Bugman, spotted this Little critter tonight. Is it a moth? If so, what kind? I’v had a search online but can’t find anything similar.
How you want your letter signed:  LJ

Geometrid Moth

Dear LJ,
This is a moth not a butterfly, and it is in the family Geometridae.  There are many similar looking species and we did a quick search on Butterfly House and could not quickly provide you with a species.  We hope a family identification is sufficient for your needs.

Subject”  Giant moth to be identified
Geographic location of the bug:  Kangaroo Ground, Victoria
Date: 02/08/2021
Time: 05:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This was on a tree in our yard yesterday 8 Feb 2021. It has been an unusually mild summer, with lower temperatures than usual. And last year we had more rain than usual. We wonder if this is a Giant Wood Moth, even though we are in Victoria. Photos include a closeup of the wings, a photo side-on showing environmental context and relative size to my husband who is 6’4″ tall (in which you should be able to see the striped body of the moth), and a photo of the remains of a cocoon on the same tree from which we believe it emerged. Hopefully this helps.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Giant Wood Moth

We agree that this is a Giant Wood Moth, Endoxyla cinereus, and according to Butterfly House:  “The caterpillars pupate in their borehole. When the adult moth emerges, the empty pupal skin is left sticking out of the hole” as your one image illustrates.  According to Australian Museum:  “The Giant Wood Moth is the heaviest moth in the world, with some females weighing up to 30 grams.”

Exuvia of a Giant Wood Moth

Subject:  What is this caterpillar?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney, Australia
Date: 03/20/2021
Time: 02:49 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi
Found this little agile one eating my curry leaves. Want to know if it is a pest amd curious about it’s species. Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious gardener

Inchworm on Curry Plant

Dear Curious Gardener,
This is an Inchworm or Spanworm in the family Geometridae.  We believe it might be
Hyposidra talaca based on an image posted to the Butterfly House website.  Though curry is not listed as a food plant, the site indicates:  “It is polyphagous, eating the foliage of many plants including the crops.”

Thank you so much for the information.
Cheers,
Rashmi