Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Adelaide Australia
Date: 10/17/2017
Time: 03:33 AM EDT
Hi I’m just wondering if you can tell me what bug this is theres little things like this all over the outside of house
How you want your letter signed:  Email

Paper Wasp

This is a Paper Wasp in the genus Polistes, possibly Polistes humilis, based on this Atlas of Living Australia posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What insect lays these eggs?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Australia, South East Queensland
Date: 10/11/2017
Time: 09:38 AM EDT
I’ve been seeing these little clusters of tiny white eggs on long slender stalks in odd places around the house eg, on the internal stairwell, bathroom window, etc. They really are tiny, the whole cluster covers an area no larger than a thumbnail & the eggs are smaller than poppy seeds.  In this pic it looks like they’ve hatched.. What are they?!
How you want your letter signed:  Renee

Lacewing Eggs

Dear Renee,
We are nearly certain these are Lacewing Eggs, but we won’t rule out they might be the Eggs of a different member of the order Neuroptera.  Lacewings have extremely predatory larvae, and they have evolved to lay eggs in this manner to help ensure higher survival rates so the hatchling larvae don’t cannibalize each other.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird insect : cross between cicada and spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney
Date: 10/11/2017
Time: 06:15 PM EDT
We found this in our backyard. Could you help me identify this insect? And if it is harmful to my kids?
How you want your letter signed:  Dida

Robber Fly

Dear Dida,
This is a predatory Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, and members of the family are not aggressive toward humans, however, we would not try to handle one at the risk of being bitten.  Your individual looks similar to this individual posted to Australian Geographic.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for your quick respond! 🙂 we are new to Australia, and constantly see ‘new’ insect species. As Australia is known for venomous animal kingdom, we try to keep our kids from harm. Thanks again!
Cheers!
Dida

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wtf
Location: Northlands
June 9, 2017 6:29 pm
Found this in red rooster in Perth
Signature: jason battersby

Patterson’s Curse Crown Weevil

Dear Jason,
This is a very unusual looking Weevil.  According to Australian Critters, it is a Crown Weevil,
Mogulones larvatus.  Prior to locating the image on that site, we found images on the Agriculture Victoria site where we learned that two species of weevils, the Crown Weevil and the Root Weevil, were introduced to Australia beginning in 1994 as biological control agents against and invasive plant known as Patterson’s Curse.  According to Agriculture Victoria:  “Paterson’s curse, Echium plantagineum, is a noxious weed of European origin that now occurs in most states of Australia and is mainly a problem in pastures, on roadsides and in degraded and disturbed areas. It reduces agricultural productivity by competing with more nutritious pasture plants and because it is toxic to livestock when ingested continuously. … The crown boring weevil and the root boring weevil are two European insects that have been released in Australia for the biological control of Paterson’s curse.” There are additional images on Atlas of Living Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly with plumes
Location: North Sydney, Australia
June 6, 2017 9:18 pm
Hi!
A colleague sent me a picture of this insect she found. Whilst my first thought was that some unfortunate insect had met its end by Cordyceps, I was told it was definitely alive.
I presume therefore this is a male specimen of some species, but I don’t know where to start to id this.
Could you help me? Thanks!
Signature: Fe

Bird of Paradise Fly

Dear Fe,
This is a male Mealybug, sometimes called a Bird of Paradise Fly, a statement we verified on the Brisbane Insect site, where it states:  “As a member in the Mealy Bugs family, Bird of Paradise Fly is unbelievable large. Females grow up to 40mm, the largest in Soft Bug suborder. Bird of Paradise Fly is an incredible insect. It Adult males have only one pair of wings. When we first it we thought it could be a fly in order Diptera. After we saw the female and we were confused. We cannot tell even the order of this insect. More information and pictures on Bird of Paradise Fly please click this page. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Oleander Hawk Moth?
Location: Cannonvale, North Queensland, Australia
June 3, 2017 8:58 pm
Hey – I live in Cannonvale, North Queensland, Australia. I found this Moth in my yard. After doing a google search I think it’s an Olander Hawk Moth – but apparently we don’t get them in Australia?
Winter has just started here but it is a tropical climate. I found the Moth during the day clinging to the side of the house. It let my pick it up on a stick, very quiet.
Signature: Jessica Stapleton

Hawkmoth: Daphnis protrudens

Dear Jessica,
You are correct that the Oleander Hawkmoth,
Daphnis nerii or Deilephila nerii, is not reported from Australia, however, according to Butterfly House, at least five similar looking relatives in the same genus are reported from Australia.  Of the five, we believe you have encountered Daphnis protrudens, and according to Butterfly House:  “The adult moths have wings with a bold pattern of pale and dark brown. There is a contrasting pair of dark brown and white bands across the first abdominal segment. The wingspan is about 10 cms.  The species occurs in New Guinea, Sulawesi, as well as in Australia in Queensland.”  The species is also pictured on Atlas of Living Australia and CalPhotos.  According to Papua Insects:  “Rather rare in Papua.”

 

Hawkmoth: Daphnis protrudens

Hawkmoth: Daphnis protrudens

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination