Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sawfly larva identification
Location: East Gippsland, Victoria, Australia
January 14, 2017 11:05 pm
Hello. I am wondering if you can help with the identification of this interesting creature? I think it is a sawfly, family Pergidae, subfamily Perginae (I am happy to be corrected :)), but can’t get any further than that. It was spotted in mid-January, smack-bang in the middle of our Australian summer. It was approximately 2 inches long and moving alone along a fence rail. Nearby trees included two different species of eucalypt and and a she-oak.
Any insights you have would be greatly appreciated. Thanks bug guys! 🙂
Signature: Jacinta Richardson

Spitfire

Dear Jacinta,
This is indeed a Sawfly Larva, and in Australia they are known as Spitfires because of the posture they assume when they are disturbed.  We have a group of similar looking Spitfires in our archives.  Based on information on the Australian Museum site, we believe your identification is correct, but we are unable to provide a conclusive species name at this time.

Spitfire

Hi Daniel
Thank you so much for your response. I will keep researching and if I find any additional information I will let you know. I’ll also check back in case other viewers have further insights.
Thanks again. I love the site!
Jacinta

Spitfire

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: F^©%ed up bug
Location: Brisbane
January 10, 2017 8:42 pm
Its got 6 legs, the bottom half is yellow with orange stripes on the side the top half is black, the legs are orange and black, the entanas are orange, looks like a stinger at the front, moves slow asf,
Signature: By tellin me what the fck this

Common Assassin Bug

We would urge you to handle this Common Assassin Bug, Pristhesancus plagipennis, which we identified on the Brisbane Insect site, with extreme caution.  Though it is not a dangerous species, it can deliver a painful bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scarab rhino squeaker mystery
Location: Townsville Australia
January 9, 2017 6:46 pm
Dear bugman,
We are in northern Queensland Au (nr Townsville) and found this beautiful beetle we can’t find with online searching. It is light brown, body is a little less than 2cm long and it has a very fancy rhino like head. It squeaks like an old wind up toy I think when it feels threatened and tries to dig / nibble quickly through anything.
Signature: Holly and Jake

Earth Boring Dung Beetle

Dear Holly and Jake,
We found some really close images of Earth Boring Dung Beetles in the family Geotrupidae from Australia, but alas, those pages seem to no longer be active, yet the images still exist in the search engines.  This Csiro Entomology page is the best we are able to provide, and it states:  “Members of this family are closely related to scarab beetles but can be distinguished from the later as they have one extra segment (11 in total) on their antennae, and the last 3 segments form a distinctive circular club. They are very stoutly built beetles and range in size from 8-30 millimetres in length. Most adults are reddish-brown to brown in colour, although a few may be black. The head and pronotum of male geotrupids is often adorned with prominent horns and as such members of this species are often called rhinoceros beetles. ”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen before bug
Location: Frankston, Melbourne, Australia
January 8, 2017 6:27 am
Hi took this pic yesterday of strange looking bug
Signature: Vanessa

Feather-Horned Longicorn

Dear Vanessa,
We have several images in our archive of the Feather-Horned Longicorn,
Piesarthrius marginellus, from Australia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bugs are these?
Location: Cairns, QLD, Australia
December 3, 2016 7:11 am
Found these in my yard.
Signature: CE

Stilt Legged Fly

Stilt Legged Fly

Dear CE,
Like another of your submitted images, we believe this is a Stilt Legged Fly in the family Micropezidae, but unlike the previous image, we have not been successful in finding any matching images from Australia online.  We are postdating this submission to go live to our site when we are out of the office for the holidays at the end of the month.

Correction Courtesy of Karl:  Banana Stalk Fly
Hi Daniel and CE:
This is actually a Banana Stalk Fly (Family Neriidae); we usually call them Cactus Flies in North America. Depending on which source you read, there are either two or three species in Australia. Of these, I believe Telostylinus lineolatus is the closest match. Regards, Karl

Thanks so much Karl.  Interestingly, we have a mating pair of Banana Stalk Flies from Hawaii in our archives, and that posting is also listed as Stilt Legged Flies.  We will create a Cactus Fly subcategory for both postings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bugs are these?
Location: Cairns, QLD, Australia
December 3, 2016 7:11 am
Found these in my yard.
Signature: CE

Signal Fly, we believe

Signal Fly, we believe

Dear CE,
We believe this is a Signal Fly in the family Platystomatidae based on this BugGuide image of a member of the genus
Rivellia.  According to BugGuide they are found:  “worldwide, incl. most of the Americas” and “Found on foliage, feces.”  Australian species are represented on FlickR and Discover Life.  Because we will be away from the office during the holidays, we will be postdating this submission to go live at the end of the month.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination